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Wait! Don't shoot the messenger. I'd like to say I'm sorry if this offends anyone, but I really think burning the Koran is a good idea.

Let me explain a bit further, before e-tomatoes are hurled in my general direction. I'm sure someone will demand I take this inflammatory post down. Maybe I'll even be fortunate to be HR'd. That would be cool.

Again, I am fine with the Koran being burnt, but only if the Bible and the Torah and any other religious document is included in the prodigious torching. If you've watched the Denzel Washington movie "The Book of Eli" you'd probably think that a braille copy of the Bible could save humanity.

Well, in this country, we've got one of 'em in just about every hotel and motel room - and things just aren't getting better.

I believe sans religion, we'll all be better off. Isn't it astounding that a pastor from bumble-fuck Florida with a congregation of fifty people (and a collective tooth total of about 50) has become a national figure. Some people (albeit few publicly) actually like this guy.

So here's my plan. We spend the next month gathering up all the religious documents in the world - after all, it's time to let the invisible man go - and we allocate them to cold places, so they can be burned for a good cause...heat. Energy prices are going up, and people are going to freeze to death this winter. Actually, providing heat would be the ultimate use for these books...

Imagine, the "words" of God actually accomplishing tangible. It would be a pretty amazing time.

We could even send some extra to Wasilla, so the Palin bunch can heat their shadily-built house. The point here, is let's find a use for these soon-to-be charred leftovers of pre-scientific superstition.

Originally posted to qinkilla on Fri Sep 10, 2010 at 06:56 PM PDT.

Poll

We should burn:

17%15 votes
3%3 votes
0%0 votes
41%35 votes
37%32 votes

| 85 votes | Vote | Results

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Comment Preferences

  •  aren't "snarks" supposed to be funny? (8+ / 0-)

    might have missed the mark here

    I'm an atheist and I don't think this is a good idea.

    If your comment is mean, I might have Sarah Palin sue you.

    by in2mixin on Fri Sep 10, 2010 at 07:02:58 PM PDT

  •  hahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahaha (0+ / 0-)

    hahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahaha hahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahaha hahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahaha hahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahaha

    "Help us fill the hole, help us fill the hole Anderson"-Louise Gohmert (R)

    by sancerre2001 on Fri Sep 10, 2010 at 07:04:23 PM PDT

  •  I will defend the right to burn any religious tex (11+ / 0-)

    and the protest to the death the act of doing it.  

    Both are first amendment rights.  The burning is just stupid and antagonistic with no good coming of it.

    After the Republicans burn down the world, they will prove the Democrats did it.

    by jimraff on Fri Sep 10, 2010 at 07:04:28 PM PDT

    •  Greenwald has a good point about this, too, (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Alec82

      that the tut-tutting from Petraeus is a bad dynamic. Squelching dialog in the name of national security is not cool, no matter how stupid the dialog.

      Furthermore, I don't remember who, but someone mentioned that the collective Muslim response to the Koran-burning stunt is “meh” — people can do anything in America, and it's just one nutjob. The craziness over Park51 is much more disturbing (as well it should be).

      Formerly known as Jyrinx.

      “If I can't dance to it, it's not my revolution.” ― Emma Goldman

      by Code Monkey on Fri Sep 10, 2010 at 07:11:50 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Well... (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        fl1972, Code Monkey

        ...the reaction is "meh" here, maybe, but hardly the global response:

        Thousands of Muslims around the world have taken to the streets to protest against threats by an obscure pastor in the United States to burn copies of the Quran on the ninth anniversary of the September 11 attacks on the US.

        Demonstrations have erupted in countries including Afghanistan, Pakistan, India, Indonesia and the Palestinian territories, despite the church in question saying it would not go ahead with the plan.

        In Afghanistan, at least one person was reported to have been killed in clashes with security forces as an angry crowd attacked a Nato base in the northern province of Badakshan.

        Courtesy Al Jazeera.

