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The number one bestseller in France this holidays.

"Indignez-vous!" by Stéphane Hessel [Become outraged]

A 93 year old former Resistance fighter and diplomat has made a simple and defiant call for resistance.

"This is an appeal to citizens, young and old, to take responsibility for the things in our society that don't work," he said. "I wish every one of you to find your own reason for indignation. It's precious.

yes both ML and myself received copies in our X-mass stockings from friends, as if we needed and excuse.

;-)

Sarkozy can expect another summer of "Love" if the sales of this essay are anything to go by, and Marie Louise has placed a copy in her surgery waiting room.

The treatise is simple.

If you see something that does not work don't just tut tut do something positive and fight to change it so it does work as it should.

His call is for peaceful insurrection, if needed get the help of lawyers and fight back.

Learn from the French Resistance [except the bombs and guns] how to deal with an oppressive regime, stand up and refuse to budge!

Down with inequality!

Down with corporate pillage!

Aux barricades, mes amis!

Vive la revolution!

;-)

See I'm easy to motivate.

Heh....

Getting a little carried away, don't worry the book is being translated into numerous European [and English] languages soon. The beauty of it is its simplicity and fundamental clarity, words can be very powerful. It is no wonder that it is this years best seller and the time could not be more ripe.

The new "little red book"

We wont be under the bed....Oh No...we will be out on the streets again!

So stop whining

Resist!

Ready to join us?

france-sep-5-5

It is time we took our outrage back!

;-)

Originally posted to LaFeminista on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 06:45 AM PST.

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Comment Preferences

  •  Tip Jar ready to fight yet (228+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Renee, Lupin, JekyllnHyde, Alumbrados, Angie in WA State, murphy, glitterscale, Geenius at Wrok, mattman, Shockwave, Emocrat, Pesto, Mnemosyne, varro, RFK Lives, Matilda, Euroliberal, srkp23, Agathena, chuckvw, high uintas, tomephil, Eric Blair, American Zapatista, figbash, pat bunny, gmb, TiaRachel, Laborguy, churchylafemme, penguins4peace, lcrp, riverlover, forrest, Chun Yang, dkmich, zerelda, side pocket, fran1, bablhous, valadon, slapshoe, joanneleon, kbman, maybeeso in michigan, historys mysteries, Bluesee, radarlady, jrooth, greycat, UncleCharlie, unclejohn, SherwoodB, PBen, corvo, Alice Venturi, frandor55, ChemBob, orson, reflectionsv37, Jaime Frontero, cassidy3, Churchill, WisePiper, Floja Roja, coolbreeze, Lisa Lockwood, Pluto, peacestpete, Snud, xaxnar, RJDixon74135, third Party please, cre8fire, ksingh, Kingsmeg, cybersaur, ActivistGuy, RAZE, Lefty Coaster, blueoasis, NBBooks, gooderservice, NearlyNormal, bleeding heart, Preston S, onionjim, CA Nana, Persiflage, Clive all hat no horse Rodeo, shaharazade, Statusquomustgo, kurious, Hedwig, Eryk, Aaa T Tudeattack, AntKat, bigchin, Noor B, Ken in MN, california keefer, grelinda, Margfh, karmsy, Mary Mike, Matt Z, biggus, terabytes, greenchiledem, Unbozo, puzzled, jayden, mcgee85, snowshoeblue, jnhobbs, millwood, LWelsch, keikekaze, Blue Boy Red State, martydd, adrianrf, JeffW, MikePhoenix, zerone, bythesea, lineatus, KJG52, mikeconwell, beltane, MrJayTee, Jeff Y, rubine, temptxan, daliscar, luckylizard, xysea, BYw, allie123, papicek, Leo in NJ, ZhenRen, J M F, DontTaseMeBro, Pattern Math, ALifeLessFrightening, greengemini, lostinamerica, An Affirming Flame, banjolele, eltee, stolen water, allep10, Deoliver47, kevinpdx, dalfireplug, ArthurPoet, jfromga, mahakali overdrive, deviant24x, catilinus, fatherofdragonwagon, haensgen, smileycreek, political junquie, FogCityJohn, LaughingPlanet, politik, angelajean, ATFILLINOIS, Eddie L, gulfgal98, SoCalHobbit, Kristina40, pateTX, jazzbuff, Publius2008, farbuska, Floande, science nerd, TheHalfrican, Colorado is the Shiznit, redlum jak, allenjo, ozsea1, Jazzenterprises, CaliKitty, implicate order, jm214, BlueJessamine, BlackQueen40, mujr, KelleyRN2, mawazo, princesspat, Alice Olson, Billdbq, Wolf10, tardis10, enhydra lutris, beforedawn, Anthony Page aka SecondComing, Sunspots, jadt65, Regina in a Sears Kit House, bubbuh, allergywoman, No one gets out alive, Azazello, Only Needs a Beat, Patric Juillet, yawnimawke, GenXangster, heyday, OHknighty, greenbastard, Siri, dance you monster, toilpress, The Lone Apple, oldcrow, barkingcat, AnnieR, Joieau, Ginger1, MinistryOfLove, supercereal, The Uncola, lunachickie

    and to any comments comparing to the "tea party" I say

    funny-pictures-cat-makes-a-raspberry-at-you1

    "Another world is not only possible, she is on her way. On a quiet day, I can hear her breathing." Arundhati Roy

    by LaFeminista on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 06:43:39 AM PST

  •  "Indignons-Nous" Shouldn't it Be? (9+ / 0-)

    Although with 40 years of conservative money mentally preparing the rightwing for revolution against the intellectuals and liberals in favor of the rich, I don't see that a popular revolution would result in anything other than a couple afternoon's trip to formal fascism.

    We are called to speak for the weak, for the voiceless, for victims of our nation and for those it calls enemy.... --ML King "Beyond Vietnam"

    by Gooserock on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 07:01:02 AM PST

  •  Tippd & reccd (18+ / 0-)

    for fighting. Unfortunatly, I think Europeans, and most advanced nations on this planet, are light-years ahead of the US in holding their govts accountable. We have become shellshocked and lethargic...

    •  we haven't become that way on our own (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      TiaRachel, ozsea1

      IMO, we've been institutionally/systematically demoralized by more than our share of contrived events tragedy in the last forty years.

      For many, the mental beating and demoralization kicked off on Dec. 8, 1980. Some go back as far as Nov. 22, 1963. What's your start date?

  •  We could take a cue from the French (15+ / 0-)

    French strike against changes to pensions

    "Respect for the rights of others is peace." Benito Juarez

    by Blue Boy Red State on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 07:16:58 AM PST

  •  I will be thrilling to watch it on the tee-vee :) (7+ / 0-)

    wonder what angle Faux Snooze will put on it...

    Photobucket

    It is horrifying that we have to fight our own government to save the environment. Ansel Adams -6.5 -6.75

    by Statusquomustgo on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 07:22:50 AM PST

  •  Hadn't heard of the book. TY! Will order it! :) (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    gmb, historys mysteries, LaFeminista

    There are moments when the body is as numinous as words, days that are the good flesh continuing. -- Robert Hass

    by srkp23 on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 07:24:28 AM PST

  •  Time to Stop Letting the Grassroots Grow (9+ / 0-)

    under our feet and start pulling up weeds.

    Call me a Constant Gardener (nod to John le Carré).

    "ingratiation and access . . . are not corruption." -- Justice Kennedy (Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, 2010)

    by Limelite on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 07:32:39 AM PST

  •  I just had this conversation last night (23+ / 0-)

    with extended family. What I found out is that not one of them felt enough control over the situation to feel like their actions would make a difference one way or another.

    They were happy with the status quo because it was working for them. Even when it didn't work well, it worked well enough.

    They believe that change comes in tiny bites - the famous incrementalism argument.

    They're also very Californian. And I explained to them how incrementalism was going to kill the state. I reminded them that when they were in school 20 to 30 years ago, California had the best schools in the nation. Now, they're close to rock bottom. Shrugged shoulders and comments of, 'it will turn around.'

    People just don't care.  I did my best last night (and probably made my family think, once again, does everything have to turn into a political discussion around her?). But I doubt I made much of a dent. The only piece of the conversation that made them think twice was discussion about increasing the number of representatives to the House (if you missed that diary, take a peek: A 3,000 Member US House? Bring it on). But, basically, everything was just overwhelming. How do we fix any one problem when they are all interlinked? In their opinion, you just don't try.

    I like your approach - make them indignant about something and maybe, just maybe, they'll be become engaged. It's what happened to me. As a military wife, I became indignant about the Iraq war and when I started to see the interconnections, I started to work towards other solutions as well. But, I do wish we could find the magic straw that would break the camel's back, if you know what I mean. That straw that would engage voters and make them realize that unless they start engaging, our democracy is lost.

    •  I think he has a very intelligent approach (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      banjolele

      one thing at a time.

      Government is not regarded as the problem here however.

      "Another world is not only possible, she is on her way. On a quiet day, I can hear her breathing." Arundhati Roy

      by LaFeminista on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 07:42:31 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  If government isn't the problem, what is? (0+ / 0-)

        If we make a call to folks to become indignant, what is it that we want them to change?

        I thought your diary was a call to action to get folks engaged in their local systems.  Government to be responsive at the local level... change the things within your control.

        I guess I see government as both the problem and the solution. How convoluted is that?

        •  It is who government is meant to (5+ / 0-)

          represent that is at stake. the fight is against corporate/monied interests.

          Its how to take our government back for the people.

          "Another world is not only possible, she is on her way. On a quiet day, I can hear her breathing." Arundhati Roy

          by LaFeminista on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 08:19:56 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  So your call to action is against (0+ / 0-)

            corporations?

            But the French aren't boycotting companies... they're protesting their government and it's decisions. Or am I missing something?

            •  ?????/ (6+ / 0-)

              I really don't understand what you dont understand.

              The meme in the US is government is bad.

              That is not the meme here.

