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In a statement released a couple hours ago, Speaker Nancy Pelosi strongly condemned the recommendations made by the co-chairs of the deficit commission (emphasis mine):

November 10th, 2010 by Speaker Pelosi

Our nation is facing two challenges: the need to create jobs and address our budget deficit. Any viable proposal from the President’s Fiscal Commission must strengthen our economy, but it must do so in a fair way, focusing on how we can effectively promote economic growth.

This proposal is simply unacceptable. Any final proposal from the Commission should do what is right for our children and grandchildren’s economic security as well as for our nation’s fiscal security, and it must do what is right for our seniors, who are counting on the bedrock promises of Social Security and Medicare. And it must strengthen America’s middle class families–under siege for the last decade, and unable to withstand further encroachment on their economic security.

Good on her. She will remain Speaker for as long as the commission has authority, so her denunciations are very important.

Reward good behavior, and sign our petition supporting Nancy Pelosi as Democratic Minority Leader. Over 31,000 Kossacks have signed so far.

The House leadership elections will be next Wednesday, and I am delivering the petition tomorrow, so make sure your voice is heard.

Originally posted to Daily Kos on Wed Nov 10, 2010 at 05:30 PM PST.

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Comment Preferences

  •  Why did this draft get released? What's the (22+ / 0-)

    politics here? Did the GOPers want Democrats to shit all over it? Did they think the Village would get a woody? I can't figure this out exactly . . .

    •  Obama set the damn thing up (6+ / 0-)

      this is the political equivalent of kicking the ball  into your own goal straight from the kick off in a game of soccer.

      either Obama is stupid (he isn't) or there is something that I don't want to even contemplate going on here.

       

      •  he is trying to save the country's (0+ / 0-)

        economy- and Democrat's political viability. We are on a path to Greece. He, sensibly, knows that harsh measures are necessary to fix our structural fiscal problem. This did not happen overnight. it will not be fixed overnight. But a solution DOES need the patina of bipartisanship. Raising some taxes, eliminating some loopholes, and decreasing some benefits (as this draft suggests) is the ONLY viable political and economic option. I am opposed to more than a few items in it, but it is medicine that needs to be taken. Making the rich pay for HCR, AND SS fix, AND the deficit isn't going to fly.

        On a purely, and perhaps larger, political point: Democrats will lose BIG again in 2012 if they reject a bipartisan, Obama appointed committee's recommendation to reduce the structural deficit of this nation. You think the right/tea/faction won't win with THAT as a talking point? Pelosi has already started down that path.

        •  So much crap in one posting (11+ / 0-)

          Since you need to understand things better, I suggest you go see the movie Inside Job. You will find out exactly why we are in this mess, and it has nothing to do with Social Security.

          You are a wolf in sheeps clothing. So you are saying Democrats will lose big in 2012 if they reject this "bipartisan" commission. Bullshit. They will lose big if they do anything that touches Social Security, which is what you are proposing they do.

          Funny, the pessimistic 75 year shortfall in Social Security is less than the amount of money the government would lose if they continue the Bush tax cuts for the upper 2%. So the choice you seem to be advocating is drastically hurt a program which hasn't contributed one red cent to the deficit, and a program that is greatly needed by at least 50% to 75% of americans, all the keep a tax cut for the upper 2%. Remember these rich people incomes have exploded in the last few years. And you want us to worry about these poor rich people not being able to bear the burden of 3% more taxes on everything above 250K. Bullshit. Pure, evil bullshit.

          We got into this mess because of exhorbitant tax cuts that went predominantly to the stinking rich. We got into this mess because Bush started a couple of unpaid for wars based on a pack of lies.

          This financial mess has nothing to do with Social Security or the middle class, and yet while Wall Street hands out bigger bonuses than ever, the poor and middle class are getting socked with the bill. Go fuck yourself.

          Everything I write is within a margin of error of precisely 100%.

          by Bailey Savings and Loan on Wed Nov 10, 2010 at 06:26:02 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  I couldn't have said it better myself! (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            cinsch

            Bravo!

            These Eleventh Dimension Chess Apologists really piss me off.

            My favorite color is orange, love long walks on the beach, and I enjoy kicking Republicans right in their canards!

            by MacJimi on Wed Nov 10, 2010 at 06:30:12 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

          •  well, you are right about 1 thing (0+ / 0-)

            Everything I write is within a margin of error of precisely 100%.

          •  Get a grip (0+ / 0-)

            You can tax the rich at 100% and it wont scratch the surface of covering our current spending levels...the "tax cuts for the rich mantra" is tired worn out class warfare bullshit. And anybody claiming that an income tax cut for anyone will harm social security is either an idiot or willfully trying to mislead people.  

            Anyone that can add and subtract (anyone with a second grade education) knows the only way we start to get our finances in order is to spend less than we take in.  

        •  What's the Euro in this scenario???? (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          cinsch

          We are on a path to Greece.

          A big part of Greece's trouble is that they surrendered their monetary policy to the European Central Bank. The only way they could devalue their currency is to abandon the Euro. Also, Greece has little clout even within the room they have for fiscal policy.

          Do you think we wouldn't know that?

          He, sensibly, knows that harsh measures are necessary to fix our structural fiscal problem.

          If that were true, wouldn't the commissioners have been able to stay on message? Why would they have called for a corporate tax cut, unless they don't think that harsh measures are really necessary?

          Democrats will lose BIG again in 2012 if they reject a bipartisan,

          Do you expect us to believe that because Obama appointed the commission, that automatically makes it bipartisan? I'm sure that if he got some RINOs to support a pre-ordained liberal conclusion, you would not accept that as bipartisan.

          Greg McKendry, Linda Kraeger, Dr. George Tiller, Steven Johns. Victims of Wingnut violence

          by Judge Moonbox on Wed Nov 10, 2010 at 06:29:51 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  yes... (0+ / 0-)

            because Obama appointed the commission, that automatically makes it bipartisan?

          •  Greece (0+ / 0-)

            crisis was due to years of unrestrained spending (and some cheap lending). When the global economy tanked. their "enron numbers"  revealed debt levels and deficits that exceeded limits set by the eurozone. They were approaching a debt of 120% of their gdp. France is in similar straights. We are on a trajectory to do the same thing. Which is why the commission recommended spending caps related to GDP.