        "All along the watchtower, princes kept the view..."

        by Alec82 on Fri Sep 10, 2010 at 07:49:20 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  Burning books is dialog? (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        UntimelyRippd

        He didn't tell him he couldn't do it.  He said it would have negative consequences.  

        •  Yes, absolutely. Which is why (0+ / 0-)

          the First Amendment protects it.

          Also, “nobody's telling” the Cordoba Project they can't build a mosque near Ground Zero (at least that's the official party line). It's a pretty empty qualifier, akin to “I'm not angry, I'm just saying.”

          Formerly known as Jyrinx.

          “If I can't dance to it, it's not my revolution.” ― Emma Goldman

          by Code Monkey on Fri Sep 10, 2010 at 09:08:09 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

      •  Requesting that stupid people not engage in (4+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Ahianne, pgm 01, fl1972, qinkilla

        stupid behavior, despite whatever rights are granted to them, because their stupid behavior endangers other people is not "squelching dialog in the name of national security."

        It's asking stupid people to not engage in stupid behavior.

        To put the torture behind us is, inevitably, to put it in front of us.

        by UntimelyRippd on Fri Sep 10, 2010 at 08:28:29 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  There was a time when protesting the war (0+ / 0-)

          was seen as a “stupid behavior” that should be stopped in the name of national security.

          Besides, it's really cute for the Pentagon to suddenly start caring about what endangers the troops. Anytime they trot out that line, they're usually being disingenuous. After all, I doubt that the burning will cause as many people to turn to terrorism as a single drone strike.

          Formerly known as Jyrinx.

          “If I can't dance to it, it's not my revolution.” ― Emma Goldman

          by Code Monkey on Fri Sep 10, 2010 at 09:12:31 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Stupid is as stupid does. (0+ / 0-)

            I don't believe in "squelching" speech. I do believe in calling people out for the consequences of their behavior. Especially stupid behavior.

            In the short term, for citizens at home to protest against any given war probably isn't in the soldiers' best interest. That's a responsibility the protesters accept, because they believe that the war itself isn't in the soldiers' best interest -- and even if it were, there are other interests of greater significance. Contrasting that to some hatemongering publicity-hound who wants to burn Korans in order to ... well ... what, exactly? ... doesn't meet my analogy threshold.

            To put the torture behind us is, inevitably, to put it in front of us.

            by UntimelyRippd on Sat Sep 11, 2010 at 10:53:43 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

  •  Burning books is dumb. (5+ / 0-)

    Any books.
    Dumb.
    For any reason.
    Dumb.
    Don't do it.  Don't condone it.
    Really, don't even joke about it.
    Especially if the joke isn't funny.

    This world has lots of problems.  We need more serious people in it, with serious ideas.  We have enough joksters.

    "There is nothing impossible to him who will try." -Alexander the Great

    by The Octopus on Fri Sep 10, 2010 at 07:06:52 PM PDT

  •  It's theater of the absurd (0+ / 0-)

    like stopping at a red light when there no traffic. I am an atheist and I don't think anyone burning any book could truly offend me unless they were burning the books that I personally own. Why anyone would care is a mystery to me. However, knowing that many people do really care about this I would not do it lest I offend them for no good reason.

    If you want to do an experiment to see how messed up in our priorities people are, get 20-$1 dollar bills and crumple them into a pile on a busy side walk and set them on fire. I'll bet you $50 that someone frantically stomps the fire out. Or just take a single dollar bill and burn it in front of a group of friends to catch their reaction. It's like when Abby Hoffmann threw a handful of $1 bills onto the floor of the stock exchange and all the traders scrambled to get them.

    It's all absurd.

    "Everybody does better, when everybody does better" - Paul Wellstone 1997

    by yuriwho on Fri Sep 10, 2010 at 07:17:55 PM PDT

    •  Very true. I would be pissed if someone burned (0+ / 0-)

      the books I own. BTW, just finished "Under the Dome" by Stephen King today. Pretty good read.

    •  I can't speak for others... (9+ / 0-)

      ...but my own visceral, negative reaction to book burning is that societies that do it or condone it tend, historically, to be on the brink of collapse.