              It is who runs the government that counts.

              At the moment the battle is between the people and the corporations both in France and the US. In the US the corporations have more control of government.

              "Another world is not only possible, she is on her way. On a quiet day, I can hear her breathing." Arundhati Roy

              by LaFeminista on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 08:33:31 AM PST

              [ Parent ]

              •  And France has Sarkozy in power....why? (0+ / 0-)

                Do these protests and demonstrations you're talking about call for people to vote in the next election, for the most viable, progressive candidates, those most likely to be able to win, in order to block the right from power?

                My impression is that maybe they don't.

                That's the problem with such actions in the US.  The most predominant line tends to call for electoral boycott or splitting, rather than for actually seizing the power, democratically, electorally, by electing more better Democrats, say.

                I have nothing against protests and demonstrations, per se...for me, the problem is usually in the line they tend to project.

                They may be virtually 100% correct, more or less, in their critique of the many evils of capitalism...but then they call for electoral boycott or splitting, which guarantees the ascendency of the right, and fascism.

                That seems...contradictory.

                "...a printing press is worth 10,000 rifles..." Ho Chi Minh

                by Radical def on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 10:24:09 AM PST

                [ Parent ]

            •  The French do blockade the economy (5+ / 0-)

              when they want to make their point.  Before Sarkozy forced through his attack on pensions, French protesters and unions shut down oil refineries all over France.

              That's not, as far as I can tell, because the proposed change to pensions was particularly aimed at oil companies.  It's because workers wanted empowered interests to pay a price for attacking workers, and shutting down oil refineries is something that empowered interests see as a threat and take seriously.

              "Run, comrade, the old world is behind you!" -- Situationist graffito, 1968

              by Pesto on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 08:37:19 AM PST

              [ Parent ]

              •  General strikes in the U.S. would go a long ways (4+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                Pesto, rubyr, gmb, AoT

                toward rebuilding our Government and its various agencies with less corporate interests. Of course, it would take the will of the people to do that. And for all of the typing on this site, I don't see much will.

                General strikes.

                Shut down important things.

                Whenever I've organized a march, at least we have the intention of shutting down the freeway during five o'clock traffic so that the public gets enraged by the bother. Or has to see it. Do that every day and the response would be yet more profound. And it's never directed at protesters, incidentally, not en masse. You get a little aggravation, but also a lot of thumbs up and peace signs tossed at you. Of course, you want them to get out of their cars and join you.

                We have a lack of imagination and understanding of our own power in this country.

                "There are always two parties; the establishment and the movement." - Emerson

                by mahakali overdrive on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 11:20:44 AM PST

                [ Parent ]

                •  If you told me a year ago (3+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  gmb, mahakali overdrive, angelajean

                  that there was any possibility of a general strike in the US I'd have called you crazy.  Not that I wouldn't support one, I just never thought it possible.  Now that they're talking about cutting social security and have raised tuition I think it's more and more possible every day.  The big problem in the US is that the unions will never call a general strike.  It will have to be a wildcat strike.

                  I refuse to represent my political beliefs using numbers. It isn't accurate, nor is it helpful. But I'm around a -10 on both scales.

                  by AoT on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 11:55:07 AM PST

                  [ Parent ]

                  •  As much as I love unions in theory (3+ / 0-)
                    Recommended by:
                    rubyr, gmb, AoT

                    the actual unions we have in our area aren't protecting jack shit. Excuse my French. At least many of them. I've known more people than I can count refusing to join the trade unions here because of various reasons. They're deeply politicized. Same as the educational unions. I approve of the nurses union in area, however, since they seem to have some real chutzpah. Likewise, the UFW, although I do know some folks who took issue with their last local leadership. Definitely meant a wildcat strike.

                    Don't get me started about tuitions. I'll go on and on all day. My brother was sending me cam shots of the Berkeley "riots" while friends who work as faculty there were emailing about it. Surprised the SFSU situation didn't get more play. I was there not long before and commented that it was about to blow, so to speak.

                    "There are always two parties; the establishment and the movement." - Emerson

                    by mahakali overdrive on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 12:12:24 PM PST

                    [ Parent ]

                    •  Weird, I graduated SFSU (1+ / 0-)
                      Recommended by:
                      figbash

                      in 2008.  The media simply isn't going to give any attention to students and youth organizing.  It will always be portrayed as a temper tantrum.  Unlike the Tea Party, which is clearly a group of terribly responsible adults ;)

                      Look at how the situation in France and England played out.  If the students and youth here come out in protest of SS cuts, and who knows how many would, it could make a real difference.

                      I refuse to represent my political beliefs using numbers. It isn't accurate, nor is it helpful. But I'm around a -10 on both scales.

                      by AoT on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 12:24:02 PM PST

                      [ Parent ]

                •  I think it would matter, what the line was... (0+ / 0-)

                  If the street actions primarily attack Obama and "teh Dems", seeking to promulgate electoral boycott and splitting sentiments, I'd say they would be counterproductive, serving only the interests of fascism, no matter how militant and strident, and more or less correct, their denunciations of fascism might be.  

                  If the actions promulgate the need for more democracy, focused on a call to turn out en masse at the next elections, to sweep the right from power more decisively, democratically, electorally, to seize the power, by electing more better Democrats, then maybe such mass street actions could be viable.

                  And why, btw, did you HR my other comment?  It seems...inappropriate.

                  Maybe if you read the rest of that thread, you will reconsider?

                  "...a printing press is worth 10,000 rifles..." Ho Chi Minh

                  by Radical def on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 01:11:30 PM PST

                  [ Parent ]

                  •  It has nothing to do with partisanship (0+ / 0-)

                    and everything to do with corporatism and lobbyist control.

                    I haven't HR any of your comments. Where?

                    "There are always two parties; the establishment and the movement." - Emerson

                    by mahakali overdrive on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 01:19:21 PM PST

                    [ Parent ]

                    •  I think you should differentiate more... (0+ / 0-)

                      ...the right, the Blue Dogs and Republicans, fit your descriptives, but not necessarily the Democratic Party, or Obama, per se, who have very substantially more progressive aspects, history, and program than anything the right has put forward, or than you seem willing to acknowledge.

                      It's all relative.

                      Clearly, this is more about defining the real partisan terms, left and right.

                      The more substantially the right is purged and suppressed, the less influence and coercion they can bring to bear on more progressive elements.

                      Then, with the right out of the way, we can further sort out the rest of the more or less liberal bourgeois elements.

                      This may take several election cycles, to reach a more optimal feasibility for real democracy...but 2012 could make a very big difference in this regard, seems to me.

                      But then, if one really thinks that the Democratic Party is absolutely, irretrievably non-viable, why click "yes" on the dkos TOS?

                      Oh, and I was hoping that was an inadvertent HR, heh.  It was in this diary's comment thread.  

                      "...a printing press is worth 10,000 rifles..." Ho Chi Minh

                      by Radical def on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 02:54:45 PM PST

                      [ Parent ]

                      •  Progressive in rhetoric (1+ / 0-)
                        Recommended by:
                        angelajean

                        not necessarily in action.  Or at least not for quite a while.  Really, the government has almost never done anything progressive when there hasn't been a vocal, radical left in this country.

                        I refuse to represent my political beliefs using numbers. It isn't accurate, nor is it helpful. But I'm around a -10 on both scales.

                        by AoT on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 03:14:12 PM PST

                        [ Parent ]

          •  I think it's actually more than that (6+ / 0-)

            I think the problem is the maldistribution of power in our society.

            Too much of it is being held by too few people/institutions.  That goes for money, political influence, media coverage and access, legal access, everything.

            Any collective action that redistributes power downward and outward is good.  And I don't mean that in the very limited way the right wing would mean it -- that is, "Drown the Federal Government in a bathtub and let power revert to states and localities," because the same malign interests that unduly influence Washington can (and do) unduly influence government at all levels.

            "Run, comrade, the old world is behind you!" -- Situationist graffito, 1968

            by Pesto on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 08:34:03 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

    •  It's amazing how we've been hypnotized into (8+ / 0-)

      submission, isn't it?  I asked in another diary if Huffington's suggestion of taking our money out of the big banks would be a good start, or if we would wind up having to bail them out because of our actions?  Those bonuses three years running are an insult to all that is supposed to be decent about us.  Plus these guys are running the game.  Could it be where we make our start?  The next time a financial person writes a diary, I'm going to ask again.  We need to know the pros and cons.

      The GOP will destroy anything they can't purchase or own.

      by AnnieR on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 07:43:00 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  A sweet lullaby written by corporate ad-men (3+ / 0-)

        "Another world is not only possible, she is on her way. On a quiet day, I can hear her breathing." Arundhati Roy

        by LaFeminista on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 07:44:35 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  Hypnotized is a good analogy. (8+ / 0-)

        That's exactly what it was like.

        My teenage son was discussing public education with his recently college graduated cousin. My son was amazed at how easily dismissed his points were as his cousin just circled back around to his own. Just sweep away any idea that may make you change your mind because it's too much to contemplate. I heard him say many times, "The logistics of that is just too difficult."

        •  I wanted to use lulled. (3+ / 0-)

          However, what the right believes are lies told over and over again to the point where they are now instilled in the very fabric of their being, which is way beyond lulled.  And as far as logistics being too difficult, what good that this country has done for its citizens has ever been easy?  It's very sad what we're seeing happen right in front of us.  I saw a comment earlier about the media having a huge hand in this.  I can't disagree.  But it goes so far beyond that now, too.  

           

          The GOP will destroy anything they can't purchase or own.

          by AnnieR on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 08:42:40 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  that's because the media lulling (5+ / 0-)

            has taken hold. All it needed was about 10-15 years of 24/7 coverage ability, an act of Congress (Telecommunications Act) and court case precedent or two allowing their staff to be co-opted into use as propagandists (FOX BgH suit) upon pain of joblessness.

