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A short time ago, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, making what Al Jazeera called the United States "strongest statement" to date, spoke about the uprising in Egypt and its government's harsh crackdown on its people:

Clinton's statement comes on a day where protests are escalating across Egypt. A country-wide curfew has been imposed (and ignored), the ruling party's headquarters were engulfed in flames, tanks are rolling after President Mubarak ordered the army into the streets, there are nearly constant "massive explosions" and the sound of shots being fired.

Follow the situation via the Egyptian/Middle East Protests Mothership Diary.

For more information, Nick Baumann at Mother Jones has a good rundown on the issues that led to the events we are seeing today.

And for continuing live coverage -- as long as they're allowed to stay on the air anyway -- from Al Jazeera can be seen here.

Originally posted to Daily Kos on Fri Jan 28, 2011 at 09:47 AM PST.

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Comment Preferences

  •  Via CNN, Protesters are chanting "Army & The peop (11+ / 0-)

    le are one"

    Republicans secret dream = the impeachment of Bo the Dog LOL

    by LaurenMonica on Fri Jan 28, 2011 at 09:48:54 AM PST

  •  I think the Army will throw Mubarak under the bus (5+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    sapper, grannyhelen, dibsa, blue aardvark, Loge

    The Generals hate his son anyway

    Republicans secret dream = the impeachment of Bo the Dog LOL

    by LaurenMonica on Fri Jan 28, 2011 at 09:49:27 AM PST

  •  William Hague (8+ / 0-)

    MP and Foreign Secretary pretty much mirrored Clinton's remarks about peaceful reforms and it doesn't help when you surpress people's freedom of expression.

    Hey you, dont tell me theres no hope at all Together we stand, divided we fall.

    by marcvstraianvs on Fri Jan 28, 2011 at 09:50:42 AM PST

    •  Thanks for posting about his statement (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      sapper
    •  I wonder how our diplomatic corps (7+ / 0-)

      will react to this Al Jazeera story.  Seems thousands of protesters in Jordan have taken to the streets to demand their prime minister step down.

      All hell seems to breaking loose against autocratic rule in the Arab world, and good for them.

      "In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican." - H. L. Mencken

      by SueDe on Fri Jan 28, 2011 at 10:06:38 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Jordan (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        sapper

        Is interesting since it is ruled by Hashemites who are historically from Mecca/Medinah and populated by Levants, including a huge amount of Palestinian refugees.

        I do think Jordan and Syria both could go the same route, but both would be met with different opinion from the west.

        Hey you, dont tell me theres no hope at all Together we stand, divided we fall.

        by marcvstraianvs on Fri Jan 28, 2011 at 10:17:35 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Internet shut down in Syria today (0+ / 0-)
          middle east is on fire. Also Suez canal endanger of being shut down. Price of oil will sky rocket if this happens for any length of time.
          •  it'll probably skyrocket anyway (0+ / 0-)

            The oil companies live in constant terror that their friendly unelected regimes will one day crumble, and the people in the Middle East will force a better oil deal (better for THEM, not better for the oil companies). When Mubarak falls, the oil companies will hold their breath in terror, and they'll want a nice little nest egg just in case.

            One of the reasons why so many oil companies opposed the American invasion of Iraq was because Saddam had been good to them and they had no way of guaranteeing that any successor would be better if tings didn't go as planned (and of course the oil companies already recognized that all the neocon assumptions about what would happen were pure fantasy).

  •  That's a good statement. (6+ / 0-)

    Let's all fervently hope that something better replaces Mubarak.  ElBaradei would be fine with me.

    Still enjoying my stimulus package.

    by Kevvboy on Fri Jan 28, 2011 at 09:51:21 AM PST

  •  Nobel Peace Prize 2009? (5+ / 0-)

    Remember this?

    The Norwegian Nobel Committee has decided that the Nobel Peace Prize for 2009 is to be awarded to President Barack Obama for his extraordinary efforts to strengthen international diplomacy and cooperation between peoples. The Committee has attached special importance to Obama's vision of and work for a world without nuclear weapons.

    Obama has as President created a new climate in international politics. Multilateral diplomacy has regained a central position, with emphasis on the role that the United Nations and other international institutions can play. Dialogue and negotiations are preferred as instruments for resolving even the most difficult international conflicts. The vision of a world free from nuclear arms has powerfully stimulated disarmament and arms control negotiations. Thanks to Obama's initiative, the USA is now playing a more constructive role in meeting the great climatic challenges the world is confronting. Democracy and human rights are to be strengthened.

    Only very rarely has a person to the same extent as Obama captured the world's attention and given its people hope for a better future. His diplomacy is founded in the concept that those who are to lead the world must do so on the basis of values and attitudes that are shared by the majority of the world's population.

    For 108 years, the Norwegian Nobel Committee has sought to stimulate precisely that international policy and those attitudes for which Obama is now the world's leading spokesman. The Committee endorses Obama's appeal that "Now is the time for all of us to take our share of responsibility for a global response to global challenges."

    Oslo, October 9, 2009

    •  I hope he lives up to it (5+ / 0-)

      this is truly challenging to react to given the state of US politics and the relationship with Israel. If it spirals out of control into a bloody civil war, the Middle East could be seriously destabilized from an already precariously destabilized position.  And our policies are so screwed up, we've left ourselves with little room to manuever and few friends and average citizens of these countries have no reason to believe in the good faith of the US in the region.

      The right wing hate machine could interfere in disasterous ways, Congress can play political games trying to tie the President's hands even if he's trying to shape this positively to have Mubarek exit and a better government that will address poverty and unemployment in meaningful ways be installed.

      If the US brokers a good end to the people's uprisings Obama will have earned that Peace Prize.

  •  Mubarak is MIA, he was supposed to speak (6+ / 0-)

    a yr ago. I think he extended the curfew to flee the country.

    Republicans secret dream = the impeachment of Bo the Dog LOL

    by LaurenMonica on Fri Jan 28, 2011 at 09:53:15 AM PST

  •  Clinton's statement .. (18+ / 0-)

    .. was seen by Al Jazeera as supportive of the people, and of course their comments on her statement are being heard throughout the region and the world.