      Perhaps some here wish for this; I am not among them.

      Someone said 200 years ago that those who burn books soon enough turn to burning people.  It's proven true all too often.

      "There is nothing impossible to him who will try." -Alexander the Great

      by The Octopus on Fri Sep 10, 2010 at 07:21:07 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Octopus - again, I'm really not in favor (0+ / 0-)

        of burning books. This was tongue-in-cheek. That's it. I hope your case of seriousness clears up in time for the next episode of South Park.

        •  We understand, dude. You just wanted cheap (0+ / 0-)

          attention and there's nothing to your little performance. This prank has only one iteration, really, and the reverend in Gainsville is the king of the hill right now. You did grub up some attention, though, didn't you?

          Who's a clever boy? Who? YOU ARE, that's WHO!

          Pareto Principle: 20% of the people do 80% of the work.

          by jeff in nyc on Fri Sep 10, 2010 at 09:03:08 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

      •  it's a fear of your ideas being challenged... (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        fl1972

        ...which shows an alarming level of intellectual and/or philosophical insecurity.

        Goodness.

        "The revolution's just an ethical haircut away..." Billy Bragg

        by grannyhelen on Fri Sep 10, 2010 at 07:25:21 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  "ones" not "your" nt (0+ / 0-)

          "The revolution's just an ethical haircut away..." Billy Bragg

          by grannyhelen on Fri Sep 10, 2010 at 07:26:10 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  ideas being challenged? (0+ / 0-)

          Did I miss something?

          •  If one wants to burn a book what they're saying (5+ / 0-)

            in effect is they can't handle the ideas being presented in the book - they can't debate them on an intellectual or philosophical level, therefore they just have to surpress the ideas wholesale.

            The physical representation of that attitude is burning books.

            That was my point.

            "The revolution's just an ethical haircut away..." Billy Bragg

            by grannyhelen on Fri Sep 10, 2010 at 07:33:08 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  Good point..Here's my take (0+ / 0-)

              I think the core aspect of religion is to diminish the psychic crush of knowing that one day, you will die.

              It's inevitable. We all will die. Now, each faith (for the most part) has some version of the afterlife. If one is true, religious logic dictates that the other isn't.

              So people basically fight and kill one another to validate their magic fantasy land. It's just too much for me to take seriously.

              •  Mmmm...having experienced a tragic death in (3+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                Ahianne, Nowhere Man, The Octopus

                our family I'm not touching the first point (not worth it - hope you understand).

                Regarding the second point, people fight and kill each other over many, many things - utopian paradises are not limited to religions after all. Personally, I think if folks actually bothered to think about the religious texts they're reading - I mean, really think about them as opposed to just turning the blinders on and doing the literal interpretation stuff - they'd see exactly how irreligious killing folks over the question of religion is.

                On that level I agree - it's pretty dumb because it contradicts what the religion itself stands for.

                "The revolution's just an ethical haircut away..." Billy Bragg

                by grannyhelen on Fri Sep 10, 2010 at 07:47:56 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

        •  qinkilla (4+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Ahianne, Nowhere Man, fl1972, MRA NY

          You may have gathered by now that there are many here posting in these comments who likely agree with much of what you have to say.

          Myself among them.

          But your manner of expressing it has managed to turn me off, and I think others as well.

          Your cavalier attitude toward drawing HRs and evening being banned doesn't help.

          And the wholesale condemnation of religion -- "magical creatures," "invisible men" -- doesn't sit well, either.  It's rather unsophisticated and small.  It makes me think you're afraid to debate an issue on its merits.  

          I suspect I'm wasting my time.  But I hope not.

          Good luck.

          "There is nothing impossible to him who will try." -Alexander the Great

          by The Octopus on Fri Sep 10, 2010 at 07:29:36 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Octopus, (0+ / 0-)

            I understand what you're saying. I really do. You have mentioned my attitude a few times. Which I understand could be thought of as a bit cavalier - and yes, maybe I do have a negative opinion of organized religion as it's practiced by the masses.