            Mission Accomplished. It's beyond media. But, there is time to bring it back full circle and wake people up, by holding media accountable. They continue to reinforce all the lies and it needs to be stopped. And that has nothing to do whatsofuckingever with First Amendment Rights. You can say what you want--the First Amendment protects your speech, but it does not guarantee you an audience. IMO, what needs to happen soon is that odious act of Congress must be overturned.

      •  I'm no economist (6+ / 0-)

        but I read Jeromea Paris and Atrios and others on line who wrote about what was happening before the economy melted down. Our tax accountant advised us to move our money to a reliable credit union/community bank. We were banking at WaMu now Chase. We moved all our money there including the mortgage and credit cards. I used to dread any transactions with the bank, not anymore. The difference was a pleasent surprise and I only wish I had moved our business and money years ago.  

        It is an old one the teachers credit union in our state. It was the best financial move I ever made. They do not treat you like a criminal or dice, slice and bundle your mortgage. The money stays in your community and helps other small businesses and members. It is a good start, why put your money in the hands of criminals who are looking to fleece you and your neighbors? It helps your local economy and and for us it has helped our business and personal finances.        

    •  Incrementally...All The Way Down The Drain (8+ / 0-)

      Incementalism, as it is espoused by many Dems, is a joke.

      They believe that change comes in tiny bites - the famous incrementalism argument.

      If I were to get a job in a factory, the first thing I'd do is join a union.---FDR

      by frandor55 on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 07:46:00 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  They forget real change comes like a (10+ / 0-)

        tsunami

        "Another world is not only possible, she is on her way. On a quiet day, I can hear her breathing." Arundhati Roy

        by LaFeminista on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 07:48:56 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  Incremental change (4+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        gmb, TiaRachel, LaFeminista, farbuska

        is nor happening if anything any change were getting is moving us like sheep towards slaughter and it seems like they are moving us forward to the new normal atg an alarming clip. Were moving forward in the wrong direction as far as the common good of the people goes. It amazes me that those of us who organized to fight the bush regime now call the continuation and normalizing of the same agenda, compromise or incremental change.

        No pol even ones like Bernie talks about real regulation. Getting your credit card rate down to 30% is not financial reform. Austerity for wealth creation is not incremental change. It really is the shock doctrine in action when working people regardless of their political affiliation start believing that this is inevitable or incremental change.        

    •  You discovered an important truth. (7+ / 0-)

      The population of the country is about 310 million.

      It doesn't work very well or at all for about 100 million plus or minus.

      It works ok for 200 million.

      It works really well for 10 million.

      The 210 million are not going to mount the barricades for the 100 million.

      •  Nobody's mounting any barricades here. (5+ / 0-)

        They're all too obese from watching the TeeVee and eating junk food.

        •  Nonsense, there are barricades (4+ / 0-)

          But the press, and people at this site, deride those at them as anarchists and hooligans every single time.  Go back and look at people's response here to the protests in Oakland following the Oscar Grant killing.  As if breaking some windows is equivalent to the violence perpetrated against human beings on a regular basis by the American system.

          I refuse to represent my political beliefs using numbers. It isn't accurate, nor is it helpful. But I'm around a -10 on both scales.

          by AoT on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 11:07:04 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  Yes, that's in my area as well (3+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            gmb, AoT, shaharazade

            and we protested and yes, we were dismissed by the press. Of course we were. You have to ignore what society calls you and go with your heart. You also have to talk to lots and lots and lots of people in your area to circumvent the "bad press."

            The Oscar Grant tragedy shed daylight that few saw the light from.

            "There are always two parties; the establishment and the movement." - Emerson

            by mahakali overdrive on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 11:27:14 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  I had moved away from Oakland for a while (4+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              tmo, gmb, shaharazade, mahakali overdrive

              but have moved back since.  I am amazed to see the interactions between a lot of the white far left, mostly anarchists, and people of color here now.  There seems to be much more respect from both sides.

              I refuse to represent my political beliefs using numbers. It isn't accurate, nor is it helpful. But I'm around a -10 on both scales.

              by AoT on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 11:39:08 AM PST

              [ Parent ]

              •  Have I told you that you're awesome (3+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                gmb, AoT, shaharazade

                yet today? I concur that there is more respect, especially for legal observation, which I think every citizen should learn to do as a show of respect for the community. We (radical groups) didn't have that tension up here so much, but some suspicion between (some) white folks and some Latinos, which is no good. Much came from language barriers, however. I regret that I haven't been able to be more direct action-y over the past few years, in truth.

                We were upset up here over our own local officer-involved fatalities. They're more prevalent than in Oakland, per capita. Our cops are largely "rednecks" for want of a better word.

                "There are always two parties; the establishment and the movement." - Emerson

                by mahakali overdrive on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 12:03:06 PM PST

                [ Parent ]

                •  You beat me to it. (4+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  tmo, gmb, shaharazade, mahakali overdrive

                  I always appreciate you comments.

                  The issue of language is a big one.  I have a friend who's doing a beginning Spanish class at the Free Skool here in the east bay.  It isn't the end all be all of what need to be done, but it's at least a start.  I've been learning off and on, I really do need to just break down and really start studying for real.

                  We were upset up here over our own local officer-involved fatalities. They're more prevalent than in Oakland, per capita. Our cops are largely "rednecks" for want of a better word.

                  I think can guess where you live.  Police violence is becoming more and more of a problem these days.  Oscar wasn't the end of it, unfortunately.

                  On the plus side, Oakland homicides are down 40% this year.

                  I refuse to represent my political beliefs using numbers. It isn't accurate, nor is it helpful. But I'm around a -10 on both scales.

                  by AoT on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 12:15:57 PM PST

                  [ Parent ]

              •  Woot, more Oaklanders! (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                AoT

                I'm always surprised, but I guess I shouldn't be anymore, at how many Oaklanders are lurking on DK. I wish there was some indicator of a commenter's home city in the comment or sigline, if the commenter chose to allow it. Anyways, I'm thinking we're going to need an Oaktown group-blog over on DK4. Would you be interested in participating?

                Unemployed? See my Unemployment Chronicles for resources and advice.

                by tmo on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 12:43:23 PM PST

                [ Parent ]

          •  When people strike (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Melanchthon, AoT

            or demonstrate or stand up for themselves and the Democratic establishment doesn't like it and tries to marginalize that's okay your having an effect. It is self defeating to want to be moderate these are not moderate times. Why not rock the boat even if it is a small local one? Of course they wont cover it, but if you keep at it and get more and more people to join you it has an effect. It gives people courage it forms coalitions and it helps build a critical mass. Some who call themselves moderate are afraid of dissent they think it makes the left look extreme. all this does is play into the political fictions, that lefty's are nuts they can ignore.

            Who gives a rats ass if the media doesn't like it or fearful authoritarians from either party find it inappropriate. The way things are going it won't be hard to find people willing to make themselves heard. The worst thing to do imho is to look upon the people who do get out front and resist, and tell the truth, as extremist's or dangerous to the Democratic establishment. They need to know that we the people do not buy this by-partisan bamboozle and aren't afraid to do what citizens in a democracy are supposed to do. Stand up and fight for ourselves and our fellow citizens and our laws. We have the net and globalism works two ways. Wikileaks is a good start.          

            •  You can hardly get some people here to (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              shaharazade

              support strikes sometime.  At the very least people could not condemn people who are fighting for a better world.

              I refuse to represent my political beliefs using numbers. It isn't accurate, nor is it helpful. But I'm around a -10 on both scales.

              by AoT on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 05:27:39 PM PST

              [ Parent ]

      •  I wanted to think that it wasn't a truth for my (13+ / 0-)

        own family... but it is. And these are folks that proclaim to be interested in politics and to be educated voters. But that's as far as it goes. And they're lives are all in decent order... they all have jobs, though not all great ones; they're not in the military so are not horrified by the war, just disgusted by it; their kids go to decent schools which they chose by having the flexibility and the money to chose the neighborhoods where they will live; they all have health insurance; etc. They just don't care enough that the system is breaking. I guess it will have to break for a hell of a lot more people before we see any change.

        •  I think you are right. (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          angelajean

          And the thing that is going to break it is the combination of energy prices and the conflict of trying to de-carbon our economy.

          The widespread economic stress from this will break many things.

          •  I'm afraid you're right. (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            camelopardalis

            I wish people would catch on sooner than that.

            A couple of years ago, when it first became apparent that we couldn't buy anything made in America anymore and only made in China, my sister asked me how I knew, years before, that we should buy American. I told her that I had read the news and noticed what was going on and ignored the cheap, cheap prices. I knew that I wanted my local businesses to be vibrant and that meant investing locally. But when I had tried to tell her that years before, she didn't want to listen. No one in my family wants to listen now. They'd rather bury their heads in the sand.

        •  in fairness to them, (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          melo, gmb, AoT

          I know a lot of people like that, most of whom probably think I'm some kind of Cassandra.

          But it's really hard to imagine outside the box, when the box is all-encompassing. It's like trying to stand outside yourself to get an objective look at your own life.

          And given how few Americans have experience of traveling to other countries or cultures, there's precious little in the way of reference points. You have to keep working at it, bit by bit.

          Also, I've learned that you can tell and tell, but people hear when they are ready to hear. So all you can do, much of the time, is keep putting your truth out there. Someday, maybe when you least expect it, something will go PING, and the magic door will open for them.

          One of the advantages of being disorderly is that one is constantly making exciting discoveries.--A.A. Milne

          by Mnemosyne on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 10:47:18 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  Travel came up several times. (0+ / 0-)

            I think that we really need to encourage more high school age kids to spend time away from home - a few months in a different State - just to get an idea about the diversity, not just of skin, but of culture and of politics.

            I hope I'm around to see the PING. But I don't hold out much hope. Maybe for my nieces and nephews.

    •  9/11 Responders and dog fighting (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      gmb, LaFeminista, angelajean

      seem to work.

