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Ta-Nehisi Coates:

Last week we saw quite a few African-American bloggers and writers offering critiques of birtherism and race. The salient point is that the tradition of attacking the citizenship rights of African-Americans extends from slave codes to state-wide bans on black residence to black codes to debt peonage to literacy tests, to felon disenfranchisement. You literally can trace attacks on black citizenship from the very origins of American citizenship itself, up into the present day. …

…when broad sections of this country foolishly follow a carnival barker in the ugly tradition of attacking black citizenship rights, when pundits shriek  that Obama's successes are simply the result of the misguided largess of white people, they undermine our most intimate war. They undermine the notion that someone familiar to that kid on the corner could legitimately reach the highest levels of the country, that someone like that kid's Aunt could be the First Lady. They undermine this country's social contract, and the "hard work pays" message of my parents. And to that we object.

For if they will not take as legitimate a magna cum laude from their highest institutions, if they will not accept a man who tells black kids to cut off the video games and study, who accedes to their absurd requests one week, and slays their demons the next, who will they accept? Who among us would they ever believe?

Ann Coulter proves she hasn't gotten any smarter in the 10 years since she said the U.S. should invade Muslim countries and convert all the civilians who aren't killed in the attack to Christianity. She hasn't gotten any funnier either.

Charles Fried and Gregory Fried:  

In this all civilized men and women agree: Torture is condemned by American law, international law and by the pronouncements of the Roman Catholic Church. In 2005 it was condemned by Congress at the instance of, among others, Sen. John McCain. Now, the same apologists who applauded President George W. Bush's authorization of torture—and make no mistake, waterboarding is torture—are working to stain this great triumph. They argue that but for their barbaric treatment of detainees through 2003, we would never have found our man.

Paul Krugman says key indicators indicate that the economic recovery may be sputtering:

And it wasn’t much of a recovery to start with. Employment has risen from its low point, but it has grown no faster than the adult population. And the plight of the unemployed continues to worsen: more than six million Americans have been out of work for six months or longer, and more than four million have been jobless for more than a year.

It would be nice if someone in Washington actually cared.

Tom Hayden:

There is no excuse for not beginning to end these wars one at a time, at vast savings in lives and billions in tax dollars. This is Obama's moment of opportunity. Let the hawks in the Pentagon and the Republican Party call for endless war in Afghanistan and Iraq. Obama can campaign on ending two quagmires, and on breaking the momentum of the long war on terrorism that some propose. Indeed, the Democratic National Committee, even before the weekend mission against Bin Laden, passed without dissent a resolution by Rep. Barbara Lee (D-Oakland) calling for a significant withdrawal from Afghanistan starting this summer.

Cal Thomas drones out the oil-company line. Remember when I was editing you, Cal? Never use the same boring construction twice in the same sentence.  

Gordon Adams has some defense spending suggestions for Leon Panetta, including:

The defense budget could actually be cut by $1 trillion, or 15 percent below current projections over the next decade, and there is a wealth of proposals for how to do it, starting with those from the president’s own fiscal responsibility commission, the Rivlin-Domenici debt task force and the report by Reps. Barney Frank and Ron Paul.

Ed Quillen said that in his hometown of Salida, Colorado, there wasn't a lot of interest in Osama bin Laden's departure from this earth because it isn't going to change anything:

We will not close Guantanamo. We will not dismantle the Homeland Security Administration. Our government will not eliminate warrantless wiretaps, nor those secret National Security Letters.

We will not open roads that have been closed on account of "security," and we will not reopen facilities like dams and power plants that were closed to the public after 9/11.

You will still run the risk of being groped and probed if you want to board an airplane, and you will still need to provide all manner of identification for routine transactions.

We will still be at war in Afghanistan and Iraq and at whatever we're at over Libya. We will still owe trillions in debt from these wars as we borrow even more money.

Jack Lessenberry writes that in Michigan there is one group which does not agree that raising taxes is political suicide: the voters.