            •  That's one narrative. There are others. (0+ / 0-)

              I have seen accounts that easily show the crazy spending was a result of plutocratic raiding of government coffers.

              Remember, the Greek deficit is only $300 billion. AND Greece spends the second most as a % of GDP on military weaponry of any country in the entire world. The accounting I saw listed well over $100 billion in weaponry purchased in the last 10 years. In the aftermath of their economic collapse, the country was awash in a variety of scandals having to do with the military, and the two biggest were the bribes from Siemens or Thyssen Kruppe for many billions in submarines and tanks. Greek politicians took hundreds of millions, literally, for these deals, approved tens of billions, and borrowed the money from the host nation of the bribers. Who was left angry? Greek and German taxpayers. Who was left happy? Corporatists in Germany, employees in the German Military-Industries, and Greek politicians.

              Siemens claims now that it's the only way to do business with Greece's corruption, which negates of course the fact that Siemens is in the dock for bribes all over Europe.

              For all the crying about social welfare and a crazy social welfare state in Greece, the facts show that Greece doesn't even have a social welfare program. It has a social workfare program (700,000 public servants in a country of 11 million). They earn an average of $7k a year. If they weren't in the bloated bureaucracy, they'd likely starve. so the money going to their incredibly bloated bureaucracy actually pails by comparison to the money lost through all the Greek Bridges-to-Nowhere, boondoggle after boondoggle.

              Again, the answer is austerity. Rip away a social fabric that hardly even exists. Meanwhile all the billions that went to the rich are left unharmed. That's why any sane commission should be in the business of redistributing wealth both in the EU and in the USA.

              There are two kinds of people in this world. The kind who divide the world into two kinds of people, and the kind who don't.

              by upstate NY on Thu Nov 11, 2010 at 09:39:58 AM PST

              [ Parent ]

              •  well, it isn't a "Narrative" (0+ / 0-)

                it is a fact. they were spending 120% of their GDP. Cannot be sustained- and we are heading to that sane scenario (est. 100 % in a few years). It isn;t "ripping" the social fabric to put restraints on spending so that future generations even HAVE a safety net. Redistributing wealth in a capitalist system can only go so far. taxes can only be so high on so many. These variables are not static of course, but are dependent measures.

                •  They have been at 120% to 150% for over (0+ / 0-)

                  3 decades.

                  The question of sustainability has everything to do with nationalizing debt of the banking system, and the hordeing of cash.

                  The ECB could easily have nationalized those banks and monetized the recovery were it not for Germany's austerity loving deficit hawks.

                  There are two kinds of people in this world. The kind who divide the world into two kinds of people, and the kind who don't.

                  by upstate NY on Fri Nov 12, 2010 at 07:05:47 AM PST

                  [ Parent ]

                  •  are you saying that the EU (0+ / 0-)

                    should "bail out" Greece? Who's next?

                    •  ??? (0+ / 0-)

                      They are bailing out Greece. Although even that is arguable.

                      I'm not getting you here.

                      What I'm saying is that the EU, through the ECB, can choose stimulus over austerity. There is no reason why the private sector will be better than the public sector at producing more growth. Take Greece's energy sector. huge investment in that sector would pump up the Greek economy, and together with the recent changes in Greece's system, would help Greece get back on its feet rather quickly. All that's needed is for the ECB to pump some funds into the economy.

                      There are two kinds of people in this world. The kind who divide the world into two kinds of people, and the kind who don't.

                      by upstate NY on Fri Nov 12, 2010 at 11:10:07 AM PST

                      [ Parent ]

                      •  I'm not getting you either unfortunately (0+ / 0-)

                        " huge investment in that sector would pump up the Greek economy'

                        That is not the mission of the ECB not in my be effectual to the cause.

                        When they joined the eurozone, Greece failed to reform the economy and reduce public spending (including the huge military budget) and entered the recession ill equipped to cope. Greece was already WAY in breach of eurozone rules, and the Government lied about the true state of its finances. Cuts in public spending and tax rises are now necessary to bring the deficit down.

                        the benefits of investing in their energy sector is mere speculation, and would bring dissension from members and encourage other members such as Spain perhaps to violate EZ rules. Plus Greece would need to give up some control of its own affairs and sovereignty for such an infusion.

                        ' the recent changes in Greece's system" were a direct result of their collapsed system which was, as I said predicated by too much debt, corrupt accounting, and the global downturn.

                        austerity (after years of free spending) may not be fun, but it was certainly necessary in Europe and is working.

                        •  Actually, it is in the ECB's bylaws (0+ / 0-)

                          The ECB's bylaws mainly allow it to create credit by buying corporate bonds, but a subsection of that provision also allows it to buy public bonds. Effectively, the ECB has been buying bonds, and issuing credit to Greek banks to allow them to become sovereign holders of Greek debt, thereby repatriating Greece's debt away from France and Germany and back to Greece. but they haven't been doing it in nearly the volume they could, primarily because the hawks at the Bundesbank launched an attack on the ECB, calling the French head a Keynesian.

                          Greece didn't reform the military budget, why? Because the EU--namely Germany and France--didn't want it to. Cohn-Bendit launched a jeremiad at the EC noting that Greece was even blackmailed into accepting the bailout only if it agreed to purchasing fighter planes, tanks and submarines from the two countries. It had no choice. When you realize that fully one third of the Greek debt is military, you begin to understand the problem.

                          What's going on in Europe is that private debt is being made public, and when you add the two together, there are many more countries that violated EU bylaws. In fact, Germany is the guiltiest of all, because when it violated the laws it then had the laws changed.

                          The corrupt accounting story is totally overblown as well. If you read the Eurostat report on Greek accounting from January 8, you will find that Eurostat reported that Greece routinely underestimated the deficit, but that Eurostat conducted extensive research and reported the actual debt each and every year. This is why if you look at .pdfs of yearly EU financial reports, you'll see that Greece has been at 100% debt to GDP for well over a decade. In other words, no one was surprised by this. The IMF even has reports warning that the debt is a timebomb. The extent of it was known. Yes, the yearly deficit was underreported yet again in 209, but how could that have surprised ANYONE given the same thing had occurred yearly. The whole issue of the so-called "surprise" revelation was a political sop because the elected Greek gov't had to veer away from campaign promises and blame the previous gov't for the fiasco. They used the underreporting to pin the blame on New Democracy, even though they themselves had done the same thing earlier in the decade.