      Whatever it is, the rage only lasts til people forget what they're angry about

      Yeah, I'm pitchfork mad like that.

      by lisastar on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 08:35:52 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  The new "little red book"? (15+ / 0-)

    I think the original had a slightly more robust view of revolution.

    A revolution is not a dinner party, or writing an essay, or painting a picture, or doing embroidery; it cannot be so refined, so leisurely and gentle, so temperate, kind, courteous, restrained and magnanimous. A revolution is an insurrection, an act of violence by which one class overthrows another.

  •  And Beware The Rot From Within (7+ / 0-)

    Having just finished reading Ralph Ellison's amazing Invisible Man, especially the long section about the main characters involvement with "The Brotherhood", I find that vigilance is needed lest an honest movement becomes a vehicle for the ambition of a few. The Tea Party is not really a good example but it is an example. There are many in that group that I believe are genuine in their indignation. It's just that they got wrapped up in a movement that was a scam from the beginning -- a three-card monty game masquerading as a political party.

    "What happened to the American Dream? It came true. You're looking at it".

    by The Lone Apple on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 07:48:37 AM PST

  •  Unfortunately for us, it's 30 pages long. (6+ / 0-)

    By page 3, most American kids will have tossed it aside to play video games.

    •  there is deep pithiness is your (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      frandor55, Dartagnan

      truthiness, an abstract will have to do perhaps?

      "Another world is not only possible, she is on her way. On a quiet day, I can hear her breathing." Arundhati Roy

      by LaFeminista on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 07:56:53 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  I have to thank you (10+ / 0-)

      I have to thank you for your comment.  It is completely wrong, but it helped me.

      I'm a high school teacher enjoying my winter break and dreading getting back into school work - grading, lesson plans, etc.  However, your comment got me fired up again.

      Your comment about today's kids is a stereotype.  Like most, it has a ring of truth in it, but also, like most stereotypes it is mostly bullshit.

      Kids today are awesome.  I LOVE my kids.  That's the part of work you made me remember and look forward to getting back to.

      Kids will read.  They will delve into a subject, if it interests them and if they see how it relates to their lives.

      The kids are alright.  And they are not stupid. With your attitude towards them they wouldn't follow you to the cafeteria, much less in "revolution".

      Treat them with respect and you can lead them.  I do it everyday.  Even though many times I am not only the only adult in the room, I am also many times the only white girl in the room.  But, they respect me and tell me "I got you, Miss."

      Quit treating them like lazy, slug, stereotypes and you'd be amazed at what they can do.

      Thanks for helping me remember.  I can't wait to get back and see all those amazing kids.

      It's like, duh. Just when you thought there wasn't a dime's worth of difference between the two parties, the Republicans go and prove you're wrong.~Molly Ivins

      by TexH on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 09:11:06 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Heh. (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Mnemosyne, TexH

        My comment was mostly snark. Don't worry, I have complete confidence in kids' innate abilities. And I'm glad you're teaching them, because it sounds like you're very committed. But don't kid yourself about the pernicious effects of screens on their lives and development.

        I'll be writing about this more...later, on the new site.

        •  I look forward to reading your work (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Mnemosyne, gmb, Dartagnan

          Sounds interesting.  I understand where you're coming from and will look for your writings on the new site.

          If I could be a little snarky, too...part of your post:

          But don't kid yourself about the pernicious effects of screens on their lives and development.

          Says the two adults spending their mornings on a blog. ;)  LOL  

          It's like, duh. Just when you thought there wasn't a dime's worth of difference between the two parties, the Republicans go and prove you're wrong.~Molly Ivins

          by TexH on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 09:46:13 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

  •  La raison tonne en son cratere nt (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Melanchthon, LaFeminista

    Hegemony is always electable.

    by ActivistGuy on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 07:56:32 AM PST

  •  The Coming Insurrection (6+ / 0-)

    http://tarnac9.wordpress.com/...

    From whatever angle you approach it, the present offers no way out. This is not the least of its virtues. From those who seek hope above all, it tears away every firm ground. Those who claim to have solutions are contradicted almost immediately. Everyone agrees that things can only get worse. "The future has no future" is the wisdom of an age that, for all its appearance of perfect normalcy, has reached the level of consciousness of the first punks.

    The sphere of political representation has come to a close. From left to right, it’s the same nothingness striking the pose of an emperor or a savior, the same sales assistants adjusting their discourse according to the findings of the latest surveys. Those who still vote seem to have no other intention than to desecrate the ballot box by voting as a pure act of protest. We’re beginning to suspect that it’s only against voting itself that people continue to vote. Nothing we’re being shown is adequate to the situation, not by far. In its very silence, the populace seems infinitely more mature than all these puppets bickering amongst themselves about how to govern it. The ramblings of any Belleville chibani contain more wisdom than all the declarations of our so-called leaders. The lid on the social kettle is shut triple-tight, and the pressure inside continues to build. From out of Argentina, the specter of Que Se Vayan Todos is beginning to seriously haunt the ruling class.

    Hegemony is always electable.

    by ActivistGuy on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 08:01:19 AM PST

    •  And today at antiwar.com... (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      gmb, shaharazade, LaFeminista

      Hegemony is always electable.

      by ActivistGuy on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 08:02:50 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  I you really believe... (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      gmb

      ...that hegemony is electable, then why not accept the concept of establishing progressive (left) hegemony democratically and electorally, via the Democratic Party?

      Or, at least accept that such is the purpose of this blog, rather than to sow cynical defeatism and demoralization, with calls for electoral boycott and splitting, to suppress likely Democratic voter turnout.

      You don't have to agree with our purpose, unless you want to post here.

      Otherwise, to click "yes" on the TOS, when you have no intention or desire to comply with it, makes you an unprincipled troll, here only to harass us with your absolutist rhetoric and opportunist hyperbole.

      "...a printing press is worth 10,000 rifles..." Ho Chi Minh

      by Radical def on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 09:28:23 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  The problem, as presented in TCI (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        shaharazade

        is not just that the hegemony is electable, it is that the hegemony is monolithic in the contemporary world.  Even where it varies it is just another part of the modern brand of government as being the solver of crises.  Whatever else they may talk about in TCI, the role of government as a solver of crises* is a problem.  Not because government shouldn't solve crises, but because government has become to be viewed as being primarily about solving crises.  We can see this in the argument over Health Care Reform.  The primary rhetoric around it was that there was a "health care crisis" and so the government need to act.  Now there is a budget crisis and/or a looming entitlement crisis.

        This is a problem that extends across the political spectrum, including, ironically, the authors of The Coming Insurrection.  Both the right and the left, authoritarian states and democratic states around the world use this rhetoric.  It may be pessimism, but it isn't necessarily unwarranted pessimism.

        *See also Shock Doctrine by Naomi Klein

        I refuse to represent my political beliefs using numbers. It isn't accurate, nor is it helpful. But I'm around a -10 on both scales.

        by AoT on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 11:29:39 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  Point out my (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        shaharazade

        "calls for electoral boycott and splittiong".  If you cannot do so, then you owe me an apology.

        I participate here because in my practical political work, about half my allies are from the left wing of the Democratic Party.  Participation here allows me to remain in touch with that community, what it's thinking and doing, on a national basis.

        And besides making wildly, baseless, false accusations against me, you also fail to have a very strong sense of what hegemony is.  It's not something you elect.  Rather, it controls elections, it determines who is "electable" and its determinations are ones that you no doubt unfailingly parrot as a voluntary enforcer of the existing ideological hegemony of Reaganism-Thatcherism.  That you obediently bleat out the findings of the American Guardian council as to who is an acceptable candidate and who is not makes your self-titling as "radical" hilariously laughable.

        Hegemony is always electable.

        by ActivistGuy on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 03:13:16 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  Obama seeks to cut corporate taxes (6+ / 0-)

    be idignant about that:

    http://www.americablog.com/...

    •  If he can close the loopholes at the same time (0+ / 0-)

      Thom Hartmann said on his show today that American corporate taxes are the highest in the world, but most corporations don't pay any taxes at all due to all the loopholes. If Obama can close the loopholes, I don't really care if he lowers the corporate tax rate. Seems like we'd collect more taxes if more corporations were paying taxes.

      Unemployed? See my Unemployment Chronicles for resources and advice.

      by tmo on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 12:46:04 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Count me out... (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      claude

      I'd rather see a Democratic progressive/moderate super-majority seize the power in the House and Senate, with an explicit mandate to purge and suppress the right.

      Then, it will be the right who are relegated to futile symbolic gestures of posturing protest and defiance.

      I would also point out, for those who believe that civil war is necessary to consumate the revolution, that the surest way to precipitate that final showdown is to sieze the power democratically, electorally.  

      The right is guaranteed to "rise up" to prevent real democracy from ensuing, which will give us the moral, legal and popular democratic basis for crushing them, absolutely, once and for all.

      Bring the Better Democrats!

      All Out for 2012!

      "...a printing press is worth 10,000 rifles..." Ho Chi Minh

      by Radical def on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 09:18:47 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  We did sieze power (5+ / 0-)

        We did it! We won by a large majority. You can recite all the lame talking points of why this administration can't implement real needed change the bottom up kind but the fact is that electoral politics at this point offer nothing but variations on the corporate theme. The coalition that worked for and voted in 'bottom up change' did not read the fine print that said incremental or compromise, along with wealth creation.  

        Wealth creation trickle down austerity by-partisan, compromise, self sacrifice, the government does not work for we the people, all our avenues to real representation, are owned by the same entities whose agenda is not democratic and who actively work to subvert the common good. Revolution does not always mean bloody civil war. This is a call to arms of taking back our government, step by step. Or as Dean said precinct by precinct. If that won't work the people have no choice but to organize outside the designated 'dissent' area.  