    •  Her speaking was perfect for an ESL audience. (23+ / 0-)

      The slow articulation and tiny pausing between words and phrases allows non-native speakers of English to translate what they hear as they hear it. It's a trick I learned from teaching in the UAE, and I heard Obama do it to in Cairo, Indonesia, Beijing, and Tokyo. Very well done, Madam Secretary!

      There are two political aisles: Center-Left and Center-Right. It's impossible to cross them both. Republicans know this and govern accordingly; Democrats don't.

      by Jimdotz on Fri Jan 28, 2011 at 09:57:18 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  wait till the Muslim Brotherhood takes over (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      cdreid, Heart of the Rockies, sapper

      Then we'll see if American talk about "democracy" and "the will of the people" really is serious, or just self-serving bullshit.

      Remember how we were all gaga over democracy in Palestine--until Hamas won?

      •  Sec. Clinton is betting (2+ / 0-)

        that if she gets on the side of the protesters, she'll earn goodwill in the event the regime falls.  The problem is that might not work, and if the regime stays in place, Mubarak will not be happy.  I'd have recommended something deliberately ambiguous, like "Egypt's choice of government is an internal political matter, although the United States will continue to be an ally of Egypt and looks forward to working with Egypt on matters of mutual concern."  Not endorsing Mubarak was wise, but this is either too far or not far enough.  Obama's Cairo speech had the advantage of not being tied to a particular situation.  

        Does this send a message to other dictators we've supported that our support is only as good as their ability to maintain order?  And is that good (in the sense of incentivizing the leaders to be more responsive) or bad (in the sense of incentivizing further crackdowns)?  Or does it do neither without follow-thru?

        Does the Muslim Brotherhood thrive in the absence of a corrupt Mubarak regime?  It's a promising sign that the Copts are also protesting.

        "This world demands the qualities of youth: not a time of life but a state of mind[.]" -- Robert F. Kennedy

        by Loge on Fri Jan 28, 2011 at 10:23:57 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  this isn't new (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Heart of the Rockies

          For half a century, we gave open support to butcher regimes all over the world, from Marcos to Pinochet, as long as they fought commies for us.

          We didn't give a flying fuck about "democracy" then, and we still don't. And when "democracy" produces a result we don't like (as with Hamas's election) we will do everything we possibly can to undermine it.

        •  Your suggested comment would be far too (4+ / 0-)

          supportive of Egypt. Her statement is good, although I liked Senator Kerry's better.  

          "I call on the Egyptian government and security forces to exercise restraint in dealing with protesters and to respect the human rights of its citizens to seek greater participation in their own government. The Egyptian government also should immediately restore communications and access to social networking sites," he said.

          "I hope the people of Egypt will continue to remember the lessons and legacy of peaceful protesters from Gandhi to Dr. King and to exercise their right to be heard in that tradition, which will rally peaceful people everywhere in solidarity," Kerry added.

          Still, he stressed, it's "not with rubber bullets and water cannons that order will be restored" in the four-day-old street protests in which demonstrators have been clashing with and even chasing down riot police.

          "President Mubarak has the opportunity to quell the unrest by guaranteeing that a free and open democratic process will be in place when the time comes to choose the country’s next leader later this year," Kerry said.

          There already is an election scheduled for later this year.   This statement appears to use that and while not throwing Mubarack under the bus, he calls on him to have the grace to allow a peaceful transition.

          •  I was using "Egypt" (0+ / 0-)

            as a collective, not a specific reference to the current government.  Trying to go for some acknowledgment that the areas where we and Egypt are allied it's about the mutual interests of both countries, not the narrow policies of Mubarak. That's the theme to reinforce.  Basically, we supported Sadat, we supported Mubarak because they cut a peace deal with Israel and abided by it, and the U.S. expects that to continue whatever else happens.

            "This world demands the qualities of youth: not a time of life but a state of mind[.]" -- Robert F. Kennedy

            by Loge on Fri Jan 28, 2011 at 10:47:38 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

      •  It's the army or no one... (0+ / 0-)

        ...the MB is not going to take over Egypt.

        it fitfully blows, half conceals, half discloses

        by Addison on Fri Jan 28, 2011 at 10:27:19 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  and Hamas will never take over in Palestine . . . (1+ / 0-)

          Nor will Hezbollah ever gain any power in Lebanon . . .

          The US never learns anything from history.

          That's why we keep playing out the same movie over and over again.

          •  Hamas and Hezbollah... (0+ / 0-)

            ...existed in areas where they were a dominant Arab armed/military force. Muslim Brotherhood is a different sort of organization. I don't think you honestly think there's so much of a parallel between these situations to make your comment make sense. If you do, whatever. The idea that the Egyptian military is going to cede power to the MB (in what is going to be a primarily force-determined outcome) comes from a one-size-fits-all mentality of Arab society. If MB or any other group comes to power in some way it will be at the pleasure of the army.

            it fitfully blows, half conceals, half discloses

            by Addison on Fri Jan 28, 2011 at 10:39:59 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  that remains to be seen . . . . (0+ / 0-)

              It wasn't long ago that both Hezbollah and Hamas were dismissed as political nonentities.

              Nevertheless the fact remains that the downfall of unelected regimes in the Middle East will inevitably lead to some number of Islamist regimes. In many countries they are the best-organized and most popular group around.

              "Democracy" may not look as good as expected.

              Which of course does NOT, repeat NOT, as in N-O-T, mean that I'm against it. Unlike the USA, democracy gets my support even when it produces results I don't like.

              My point is that the US has a long long history of supporting tinhorn dictators who butcher their own people (as long as said dictator supports our interests), and then has a sudden attack of democratic conscience as soon as said dictator gets bounced out on his ass. Then we act all surprised and hurt when the new democracy hates our guts for supporting the tinhorn dictator all those years--which leads us to then overthrow the new democracy and reinstall some other tinhorn dictator, thus starting the process all over again.

              We never learn.