                          Tax rises and cuts in spending in Greece are NOT bringing the deficit down. On the contrary, they are bloating the deficit enormously. And it's been predicted that this would happen. It's no surprise.

                          Austerity is not working, and it will not work.

                          I don't understand why the EU is so hung up on American style capitalism. It's just stupid.

                          I was batting around some of these ideas with someone today who had this to say, and he's exactly right:

                          The Treasury simply spends (under professional management by professionals with a stake in the outcome) on creating productive assets, and on increasing the capacity of people to create them. The Central Bank creates the necessary credit on behalf of the Treasury.

                          When the productive assets are complete they are re-'funded' by investors in credit based directly on the use value of the assets, and the public credit which financed development is then retired and recycled. The newly productive people pay more tax, and this also retires the public credit which financed their increased productivity.

                          Spending money into existence is precisely what private banks do already when they credit the accounts of suppliers; staff; management; shareholders (dividend payments). Also when they buy assets.

                          The only difference between public and private bank credit is that the latter has an added burden of excessive payments to management and unnecessary payments to shareholders, and this combination means that private credit is by definition more inflationary as money (to the extent of rentier profit) than public credit.

                          What we have going on in Europe, therefore, is the death pang of ideological capitalists.

                          It's not going to work.

                          There are two kinds of people in this world. The kind who divide the world into two kinds of people, and the kind who don't.

                          by upstate NY on Fri Nov 12, 2010 at 03:30:47 PM PST

                          [ Parent ]

                          •  we'll see I guess (0+ / 0-)

                            Germany seems to be getting back in gear rapidly. I do not see how spending even more, with such a high debt and deficit will improve Greece's economy. I now the EU loaned them 145 billion, but that was to get them on their feet- AND predicated upon the measures they are now undertaking. And yes, their Enron accounting WAS a big deal. They simply lied to the EU until their collapse was imminent. instead of 3 or4 % they were at 12+.

          •  Devaluing currency would not work for Greece (0+ / 0-)

            in any case because they are not a manufacturing economy. It's a service economy, and the two biggest sectors are tourism and shipping. In both cases, their profits come from sources outside the country, so you're best off denominating that money in Euros.

            As well, I take issue with people who believe devaluation is somehow more honorable than defaulting on debt. It's the same thing from where I stand. Either way, your creditor gets less back.

            There are two kinds of people in this world. The kind who divide the world into two kinds of people, and the kind who don't.

            by upstate NY on Thu Nov 11, 2010 at 09:42:25 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

        •  A viable "political option?" (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          cinsch, Judge Moonbox

          For whom, Republicans??????  Who needs this medicine, the average American or the Wall St. banker who destroyed our economy and got a million dollar bonus last year paid for by the average American?

          Who pays you to waste our time?

        •  Are you fucking kidding me? (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          cinsch, Judge Moonbox

          So, we are going to remedy the structural fiscal problems by gutting the social safety net? That's just grand. See you on the streets. I wonder which side you'll be on.

          How far to the right do the Dems have to move before you stop calling them Dems?

          by Diebold Hacker on Wed Nov 10, 2010 at 07:29:39 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

        •  So tempted to hide-rate this (n/t) (0+ / 0-)

          Californians: The Courage Campaign is working for changing the 2/3 budget rule and for ending Prop 8. Go!

          by tmo on Wed Nov 10, 2010 at 09:21:06 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

    •  Why? (7+ / 0-)

      It's a trial baloon which Obama does not have to immediately address because he's out of the country on important business.

    •  We should use these proposed cuts to focus the (5+ / 0-)

      public attention on why the wealthy need to share more of the tax burden.

      If we want to reduce the deficit, no tax cuts for millionaires (except their first $250k). And have those $250+ folks continue to pay into Social Security.

      Have a small transaction tax on buying and selling financial instruments to close the gap.

      In other words, we can cut all sorts of good things that help make our country work for everyone--or, those who are best off can help keep our country great by helping pay for critical programs.

      People don't like raising taxes when they don't understand what the money is going for, but when it's a clear choice--raise these taxes on the wealthy or lose much of social security etc., it makes the public very supportive of having the wealthy pay more.

      Some people fight fire with fire. Professionals use water.

      by Happy Days on Wed Nov 10, 2010 at 05:45:57 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Expand SoSec Tax to All Income (4+ / 0-)

        Create a donut hole exemption from current cap of $106,800 and the $250,000 thresholds and make the SoSec Payroll tax non-deductible to the extent it applies to income over $250,000 (or some # north of that.)

        Raises over $100 Billion annually from just those in the Top 1% of Tax Returns (filed for 2008).

        Curently, in this Top 1% category, over 99.9% of their income is exempted from the SoSec Tax.  Yet they are among those who will benefit the most from the extention of the Bush tax cuts for the income above $250,000.  

        To extend that income tax cut while delaying and cutting Soc Sec during ecomic and fiscal times of crisis like this is not just wrong, it is an invitation to anarchy.  

        How's that regressive taxy thing working out for you?  

        Details of proposal and rough est of revenue here:

        http://www.dailykos.com/...

        In uncharted territories, don't rely too much on your charts. Stay strong and row away from the rocks.

        by Into The Woods on Wed Nov 10, 2010 at 06:11:01 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  Now let's hope (13+ / 0-)

    the president promises to veto any cuts to social security.

  •  Nancy Pelosi fights or people like me (23+ / 0-)

    and she does not shy away from the fight.

    May she continue to be a strong and effective leader.

  •  The Democrats need to DEBUNK SUPPLY-SIDE (11+ / 0-)

    ECONOMICS ONCE AND FOR ALL!

    Every time a Republican mentions supply-side theory, or a blue-dog touts it, a progressive Dem should blast it apart. There should be as much effort towards debunking the entire religious basis for Republican economic dreck that is supply-side economics as they spend trying to debunk global warming.

    The problem is that they are more effective at convincing people that their lies are true than we are at convincing people that our truths are not lies.

    And, so, the deficit commission favors making the rich richer in order to save the poor. What bunk!