        'I'm taking back my country and the vehicle I'm using is the Democratic party' Howard Dean

        These words moved me to get active in my local party and on line in 2004. If the machine that runs Democratic party ceases to be a vehicle for the people then I will not support it. Political parties are a means to an end and if they stop fighting for people and become just another arm of the corporate thugs, why would any citizen support or vote for them? Fear? That worked so well in the midterms.        

        •  Such a typical canard...a false meme (0+ / 0-)

          "We" (progressives, and moderates, who wish to see a more genuine democracy) did NOT seize the power in '08.

          The putative Democratic "Majorities" included too many Blue Dogs.

          To ignore that real politik, that the Blue Dogs and Republicans retain, yet and still, sufficient plurality to block, delay and sabotage all motion, is either foolish naivete or, more likely, contrived duplicitous weaseling, to advance a line that the Democrats are absolutely non-viable, and should thus be abandoned, in favor of electoral boycott, splitting, or mass action in the streets, it seems to me.

          "...a printing press is worth 10,000 rifles..." Ho Chi Minh

          by Radical def on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 10:59:45 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  contrived duplicitous weaseling (3+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            gmb, WisePiper, AoT

            is what got us the blue doggies in the first place, it also got us a false choice. The political machine that runs and finances the Democratic electoral system favors and actively supports these dogs. Your canard stated here is exactly the meme I meant when I said lame excuses.

            The Democratic party as it stands is nonviable. It is up to the people to take it back, bottom up. Most of the Democrats and Indies I know don't even know what a progressive is, they do however know a bamboozle when it bites them in the ass. This administration is in the process of doing just that and calling it compromise or better then or by-partisan. So good luck with advancing your line. The coalition that voted for real change are now facing the fierce urgency of now, on steroids, brought to them by the party they empowered to stop this shit.          

            •  The only thing that enabled... (0+ / 0-)

              Blue Dog and Republican plurality over the last 30 years has been low turnout by likely Democratic voters, deliberately perpetuated by hook and by crook by the Republicans...and those on the "left" who consistently call for electoral boycott and splitting.

              And only one thing will reverse that right wing plurality...a reversal of the electoral boycott and splitting trends.

              If you're not working to actually, genuinely, take over the Party, from your local precinct level on up, to displace those Blue Dogs, then you're blowing it out your ass.

              Please correct me if I'm wrong, but I see no such call here, for seizing the power more substantially in 2012, by bringing more better Democrats, like, to establish a progressive/moderate super-majority, to materially, actually, for real, displace those Blue Dogs and Republicans, so we can finally surge forward into the 21st Century, for justice and peace, to save the planet.

              Instead I see people asserting, or implying, that the Democrats, such as they are, are absolutely non-viable, and should thus be utterly abandoned for guaranteed loser historically failed "strategies" of boycott and splitting.

              Which is fine, if you're so shitheaded that you want to believe in such things...

              It just doesn't belong here on dkos, because it's a violation of TOS, which clearly, explicitly states that the blog is all about electing more better Democrats.

              "...a printing press is worth 10,000 rifles..." Ho Chi Minh

              by Radical def on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 12:18:31 PM PST

              [ Parent ]

              •  shitheaded huh? (3+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                gmb, WisePiper, AoT

                that's nice. I belong to my county party and worked hard to get Jeff Mereley elected, after years of the DCCC refusing to finance good candidates who opposed Gordon Smith. This midterm my district reelected by 80% a state representative who ran with a D and Working Family Party after his name. I campaigned, canvased and donated to him. The reason Dems have low turn out is that they are corrupt duplicitous weasels and people see no difference with good reason.  

                Obama engendered a movement a coalition that was perceived as bottom up and real, but it was just a bait and switch. The blue dogs are as I stated supported and funded by this administration and the Third Way corporate Dems the ones who are running the show the DNC and the DCCC. Obama campaigns for them.  Taking back the party is the only way to get better Dems. If that's 'splitting' so be it.

                Speaking of blowing it out of asses you are full of it and I suspect that this idiotic anti leftie talk is all just about defending this administrations rank corporatism and weaseling. Blaming the voters and the rank and file is really lame and also really electorally stupid. Bait and switch only works once.

                'But elections are not enough. In a true democracy, it is what happens between elections that is the true measure of how a government treats its people.' Barack Obama

                       
                       

                •  I fully expect that he is a (1+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  gmb

                  Trot, or some other form of authoritarian socialist.  At heart if not in group membership.  The way he talks in this thread about suppressing the right smacks of authoritarianism.

                  I refuse to represent my political beliefs using numbers. It isn't accurate, nor is it helpful. But I'm around a -10 on both scales.

                  by AoT on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 01:10:31 PM PST

                  [ Parent ]

                  •  dude, you throw out these invectives... (0+ / 0-)

                    with no basis, and they are illegitimate, up front.

                    If I had to guess, maybe you're a "Libertarian"...?

                    As if any such nebulous terms really serve to define much of anything.

                    Personally, I tend, more or less, to anarcho-communism.  That's lower case, because I do not subscribe entirely to any particular tendency within that broad current.

                    But please note, mine is a communist tendency, ie: calling for democracy, and NOT a bourgeois ultra-individualist elitist social darwinist "anarchist' poseur tendency, calling for laissez faire, anti-collectivist, anti-social, anti-democratic, absolute"freedom".  

                    Please identify your ownself, politically, so I won't have to speculate myself into a tizzy, mmk?

                    I fail to comprehend your breathless protests about suppression of the right,...and you seem loath to respond materially to my remarks, such as whether you think it's OK to just let fascists run amok?

                    Do you think democracy is inherently authoritarian?

                    If you have a problem with my qualifiers...democratically, electorally... legislatively, judicially...(which I acknowledge are the only legitimate basis and means for any such suppression)...then please spit it out.  

                    Call it what you will...the right will never surrender voluntarily to the popular democratic will.  

                    They must be suppressed.

                    Deploy FISA and Patriot Act, bring the black helicopters and throw open the FEMA camps!

                    Death to Fascism!

                    BwaHaHaaa!

                    rofl copter anim

                    Photobucket

                    "...a printing press is worth 10,000 rifles..." Ho Chi Minh

                    by Radical def on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 02:26:21 PM PST

                    [ Parent ]

                    •  Um, wrong again about me being a libertarian, (1+ / 0-)
                      Recommended by:
                      gmb

                      except in that I'm a fan of liberty in general.  And you aren't anything close to an anarcho-communist if you're calling for the right to be purged from government.  Because if you want an "anarcho" as part of your political description you don't want a government, by definition.

                      I refuse to represent my political beliefs using numbers. It isn't accurate, nor is it helpful. But I'm around a -10 on both scales.

                      by AoT on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 02:57:23 PM PST

                      [ Parent ]

                      •  Good...I really hates me some Libertarians, heh (0+ / 0-)

                        Look, anarcho means whatever you want it to mean, obviously.

                        To me it means "self-rule", in the social sense, politically, and not in the sense of any falsely conceived absolute freedom of the individual.

                        No externally imposed, hostile, arbitrary and capricious "authority" or "state" of elitist anti-democratic swine, to "govern", "over" us, yes.  

                        And that goes for elitists of any stripe, right or left.

                        But, in governing ourselves, socially, democratically, free of elite rule, I think there is a legitimate basis, and a need, for suppressing counter-revolutionary tendencies that would actively seek to thwart and overthrow democracy, as well as other general aberrant anti-social and criminal tendencies...especially coming out of a thoroughly corrupted and perverse bourgeois-dominated society.

                        The difference is that instead of a "government" externally imposed by elitists, with illegitimate laws and authority, to deliberately violate our legitimate civil and human rights for their own private profit, it would be a collective endeavor of the people, for real, deciding democratically, for our own selves, what we want the rules to be, and enforcing those rules democratically, according to what we, the people, think is rational and just.

                        So, whether or not such a collective social effort should be called a "government" is irrelevant.  It's not "the same".

                        I think there is still a legitimate, indeed, unavoidable, need for some structure, not of the nature mandated by elites, to maintain their own control over us, but for the opposite purpose, to prevent that from ever happening again, and to implement our own popular democratic programs, in the public interest, in compliance with the popular democratic will....

                        Anarcho-communism basically proposes that this should be organized primarily by workplace and area of work, and by area of residence, with rank and file grassroots councils that elect delegates to interact with a broader network of councils on local, regional, state, and national levels, to coordinate the production and distribution of goods and services in federation.

                        We propose that we do not "need" an elite "Communist Party" interim dictatorship of "Socialism", to "prepare" the masses for democracy (the ultimate theoretical goal of actual real communism) someday, maybe.

                        We want real democracy now, not "later".  

                        "...a printing press is worth 10,000 rifles..." Ho Chi Minh

                        by Radical def on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 03:47:04 PM PST

                        [ Parent ]

                        •  If it means whatever you want (2+ / 0-)
                          Recommended by:
                          gmb, shaharazade

                          then it really doesn't mean anything at all, obviously.  I can say that when I say 'cat' I really mean dog, but that isn't helpful at all if you're actually trying to communicate.  So, it would be nice if you refrained from using a word that is used by everyone else to mean a specific thing to mean something that is in support of a different thing.  If you attach anarcho to the front of a word it means that you reject the state, not that you are kinda against authoritarianism.  If that's the case you can call yourself an anti-authoritarian communist.  Although given your desire to purge the right from politics I can't imagine that label really applies.

                          I know what anarcho-communism means, and it doesn't include a state, again, by definition.  Anarchism means you reject the existence of a state.

                          I refuse to represent my political beliefs using numbers. It isn't accurate, nor is it helpful. But I'm around a -10 on both scales.

                          by AoT on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 03:56:21 PM PST

                          [ Parent ]

                •  Kind of a chicken and egg conundrum (0+ / 0-)

                  as to whether voter turnout is low because of the Party, or whether the Party sucks, due to low voter turnout.

                  What I'm calling shit-headed, btw is the boycott and splitting lines.  

                  But thanks for clarification of your perspective, I think...