            But I'm searching high and low for "merits".

            To me, sorry, it's a big joke.

            •  Sounds like something I'd expect from a (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              fl1972

              Young Republican. Has an arrogant ring to it, y'know?

              maybe I do have a negative opinion of organized religion as it's practiced by the masses

              "It is a communist chocolate hellhole and I'm here to stop it ever happening." Eloi Cole

              by perro amarillo on Fri Sep 10, 2010 at 08:10:50 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  So for having an opinion that you don't agree (0+ / 0-)

                with, I'm a young republican. Well, thanks for referring to me as young. I can take a compliment.

                I guess my own personal experiences and observations cannot be channeled into an opinion because perro amarillo doesn't agree and resorts to an attack of sorts. Nice one.

                •  Only thing I really disagree with is your 'tude. (0+ / 0-)

                  In my experience, it's mostly youngsters who are so unnecessarily offensive - as many others here have tried, uselessly, it appears, to tell you.

                  "It is a communist chocolate hellhole and I'm here to stop it ever happening." Eloi Cole

                  by perro amarillo on Sat Sep 11, 2010 at 12:52:55 AM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

    •  It's absurd to stop (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      yuriwho, JeffW

      at a red light when there is no traffic?  You just made me laugh.

  •  blah (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    MRA NY

    REBOOTNY.org - Time to reboot the New York State Senate

    by Andrew C White on Fri Sep 10, 2010 at 07:24:03 PM PDT

  •  Were you in that same high school class (0+ / 0-)

    -4.75, -5.33 Cheney 10/05/04: "I have not suggested there is a connection between Iraq and 9/11."

    by sunbro on Fri Sep 10, 2010 at 07:25:17 PM PDT

  •  Here's the thing... (9+ / 0-)

    my family always treated church like the plague--okay? We found the idea of organized religion pretty amusing. But when you treat all religious persons as intolerant, dumb, fanatical, and ignorant, and you submit, albeit in a joking way, buring their treasured books...well...it turns you into what you despise. Hate is a poison. Your dislike of religion is fine, as long as it doesn't poison you as a religious fanatic allows their hatred to poison them.

    "Come writers and critics who prophetize with your pen. And keep your eyes wide the chance won't come again." --Bob Dylan

    by Socratic Method on Fri Sep 10, 2010 at 07:30:30 PM PDT

    •  Bingo. eom. (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Ahianne, Socratic Method

      "There is nothing impossible to him who will try." -Alexander the Great

      by The Octopus on Fri Sep 10, 2010 at 07:32:13 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  I agree with you, but I don't "hate" religious (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      edtastic

      people, nor do I think they are all dumb. Here's a quick story. Last week or so, I was reading on Yahoo that the physicist Hawking changed his mind about God - saying that he didn't believe God created the universe.

      Before I read the comments on Yahoo (below the article) I guessed there would be a lot of jokes about him being crippled.

      Of course, there were. Thousands of them.

    •  Well said! (5+ / 0-)

      I guess I fall into that category of Atheist who is fine letting others believe what they will. For many, religion provides them with community and humanity and it is a positive thing in their lives. But no reason to be fanatical about about.

      "Everybody does better, when everybody does better" - Paul Wellstone 1997

      by yuriwho on Fri Sep 10, 2010 at 07:33:42 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  But in reality.. (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        yuriwho, fl1972

        ....you only tolerate defanged believers.  The people who really believe, and want others to submit to their beliefs, the throwbacks to the pre-Enlightenment era...you aren't really fine with letting them believe whatever they want to believe, are you? Because their beliefs are inseparable from their conduct.  They are animated by their beliefs; they are not mainline Protestants that are virtual atheists in practice.  

        You couldn't, and wouldn't, be able to co-exist with the salafists or the Christian Reconstructionists.  

        "All along the watchtower, princes kept the view..."

        by Alec82 on Fri Sep 10, 2010 at 07:54:29 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  I guess that is true (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Alec82

          as I said up thread, as long as they are not burning my personal books. Another way of stating that is: 'As long as their beliefs do not have a direct negative impact on me'. So yes, I suppose I am offended by extremists (of any kind) and would consider action if I felt I was being limited or threatened by their beliefs.