      •  To be fair (0+ / 0-)

        we didnt exactly install puppets in Iraq and we continued to support that government. In fact i was frankly shocked at the time that a republican administration especially didnt simply install some psychotic dictator.

        ..but if youre a writer you say all i wanna do is leave behind one story - Harlan Ellison

        by cdreid on Fri Jan 28, 2011 at 01:44:04 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  Maybe some at State were bright enough to see (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    greendem, sapper, Jimdotz, jfromga

    the wind changing direction. And pointed out to Clinton it wont be too great if the US of A is still mouthing platitudes about 'our great friend and ally'  Mubarak on the day he flees the country for Gay Paree like his son.

  •  Pretty hollow. (0+ / 0-)

    I hope the president has something better to say.

  •  LOL. Cue more military aid to our friend and ally (4+ / 0-)

    Hopefully not though, but seriously she or someone should have mentioned this serious concern decades ago.

    Listen to Noam Chomsky's Necessary Illusions. (mp3!)

    by borkitekt on Fri Jan 28, 2011 at 09:54:46 AM PST

  •  Mubarak sowed his own demise. The thug could (5+ / 0-)

    Have said last year he would transition the country to democratic rule in the next election. But power seduces like no other.

    •  the Saudi royal family must be shitting its shoes (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      cdreid, varro, Heart of the Rockies

      right now.

      They're next.

      The neocons wanted to invade the entire Middle East and transform it into a series of democracies.

      They may get their wish, but not in the way they had hoped for.

      Careful what you wish for . . . .

      •  Watch the I-word be thrown out... (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        cdreid

        ...by desperate regimes trying to hold onto power.

        (And yes, I think the Israelis should follow the model and start challenging Bibi and the fundamentalist settlers...)

        9-11 changed everything? Well, Katrina changed it back.

        by varro on Fri Jan 28, 2011 at 10:56:16 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  Contagion to Saudi (0+ / 0-)

        [The Saudi royal family is next.

        I'm not so sure about that, unfortunately.  It's not coincidence that the unrest is happening in poorer Arab states without much oil -- Tunisia, Egypt, Lebanon, Yemen.

        The oil states have the ability to buy off the population -- "we have high living standards and need stability to maintain them."  True, the Saudi monarchy can't keep living standards rising indefinitely, and it too faces problems of unemployed youth, but the problem is less immediate than in North Africa and the Levant.  And the tiny Gulf sheikhdoms are reasonably prosperous.

        If the contagion spreads, I'd say Jordan and Syria are the likely targets.  Jordan is, by Arab standards, a relatively open society; but Syria looks a lot like Egypt in terms of dynastic politics, plus the Syrian regime are Alawites, not even sunni Muslims.  That may lead the army (where Alawites are seeded in key posts) to support the Syrian regime.  If there's a Ceacescu-style outcome in any of the region's countries, Syria is most likely to be it.

  •  We shouldn't place too much importance on ourself (10+ / 0-)

    The U.S. is an important factor because Mubarak is, and has been, a key U.S. ally. But the protests are almost entirely domestic-focused, and the U.S. isn't a major factor for demonstrators.

    U.S. support is important, and I suspect that if Mubarak leaves, it'll involve some back-channel words from the US. But this isn't about us. It's about Egypt.

  •  A Neutral US (15+ / 0-)
    is a pro-democracy US.  If Clinton had said somthing like We back our Alies through all their troubles, that would be a sign for Egypt to end the protests and get on with their depotisim.  

    By saying the US supports human rights, Clinton is saying, don't send in the tanks.

    This is good news, US support for these dicators is one of the main complaints the Arab world has with the US.

    US needs to stop supporting undemocractic governments, it works against us.

    You can ask the questions or provide the answers. If you are going to do both, I don't need to be in the conversation.

    by Edge PA on Fri Jan 28, 2011 at 09:57:06 AM PST

    •  If this suceeds, the rest of the Middle East... (6+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      varro, sapper, harrije, jfromga, Edge PA, graycat13

      will go with it. This will not be the end.

      There are two political aisles: Center-Left and Center-Right. It's impossible to cross them both. Republicans know this and govern accordingly; Democrats don't.

      by Jimdotz on Fri Jan 28, 2011 at 09:59:39 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  And this is a good thing (6+ / 0-)

        Democracy gives people a voice.  Powerless peole without hope are prime recurits for terrorist.

        There is a reason that so many terrorist are from Saudi Arabia ... it's a corrupt govrenment, but its citizens have time to worry about things other than feeding themselves.

        You can ask the questions or provide the answers. If you are going to do both, I don't need to be in the conversation.

        by Edge PA on Fri Jan 28, 2011 at 10:05:20 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  you may not think so when (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          sapper

          Islamist movements win elections all over the Middle East.

          Like it or not, the Muslim parties like Hezbollah and Hamas are the best-organized, best-funded and have the popular support.

          •  Short Term vs. Long Term (5+ / 0-)

            Short term, it will mean it is harder to get things done.  Long term, let people be governed by who they want.  Also, when Hezbollah and Hamas have to run a government, it is harder for them to act like terrorist organizations.  (See the PLO for example.)

            You can ask the questions or provide the answers. If you are going to do both, I don't need to be in the conversation.

            by Edge PA on Fri Jan 28, 2011 at 10:25:08 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  historically, of course, that has NEVER (4+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              cdreid, greendem, Richard Lyon, Edge PA

              been the US attitude--our attitude has always been "when democracy produces results we don't like, then fuck democracy".

              I see no sign of that attitude ever changing.

              •  Agree with your point (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                cdreid

                I am more hopeful for the future.

                You can ask the questions or provide the answers. If you are going to do both, I don't need to be in the conversation.

                by Edge PA on Fri Jan 28, 2011 at 10:43:51 AM PST

                [ Parent ]

                •  I'm a Democrat. I gave up Hope long ago. (1+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  cdreid

                  ;)

                  •  Hope is a place (1+ / 0-)
                    Recommended by:
                    cdreid

                    Not a thing ...

                    With the help of Goggle maps maybe you can find it again.

                    A more serious thought ...