                  Merkley is also my rep, and so is Bates, who also just won an important seat in Jackson County...both of whom I like...and then there's Wyden, who is, perhaps somewhat less inspiring, but still, better than a Republican pig.

                  So...thanks for that.

                  I do not subscribe to third party approaches.

                  I dropped WFP like a hot potato, after they first promised me, personally, that they would not run against any Democrats, and were only seeking endorsements...and next thing I knew, they were running against Wyden, to parasitize on his certain victory, for their little % needed for funding.  

                  While I can dig the reasoning, that this was no threat to Wyden, I still resent being lied to in that regard, and it makes me suspicious about their viability, in light of numerous complaints from the E. Coast.

                  Anyway, your rhetorical condemnation of Obama and "teh Dems" (rather than more correctly, the Blue Dogs), in such absolute terms, seems...contradictory.

                  Objectively, the real problems are the Blue Dogs and the Republicans, who, by their plurality, and no other power, really, can block, delay and sabotage all motion, forcing onerous compromises to get any thing done and avoid complete reversal.

                  It seems to me, that power is hanging by a thread, with mad scrambles for just a few votes on any given issue.

                  Just a few more progressives, and a few less Blue Dogs and Republicans in the House and Senate...a progressive/moderate super-majority...would break the present impasse substantially, to allow the kind of real surge forward so many are pretending they expected from '08, which did NOT produce such a genuine Majority plurality of progressives and moderates.

                  Substantially purge the right, and they won't be in such a position to influence and coerce everyone else to do their bidding.   It's as simple as that.

                  Then, we can proceed to sort out the rest of the liberal bourgeois politicians toward consolidating a progressive super-majority.

                  Maybe you can tell me this...what effect will it have in the House, now that the Progressive Caucus is the majority in the Democratic Minority Caucus?

                  Will they be able to effect the composition of the DLC, and the Party, in terms of bringing forward and supporting more progressive candidates for 2012?

                   

                  "...a printing press is worth 10,000 rifles..." Ho Chi Minh

                  by Radical def on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 01:54:39 PM PST

                  [ Parent ]

      •  That's horrible (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        shaharazade, mahakali overdrive

        This is incredibly authoritarian and I absolutely reject calls to use the Democratic party to "suppress the right."  The problem we face is authoritarianism far more than the right wing itself. Yes, the right wing in the US is currently the face of authoritarianism, but that isn't the case around the world.  Nor is it the case historically.

        I refuse to represent my political beliefs using numbers. It isn't accurate, nor is it helpful. But I'm around a -10 on both scales.

        by AoT on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 11:34:09 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  lol, said the person on the right... (0+ / 1-)
          Recommended by:
          Hidden by:
          mahakali overdrive

          ...which, in fact, automatically, inherently, historically, seeks to suppress the left, ruthlessly, viciously, anywhere.

          I would prefer a "dictatorship" of genuine democracy over fascism, any day.

          I am no chaos freak.  

          I don't think it's "authoritarian" to insist that nobody has any "right" to any "freedom" to be a racist, sexist, eco-raping, murderous monopoly corporate rip off fascist pig, or a warmongering profiteering imperialist, for example.

          You have a problem with my terms?  

          What is it you don't like about "democratically, electorally"?

          "...a printing press is worth 10,000 rifles..." Ho Chi Minh

          by Radical def on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 11:50:25 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  Did you really just call me right wing? (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            gmb, mahakali overdrive

            or did I misinterpret that.  Because I am most certainly not.  What I am is opposed to authoritarian government measures to suppress specific groups of people based on ideology.  It may start with the right, but it always keeps going, always.  First it's the right, then the anarchists, then the trots, then the socialists.  We've seen this before.

            I refuse to represent my political beliefs using numbers. It isn't accurate, nor is it helpful. But I'm around a -10 on both scales.

            by AoT on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 12:00:17 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  It's all relative, heh. (0+ / 0-)

              I would say you are on my right, lol, when you engage in gratuitous knee-jerk reactionary commie/fascist-baiting, and try to tell me that the right is not the problem...seeming to imply that they should NOT be removed from all levers of power to the greatest extent possible, democratically, electorally, legislatively and judicially...

              If not, then why not, pray tell?  

              Do you think the right has a "right" to run amok, against the public interest, in defiance of the popular democratic will?

              Are you some kind of chaos freak?  Please clarify your perspective...  

              I say we do not "need" the right, Blue Dogs, or Republicans, to be democratic.

              Indeed, they are the principle impediments to democracy, historically.

              This is less about some nebulous conception of "ideology", than about practice.

              Death to Fascism!

              "...a printing press is worth 10,000 rifles..." Ho Chi Minh

              by Radical def on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 12:43:26 PM PST

              [ Parent ]

              •  I am most definitely not too your right. (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                gmb

                And I wasn't commie baiting, I was criticizing authoritarian leftists.  The two aren't synonymous.  

                And I agree, death to fascism, and all other forms of authoritarianism.

                I refuse to represent my political beliefs using numbers. It isn't accurate, nor is it helpful. But I'm around a -10 on both scales.

                by AoT on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 01:07:23 PM PST

                [ Parent ]

  •  Je viens de le commander (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Melanchthon, gmb, LaFeminista, CoExistNow

    chez amazon.fr

    C'est bizarre comme la livraison aux É.-U., c'est presque 8 fois le prix du livre.

  •  If we, as a people, don't stand up... (6+ / 0-)

    against what is happening to our country we will be a plutocracy.  That is guaranteed.

    Voting, letters, emails, phone calls, are not enough.  We need to shake this government at its roots.

    Great Diary!  Thank You!

    "There is no JUSTICE, there's JUST US." Terry Pratchett

    by rubine on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 08:38:45 AM PST

  •  Interesting (6+ / 0-)

    Thank you for bringing this to our attention.  For sure, the corporate media never would.

    "Truth forever on the scaffold, wrong forever on the throne." - James Russell Lowell

    by Deep Harm on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 08:46:13 AM PST

  •  The French (5+ / 0-)

    always fight! No matter how small the government's gaffe.  Americans always trust justice will be done!

    It will take a while to get them to see that Justice took a long leave in 2000 and has not returned yet.

    Your diary cheered me up. Maybe millenials will fight for us like we fought for their rights in the 60's. Off with opression, end all useless wars, take care of people's needs.  No more catfood for grandparents.  Their fights will be different but not easier. The security state has ways of controlling dissent that we would not have dreamt of at that time.

    Let's Hope.

  •  I'm reading this now (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Lupin, gmb, shaharazade, LaFeminista

    Hessel is approaching his mid-90's, but he soooooo0oo gets it.  A GREAT read.

    We should listen to the French.  They've gotten popular resistance right for 200 years. Just ask the National Socialist Germans, who were fit to be tied.

    People don't listen to propaganda because they think it's true. They listen because they wish it was true.

    by thenekkidtruth on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 08:58:21 AM PST

  •  I love the sentiment, and (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    sclminc, Radical def

    it's true the French love a good revolution.  Hell, they have one every 50 years or so.  

    The question though is what is the alternative to Sarkozy?  The PS?  The PCF?  Les Verts? The PS is mired in infighting between a Blairite centrist faction and a smaller, more radical group, and they were also trounced in the last election.  I kind of worry that the PS may be marred for a while by the chaos that followed the 35 hour week.  

    I studied abroad in Paris in 1999 and did an internship with the PS.  My most lasting image of that trip is this.  Paris hosted the biennial of the Socialist International.  One night, the PS hosted a dinner cruise on the Seine.  There we were, in suits and ties, clutching champagne flutes, singing the Internationale on a yacht in the Seine.  That's the PS in a nutshell.

    The PCF?  Come on...even when the PS was in power, and the PCF was in coalition with them, the PCF would host grand manifs in the street with the Leninist parties and wave red flags around.  They really didn't accomplish much, though their manifs were  very French, very romantic, passionate scenes.

    The French political system, though clearly much more open to "outsider" views than ours, still suffers from the stupidity that the political party idea brings to democracy.  Political parties are the root of the problem, really.  Power gets entrenched, turns inward, battens down the hatches.  

    It's all well and good to take to the streets and man the barricades, but what happens the next day?

    Red, the blood of angry men...black the dark of ages past...

    Visit Sinister, a left-handed blog about writing.

    by ethanthej on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 09:02:29 AM PST

    •  The PS is slowly changing (0+ / 0-)

      I like Martine Aubry, and btw the PS trounced the right last time out in the department and local elections.

      "Another world is not only possible, she is on her way. On a quiet day, I can hear her breathing." Arundhati Roy

      by LaFeminista on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 09:16:48 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Also: barricades increase tension, status quoism (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      AoT, Radical def, farbuska

      I think the people caught up in non-deadly but property-damaging protests feel wonderful, but I think that, except in very, very extreme cases where it's absolutely obvious that the protesters are right, those sorts of protests tend to push the swing voters in a population to the right.

      Of course, the fortunate flip side is that the implicit violence in a wingnut movement like the Tea Party movement tends to push swing voters to the left.

      The main thing is that the people in the middle who have kids, homes and jobs (even crummy jobs) may want government policies to change, but they also, at least sort of, like McDonald's, Starbucks, their houses of worships, functioning transit systems, etc., and don't want those things trashed by a bunch of protesters. I remember marching in an anti-Iraq war protest myself and trying to come up with an action plan for what I would do if the other protesters started to smash a Starbucks window.

      Even here on Daily Kos, I find my pretty liberal self being nudged toward the center by something as small as the use of the term "corporatist." Someone who uses the term told me in a post that s/he uses the term to refer to the evil types of big corporations that use lobbyists to tie the government in knots. I agree that the executives of big, evil corporations are horrible and ought to be punished, but, honestly, whenever I'd seen that term used on this site up till that point, I'd interpreted it to mean wanting to pretty much imprison the executives of all big corporations and put control of those corporations in the hands of the government. Now, I still don't feel as if I know what most people on this site mean when they use the term, and that ambiguity makes me uncomfortable.