    •  Every time the tax cut for the rich is mentioned, (5+ / 0-)

      it should be referred to as the $700 billion tax cut for the rich.

      Every time.

      "If I owned hell and Texas, I'd live in hell and rent out Texas" - Union General Phillip Sheridan

      by ZedMont on Wed Nov 10, 2010 at 05:45:47 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  It Ain't Chicken or Egg. Supply follows demand. (0+ / 0-)

      Without sufficient consumer demand in the vast general public, no investor can be coaxed into investing by assurances of lower taxes on profits that may never be made.

      Whether or not tax cuts for the rich had any positive effect in the past, right now sending more money to the rich at the expense of $700 Billion more Government Debt, is like fighting a house fire by pumping water back into the lake instead of on the burning house.  

      Tax cuts for the middle (bottom 98%):  Water on the Fire.

      Tax cuts for those already swimming in cash (Income above $250g - Top 2%):  Water back into the lake.  

      In uncharted territories, don't rely too much on your charts. Stay strong and row away from the rocks.

      by Into The Woods on Wed Nov 10, 2010 at 06:23:17 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Exactly! (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Reality Bites Back

      If supply side and deregulation work, why are we not now enjoying the greatest economy ever?  Oh, wait, corportate profits-just great, Wall Street profits?  Exceptional.  Wall Street bonuses?  On target.

      Tell me again why Pelosi is the devil?

      Either party that touches SS is in trouble.  That is something everyone understands.  People who paid into it for 40 or 50 years, who saw what happened to their voluntary retirement accounts (401K's) may be old, but they vote and own guns.

      You can fire them up with racism,but take away something they earned and rely on and no amount of bullshit will cover you.

      •  Except that authoritarian people will defend the (0+ / 0-)

        lies that get their own children killed and decimate their life savings.

        And almost 1/4 of the US population is authoritarian, and hardcore righties.

        At least laying down what is the truth in economics and regulatory policy will have a shot at waking up the other 25% or so that is voting wingnut based on a warped perception of reality. And like you say - if supply side and deregulation is so effective, why are we in the 2nd Great Depression with millions of gallons of toxic oil still floating around the deep Gulf?

  •  Uh, yeah. (5+ / 0-)

    How can this be a sitting Democratic President's Commissions findings, at a time like this? This will not end well.

    "I drank what?!" -Socrates

    by bagman on Wed Nov 10, 2010 at 05:33:52 PM PST

  •  Good on Pelosi! (8+ / 0-)

    Someone has to fight for the middle class and hold the rich 2% accountable.

  •  Glad she made it clear right away (17+ / 0-)

    The only good I have heard so far is the suggested 20% reduction in military spending.

    On another note, I heard on the News Hour that Grover Norquist is calling the report "a trillion dollar tax hike".

  •  Turning a lemon into lemonade. (6+ / 0-)

    Maybe all the Dems in congress should stand up against this and particularly single out the Repubs on the committee.

    Yeah, Obama will get some blowback, but he'll be fine.

    I, for one, welcome our new hillbilly overlords.

    by Bush Bites on Wed Nov 10, 2010 at 05:35:09 PM PST

  •  This commission report is the smartest thing (10+ / 0-)

    that could happen.  Now Obama and the dems will come in fight it and save the day for all of our senior.  This is just what he needed. A threat against the people.  Then when the republicans come in to reduce it, Obama will again be the hero.

    Live simply so that others may simply live.

    by Ann T Bush on Wed Nov 10, 2010 at 05:35:28 PM PST

  •  I have two things to say about this mess: (5+ / 0-)

    WTF?

    &

    DOA!

    "We the People of the United States...." -U.S. Constitution

    by elwior on Wed Nov 10, 2010 at 05:35:32 PM PST

  •  I'd love to know (7+ / 0-)

    what her unedited response was -- which probably is close to Thurgood Marshall's assessments of crap:  "consummate bulshit!"

    " My faith in the Constitution is whole; it is complete; it is total." Barbara Jordan, 1974

    by gchaucer2 on Wed Nov 10, 2010 at 05:35:40 PM PST

    •  It's nonsense. (0+ / 0-)

      Unfortunately not simple nonsense.

      But making things complicated does not turn them into anything but what they are:  Nonsense.  

      In uncharted territories, don't rely too much on your charts. Stay strong and row away from the rocks.

      by Into The Woods on Wed Nov 10, 2010 at 06:26:31 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Thank you Madame Speaker. (13+ / 0-)

    "Sir, you are a very clever man, but not very wise. Everyone knows it's turtles, all the way down."

    by hester on Wed Nov 10, 2010 at 05:36:35 PM PST

  •  Bachmann quits bid for leadership... (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Into The Woods, kat68, Plubius

    something about all these dingbats quitting. LOL

    I propose a toast, knowing that our ties subsist because they are not of iron or steel or even of gold, but of the silken cords of the human spirit. 11/9/10

    by BarackStarObama on Wed Nov 10, 2010 at 05:36:42 PM PST

  •  Nancy could hold back a little and let the GOP go (2+ / 0-)

    on record.

    "Because I am a river to my people."

    by lordcopper on Wed Nov 10, 2010 at 05:37:03 PM PST

  •  Man, I really hope that means (4+ / 0-)

    the proposal is dead.

    And if you haven't signed the petition yet, go do it now.  It's the single most important thing you can do as a kossack.  Pelosi has our back, and we need to cover hers.  

    Go.  

    Now.  

    Sign.

    Give me your tired, your poor, Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free
    ¡Boycott Arizona!

    by litho on Wed Nov 10, 2010 at 05:38:29 PM PST

  •  It won't pass both houses, dumb idea from the (0+ / 0-)

    start.

  •  Regular folks have to tighten their belts but (4+ / 0-)
    of course, the Catfood Commission wants no part of suggesting that the rich pay a little more in taxes, or that more people should be paying into Social Security/Medicare.
  •  This is wy we MUST keep Nancy (9+ / 0-)

    And let it be known that any Democrat that supports the odious crap in the recommendations they WILL face primary challenges.