                    We need to change what we do in the Middle East.  Supporting despots and unquestioned support of Iseral has made us the enemy of an entire region of the world.  Maybe supporting others who just want the same freedoms we already have might not be a bad idea.

                    I am an independant, I don't need your stinking hope or their stinking tax cuts.  I know this because every four years all you people want ME to like you and I can get whatever I want.

                    Mah-hah-hah

                    You can ask the questions or provide the answers. If you are going to do both, I don't need to be in the conversation.

                    by Edge PA on Fri Jan 28, 2011 at 11:45:11 AM PST

                    [ Parent ]

                    •  for us old enough to remember the Cold War (2+ / 0-)
                      Recommended by:
                      cdreid, Edge PA

                      We need to change what we do in the Middle East.  Supporting despots and unquestioned support of Iseral has made us the enemy of an entire region of the world.  Maybe supporting others who just want the same freedoms we already have might not be a bad idea.

                      this line of argument will be depressingly familiar---depressing because we still have to fight for it.

                      People don't fight us because they hate our freedoms--they fight us because they WANT our freedoms, and we are the biggest obstacle to them getting it.

                      As I said, this situation isn't new--and we have learned nothing at all whatsoever from the last time.

      •  Someone once said (5+ / 0-)

        Egypt is the only nation in the Middle East. The rest are tribes with flags.

        And Cairo is the intellectual center of Arab thought - has been for centuries.

        So as Egypt goes, so goes the Arab world.

        In theory, there is no difference between theory and practice; but in practice, there always is a difference. - Yogi Berra

        by blue aardvark on Fri Jan 28, 2011 at 10:12:35 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Make that millenia, not centuries. (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          createpeace

          The Library of Alexandria was one of the great intellectual centers of the ancient world.

          There are two political aisles: Center-Left and Center-Right. It's impossible to cross them both. Republicans know this and govern accordingly; Democrats don't.

          by Jimdotz on Fri Jan 28, 2011 at 10:30:59 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  Yes, Library of Alexandria (0+ / 0-)

            one of the 7 Wonders.

            But I think that circa 200 AD Athens and Rome would have surpassed it.

            I guess I wouldn't think of "Arab" thought prior to Mohammad. The Bedouin weren't intellectuals, by and large.

            In theory, there is no difference between theory and practice; but in practice, there always is a difference. - Yogi Berra

            by blue aardvark on Fri Jan 28, 2011 at 10:50:43 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

          •  I think (0+ / 0-)

            the people of Iran and Iraq would disagree with you.

            ..but if youre a writer you say all i wanna do is leave behind one story - Harlan Ellison

            by cdreid on Fri Jan 28, 2011 at 01:48:21 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

        •  More like countries... (0+ / 0-)

          ...being prizes, including Israel.

          Jordan is explicitly second prize for rule of the Arabian Peninsula.  "So sorry, old chap, but we gave this land to the Sauds.  Have this land instead.  Never mind the Palestinians on it - they won't bother you for another 50 years."

          9-11 changed everything? Well, Katrina changed it back.

          by varro on Fri Jan 28, 2011 at 10:59:25 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

      •  It's already spreading (0+ / 0-)

        across the Arab world.  You can read about it at Al Jazeera-English.  It's fascinating.

        "In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican." - H. L. Mencken

        by SueDe on Fri Jan 28, 2011 at 10:15:18 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

    •  She said more than that (6+ / 0-)

      "..for the Egyptian people and their government."

      Everything in her statement had the people first, that the government was subservient to their goals and aspirations.

      Here we are now Entertain us I feel stupid and contagious

      by Scarce on Fri Jan 28, 2011 at 10:13:39 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Got extraordinary rendition? (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    cdreid, varro

    I thought Mubarak's Egypt had facilitated America's extraordinary rendition program and tortured foreign nationals suspected of terrorism on our behalf.

    Now suddenly American is all about human rights. Wow. How the worm has turned.

  •  I love this country... (6+ / 0-)

    Our commitment to human rights is strong...as long as it appears the protesters are going to win.

    Its like a foreign policy based on Vegas odds.

  •  It was a good statement. (16+ / 0-)

    Strikes the proper balance, I think.

    Reports are that the army is standing aside to an extent.

    "Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity." --M. L. King "You can't fix stupid" --Ron White

    by zenbassoon on Fri Jan 28, 2011 at 09:58:41 AM PST

  •  They fired tear gas during PRAYERS. (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    cdreid, sapper, blue aardvark

    Dumb move

    "Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity." --M. L. King "You can't fix stupid" --Ron White

    by zenbassoon on Fri Jan 28, 2011 at 09:59:56 AM PST

    •  As I understand, in Egypt the clergy (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      cdreid, sapper

      are one of the few uncontrolled voices.

      So, yeah, this won't work so well. Next Friday there will be some interesting sermons given.

      In theory, there is no difference between theory and practice; but in practice, there always is a difference. - Yogi Berra

      by blue aardvark on Fri Jan 28, 2011 at 10:15:03 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Things are developing quikly (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    sapper, harrije

    I am cautiously optimistic that the violence will not break out of control.

  •  The tear gas canisters have a label on them: (4+ / 0-)

    Made in the USA

    "Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity." --M. L. King "You can't fix stupid" --Ron White

    by zenbassoon on Fri Jan 28, 2011 at 10:00:20 AM PST

  •  Mubarak expected to speak soon (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    sapper, Plubius

    "Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity." --M. L. King "You can't fix stupid" --Ron White

    by zenbassoon on Fri Jan 28, 2011 at 10:00:39 AM PST

  •  It was rather amazing a couple hours ago, (5+ / 0-)

    while Al-J was showing live shots from their vantage point of the police backing away and letting the protesters do their prayers, the reporter was relaying that the police were entering their building (where they and other media are located).

    Looks like they're still broadcasting from that same spot though - for now at least.

    Wow.

    And yet another argument for Net Neutrality I'd say.

    The Left rejects American Boehnerism.

    by here4tehbeer on Fri Jan 28, 2011 at 10:01:17 AM PST

  •  If it weren't for our government (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Euroliberal, nicta

    Mubarak would have been gone decades ago. Just sayin'..