      So, I think it's important for people on the nice, non-killing, non-smashing, non-imprisoning left to be very disciplined and very careful to make sure that they are communicating in swing-voter-friendly terms, and to make it extremely clear to the swing voters exactly what they want to eliminate and what they are willing to at least try to protect. When you march, for example, are you trying to eliminate all private ownership of big companies, or just put the obvious creeps behind bars and impose stricter oversight on the rest?

      Do you really want to smash a Starbucks, or just find some way for the cute little coffee places to survive?

      I think a lot of people here on the nice left who've read this far are thinking, "Wow, what paranoia," but the rhetoric on this site has gone from sounding pretty middle-of-the-road to sounding a lot different in about two years, and I'm not sure people are all using the same terminology to mean the same things.

      •  It depends on where the population (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        gmb

        stands in regards to the issue being protested.  And where the country stands historically in terms of the use of violence as a form of resistance.  In places like Greece where there was violent to Fascist regimes in living memory of a good portion of the population there is not nearly the same social stigma attached to property damage and attacks on police.  Yes, most of the media condemns it as hooliganism, as does the rest of the western media, but that's always been the case.

        In the United States specifically I'd say that you're right about the effects of those sorts of protests.  Although, I'd note that the majority of people involved in them are not interested in how people vote, they're anarchists, they would prefer that people not vote at all.

        About the term corporatist.  I completely understand where you're coming from on that one.  It grates on me even now, though I agree generally with the way it is used.  I've found myself having to consciously stop myself from using it.

        Do you really want to smash a Starbucks, or just find some way for the cute little coffee places to survive?

        Honestly, I think the answer is often both.  I've never gone out and smashed a Starbucks, but I'd be lying if I said the urge was never there.  Having grown up in the suburban middle-class it, and more so McDonald's, represents everything that was oppressive about growing up.  The strict, regimented organization of the suburbs where every activity that was allowed was organized from above.  You can go into any Starbucks in the country and they make every drink in exactly the same way, in exactly the same order.  It isn't just about Starbucks as being competition to local smaller coffee shops, it's about it being representative of everything that is oppressive to youth these days.  I realize that's putting a lot onto Starbucks, but I used to feel that viscerally when I saw a Starbucks. Not so much anymore, but I have some distance from the suburbs and my youth now.

        I sometimes wonder what the split in terms of age is on this site when it comes to the "nice left" and the more radical sections.  

        the rhetoric on this site has gone from sounding pretty middle-of-the-road to sounding a lot different in about two years, and I'm not sure people are all using the same terminology to mean the same things.

        It really has.  I'm certain that the expectations people had of Obama and what has happened since the election* have played into that a lot.  There also is a lot of paranoia, justified or not.  During the Bush years we saw the amount of domestic surveillance
        skyrocket, and it hasn't let up.  Activists continue to be arrested.

        I think this ended up being a bit more of a rant than I intended, but there's a lot there in your comment.

        *Whether it was Obama's doing or not.

        I refuse to represent my political beliefs using numbers. It isn't accurate, nor is it helpful. But I'm around a -10 on both scales.

        by AoT on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 01:45:22 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Whenever my computer slows down, I honestly (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          AoT

          start to think, "Oh, is the TSA monitoring me because I post on Daily Kos?", or, worse, and more extremely paranoidly, "Is Daily Kos actually just a tool the TSA uses to get my IP address?"

          But, also: I think most people here would say, "Oh, I wish the United States were more like Western Europe," but I'm married to someone from what's considered a very progressive country, and, in some ways, it's way more oppressive and homogeneous than the United States. Every town center has exactly the same 15 or so stores, plus a couple of independent boutiques that seem as if they could be part of a chain.

          So, some aspects of suburbia are certainly awful, which is why I go to great lengths not to live there, but, at the same time, what's really oppressive about youth is being a youth. Unless you are a skilled kid thief living on your own in your own warm tent, childhood is bound to seem pretty horrible to any thinking child.

          •  I certainly don't idealize Western Europe (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            gmb

            I mean, I look at what France is doing to the Roma right now and cringe.  I look at the surveillance society Britain has become and I cringe.  Everywhere has it's problems.  What's inspirational is that we see the large groups of people going out to protest.  Of course, what people forget is that the same thing happens in the US on a regular basis.  Look at the immigration marches and the anti-war marches.  Those were massive.  The same thing happens on both sides of the pond, the people get ignored.  That's why people are getting angry.

            I refuse to represent my political beliefs using numbers. It isn't accurate, nor is it helpful. But I'm around a -10 on both scales.

            by AoT on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 02:54:59 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

  •  I hate outrage. (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    beanbagz, Radical def

    Anger is like an emotional cattle prod.  It gets you moving but it might move you in a direction you regret.

    I still prefer hope.

    Stop clapping. Stop screaming. Open your mind. Listen.

    by Benintn on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 09:07:02 AM PST

  •  As I just posted on Dem Ramshield's... (12+ / 0-)

    ...diary in a comment, there is a huge difference which has become obvious to me in the last couple of years, since we moved.

    In America, all the basic FUNDAMENTALS of life have been screwed up during the last 20 years; we're now a sick, very sick society -- in many cases, literally.

    Let's review briefly -- please excuse the telegraphic style -- and compare:

    -- FOOD:
    US: totally screwed up, unhealthy (unless you live in the country or near a small farm etc);
    FRANCE: still healthy; fight tooth & nail against Monsanto & others;

    -- WORK:
    US: no vacations, work like a slave; crushed under debt;
    FRANCE: 5 weeks vacations; work ethics include family; consumer debt higher but still under control; no student loans;

    -- HOME OWNERSHIP:
    US: foreclosure crisis, totally screwed up, unreliable titles, weird loans;
    FRANCE: traditional mortgages the way they used to be in the US;

    -- HEALTH:
    US: terrible; unaffordable; they pump you full of drugs; obesity, diabetes in crisis;
    FRANCE: mix of single payer + supplemental insurance, affordable, more open to soft medicines; still healthy population;

    -- EDUCATION:
    US: uneducated masses, believe in rubbish; mindless propaganda media in the pocket of corporations;
    FRANCE: still a decent educational system; decent media; terrible TV but not partisan.

    For all their past and present trouble, no matter who is in power in France -- let's say Western Europe -- I very much doubt that the population will let these fundamentals change or be destroyed the way they were in the US.  

    OVER HERE: AN AMERICAN EXPAT IN THE SOUTH OF FRANCE, is now available on Amazon US

    by Lupin on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 09:08:07 AM PST

  •  Indignez-vous! (8+ / 0-)

    As an ex-direct action organizer, I concur! Most of my meta-war comments are along the lines of; "Screw the president! Get your ass out there on somebody's front lawn!"

    We did not deal with campaigns and endorsements from politicians when I was under the National People's Action umbrella fighting predatory lending. We went to the source of the problem and got on that person's front lawn if they didnt respond to our requests for a meeting. No ass-kissing, no begging.

    When Saul Alinsky and his committee of Illinois residents couldnt get the city to respond to complaints about garbage pickup, Alinsky advised the people to collect their trash and throw it onto the alderman's lawn. Things quickly began to change.

    Alinsky's group didnt need anybody to be on their side. They needed no support letters or stumps for their political supporters to sell themselves in exchange for DOING THEIR JOBS and responding to the complaints of the people. Take notes, teabaggers. You're not grassroots as long as the "enemy" (politicians) owns your podium and controls it. You're not grassroots if you have no inner initiative while you're parroting the talking points of the all-powerful plutocrat. :-)

    It's kindda hard to get that message across on a site dedicated to electing better Democrats as well. People have their hopes and dreams tied into election results way too much. Nothing wrong with wanting better reps for your party but the current situation requires such an intense vetting of those Democrats, I seem to only trust Kucinich, Weiner, Frank, Sanders, Grayson, etc. At some point, we have to show our "pitchforks" so that the Dems we WANT will be emboldened and empowered to come forward.

    Thanks, Lafem. :-) This is a great message! Get pissed!

    Call-- "Fired up!"

    Response-- "Cant TAKE it no more!"

    •  Agreed. Long as the site insists on (5+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      gmb, WisePiper, AoT, shaharazade, GenXangster
      more and better Democrats to the exclusion of all others, it's no longer relevant. I like DK a lot, but if it's an appendage of the Dems, a now-demonstrably corrupt corporate political party, then it's little more than a platform from which to sell ads and make money. If 2006-2008-2010 accomplished anything, it was teaching us it's the little people against both parties--including our own, the Democratic.

      Merry Christmas, Kossackistanians! Thanks to all of you for making this place fun ... esp if you might have disagreed w/me.

      by Wom Bat on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 10:02:24 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Yeah, kinda hard to follow TOS... (0+ / 0-)

      when you disagree with it, and only want to promulgate anti-Democratic lines.

      Funny, how those who least deserve it, due to their unprincipled, opportunist, hyperbolic rhetoric, demand loudest a supposed "freedom" to "speak" their "opinion", especially when they are in deliberate blatant violation of TOS.

      "...a printing press is worth 10,000 rifles..." Ho Chi Minh

      by Radical def on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 10:09:58 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Thanks. LaFem. Never stop fighting. (11+ / 0-)

    Never. Ever.

    Democracy isn't a spectator sport. It's kinda like sex: ya gotta jump in there and get a bit messy.

    Think of merchandise. You buy a pair of jeans. They fall apart after the first wearing. Do you take them back or just sigh and go buy a new pair? If so, where? The same place?

    In my experience, most people take the pants back, get something good and make a bit of noise at poor treatment. Whether or not they ever frequent that store again will depend on the treatment they get.

    So I take the same perspective on politics: if it touches my government, I contact folks.

    If the local state chamber gets too involved in political activity, I call them.

    If a local TV channel gets too involved in end of life issues and the result is a bunch of right to lifers protesting someone's removal from life support, I call that TV station.