    Hey Boehner! When are you gonna fixit?

    by Walt starr on Wed Nov 10, 2010 at 05:41:04 PM PST

  •  Did Harry Reid make a comment? (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Major Tom, LordMike, bagman, erush1345

    crickets

    Patriotism means to stand by the country. It does not mean to stand by the president or any other public official... ~Theodore Roosevelt

    by Pam from Calif on Wed Nov 10, 2010 at 05:43:30 PM PST

  •  Deficit Commission = Obama's Epic Fail (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    KLM, Major Tom, vacantlook, MacJimi

    This president has been horrible at picking folks to do important jobs and this one just takes the cake.

    Setting up this commission at all was a sign of ineptitude similar to when he was trying to figure out "whose ass to kick" statement during the BP fiasco.  

    He never figured that one out either.  Lord help us, because this guy's not going to.  

    This election is like going into a job interview with a resume that only says how much the other candidates suck.

    by Celtic Pugilist on Wed Nov 10, 2010 at 05:43:42 PM PST

    •  You can try to fail (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      cinsch

      If memory serves, the commission was part of a bargain he made with the devil Republicans. Maybe it was supposed to be an epic fail.

      It is better to light one candle than to curse the darkness - Eleanor Roosevelt

      by Fish in Illinois on Wed Nov 10, 2010 at 05:50:00 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  He's only given them more ammo (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        KLM, Major Tom

        Conservatives know that if they keep repeating lies eventually they become conventional wisdom.  The Catfood commission is just another "bipartisan" way of foisting a lie on the public.

        This election is like going into a job interview with a resume that only says how much the other candidates suck.

        by Celtic Pugilist on Wed Nov 10, 2010 at 05:52:35 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

    •  Except when seen through the lens of 11D Chess (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      KLM, Major Tom, MacJimi, Celtic Pugilist

      I mean, that worked SO well last week (unless, of course, one sees THAT as part of the whole 20-year 11D Chess strategery). Oh the brilliance, so powerful, yet so subtle, that only the privileged special few can "see" it. What fools the rest of us are.

      "Those who stand for nothing fall for anything...Mankind are forever destined to be the dupes of bold & cunning imposture" --Alexander Hamilton

      by kovie on Wed Nov 10, 2010 at 06:04:05 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Just signed the petition, and sent the form for (4+ / 0-)

    signing on to friends.

  •  you know, most of time progressive gripe (7+ / 0-)

    that Democrats don't do enough.  But Pelosi is one of those Democrats that actually got most of what we wanted ,done.  I mean, a lot.  She did it.  If everything Pelosi passed became law, can you imagine how much better off would we be today?  I think I actually love Pelosi - and you should sign the petition if you agree!

    People, not corporations. Democracy, not totalitarian capitalism.

    by democracy is coming on Wed Nov 10, 2010 at 05:45:15 PM PST

    •  Yes, luckily the Senate and WH killed it all. (0+ / 0-)

      It is a larger entity than the House, or the Senate. It is a whole production. They let the House rouse the rabble for a few years, but Oh! Look! The nasty Senate has failed to pass any of our bills. What a shame! I guess we'll have to be content with the status quo.

      Who will be the bad guy this next cycle? Tune in..

      I'm done with it. These people are all either on the take or scared shitless that someone will release the documents they have in their safes. Whatever the leverage, the status quo is supreme, and there will be only limited rocking of the boat.

      Meanwhile, the boat is now taking on serious water. We're listing, and these assholes are re-arranging deck chairs to suit their liking.

      How far to the right do the Dems have to move before you stop calling them Dems?

      by Diebold Hacker on Wed Nov 10, 2010 at 08:08:07 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Our Nancy. (4+ / 0-)

    Glad to know at least one of us will go down fighting.

    It is better to light one candle than to curse the darkness - Eleanor Roosevelt

    by Fish in Illinois on Wed Nov 10, 2010 at 05:48:23 PM PST

  •  Meanwhile, the Chief of Staff for incoming (9+ / 0-)

    fucknut teabagger Allen West called Nancy Pelosi "garbage." Her policies weren't garbage. Nothing she said was garbage. She herself was called "garbage."

    I probably couldn't be in the same building with any of these people without probably winding up in jail. I'd lose it.

    The barbarians are already past the gates.

    "This is NOT the last election on earth."--WT

    by Wildthumb on Wed Nov 10, 2010 at 05:49:16 PM PST

  •  why did she pledge not to prosecute... (0+ / 0-)

    ... war crimes of US officials?

    I don't really get that.  I actually do still like her somewhat, but the trust is not there, and it's not like there are not other people that might fare better against the Republitide, aka The Oil Spill in the DC Gulf.

    ... or I'll leave forever and never come back (and you'll be sorry).

    by GBCW on Wed Nov 10, 2010 at 05:49:27 PM PST

    •  otoh (0+ / 0-)

      I am supporting her on the premise that no one I'd like better would want to take the position from her unless she stepped aside, meaning it will be some royal j#rk running against her.

      I just wanted more justice those two years we got for that.

      ... or I'll leave forever and never come back (and you'll be sorry).

      by GBCW on Wed Nov 10, 2010 at 05:55:21 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  A lesson learned (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      GBCW, schnecke21, CalliopeIrjaPearl

      She attempted extend her own version of an olive branch to the GOP.

      They slapped it out of her hand, and as you can see she needed no additional examples to get out of the habit of "pre-concessioning."

      "Power concedes nothing without a demand. It never did and it never will." -- Frederick Douglass

      by Egalitare on Wed Nov 10, 2010 at 05:56:54 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  I think it was early, (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      cinsch, CalliopeIrjaPearl

      and she was not ready as a person to provoke a Constitutional crisis.

      I don't agree with her decision, but once I thought about what it would feel like to be staring the entire American security apparatus down, playing chicken with Dick Cheney, I started having a great deal of sympathy.

      That's my opinion, YMMV, past performance is no guarantee of future success, etc.

  •  Hmmm, (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    cinsch

    just read on TPM that Allen West's new crazy Chief of Staff referred to Pelosi as "garbage."  Can't wait until Pelosi takes that little [expletive deleted] down.

    " My faith in the Constitution is whole; it is complete; it is total." Barbara Jordan, 1974

    by gchaucer2 on Wed Nov 10, 2010 at 05:50:27 PM PST

  •  I basically worship Nancy Pelosi (0+ / 0-)

    She's so clear and brave.

    However, I read this report, and it clearly has aspects that refect Democratic values that should be discussed.