    I can't give you a brain, but I can give you a diploma- Wizard of Oz; If you have half a brain you won't need a diploma- Frank Levey

    by weathercoins on Fri Jan 28, 2011 at 10:02:06 AM PST

    •  Hmmmm (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      ferg, wader, moonpal

      I don't think US aid has been the main factor in his success.

      US aid $50B since 1975

      Egyptian economy about $500B/year

      Government expenditures about $64B / year.

      So, we have been providing maybe 2% of the government budget. That's NOT enough to make Mubarak fall without us.

      In theory, there is no difference between theory and practice; but in practice, there always is a difference. - Yogi Berra

      by blue aardvark on Fri Jan 28, 2011 at 10:20:00 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Plenty of Arab autocracies have stayed (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      wader, moonpal

      in power without US support.  

      "[R]ather high-minded, if not a bit self-referential"--The Washington Post.

      by Geekesque on Fri Jan 28, 2011 at 10:27:08 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  with an extremist government in place, (0+ / 0-)

      and then displaced, and back in place, and displaced by another band of hoodlums, and back in place, and so on and so on. In spite of (or because of) the repression and stagnation, Mubarak provided the only sense of order in the United States' perception of a raging mad Middle East.

      "Half of the American people never read a newspaper. Half never vote for President. One hopes it is the same half." - Gore Vidal

      by sapper on Fri Jan 28, 2011 at 10:42:16 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  oddly enough, that was precisely the argument (0+ / 0-)

        that apologists in the US made for its military support to unelected butcher-regimes all over the world during the Cold War.

        Some of us are old enough to remember (but not to see the split hair) the careful distinction Kirkpatrick made between "authoritarian" regimes (our friends) and "dictatorships" (our enemies).

        We're still playing the very same game.  

        We never learn anything.

  •  Marc Lynch on Clinton's remarks (12+ / 0-)

    RT @p_mandaville: Clinton's emph on need for Egyptian gov to make reforms "immediately" 1st time USG used this kind of lang w/regime
    11 minutes ago via TweetDeck

    RT @mwhanna1: US messaging and position, public and private, do matter a great deal and will figure in calculations by military.
    12 minutes ago via TweetDeck

    RT @TimFernholz: RT @NJAamer: WH: Obama received a 40-minute briefing on the situation in Egypt. http://bit.ly/...
    13 minutes ago via TweetDeck

    I think some folks need to go to Tahrir Sq to explain how protests vindicate Bush + Iraq war. I'll call the ambulance.
    18 minutes ago via TweetDeck

    Don't lfocus on what Obama admin saying to protestors, focus on message to those inside Egyptian regime who have to choose.
    18 minutes ago via TweetDeck

    Clinton no longer talking long-term, small-scale reform --- recognition of urgency of situation + clear message to regime elements
    21 minutes ago via TweetDeck

    AJ: Protestors trying to storm Egyptian television, Foreign Ministry
    26 minutes ago via TweetDeck

    Clinton: there are deep grievances within Egyptian society, Egyptian government needs to understand that violence will not make them go away
    28 minutes ago via TweetDeck

    RT @Brian_Whit: Looks to me as if Clinton is offering to broker a compromise between Egyptian govt and opponents #jan25

    Link.

    Also, Brian Whitaker, a Middle East expert from The Guardian says:

    It looks to me as if Clinton is angling for a negotiated departure by Mubarak, accompanied by an increase in political freedom. I think the US is aiming to structure the solution in a way that would protect its key interests: the peace treaty with Israel, the Suez canal, and co-operation against terrorism.

    •  Canal critical (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      cdreid, sapper, wader

      And I hope the protesters don't do anything foolish.

      Close that canal and it's going to be a cold February in Europe as the Persian Gulf oil tankers suddenly have to circumnavigate Africa.

      In theory, there is no difference between theory and practice; but in practice, there always is a difference. - Yogi Berra

      by blue aardvark on Fri Jan 28, 2011 at 10:21:57 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  need to porceed with caution (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    sapper, harrije, jfromga

    Other U.S. backed Democratic rebellions have turned out badly..Iran, 1970s & Cuba 1959.

    •  We do very badly (5+ / 0-)

      when we interfere.

      Best to stand for principles and stand back and let things work out as they will.

      And 1959 was hardly the singular moment when we screwed up Cuba. We've been screwing up that country non-stop since at least as far back as 1898.

    •  Democratic?? (0+ / 0-)

      I wouldnt call either coup either democratic or a rebellion. They were both US financed coups. Though in the case of cuba we seemed to whatever stupid shit seemed fun at the moment then abandon it the next moment so we could be sure Everyone hated us except the mafia (who still wait in miami drooling at the return of the good ol days).

      ..but if youre a writer you say all i wanna do is leave behind one story - Harlan Ellison

      by cdreid on Fri Jan 28, 2011 at 01:53:43 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Army (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    sapper, jfromga

    If the army doesn't help the police, we have exactly the same situation we had in Tunisia, and probably the end of Mubarak. Thank you MSNBC and Al Jazeera

    I can't give you a brain, but I can give you a diploma- Wizard of Oz; If you have half a brain you won't need a diploma- Frank Levey

    by weathercoins on Fri Jan 28, 2011 at 10:03:28 AM PST

  •  I think Secretary Clinton's statement translates (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    sapper, jfromga

    "Good luck, Hosni. You're on your own."

    The Republican motto: "There's been a lot of progress in this country over the last 75 years, and we've been against all of it."

    by Hillbilly Dem on Fri Jan 28, 2011 at 10:04:33 AM PST

  •  Food prices feeding protests (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    sapper, jfromga

    Not only are prices approaching 2008 highs that caused riots in several countries. Several governments are stockpiling food right now driving prices even higher. If Egypt's protesters are hungry, they won't stop.

  •  Guardian ME expert on Egyptian Democracy (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    sapper, harrije, jfromga, blue aardvark

    Q. A question about an Eqyptian democracy... is there a basis for hope? is there a political culture that can step up to represent the people and what role will youth play in the new landscape?