Ari Paul wonders if Sandy Pope can revive the Teamsters:

There was a time when the Teamsters called the shots in the hauling industry. (Recall the joke, How many Teamsters does it take to screw in a light bulb? Twelve. You got a problem with that?) Now the 1.4 million–member union has shed its street-fighting image and is focusing its efforts on Washington in hopes that legislative action rather than shop-floor organizing can force giants like FedEx into unionization. But as Pope tells it, Hoffa, elected president in 1998 and re-elected twice, betrayed the positive aspects of his father’s storied presidency—the mobilization of the membership and the founding of viable pensions—and is unable to confront the corrupt elements that led to Hoffa Senior’s downfall

Tom Wright:

Consider the following scenario. A group of Irish republican terrorists carries out a bombing raid in London. People are killed and wounded. The group escapes, first to Ireland, then to the US, where they disappear into the sympathetic hinterland of a country where IRA leaders have in the past been welcomed at the White House. Britain cannot extradite them, because of the gross imbalance of the relevant treaty. So far, this seems plausible enough.

But now imagine that the British government, seeing the murderers escape justice, sends an aircraft carrier (always supposing we've still got any) to the Nova Scotia coast. From there, unannounced, two helicopters fly in under the radar to the Boston suburb where the terrorists are holed up. They carry out a daring raid, killing the (unarmed) leaders and making their escape. Westminster celebrates; Washington is furious.

What's the difference between this and the recent events in Pakistan? Answer: American exceptionalism. America is subject to different rules to the rest of the world. By what right? Who says?

A Minneapolis Star Tribune Editorial says the Republican-pushed bill requiring voters to show a photo I.D. is a bad idea, not least of all because some 440,000 voting-age Minnesotans have no driver's license or state-issued identity card.  

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Comment Preferences

  •  Tom Wright is wrong---if for no other reason than (32+ / 0-)

    that if Britain asked for help in capturing those guys, the US would have aided them.  Pakistan was not helping us; and may likely have actually aided OBL.
    Big difference, IMO.

    •  Bingo. There you go. Beat me to it. (15+ / 0-)

      Plenty of false equivalencies spouting around after the death of a mastermind of terrorism.

      One bitter fact is two bit hacks populate the third rate fourth estate who are truly the fifth columnists.
      A No-Drama Obama Site & Some Straight Talkin'

      by amk for obama on Fri May 06, 2011 at 04:48:36 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  False equivalencies! Great answer. (0+ / 0-)

        I would not be quick to say that the "answer" is "American exceptionalism" -- that is an oversimplification.

        And the comparison to the attack in question to an IRA bombing in London is quite ludicrous.  If the IRA had done anything on the scale of the attacks of September 11, 2001, they would not have likely found safe harbor in the US.

        However, I can see how others elsewhere in the world might see this as a case of "American exceptionalism" and we should be prepared to deal with that in a reasonable (and not chest-thumping) manner.

        "Don't bring that horse in here!" -- Cassandra

        by tc59 on Fri May 06, 2011 at 11:17:12 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  Completely agree (6+ / 0-)

      I would say that not only would we have helped Britain, but the minute the bombers killed dozens of people, our citizens would, by and large, immediately have turned on them.

      Look at what happened to the Irish back in the day?  They had huge support in this country and in Ireland.  Then they bombed some police in London and killed them.  They totally lost support. WHy? Because in the bombing, 8 horses died.

      •  They lost support because the coppers (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        SuetheRedWA, rbird

        had relatives both in America and in Australia.

        Also, it became clear that every single dangerous Irish mental case had been recruited into one or another IRA offshoot. Looney tunes with American and then Gaddafi financed guns/bombs..

        Financial criminals + Angry White Males + Personality Disorder dreamers + KKKwannabes + George Will =EQ= The GOPer Base (-4.38,-3.74)

        by vets74 on Fri May 06, 2011 at 05:24:49 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  agree and add; (6+ / 0-)

        If the US was upset about this hypothetical violation of sovereignity, I would not, as a citizen, be among those expressing outrage.
        If my country is unable or unwilling to see justice done (i'm looking at YOU bush/Cheney cabal and banksters alike) then i would have zero problem with a civilized nation taking matters into its own hands.
        Justice is far more important to the advancement of civilization than the sacred right of every entity with its own flag to tell everyone else to "get off my lawn".