          "Everybody does better, when everybody does better" - Paul Wellstone 1997

          by yuriwho on Fri Sep 10, 2010 at 08:00:47 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  Hey! I got fangs :-) (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Ahianne, Alec82, qinkilla

          or...incisors.

          "The revolution's just an ethical haircut away..." Billy Bragg

          by grannyhelen on Fri Sep 10, 2010 at 08:01:32 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  Good point, Alec... (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Alec82

          I think you said it better than I did.

          •  Arthur C Clarke... (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            qinkilla

            ...in his short story, "The Songs of Distant Earth," includes a line if I recall correctly, about the decision not to send religious texts along with other works of art to planets that are going to be colonized by robots carrying an embryonic seed pod to distant planets.  The reasoning was as simple as any cost/benefit analysis: It was more likely than not that the works would be used for harmful purposes, and so they did not go.  

            "All along the watchtower, princes kept the view..."

            by Alec82 on Fri Sep 10, 2010 at 08:24:54 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

        •  The fault lies not in religion (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Ahianne, yuriwho

          but in ourselves, that we are human. Our suffering stems from a lack of collective wisdom. Without a cure for that illness, losing our religions wouldn't make a damned bit of difference.

          Speaking for myself, Theodicy (aka The Problem Of Evil) doesn't convince me of the nonexistence of deities. The idiocy does. I can't fathom why an all-powerful deity would have created a race in which an MLK or Gandhi is such a rare exception.

          Even though our dream is not yet completed... we are not quitters... and we are not through. Ty'Sheoma Bethea

          by Nowhere Man on Fri Sep 10, 2010 at 08:09:15 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  sometimes.... (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Alec82

          you blow my mind.  You are one smart, little cookie.

  •  From another atheist (6+ / 0-)

    So when you burn the Torah, are you going to include Leviticus 19:18?

    Do not seek revenge or bear a grudge against one of your people, but love your neighbor as yourself.

    When you burn the New Testament, will that include 1 corinthians 13?

    Love is patient, love is kind. It does not envy, it does not boast, it is not proud. It is not rude, it is not self-seeking, it is not easily angered, it keeps no record of wrongs. Love does not delight in evil but rejoices with the truth. It always protects, always trusts, always hopes, always perseveres.

    Love never fails. But where there are prophecies, they will cease; where there are tongues, they will be stilled; where there is knowledge, it will pass away. For we know in part and we prophesy in part, but when perfection comes, the imperfect disappears. When I was a child, I talked like a child, I thought like a child, I reasoned like a child. When I became a man, I put childish ways behind me. Now we see but a poor reflection as in a mirror; then we shall see face to face. Now I know in part; then I shall know fully, even as I am fully known.

    And now these three remain: faith, hope and love. But the greatest of these is love.

    Or these from the Quran?

    And if you punished, let your punishment be proportionate to the wrong that has been done to you; but if you show patience, that is indeed the best course. [16:126]

    Whoever kills another one without justifiable cause, surely he is killing all of humanity. And whoever saves the life of another one, surely he saves the lives of all of humanity. [Sura Al Ma'aidah: Ayah 32]

    Oh, sure, you're speaking metaphorically. I get it. My point is, before you throw out all religious works, see if you can't find something in them worth saving. For all the harm that they've brought to the world, the world's religions have enriched us immensely too. Without religion, we'd very likely find other things to fight over, but I'm not as sure that we'd have had Bach or MLK.

    On the whole, I think I'd rather do without religion, too. But it's more to me that our species acquires greater wisdom, fast. Throw out religion completely, and you lose the opportunity to learn from its wisdom.