    Brian's Answer: Egypt already has the infrastructure to turn into a working democracy -- elected parliament, long-established political parties, etc. The problem is the the NDP has monopolised this system for a very long time. So the transition to a working democracy would not be all that difficult, though I would expect it to be a somewhat flawed democracy for some time - maybe like some of the East European or Latin American countries. One problem is that most of the opposition parties are just as hidebound as the regime. The younger "Facebook generation" doesn't seem to have much interest in them and prefers to do things in its own way. Youth movements are going to become more and more important, and they are a very hopeful sign.

    Q. What are the chances that all this could be repeated in Syria?

    Brian's answer: I was discussing that with an Arab friend yesterday. We both felt that it would be very difficult at present in Syria to organise the kind of protests seen in Tunisia and Egypt. One thing you need for it to happen is a civil society structure of some kind, whether it's trade unions, opposition parties or NGOs, plus a lot of internet users. I don't think Syria has that. Instead, it as a very proficient secret police.

    That said, I would expect the Syrian regime to be very scared. Yemenis have told me of the panic in the Marxist regime in the PDRY following the revolution in Romania in 1989 -- they feared it could happen to them. I would expect similar fears in the Syrian regime.

    Who knows? Could they be the ones who decide to reform rather than waiting to be toppled?

    Q. How likely do you think it is that these uprisings will drive Egypt & Tunisia towards democracy? Is it likely that these situations will descend into sectarian or ethnic conflict as we seen in Kyrgyzstan last year?

    Brian's answer: Adapting to democracy will be a lot easier in Tunisia and Egypt than it was in Iraq. There are no major ethnic issues; Egypt does have something of a sectarian problem but it is not insurmountable.

    Link.

  •  Human Rights v. Treasury Transfers (0+ / 0-)

    Did she also ensure Mubarek that the monthly check from Treasury is in the mail too?

  •  There is a European communication satellite (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    varro, jfromga

    right near Cairo:

    Astra_1D

    I don't think that SES, which is French, is going to listen to Mubarak if he asks for a shut-down of AJ.

    They might jam, of course, but once the uplink hits Astra_1D (or any of a number of other visible satellites) the dictatorship has no control over what happens.

    In theory, there is no difference between theory and practice; but in practice, there always is a difference. - Yogi Berra

    by blue aardvark on Fri Jan 28, 2011 at 10:06:30 AM PST

  •  All is calm on Egyptian tv though.... (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    harrije, Geekesque, jfromga, blue aardvark

    Al-Jazeera showed incredible footage of a vehicle burning in Cairo burning alongside "live" state TV pictures showing a relatively calm scene:

    A screengrab from al-Jazeera showing the difference between its own coverage (l) and that from Egyptian state TV (r) of the protests in Cairo. Photograph: Al-Jazeera

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/...

    Here we are now Entertain us I feel stupid and contagious

    by Scarce on Fri Jan 28, 2011 at 10:06:46 AM PST

  •  These are encouraging statements from SoS Clinton (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    harrije, jfromga, moonpal

    given the United States governments relationship with the current Egyptian government and general desire for "stability" in allied governments.

    Politically they are in need of walking a very fine line and so far are doing it well. Let's hope they continue to stay on the line and that if they fall off to one side or the other that they fall off to the side of the people and not that of repressive government.

    Side with the people America.

    Peace,

    Andrew

    "Do what you can with what you have where you are." - Teddy Roosevelt

    by Andrew C White on Fri Jan 28, 2011 at 10:07:39 AM PST

  •  Travel the Web (0+ / 0-)

    And read some of the comments being made by obvious tepublican types who are trying to do a quick job of rovian revisionist history by writing like they are embracing what the Egyptians, Muslims, are doing. Like they've always been loving brothers and sisters of not only the Egyptians but All in that region and the others as well as here!!

    Women say 7,000 a day, Men 2000plus, little sarah at around 28,000 w/no common sense nor idea's!

    by jimstaro on Fri Jan 28, 2011 at 10:08:50 AM PST

  •  Well said Clinton. Now, how about supportinh (0+ / 0-)

    the universal human rights of the American people, plus Gitmo detainees? Mr. Nobel Peace Prize winner has been lacking quite a bit in that area. Nobody likes hypocrites...

  •  The U.S. is late to the party-- (0+ / 0-)

    ---as usual.

    Our revolution inspired revolutionaries worldwide, and we have done our very best to suppress reform, evolution, and revolution that are in the interest of people at nearly every opportunity. (Post WWII Japan and Europe partially excepted.)

    Perhaps President Obama's speeches in the Arab world early in his presidency helped to inspire a bit of what is happening now; I'd like to think so, but I think it was minimal, if any.

    Joe

    Save energy! Install the dimmest bulbs available: Vote Republican.

    by CitizenJoe on Fri Jan 28, 2011 at 10:17:21 AM PST

  •  Video missing? (0+ / 0-)

    IS the video working for other people?

    "How did you go bankrupt?" "Two ways. Gradually, then suddenly." - Ernest Hemingway, The Sun Also Rises.

    by weasel on Fri Jan 28, 2011 at 10:17:41 AM PST

  •  Was listening to FOX News Lite (NPR/WNYC) today.. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    jfromga

    where the host in question (Brian Lehrer) was doing his usual insidious leading question schtick with various guests -  the upshot being that the MSM seems to be hoping to frame dissent in Egypt/Tunisia as being generated by the Taliban and/or Iran.

    Fortunately, Lehrer was shot down by guests who suggested that its ridiculous that Shiite Iran would have any clout in Suni Egypt, and that perhaps it is Tunisia's govt that might have links to the Taliban, not the opposition.

    Irregardless, I suggest folks keep a wary eye on MSM reporting of these issues, as I have no reason to doubt it is in the interest of the corporate powers-that-be to keep compliant middle-eastern dictators  in power and to quash any sort of liberalization of these countries.

    And no doubt the Saudis (the second biggest shareholder of NewsCorp is a Saudi) are made very nervous by al this too.