        Dear Confederacy, please remember what happened last time you acted like this.

        by kamarvt on Fri May 06, 2011 at 05:25:54 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Not to pile on....but I will anyway (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Larsstephens

          Tom Wright might have had a point.....oh, wait, he doesn't have a leg to stand on.  The SAS has been involved in operations all over the planet, in Europe, in foreign countries, everywhere pretty much, for the last sixty years.  They've carried out hit operations against the IRA, participated in counter-terror strikes, hell, you name the country, they've been there shooting the place up.

          If you go back even farther, the Brits set up a spy ring in the USA during WW2.

          The British government has played fast and loose with the politics of other countries for the past hundred years or so.  

          Do I spite them for it?  No.  That's how the game of nations is played.  The French and Israelis have on-going spy operations in the USA . . . and they're our allies.  Allies spy on allies.  Allies sometimes even put hits on dangerous people inside the borders of other allied nations.

          I leave you with a quote from my favorite movie.  Somehow, I see Tom Wright in one of the roles.

          Rick: How can you close me up? On what grounds?
          Renault: I’m shocked, shocked to find that gambling is going on in here.
          Employee of Rick's: [hands Renault money] Your winnings, sir.
          Renault: Oh, thank you, very much. Everybody out at once!

          "It was like that when I got here." - Homer Simpson

          by rbird on Fri May 06, 2011 at 12:27:05 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

    •  The crass viewpoint: (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      SuetheRedWA, Larsstephens

      I don't want to sound crass, but the billions of my taxpayer dollars (not GE's; not fund managers'; not Goldman's) that have gone to Pakistan's corrupt ruling class bought that right.

      What's the difference between this and the recent events in Pakistan? Answer: American exceptionalism. America is subject to different rules to the rest of the world. By what right? Who says?

      Personally, I'm not much in favor of piping the billions, wars in two countries, or the commando raid.

      Thump! Bang. Whack-boing. It's dub!

      by dadadata on Fri May 06, 2011 at 05:24:11 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  The other big difference (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Kev, tc59, a gilas girl

      is that I would bet that through most of that era there were undercover British agents working in places like Boston with the full knowledge of their US counterparts.

      OTOH, if the Brits had flown a couple of helicopters into Southie, they'd have been lucky to get a flywheel back.  You can't park there unless you've lived there for twenty years and expect to come back to it in one piece.

      Remember to kick it over.

      by sprogga on Fri May 06, 2011 at 06:20:03 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Um, it was an analogy (0+ / 0-)

      Wherein the analogy the US was aiding and abetting (playing the role of Pakistan) the terrorist(s) that Britain wanted (playing the role of the US).

      I realize that such things are lost on folks like yourself. But this was simply an analogy using two different countries as the actors in the events that unfolded under exactly the same conditions.

      What you are reading into it is the existing cooperative relationship between Britain and the US - which is NOT part of the person's analogy.

      •  Then the person's analogy is dumb (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        tc59

        They are completely different scenarios in every way.  

        •  Okay (0+ / 0-)

          What that op-ed person didn't write in detail in the analogy was this:

          The IRA does a bombing in Britain killing 3000 people.

          The leader of the IRA goes to the US.

          Britain suspects that the IRA leader is in the US.

          US denies this, but vows to look anyway.

          US tells Britain we looked but can't find the guy.

          Britain spends more time gathering intelligence and determines once again that its is highly likely the IRA leader is in the US.

          Britain tells the US.

          US denies it but vows to take a look and really try this time.

          US tells Britain that they looked this time even under the bed, in the closet, and under the pillows but no such luck.

          Britain is certain that the US government and/or military  or portions of it know exactly where the IRA leader is and is protecting him.

          Britain finally tracks down a courier's name for the IRA leader and identifies a property about 100 yards from West Point. It has 18 foot walls topped with barbed wire.

          Britain launches a commando operation into the US and raids that property, kills the IRA leader, and dumps the body in the Atlantic.

          Britain announces the raid into sovereign US territory right under the noses of the US military and without informing the US government in advance.

          Britain questions how it would be possible for the US government and/or military not to know that the IRA leader was living 100 yards from the gates of West Point in a fortress-like compound.