    Her blanket NO is strange to me. Austerity is coming regardless, so I suppose this is "party of NO" type positioning. I would like to be in on the strategy instead of feeling like a political tool of general obstruction.

    Here it is, if you would like to read it:

  •  Besides signing this petition, should we also... (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    mahakali overdrive

    ...be getting on our Congresscritters about this now (rather than before the Tealiban gets to them)?

    President Obama will need us, and we will need each other, now more than ever.

    by boofdah on Wed Nov 10, 2010 at 05:52:47 PM PST

  •  Unemployment extensions AFL-CIO petition (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Major Tom

    Please sign the petition to extend unemployment benefits - it's on the AFL-CIO Working America site - and let your friends know - it's urgent that it gets done during Congress' four days back before Thanksgiving

  •  I say get rid of ALL the Bush tax cuts (5+ / 0-)

    They never should have been put in place in the first place.

    Jim Manley: "Republicans are making love to Wall Street, while the people on Main Street are getting screwed."

    by Drdemocrat on Wed Nov 10, 2010 at 05:55:03 PM PST

  •  National Nurses Union just sent this out (7+ / 0-)

    Washington Insiders Misreading Demands of American Public With Efforts to Undermine Retirement Security - Middle Class to Suffer If Bowles-Simpson Passes

    (Washington, D.C.)--Jean Ross, RN, co-president of National Nurses United, the nation's union and professional association for registered nurses, issued the following statement on suggestions from Erskine Bowles and Alan Simpson, co-chairs of the Commission on the Deficit, that Social Security and Medicare be cut:

    "Nurses are aghast at the Commission on the Deficit's Bowles-Simpson proposal for a cruel and senseless cut to the Social Security and Medicare programs that are the core of American retirement and healthcare security for tens of millions of people.  This is just heartless at a time when the average Social Security benefit is already insufficient, especially for women, and for the millions of Americans who have seen their retirement savings lost in this Great Recession." Read the complete release here.

    LESSONS LEARNED...

    One lesson that can be drawn from the election last week is that supporting Social Security and Medicare isn't just the right thing to do, it will help members of Congress keep their seats.  Only 15 of 140 members who signed a letter to the president pledging to vote against any cuts in these important programs lost their bid for re-election, and only one of eight senators who have signed on to a similar Senate resolution lost his seat.

    And yet, the news coming out of Washington this week is that the president's Deficit Commission still plans to release a report in the near future recommending that the lame-duck Congress hastily pass deficit-reduction legislation that could slash these critical programs, because they decided this election meant that voters want austerity.  Wrong.  The reality is that people are unemployed and underemployed and the economy hasn't improved quickly enough.

    That's why they need to hear from bedside nurses from all over the country that Social Security isn't broke, so they better not try to fix it in the context of this commission.

    http://www.calnurses.org/...

    Update Ca Schools Diabetes Lawsuit to be heard in Ca Supreme Court(unanimous decision) http://tiny.cc/zknbl

    by foggycity on Wed Nov 10, 2010 at 05:56:05 PM PST

  •  oh, Chris, (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    wanderindiana, cinsch

    i don't know how to hope like i used to.
    poke me. make me fired up again.
    you're keeping me from crawling into the forest to get lost...
    i've done the petition.
    i've given my thanks early this year for what i had that's gone, for what i have left still to lose, but the wind howls, and i lose heart, and am a cold cold soldier.

    The Addington perpwalk is the trailhead for accountability in this wound on our national psyche. [...you know: Dick Cheney's "top" lawyer.] --Sachem

    by greenbird on Wed Nov 10, 2010 at 05:57:44 PM PST

  •  Breaking news, deficit commission (0+ / 0-)

    Issues a press release:

  •  Dick Durbin is against most of it too, and he's (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    LordMike, CalliopeIrjaPearl

    Whip in the Senate, so that's good news.

  •  I would have worded her response differently (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    cinsch

    Because our nation is facing multiple challenges, of which creating jobs (and good jobs at that, and thus by implication also fixing an economy that can be the only long-term source of such jobs) is but one, and a far more pressing one than that of reducing and hopefully someday eliminating the deficit. We also face the challenge of repairing and rebuilding our infrastructure (roads, rail, schools, etc.), protecting ourselves and the world from terrorism, fixing our broken health care system, reversing global warming, reversing income and wealth inequality, etc. And of these, dealing with the deficit is way way WAY down the list (and anyone saying otherwise is a liar or fool).

    Thankfully, the way to solve all of these problems (and a bunch of others) is by being smart and investing in short, mid and long-term projects of various scope, size and nature, that will benefit the maximal number of people, and not just the rich and powerful few, that the current system and existing "solutions" invariably do--including ones passed recently by Dems. E.g. invest in roads, rail and schools, scale down and end these wars, cut the bloated defense budget, address global warming, etc., and the economy will recover, jobs will be created, terrorism will be reduced, and the deficit will go down. We need smart, big, bold and reality-based solutions, not quick fixes or libertarian wet dreams that only make all these things worse.

    "Those who stand for nothing fall for anything...Mankind are forever destined to be the dupes of bold & cunning imposture" --Alexander Hamilton

    by kovie on Wed Nov 10, 2010 at 05:59:07 PM PST

    •  Great ideas! (0+ / 0-)

      Too bad the Dem leadership has utterly failed to capitalize on their power these last two years. Oh, and now we accidentally lost the House! Darn! I guess any progressive change will just have to wait until never.

      But be sure to vote for us! And give all you can so we can continue to work our magic!

      To discuss Republican policies that hurt the less affluent and favor those that need no favors is class warfare.

      by Diebold Hacker on Wed Nov 10, 2010 at 06:44:55 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  The plan has a few good elements (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Pluto

       * Increase progressivity of benefit formula" -- i.e., means test part of Social Security benefits by 2050.

       * Increase the Social Security contribution ceiling: while people only pay Social Security taxes on the first $106,800 of their wages today, that's only about 86% of the total potentially taxable wages. The co-chairs suggest raising the ceiling to capture 90% of wages.

       * Reduce farm subsidies by $3 billion per year.

       * End "low-priority" Army Corps of Engineers programs to the tune of $1 billion by 2015.