    The White House would do well NOT to antagonize the people pushing back against oppressive regimes, especially if we do NOT want to aid and abet religious extremists gaining more power in these nations.

  •  The Internet in Egypt (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    jfromga, blue aardvark, moonpal

    Free Image Hosting at www.ImageShack.us

    Internet in Egypt, as far as we can tell, has now been disabled for a full 24 hours. Arbor Networks, which has been monitoring traffic in and out of the country over 80 service providers, has released an updated graphic:

    http://blogs.aljazeera.net/...

    Here we are now Entertain us I feel stupid and contagious

    by Scarce on Fri Jan 28, 2011 at 10:20:28 AM PST

  •  Foreign Policy blogger praises Obama Admin (8+ / 0-)

    ... re: Egypt and Tunisia.

    Article: Principled Neutrality? By Andrew Albertson

    Excerpt:

    In addition to expressing support for universal principles and refusing to offer unquestioned support for scrambling authoritarians, the Obama administration has done three more things right.

    First, it hasn't leaped to take credit for democratic uprisings, in the way that characterized the high times of the Bush administration freedom agenda, preferring instead to stay out of the spotlight in Tunisia's inspiring national drama. As Tunisians work to build a new, more democratic national narrative, they are rightly proud to note that they did it on their own.

    Second, the administration seems to be smartly concentrating on regime violence. If there's anything the U.S. is well-placed to do, it may be preventing a violent reprisal of the Tiananmen disaster by an allied government like Egypt - particularly with weapons financed by US aid money. Few things will be more important for the course of events in Egypt and elsewhere in the Arab world than that government forces refrain from using deadly force.

    Finally, it appears ready and willing to translate the present instability into increased pressure for reforms. Speaking from Tunis, Assistant Secretary for Near East Affairs Jeffrey Feltman said Wednesday, "I certainly expect that we'll be using the Tunisian example" in conversations with other Arab governments.

    Secretary Clinton made the point more dramatically last week: speaking in Doha just one day before Ben Ali fled, she warned a gathering of Arab foreign ministers: "Those who cling to the status quo may be able to hold back the full impact of their countries' problems for a little while, but not forever." The U.S. benefits most not from protests on the streets, but from steady democratic reforms by governments themselves, in concert with popular participation. That's the true road to stability. And there has never been a better moment for the U.S. to articulate this message to Arab governments, in public and in private.

    During the first two years of the Obama administration, many observers have been quick to criticize its quiet approach to supporting human rights and democracy in the Middle East. I'll admit that I've been one.

    But perhaps it's time for a reassessment. During this unstable period, these five elements have had a positive impact: consistent support for universal principles, refusal to take sides, reticence to take the spotlight, focus on regime violence, and a readiness to respond to crisis with calls for reform.

    One can only hope the administration has the fortitude and farsightedness to stick with this strategy as protests build.

  •  Clinton (0+ / 0-)

    is a disgrace. She and the Obama administration needed to come out in full support of the Egyptian popular uprising. They did not.

  •  Should be happening here. n.t (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    cdreid

    What we need is a Democrat in the White House.

    by dkmich on Fri Jan 28, 2011 at 10:25:49 AM PST

    •  We live in a functioning democracy. (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      sapper

      We are not oppressed.

      •  I would like to disagree but can't exactly (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        sapper

        I think the buying of elections isn't exactly a sign of a functioning democracy.   But we chose it for ourselves over the years.

      •  functioning democracy? pfft! (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        cdreid

        Bush and his daddy's Supreme Court stole the election and lied us into war.  He tortured and committed war crimes for which he isn't being held accountable.   Corporations own the ballot boxes and the politicians.  They buy elections and the laws they need to favor them over the people.  The constitutions say nowhere "we the corporations".  

        We don't have majority rule, and we sure as shit aren't a representative democracy.  When's the last time those yahoos in DC passed anything the people support?  Public option/Medicare for all?  Raise the cap on Social Security?   Raise taxes on billionaires?   Renegotiate NAFTA and other bad trade deals?   Stop the war on drugs/legalize pot?  Let the banks fail?  

        The only people not oppressed in this country is the top 1%.

        What we need is a Democrat in the White House.

        by dkmich on Fri Jan 28, 2011 at 11:00:14 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  That's quite a tell. (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    cdreid, ferg, greendem, marcvstraianvs

    Sad to say, but "we support the universal human rights of the Egyptian people" is pretty much a vote of no-confidence in Mubarak.

    "[R]ather high-minded, if not a bit self-referential"--The Washington Post.

    by Geekesque on Fri Jan 28, 2011 at 10:26:01 AM PST

  •  Senator Kerry's statement on Eqypt is good (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    sapper, jfromga, Jerry056

    "

    I call on the Egyptian government and security forces to exercise restraint in dealing with protesters and to respect the human rights of its citizens to seek greater participation in their own government. The Egyptian government also should immediately restore communications and access to social networking sites," he said.

    "I hope the people of Egypt will continue to remember the lessons and legacy of peaceful protesters from Gandhi to Dr. King and to exercise their right to be heard in that tradition, which will rally peaceful people everywhere in solidarity," Kerry added.

    Still, he stressed, it's "not with rubber bullets and water cannons that order will be restored" in the four-day-old street protests in which demonstrators have been clashing with and even chasing down riot police.

    "President Mubarak has the opportunity to quell the unrest by guaranteeing that a free and open democratic process will be in place when the time comes to choose the country’s next leader later this year," Kerry said.

    http://thehill.com/...

  •  The British seem to be coordinating with the US. (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    greendem, moonpal

    The foreign minister Hague has issued a statement along similar lines as Clinton's. They would appear to have decided to pull the plug on Mubarak. Beyond Egypt pots are boiling in Tunisia, Yemen and Jordan. The ability of the US to continue to control the Middle East is getting a bit flaky.

  •  The Death of CNN (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    cdreid, ferg, sapper

    If the Michelle Bachman didn't put the nail in the coffing, watching AlJazeera outclass all the major networks in the USA today is just amazing.

    The center of the world has shifted overnight, and the US media has missed the boat.