    When my doctors won't pay attention to the decisions that the right wing is making for them, I pay my doc with a chicken. Yes, I did that.

    If people standing in a checkout line say something incorrect, I correct them in a very friendly manner. None of these encounters has ever ended unpleasantly.

    Yet when hearing what I do, everyone says, "Waste of time." They think I'm nuts. So I ask, "What should I do? What would you do?" The answer is nothing. To which I respond, "That guarantees that nothing will get done. If folks call, at least there's a chance."  I won't go gently.

    You can always count on Americans to do the right thing - after they've tried everything else. -- Sir Winston Churchill

    by bleeding heart on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 09:13:18 AM PST

    •  Tipped especially (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      gmb, bleeding heart, bigchin

      for paying the doc with a chicken. De s/he squawk?

      One of the advantages of being disorderly is that one is constantly making exciting discoveries.--A.A. Milne

      by Mnemosyne on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 10:56:40 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  He was certainly stunned. (6+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Mnemosyne, rubyr, Melanchthon, figbash, gmb, bigchin

        A rubber chicken was sitting on his desk when he walked in.

        I launched into a "if you guys don't speak up, all our medical decisions will be made for us ... etc., etc., etc)" explaining that legitimate politicians were being seriously challenged by candidates who were advocating for things like paying your doc with a chicken, limiting the meds and procedures available. I told him I didn't know how he would pay his staff their share, but suggested that the feet and beak could be used to make gelatin. So, we spent time discussing how docs could pay their staffs via that barter process. Not very well, was the upshot.

        Yes, we laughed a lot, but he knew I was spot on.

        I live with chronic illness, so I have lots of docs. Another uses me as "specimen of the day" for the med school and I get poked and prodded by 10 or so classes of 8-10 med students. My doc, who hadn't seen me at this event, noticed the students all leaving trying to stuff Obama merch in their notebooks, told me he said, "Yep, bh is here."

        I challenge the docs on medical marijuana, end of life issues (mine), everything. If there's a medical issue that touches the public square like insurance, treatment, limitations, stupid rules/laws, they're going to hear about it from me. I'm friendly, funny and dead serious.

        With the exception of being socially appropriate (no political speeches at funerals, for example), I don't let up. I wish more people would do it. I could take an occasional break!

        You can always count on Americans to do the right thing - after they've tried everything else. -- Sir Winston Churchill

        by bleeding heart on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 11:19:08 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

    •  So excellent!!! n/t (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      bleeding heart

      Action is the only agent for change -- talking without action has never effected change anywhere, in any way, at any time.

      by rubyr on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 06:31:43 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Let's all (0+ / 0-)

    go to Rick's cafe and hang around...great piano player.  Rick seems somewhat melancholy tho.  Let's go!  Bring your cats and French Phrase books!

  •  Yeah, like those union guys (0+ / 0-)

    who wouldn't plow the snow in Queens.    That'll teach those bourgeoisie pigs.

    •  Not heard that the work stoppage (10+ / 0-)

      there had anything whatever to do with unions. I'd heard that it was due to administrative incompetence.

      Sounds like somebody is looking for an excuse to demonize unions.

      It's here they got the range/ and the machinery for change/ and it's here they got the spiritual thirst. --Leonard Cohen

      by karmsy on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 09:43:40 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Not scary (0+ / 0-)

        just corrupt.   And getting weaker because of it.

        •  There are intelligent, good-faith ways (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          gmb

          to make this argument, i.e., so you don't sound trollish ;)

          It's here they got the range/ and the machinery for change/ and it's here they got the spiritual thirst. --Leonard Cohen

          by karmsy on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 12:40:40 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  I don't really care (0+ / 0-)

            if I sound trollish or not.   If the news reports on  this are true and union scumbags   are  causing people to freeze,  blocking  emergency vehicles, etc  to protest work related stuff they don't like, then fuck 'em.   The reports are that guilt ridden workers reported their bosses  to a  legislator.  Those guys deserve medals.

            •  Which news reports? (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              gmb, karmsy

              Yes, your use of phrases such as "union scumbags" would give any reasonable person doubt that you are posting here in good faith.  However, to give you the benefit of the doubt, you could provide the independent news sources to support your contention that the unions are deliberately slowing snow clearing operations in Queens.  However, rumors, speculations, coffee shop gossip, and anti-union propaganda do not count, nor do "reports" harkening back to 1969 when sanitation workers were using job action to undermine Mayor Lindsey as a result of the outcome of their strike the previous year.  

              These Republican gluttons of priviledge are cold men ... They want a return of the Wall Street economic dictatorship -- Harry Truman

              by Laborguy on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 02:17:34 PM PST

              [ Parent ]

              •  Mayor Bloomberg failed to call a snow (2+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                Laborguy, karmsy

                emergency, which would have activated the snow removal plans used effectively (mostly) for a very long time. He applied his business model to a human situation and it failed miserably. We pay a lot of city taxes, so it is really reprehensible.

                Where did that guys story come from?

                Action is the only agent for change -- talking without action has never effected change anywhere, in any way, at any time.

                by rubyr on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 06:35:59 PM PST

                [ Parent ]

    •  OOOHHHH SCARY SCARY (5+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Mnemosyne, gmb, AoT, karmsy, An Affirming Flame

      UNIONS!!!!!

      Grow up bub!

  •  We can't... (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    LaFeminista, mahakali overdrive

    ...we're all in debt.

    "Merry Merry, Happy Happy, Ho Ho Ho" - Lewis Black

    by Rustbelt Dem on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 09:35:44 AM PST

  •  I pointed out in a thread not long ago (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Mnemosyne, gmb, shaharazade, LaFeminista

    that "Rules for Radicals," the guidebook by Saul Alinsky that influenced political demonstrators in the 60s, is always checked out, with many holds placed on it, at the local library. Others in the thread noted that the book is selling briskly. A few people argued that this had to be mostly due to the new popularity of the book among the Tea Baggers. We don't really know the truth behind the phenomenon of the old chestnut's popularity, it's all speculation. But this argument irritated me. What, our side never gets to be outraged?

    Thanks for the diary.  

    It's here they got the range/ and the machinery for change/ and it's here they got the spiritual thirst. --Leonard Cohen

    by karmsy on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 09:39:38 AM PST

  •  The French are freer than Americans (5+ / 0-)

    and have fewer distractions on TV.

    The revolution won't be televised in America because it would be bumped for something mind-numbingly stupid.

    America legalized torture before they legalized marijuana.
    Take your stinking paws off me, you damned dirty ape!

    by xxdr zombiexx on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 09:54:10 AM PST

  •  Start by not denigrating those that have begun (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    mikeconwell, Radical def

    Might I suggest that to embrace the spirit of this book as described and at the same time ridicule those who are already engaged particularly in an organization like OFA is inconsistent.  I am speaking to everyone.  Every effort should be valued otherwise we will waste time on power-over efforts instead of shouldering the work at hand in a mutual way.

  •  I've always liked the (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    LaFeminista
    whole citizen pamphlet tradition.  

    It's welcome back, even in e-form.

    Denial is complicity.

    by Publius2008 on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 10:21:11 AM PST

  •  Thanks (3+ / 0-)

    Tax cuts create votes not jobs.

    by OHknighty on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 10:41:55 AM PST

  •  We may not have to worry about it (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    hkorens

    The right may start the revolution even though they are supposedly winning.  

    They talk about seceding from the union again.  They trash talk about the president and they are talking about endless investigations, not about things that we care about, but to tarnish the current presidency and to hamper any or the legislation from the last two years coming into effect.  We can argue all day long about what the dems SHOULD have done and now we get to watch the right clog the government up like a stopped toilet.

    I don't think we will have to start the revolution, I think it has begun.  Our problem is coming to grips with what that means.

  •  Yep, I'll be out there every time (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Regina in a Sears Kit House

    that people stand up. The French have this one down too. Excellent call to action. If only Americans understood that protesting worked better not in DC but in their home towns.

    "There are always two parties; the establishment and the movement." - Emerson

    by mahakali overdrive on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 11:14:39 AM PST

  •  I had a thorough comment all prepped (3+ / 0-)

    and my browser ate it.  Suffice it to say that you can find Indegnez Vous at Amazon.co.uk, but not in the US at Amazon.com.

    Republicans: They hate us for our Freedom.

    by mikeconwell on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 11:22:17 AM PST

  •  D'accord! n/t (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    gmb

    "History is a tragedy, not a melodrama." - I.F.Stone

    by bigchin on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 11:50:02 AM PST

  •  Here's a link to Stephane Hessels's (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Melanchthon, gmb

    video wishes for 2011. He's 93. Sorry, it's in French.

    http://www.dailymotion.com/...

  •  Liberte, Equalite, Fraternite (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    gmb

    In America?  Nope.  This is the land of the wage slave, inequity and virulent racism.

    When the rose lies withered by the roadside don't try to negotiate the bloom.

    by Atilla the Honey Bunny on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 12:32:22 PM PST

  •  Welcome back, LaFem (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    gmb, forrest, LaFeminista

    I've always enjoyed your work and I'm hoping that you are the next one Kos promotes to the front page.

    "He's the one, who likes all our pretty songs. And he likes to sing along. And he likes to shoot his gun. But he knows not what it means" - Kurt Cobain

    by Jeff Y on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 02:22:29 PM PST

  •  Heh (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    gmb, LaFeminista

    I knew you couldn't leave!  What would the children think?

  •  A bunch of us marched around (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    LaFeminista

    our computers in our jammies in our parents' basement shouting "La Femme! La Femme! Cherchez La Femme!"

    So, I mean, some of us already know this shit works. :)

  •  Bravo, LaFeminista! n/t (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    gmb, LaFeminista

    ~we study the old to understand the new~from one thing know ten thousand~to see things truly one must see what is in the light and what lies hidden in shadow~

    by ArthurPoet on Thu Dec 30, 2010 at 04:12:00 PM PST

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