    Even though our dream is not yet completed... we are not quitters... and we are not through. Ty'Sheoma Bethea

    by Nowhere Man on Fri Sep 10, 2010 at 07:56:55 PM PDT

    •  Well said. Amen. ;-) /nt (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      grannyhelen, Nowhere Man

      "There is nothing impossible to him who will try." -Alexander the Great

      by The Octopus on Fri Sep 10, 2010 at 07:58:18 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Nowhere man, good point... (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Nowhere Man

      I think my snarkiness may have gotten lost in translation. Of course there are good things in religious texts. The 10 Commandments (watch Carlin's riff on these for a good laugh) are basically great tenants to live by.

      The problem is that most people pick and choose what aspects of a highly-contradictory text. For instance: An eye for an eye vs. turn the other cheek.

      Too malleable.

      •  These would be "the merits" (0+ / 0-)

        of which I spoke earlier.

        "There is nothing impossible to him who will try." -Alexander the Great

        by The Octopus on Fri Sep 10, 2010 at 08:10:06 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Right. I agree, but doesn't (0+ / 0-)

          it trouble you how these documents are open to such variance of interpretation that their meanings are always up in the air. There's no grounding force.

          The douche bag in Florida was put down by his mentor, after all. Cut from the same cloth (forgive the pun) but with different viewpoints on the same issue.

          •  No trouble at all (3+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Ahianne, yuriwho, qinkilla

            Trying to find meaning in any document is a challenge.  

            Take, for example, the Constitution.  A document that is certainly as "open to such variance of interpretation that their meanings are always up in the air."  Even with High Priests... er...  Supreme Court Justices to interpret it for us (thanks to that document's own Article III), there really is no "grounding force" for the Constitution (unless you believe in Natural Law -- which as a good Atheist you certainly do not!  Yet it still has profound and powerful meaning.  It's been a force for doing harm -- it originally expressly condoned slavery, and it took quite some time and fighting to get it to reflect some measure of equality for non-whites and women -- but by and large it has had a positive, unifying influence on our society and, in fact, on most of the rest of the world over the last roughly 225 years.

            Chucking the whole damn thing out -- whether it's a religious text or the US Constitution -- because it's tough to understand what it means, or because it's imperfect, or because some would use it to do evil in its name....  That's not a particularly satisfying approach.  For whatever you replace it with will suffer from the same problem.

            "There is nothing impossible to him who will try." -Alexander the Great

            by The Octopus on Fri Sep 10, 2010 at 08:18:40 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  Again, good point - but a bit different (0+ / 0-)

              since the Constitution is somewhat based in reality, whereas religious texts are most likely not.

              Side note: I saw "The Passion of the Christ" in the movie theater and heard a frenzied moviegoer utter this gem as he headed for the exit: "That was the best documentary I've ever seen"

              •  The Constitution is not reality based (2+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                Ahianne, Nowhere Man

                since the Constitution is somewhat based in reality

                Not really.  Not anymore so than a religious text -- so long as you accept that the religious text was written by mortal men, the same as you or I.  (And so long as you do not accept Natural Law.)

                There's nothing that makes the Constitution any different from the "Dear Abby" column in today's paper, or from the last month's Car and Driver.

                In fact, a religious text -- specifically a Bible -- is very closely related to a constitution.  Both are documents that some group of people has decided (usually voluntarily) to organize themselves around.  Both are considered primary documents within their own sphere.

                Sometime read accounts of the Constitutional Convention.  You'll see what a total hash-making process drafting the Constitution was.  Like all Bibles, it drew heavily from other, similar texts and traditions that had come before it.  Fights about what it meant were in full swing before the convention was adjourned.  Fascinating stuff.

                "There is nothing impossible to him who will try." -Alexander the Great

                by The Octopus on Fri Sep 10, 2010 at 08:31:47 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

      •  I'm not wild about the 10 Commandments, actually. (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        qinkilla

        Some of them are pretty common-sensical. But others I could do without. For instance, I have rather a fondness for the witches in my life.

        Even though our dream is not yet completed... we are not quitters... and we are not through. Ty'Sheoma Bethea

        by Nowhere Man on Fri Sep 10, 2010 at 08:11:53 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Witches? (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Ahianne, Nowhere Man

          Uh ... which commandment references those?