    BBC, Guardian UK, and France 24 are doing great work as well in the western media.

    •  Actually, CNN hasn't been bad today (4+ / 0-)

      They've switched to CNN Intl' and it's generally quite good. They should stick to this stuff more instead of their stupid attempts to outfox FOX. Fewer stupid political talk shows and more world news, please!

      AJ has been excellent, but in fairness, they ARE based in the Arab world, so you'd expect them to have more expertise and better coverage.

    •  Wow... (0+ / 0-)

      ...you couldn't be more wrong and so I'm guessing your comment is more about reflexive attacks (based on the Bachmann appearance) than reality. CNN is actually doing pretty well providing comprehensive coverage and on the standard of other American/European networks. And of course Al Jazeera is providing the best coverage of protests in an Arab state -- if they weren't that'd be the end of THEM. If there were a revolt in Ireland BBC would be best, and in Atlanta CNN, etc.

      it fitfully blows, half conceals, half discloses

      by Addison on Fri Jan 28, 2011 at 10:58:57 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  my connection (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Plubius

    turned really sluggish like molasses for about 10 minutes. couldn't even get a page. anybody else?

  •  Good news (0+ / 0-)

    It seems the army is going to play a role similar to the Turkish model.

  •  Tell JoBi this is a "Big F***ing Deal" (0+ / 0-)

    You are What You Eat; Eat the Rich.

    by olo on Fri Jan 28, 2011 at 10:52:30 AM PST

  •  it's good to know that hypocrisy is always (0+ / 0-)

    part of the US repetoire.  Where was our concern for universal human rights while we were propping up the Egyptian dictator ?

    big badda boom : GRB 080913

    by squarewheel on Fri Jan 28, 2011 at 10:55:49 AM PST

  •  so what's the next govt going to be ? (0+ / 0-)

    another dictator or just a military junta ?

    big badda boom : GRB 080913

    by squarewheel on Fri Jan 28, 2011 at 10:57:01 AM PST

  •  The U.S. will do business with anyone as long (0+ / 0-)

    as they're in power. That Clinton and Obama are now openly criticizing Mubarak says volumes more about the chances of Mubarak's political survival than any report from the ground.

  •  Hillary did an excellent job (0+ / 0-)

    Gibbs was babbling like an idiot. Any press spokesman with a brain would have been very very tight lipped.

    What youre seeing here is the result of Worldbank/IMF policies over time folks. Its coming to other countries near you soon.

    ..but if youre a writer you say all i wanna do is leave behind one story - Harlan Ellison

    by cdreid on Fri Jan 28, 2011 at 01:40:42 PM PST

  •  I've got to say (0+ / 0-)

    The sheer level of information, smart analysis, and wisdom in this stories comments is stunning. Its a damn shame we dont have more kossacks and fewer dc hacks and MIC gangsters in charge of our foreign policy (this is NOT snark).

    ..but if youre a writer you say all i wanna do is leave behind one story - Harlan Ellison

    by cdreid on Fri Jan 28, 2011 at 01:55:14 PM PST

  •  Vive la revolution! Vive la dial-up! (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    cdreid

    Egypt has shut down internet access and their cell phone service.
    So the French internet provider FDN has opened up their dial up service.

    http://lifehacker.com/...

    From the FDN site.:

    Internet Censorship in Egypt: a humble action from FDN

    According To this news article last night it Appears That The Egyptian governing bodies Ordered The Egyptian Internet service providers to shut down Their international interconnections, and Them With The Rest Of The Internet.

    This action WAS frighteningly efficient today as the Internet "unlearned" how to reach Egypt and It Is No Longer possible to Communicate With The egyptian people by email, forums, usenet, or Any Other IP-based technology.

    Followings this, this morning SMS services Seem To Have Been Shut Down aussi thereby depriving people of The Egypt of mean "any electronic communcation.

    For this Reason, and This Is Because definitely has open attack from a state Against Internet NDF has Decided to have small Window on the network by Giving access to anyone INTERESTED modem access account.

    This way, anyone in Egypt Who has access to a analog phone line and call Cdn France Is Able to Connect to the network using THE FOLLOWING number: +33 1 72 89 01 50 (login: foo , password: foo ).

    We hope by this action to Contribute To The freedom of expression of the Egyptian people and allow 'em to keep a connection With The Rest of the World. Finally let's FDN Emphasize That Offers A technical solution only.

    How far to the right do the Dems have to move before you stop calling them Dems?

    by Diebold Hacker on Fri Jan 28, 2011 at 02:29:27 PM PST

  •  Caution Is Need (0+ / 0-)

    Obviously we all want freedom and democracy to emerge everywhere it can, that goes without saying, but just to make it clear I said it.

    However, we have to consider that Egypt is not Europe and we don't know what will emerge.

    Best case scenario would be a quasi democracy, they simply aren't going to go from thousands of years of non democracy to full western democracy overnight.

    Call this the psuedo Turkey scenario, though without the secular imprint that Turkey has.

    That is because the clerics are going to have a role in society that is much greater than we would tolerate. For all of the problems with the religious right in the US they aren't anywhere close to what groups like Muslim Brotherhood have in much of the Islamic world.

    That of course leads to the worst case scenario which would be the Iran scenario with hard line clerics in charge.

    Luckily this is less likely but if it happens it would be a complete disaster, especially considering that Egypt still has the power to starve out Israel and that is not a situation we want to even think about.

  •  To the people of Egypt (0+ / 0-)

    My best wishes to the Egyptian people protesting and any people who are deprived of human rights.

  •  well, that's better than her China statement (0+ / 0-)

    if you recall

  •  Hillary is perfect! (0+ / 0-)

    Mubarak is dead meat. He'll be gone with a few weeks. Sec. Clinton nailed the judicious official foreign policy decision on the current strife in Egypt. By saying that we support the aspirations of the people, she's saying that we are not going to swoop in and try to buck up the Mubarak regime. That is exactly what they needed to hear on the streets of Cairo. They will now go about establishing self-determination without fear of reprisal from us. It's a done deal.

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