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Last night was my wife's birthday so we went to a broadway play, "Fela!". It's the story of a person challenging the ruling powers of Nigeria, and trying to bring change to that country. Guess who showed up? Michelle Obama. She got a standing ovation from the crowd when she came in, and I stood out of respect, but the whole time I was dying to ask her for real change here in America. Even though she was sitting in the row in front of us, with about seven secret service guys between us, I never got to deliver this message to her.

Mrs. Obama can you please tell your husband two things. One, we elected him for change and I'm beginning to think that he doesn't know what we meant by that. Why do you think so many Independents and even Republicans voted for him in 2008, but are now leaving him in droves? Do you think they were expecting him to have more conservative policies? No, of course not, they were expecting him to do the same thing progressives wanted, and the one thing that we actually all agree on, change the system. I often hear the President talking about how he couldn't do more because he couldn't get sixty votes or that he did the best he could within the realities of Washington. He might actually be right about that, but we didn't want him to accept Washington. We want him to change Washington. We don't want the lobbyists to run the place any more. And unfortunately, they still do. That's what everyone is disillusioned by. Can you please ask your husband if he realizes that? He seems to be trying so hard to please everyone in Washington, but that's exactly the opposite of what we want. If he's doing his job right the entrenched powers in DC, whether it's the politicians or the Washington media, should be livid with him. If they're happy you're on the wrong path. We want you to turn their apple carts over. All these people got to where they are within this system. They're motivated to protect it. You should be storming their castle. You're the President you have the power to do it we don't that's why we elected you.

Now that leads to my second point, Mrs. Obama please ask him to fight. Don't fight for the sake of being disagreeable. Or seeming like a tough guy. Fight for us. Fight for the average guy who's getting screwed over by this system. And those people that are in power in DC, and here in the banks of New York. Remember you're our representative. We need you to fight for reform. Fight against the powerful. Fight to protect us. Fight! Fight! Fight! Mrs. Obama can you please remind your husband that's what we elected him for.

And by the way, that's exactly what the tea party people want out of their people to. They just told John Boehner you better not get rid of the Office of Ethics Reform. Because they don't want to go back to the same old stuff. They don't want the lobbyists buying the politicians. Republicans, Democrats, Liberals, Conservatives, we all agree with it. Mr. Obama please that's what we elected you for. You've gotta represent us against those guys. If they're sitting there happy as can be you're on the wrong path. Please. That's the message we're trying to get across to you. That's why you had conservatives on your side in the first place. And you gotta do public financing of campaigns, you've gotta say to them, "hey you know what if you're in government you can not work for lobbyists for ten years." You know what, that would be incredibly hard, but if you do that and you fight that way then we'll fight for you and we'll have your back and together maybe we can dare to hope that we can do this together and change the system together.

Watch the video clip of this message here: http://youtu.be/...

Help us give Pres. Obama this message here: http://eepurl.com/...

Originally posted to Cenk Uygur on Sat Nov 20, 2010 at 06:50 PM PST.

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