          To put the torture behind us is, inevitably, to put it in front of us.

          by UntimelyRippd on Fri Sep 10, 2010 at 08:36:36 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  You got me (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            the fan man

            There's a hole in my Biblical scholarship ;-)

            The phrase translated as (among others) "Thou shalt not suffer a witch to live" comes from Exodus 22:18, whereas the 10 Commandments come from (Column A) Exodus 20:2–17 or (Column B) Deuteronomy 5:6–21. I'd still rather not see people adhere too closely to Exodus 22:18, particularly the common interpretation thereof.

            But, going back to the Commandments, I don't have all that much use for keeping the Sabbath holy. Nor do I have much use for idols; but if I want to make one, that's between me and my minor god(ess.)

            Even though our dream is not yet completed... we are not quitters... and we are not through. Ty'Sheoma Bethea

            by Nowhere Man on Fri Sep 10, 2010 at 08:48:20 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  as it happens, the commandment against (0+ / 0-)

              idols is one of my favorites. i consider it high wisdom. if people didn't confuse the pieces of paper containing ink marks that encode for human use the precepts of their faith (pause) with their actual god, then nobody would care who burned what. (ref: "the" flag)

              To put the torture behind us is, inevitably, to put it in front of us.

              by UntimelyRippd on Sat Sep 11, 2010 at 10:48:26 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

        •  I don't think witches are mentioned (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          RunawayRose, Nowhere Man

          ..in the Big Ten. (Side note - if Nebraska is joining the Big 10, will the Big 12 ratchet down to the Big 11? Does that make 12 teams in the Big 10? Do I no longer get to say "Huck the Fuskers" when I notice football, which is rarely?)

          I can haz vuvuzela!!!

          by Ahianne on Fri Sep 10, 2010 at 08:45:43 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

    •  It's only paper, man. (0+ / 0-)

      People need to stop worshipping the books, and start honoring the ideas. (Per the second commandment, I note.)

      To put the torture behind us is, inevitably, to put it in front of us.

      by UntimelyRippd on Fri Sep 10, 2010 at 08:34:09 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  I hate the idea of burning pie (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Ahianne, sunbro, the fan man

    but it's the only palatable choice. I'm far from religious, but there is such a thing as respect for others. Burning their religious books, regardless of whether I believe in them or not, is not a respectful act. It proves nothing and pisses people off for no good reason.

    Bad idea.

    Now if you want to burn all existing copies of the movies of chuck norris and the recordings of ted nugent, we can talk.

    A learning experience is one of those things that says, 'You know that thing you just did? Don't do that.' Douglas Adams

    by dougymi on Fri Sep 10, 2010 at 08:08:42 PM PDT

  •  I'm sure the title of this diary is (0+ / 0-)

    helping.

    Solidarity Now. Join the Union...Washington D.C. 10-02-10. {Dems: Tax cuts for the middle class. Repubs: Tax cuts for millionaires.}

    by reddbierd on Fri Sep 10, 2010 at 08:43:18 PM PDT

  •  Kinda pointless to burn any of them. (0+ / 0-)

    All it does is escalate the problem.

    And we all know if the shoe was on the other foot and it was some Muslim group talking about burning Bibles, this same dumb pastor would be crying bloody murder, ranting and raving.

    And when we ask you why, you raise your sticks and cry and we fall.

    by Ninbyo on Fri Sep 10, 2010 at 08:45:46 PM PDT

  •  The truly absurd thing is that this moran (0+ / 0-)

    has written a book about Islam without actually reading the book he wants to burn.

    As a Wiccan, I hate burning any books, even if my faith (disorganized religiona t its finest) doesn't have a holy book for someone to burn. I suppose they could burn a copy of the Rede, but setting fire to a single page just lacks grandeur.  Wicca is the Bill and Ted of religions: we have almost no dogma and "Be excellent to each other" and "Pary On" aren't far off from the Rede.

    The last time we mixed religion and politics people got burned at the stake.

    by irishwitch on Fri Sep 10, 2010 at 09:40:05 PM PDT

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