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Glen Beck (Mormon) and Pamela Geller (Jew) are a couple of odd birds.

Both rabble-rousers. Both make their living scapegoating others. Both were members of a once oppressed minority but now feel comfortable enough to lash out at others.

Beck, a proud member of the Later Day Saints Church, shows no mercy while he attacks anyone and everyone who isn't as American as he sees himself to be. FOX boasts that this sort of programing is "fair and balanced."

Geller, a vocal Ayn Rand devotee, gets attention whipping up a froth about all things Muslim. Islam bashing here. Her assaults on the "ground zero mosque" have gathered an audience of admirers.

Note how soon the hunted become the hunters.

The scapegoating of Jews in various countries over the centuries is well documented -- you could fill an airplane hanger with the material, easily. In fact, there's a mall in Washington that has a big museum devoted to the subject. (And, no, I'm not Jewish; I'm a Goy.)

The Mormon story is less familiar to most. But with more and more LDS members taking prominent positions in our society (like Mitt Romney and Harry Reid), it's worth recalling some of it. Back in the early 19th century, Mormons were driven out of Missouri and Illinois. Their town, Nauvoo, was the second largest settlement in Illinois, at one point, only Chicago was bigger. That was all wrecked by angry mobs that saw the LDS community as a crazy, cultish band of bigamists. Their leader, Joseph Smith, was murdered. Those attacking Mormons used the term, "wolf hunts," to describe their activity. The Mormons found temporary refuge in Iowa, then headed west to start their own country, Deseret, in what is now Utah. (And, I'm not Mormon either; I'm a Gentile.)

With this history in mind, how in the world can someone like Geller and Beck lash out at any other minority group that is trying to make a go of it in the USA?

Originally posted to Otherday on Tue Oct 12, 2010 at 02:13 PM PDT.

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If You've Ever Been Hunted . . .

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| 32 votes | Vote | Results

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Comment Preferences

  •  Tip Jar (10+ / 0-)

    Greenspan admits his free market faith was "a mistake" - Reliance on self interest creates a flaw "in how the world works."

    by Otherday on Tue Oct 12, 2010 at 02:13:16 PM PDT

  •  Just goes to show... (7+ / 0-)

    Suffering does not ennoble anyone. Like chickens in a pecking frenzy, most will just turn and oppress whoever is next in line.

    Sad.

    Free Don Seigelman, jail Karl Rove ~ mission halfway accomplished !

    by Dvalkure on Tue Oct 12, 2010 at 02:22:27 PM PDT

    •  Suffering has ennobled many. (0+ / 0-)

      I don't think you mean that, do you?

      Think of all those slaves who maintained their dignity and rose above it, like Frederick Douglass.

      Greenspan admits his free market faith was "a mistake" - Reliance on self interest creates a flaw "in how the world works."

      by Otherday on Tue Oct 12, 2010 at 02:27:21 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Douglass is pretty clear (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        neroden, raincrow, billmosby

        That it was learning to read and whipping the shit out of Covey (his "owner") instead of passively accepting the whipping that ennobled him. Not the suffering.

        ennoble (v) 3. To impart a higher character to (a person or thing); to dignify, elevate, refine.

        •  Agitate, Agitate, Agitate! (0+ / 0-)

          No doubt beating up his "owner" did him some good. Do you think he would have gotten an audience if that is all he had done? Nope.

          Think of all the Nobel Prize winners over the years, like Elie Wiesel. Practically everyone has had their "time of ashes," their moments of suffering. And they didn't cave in to it. Spending time in a prison, like so many of them did, most likely made them more empathetic and determined, at the very least.

          Greenspan admits his free market faith was "a mistake" - Reliance on self interest creates a flaw "in how the world works."

          by Otherday on Tue Oct 12, 2010 at 02:45:19 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

      •  I guess I was unclear (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Otherday

        my meaning is better expressed by suffering does not in and of itself, or automatically, ennoble anyone. There are always exceptionally great-souled people, like Douglass, who manage to overcome suffering and ennoble themselves.

        Free Don Seigelman, jail Karl Rove ~ mission halfway accomplished !

        by Dvalkure on Wed Oct 13, 2010 at 12:52:42 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  You're right, to a point. (0+ / 0-)

          I, too, am disgusted by those who say suffering alone is such a great thing. Screw that! It's almost an excuse to abuse people, then claiming that their suffering was good for them.

          Because FDR had polio, he was a better man. He was a spoiled, elite, horny rich guy until then. Polio was a kind of sticking post, it forced him to face death, it made him consider the struggles of those with disabilities, it made him empathize with those less fortunate. At least I like to think so.

          Robert Bly, the poet, in his book, Iron John, writes about the need for a "time of ashes." Maybe Bill Clinton was a better leader because his dad was killed in a car crash. Maybe Barack Obama grew because he lived in Indonesia, as a black American outsider, and had to figure out his place in the world in which he wasn't a favorite of any sort. Maybe JFK added a layer or two to his personality when his PT boat sunk and he had to swim for his life, dragging a buddy all the way.

          Suffering isn't enough by itself. But a period of suffering, in some notable cases, does seem to ignite an important element of the sufferer's humanity. Like they gain another dimension.

          Greenspan admits his free market faith was "a mistake" - Reliance on self interest creates a flaw "in how the world works."

          by Otherday on Wed Oct 13, 2010 at 01:35:03 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

  •  . (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    raincrow, Otherday

    Continued dependence upon relief induces a spiritual and moral disintegration fundamentally destructive to the national fiber. - FDR

    by SpamNunn on Tue Oct 12, 2010 at 03:04:48 PM PDT

  •  WOW (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Otherday

    Expecting self-serving, profiteering thugs like Beck and Geller to have empathy, thoughtfulness and compassion is an absurd notion.

    Both are fascist propagandists that get off on seeing themselves as kingmakers.

    Of course your argument would make sense to any rational individual, but these people aren't motivated by rational thinking - just profit.

    "Ubermensch" is German for "Douchebag"

    by meatballs on Tue Oct 12, 2010 at 05:13:34 PM PDT

  •  This always happens with religions. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Otherday

    How many persecuted religious groups, given a taste of power, didn't have at least some of their members turn into persecutors?

    Well, the Unitarians and the Quakers, I guess, but I can't think of any other examples.

    -5.63, -8.10. Learn about Duverger's Law.

    by neroden on Tue Oct 12, 2010 at 06:34:18 PM PDT

    •  Unitarians & Quakers are Due. (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Dvalkure

      Don't turn your back to either one!

      Greenspan admits his free market faith was "a mistake" - Reliance on self interest creates a flaw "in how the world works."

      by Otherday on Tue Oct 12, 2010 at 08:59:41 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

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