       * Eliminate the Overseas Private Investment Corporation, which provides subsidized financing and political risk insurance for U.S. companies' investments abroad.

       * Cut $900 million in fossil fuel research funds

    Defense spending cuts:

       * Double the number of defense contractor positions scheduled for elimination from 10 percent of current staff augmentees to 20 percent.

       * Reduce procurement by 15 percent, or $20 billion.

       * Eliminate the V-22 Osprey program.

       * Cancel the Marine Corps' Expeditionary Fighting Vehicle program.

       * Halve the number of F-35 Joint Strike Fighters in favor of F-16s and F/A-18Es.

       * Cancel the Marine Corps F-35 program.

       * Cancel the Navy's Future Maritime Prepositioning Force.

       * Cancel the new Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV), the Ground Combat Vehicle, and the Joint Tactical Radio.

       * Reduce military forces in Europe and Asia by one-third.

       * Send all military children based in the U.S. to local schools.

    Demand Filibuster Reform call your Senators at (202) 224-3121 -AND KEEP CALLING

    by Lefty Coaster on Wed Nov 10, 2010 at 06:01:45 PM PST

  •  signatures for Olbermann v. signatures for Pelosi (0+ / 0-)

    Anyone have a solid comparison?

    It's a shame I even have to ask who garnered more support. Confidence is low.

    they sentenced me to 20 years of boredom
    for trying to change the system from within

    by wanderindiana on Wed Nov 10, 2010 at 06:05:07 PM PST

  •  Man, I've just about had it it (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Major Tom, Karl Rover

    First, the group of douchnozzles on the healthcare committee and now these fuckin' pig fuckers.

    Who in the hell put all these fucks in place?

    "If we can't be free at least we can be cheap." Zappa

    by Zwoof on Wed Nov 10, 2010 at 06:05:16 PM PST

  •  there's also (0+ / 0-)

    raul, here: but still, i have persistent vertigo...

    The Addington perpwalk is the trailhead for accountability in this wound on our national psyche. [...you know: Dick Cheney's "top" lawyer.] --Sachem

    by greenbird on Wed Nov 10, 2010 at 06:08:26 PM PST

  •  Is the Pelosi rule still in effect ? (0+ / 0-)

    American Heart Association: Diet Soda can cause type 2 Diabetes. "Circulation" July 23, 2007. Read it for yourself.

    by jeffrey789 on Wed Nov 10, 2010 at 06:16:04 PM PST

    •  That was non-binding (0+ / 0-)

      I'll be lazy and reference my own comment from when that happened for the full quote.

      The short version is that the language expressed the "sense of the House" that the deficit commission recommendations should be voted upon but set forth no actual requirement to do so.  Since that was inserted by the House leadership, the assumption was that even though it was non-binding, it meant that we'd probably see a vote on the recommendations anyway since the Speaker ultimately gets to set the House's schedule.

      However, given that (1) these aren't the official commission recommendations and (2) the Speaker hates them, I'd be surprised if anything resembling them actually made it onto the House floor this session.  If the Speaker thinks your proposal is unacceptable, she's not going to let it through.

  •  The Problem... (0+ / 0-)

    is the nation will never get beyond its current dilemma of sinking in national debt if no one is forced to make fiscal sacrifices.

    Maybe we should truck on over to namby-pamby land where we could find some self- confidence for you....ya jack wagon!

    by Iggy1962 on Wed Nov 10, 2010 at 06:22:37 PM PST

  •  Wait, so the losing blue dogs get a say in who (0+ / 0-)
    leads us? ughhh
  •  Thank you Nancy (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    cinsch, trinite

    Hang in there & keep standing up for us. We know you are on our side.

  •  Make calls in support of Pelosi (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    trinite

    With the vote on having Pelosi as our House Democratic leader occurring next week, now is the time to call your Democratic Congressperson and ask them to support Pelosi.

    http://www.winningprogressive.org/...

    Winning Progressive - When Progressives Organize, Everyone Wins - http://www.winningprogressive.org

    by Winning Progressive on Wed Nov 10, 2010 at 06:34:35 PM PST

  •  Minor quibble. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    cinsch

    "but in a fair way" implies that there is a tradeoff between fairness and growth.  In fact, the record in the US shows that fairness creates growth.

  •  With All Respect (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    cinsch

    Rep. Pelosi and Secretary of State Clinton have bigger stones than any man in the Democratic party.

    People rarely read the comments at the bottom of a thread.

    by stewarjt on Wed Nov 10, 2010 at 07:14:15 PM PST

  •  More than half the budget goes to "defense." (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    cinsch, stolen water

    It's been estimated that the war on Iraq will cost in the trillions, all on borrowed money that wasn't even in the budget.  It was all called "emergency spending" and GWB and his advisors told us that the oil in Iraq would pay for all of it, and that it would cause the entire Middle East to become democratic and end the problems between Israel and Palestinians.  Has the war on Iraq achieved that goal?  This is the same man who was  AWOL when he was supposed to be in the air national guard, the very same man who was kind of "elected" to the presidency by the Supreme Court and REELECTED again four years later.  

  •  I'm about to duck. (0+ / 0-)

    Is it really (really) possible that we can get to a balanced budget without cutting a buttload of spending?  And before you pile on, defense spending is maybe perhaps a little important to our national security, possibly...

    No politician ever lost an election by underestimating the intelligence of the American public. PT Barnum, paraphrased...

    by jarhead5536 on Wed Nov 10, 2010 at 07:18:58 PM PST

  •  We have to modify SS and medicare to save it. (0+ / 0-)

    If that means raising the income cap, extending the full benefit retirement age and slighly raising the contribution then that is what we must do.  There can be no social safety net if the nation is not on a multi-decade sustainable financial path.

    No quarter. No surrender.

    by hegemony57 on Wed Nov 10, 2010 at 07:27:47 PM PST

    •  That's Complete and Total Bullshit! (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      cinsch, schnecke21

      From Dean Baker, "And, contrary to the Washington fear mongers, Social Security is in solid financial shape by any reasonable definition. The Congressional Budget Office projects that it can pay all scheduled benefits for the next 29 years with no changes whatsoever. Even after it first is projected to face a shortfall in 2039, the program could still pay nearly 80 percent of benefits into the next century without any changes at all."

      People rarely read the comments at the bottom of a thread.

      by stewarjt on Wed Nov 10, 2010 at 07:32:32 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Total bullshit is solvency for a whole 28 years? (0+ / 0-)

        With that as a time line my two sons (27 and 20) won't have a strong safety net when they are at retirement age.  If you think that is a sustainable system then I don't believe we share the same understanding of what the word means.

        So what you and Dean Baker are saying ....

        That's Complete and Total Bullshit! (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:cinsch, schnecke21
        From Dean Baker, "And, contrary to the Washington fear mongers, Social Security is in solid financial shape by any reasonable definition. The Congressional Budget Office projects that it can pay all scheduled benefits for the next 29 years with no changes whatsoever. Even after it first is projected to face a shortfall in 2039, the program could still pay nearly 80 percent of benefits into the next century without any changes at all."

        ... is that a 20% reduction in SS retirement benefits post 2038 is nothing to worry about and deal with today.

        I think that is an unreasonable position when you consider my sons and future grandchildren's generations.

        It is truly surprising to me that the very same people who argue for a 50-100+ year outlook for energy use and climate change are unwilling to take the long view with SS and medicare.

        No quarter. No surrender.

        by hegemony57 on Thu Nov 11, 2010 at 07:47:35 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

    •  Really (0+ / 0-)

      I thought about being nice.  You really should reasons for what you believe.  Assertions aren't the same thing as having logic and facts supporting your conclusions.

      Here's a quarter.  Buy a clue.

      People rarely read the comments at the bottom of a thread.

      by stewarjt on Wed Nov 10, 2010 at 07:33:58 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  did you get confused? (0+ / 0-)

        tmo wasn't saying he wanted to HR you.

      •  A quarter doesn't go very far these days. (0+ / 0-)

        Though first rate witticisms never lose their value.

        Let's here your logic and facts.

        Here are mine.  To save the most successful program in the history of the United State we need to make it permanently sustainable.  This means the parameters of the program must be adjusted to reflect changing demographics, extended life spans, shifting work/life conditions, increased economic inequality and a host of other factors that make the next 75+ years of SS different from the first 75.

        I am not looking to privatize, gut, underfund or make mean the system that provides a lifeline for my father.  Rather I am steadfast in my desire to make the system sustainable so that it will provide benefits for my 27 and 20 year old sons in 2050 and beyond.

        A system that is unsustainable for future generations is a system that will lose political support and undermine its success.  We must not let that happen.  And if the price is some mixture of raising the income cap, extending the age when retirees full benefits, increasing the contribution or some other mechanism that perserves the core program then I am for it.

        No quarter. No surrender.

        by hegemony57 on Thu Nov 11, 2010 at 07:59:47 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

    •  So close to hide-rating this (n/t) (0+ / 0-)

      Californians: The Courage Campaign is working for changing the 2/3 budget rule and for ending Prop 8. Go!

      by tmo on Wed Nov 10, 2010 at 09:11:15 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Try this and see what you think. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    stolen water
    •  why offer it up a hypothetical (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      CarolinNJ

      if it's unlikely to pass? what political objective was gained here? just so obama looks like he's serious about cutting the deficit? talk about cutting social security and medicare makes people nervous. obama was willing unsettle people and put everybody's nerves on edge merely for appearance sake?

      •  I can't ascribe motive, altho I certainly don't (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        stolen water

        trust Obama's--or any politician's.  I don't find politicians notably trustworthy.  I offer the link for thought.  I do agree that commissions are a way of appearing to do something while actually doing nothing, besides shaking hands with the commissioners; signing the first, historical copy, beautifully bound and embossed; handing around the obligatory commemorative pens; letting the photographers immortalize the moment; etc.  Alan Simpson got to demonstrate, again, why he needs the wide open spaces of Wyoming.  Erskine Bowles why he's the insider's insider and how personally rewarding that is.  I mean, c'mon...........  Pelosi's was the only sensible comment from a politician and who knows to what extent she can make that stick.  Or if she really intends to.  We'll live, we'll see.  In the meantime, I shall do what I can and continue to work on getting a development construction company to sell a very beautiful site near my home for a nature preserve.  The migrating waterfowl will love it.

  •  Pelosi must step down (0+ / 0-)

    In the interest of Democratic renewal.  Although no one else has stepped forth yet as a serious candidate that is largely because she refuses to relax her death grip.  

    There are any number of strong candidates who would be acceptable to all the caucus.  She is becoming a divisive and distracting presence.

    Pelosi is to be applauded for her service and long record of achievement.  Now it is time for her to go to a well-earned retirement.

    •  lawrence o'donnell, is that you? (0+ / 0-)

      your stalking horse act fools no one.

      •  Another cult of personality? (0+ / 0-)

        The party has a deep bench.  It is not as if Pelosi is the only strong progressive in Congress.  Nor is she the only strong female progressive.  Why cling to her so bitterly?

        •  why toss her out (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          cinsch

          simply because republicans poured tens of millions in a PR campaign to smear her?

          aren't you strong enough to withstand the brain fuck?

          •  The new PUMAs (0+ / 0-)

            The open dissent from many other Democrats across the spectrum show that Pelosi is not the person to lead a recovery.  This is not a question of GOP slandering - she has lost much credibility in her own caucus.  She would win the vote, but she would be a wounded leader.

            And for what?  Out of pure stubborness?  For the momentary pleasure of forcing her down people's throats?

            I was behind Hillary 100 percent in the 08' primaries.  Then, when it was clear she lost and the greater cause meant supporting Obama, I switched.  And I still back him, 100 percent.  

            The people who refuse to see it is time for Pelosi to go are the new PUMAs.

  •  it's a damn shame pelosi couldn't be president. (0+ / 0-)

    unlike obama, i have faith in her. the base shouldn't be in fear and constantly second guessing their president, like we do with obama. we shouldn't be in a state of worry wondering how obama is going to betray us next and throw us to the plutocratic wolves.

    we were forced to endure eight long years of bush. haven't we been punished enough?

  •  Brace yourselves for the "compromise" (0+ / 0-)

    position. Durbin somehow found things to be "inspired" about in this POS. Obama has been talking about "modest adjustments" to benefits. Cuts WILL be made to SS. Change you can beg for on the streets.

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