          I am sure that the writer expected his audience to not all be completely clueless on the circumstances of the events being exactly the same with only the names of the countries involved being different.

          Given the military capability of the US what exactly would the reaction of the US government be to such an incursion into the US? Would the US just sit there and do nothing or would they do something about it - anything from military action to economic and diplomatic actions against and to isolate Britain.

          His point being that the US can go anywhere in the world and do anything at all that it wants but who in the hell granted that right to the US while all other countries of the world have to play by international rules. And Pakistan, with no ability to project power in any form, has no rights whatsoever.  His ultimate argument/answer being "American Exceptionalism".

          People can obviously agree or disagree with the argument that "American Exceptionalism" confers the US the right to whatever it damn well pleases wherever it wants to regardless of international laws.

          However, I am mystified as to how people simply don't understand the analogy at all.

          •  We understand the analogy. (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            rbird, PsychoSavannah

            We just don't buy it.

            Don't fall into the trap that those who disagree with you are unable to comprehend your argument.  It might be your argument that is flawed.

            "Don't bring that horse in here!" -- Cassandra

            by tc59 on Fri May 06, 2011 at 11:22:54 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  I don't think so (0+ / 0-)

              There are plenty of comments not only in this subthread but downstream of the whole comments that clearly don't get it.

              Including the one where one commenter thinks that Britain is not just Pakistan in the analogy but takes it as meaning Britain as a country i.e. in reality is just like Pakistan. And then, someone replied saying no, the US is Pakistan in the analogy and the person takes it as US=Pakistan (i.e. just like Pakistan in reality) and calls the op-ed writer a nut job or similar.

              There was another person, above I think, that said, well if Britain had asked for help the US would have helped them - completely not understanding what was being presented by the writer.

              I wouldn't have gone through the exercise of writing it out if I thought it was one or two that didn't get it.

              Oh, and by the way, I am not making any argument in support or against that op-ed writer's piece. None whatsoever. I am still not making any argument whatsoever. I am merely explaining what the analogy was rather than what the people commenting were reading into it or not reading into it as the case may be.

              It seems clear to me that the flaw is with the op-ed writer who failed to understand that the potential audience for his analogy - but not his larger point - would be totally lost on it. Perhaps he should have just left the analogy out of there and found some other way of crystalizing in the audience's mind his argument that "American Exceptionalism" is all the reason the US needs to do anything.

              And more to the point it seemed it was more of "how would the people or government of the US like it if some country unilaterally conducted a military operation on US soil without permission or consultation?" I suppose he would have better served simply leaving it at that and maybe literally like that rather than put it in the form of an analogy that seemingly eludes too many people.

              Like I said, I make no argument whatsoever on that. I was just mystified that people didn't understand the analogy at all.

              •  Perhaps his analogy would have been understood (0+ / 0-)

                better if it had been written better.

                As you point out, there may have been several commenters who did not get it, but the majority (that I read, anyway) DID get it and many who disagreed with it fully understood it.

                Personally, I think his flaw is equating an IRS bombing with the events of September 11th -- the difference in magnitude is too great to overlook.

                Though there are many that subscribe to an "American exceptionaism" that would allow us to do anything we want anywhere in the world, I do not think killing bin Laden is a good example of it.

                "Don't bring that horse in here!" -- Cassandra

                by tc59 on Fri May 06, 2011 at 02:51:58 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

      •  The analogy (0+ / 0-)

        requires an acceptance of a relative comparison of the IRA bombings to the attack on September 11 and therefore falls short of making its point.

        "Don't bring that horse in here!" -- Cassandra

        by tc59 on Fri May 06, 2011 at 11:20:45 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  33 Dems voted to maintain (10+ / 0-)

    $ub$idie$ to the already obscenely, filthily rich Oil Co's.
    Why?

    If you believe "government is the problem," then getTF out of government, douches!
    I spit on Ronnie Raygun's grave.

    by OleHippieChick on Fri May 06, 2011 at 04:39:30 AM PDT

  •  You edited Cal Thomas? My comissierations n/t (6+ / 0-)

    "what the best and wisest parent wants for his child is what we should want for all the children of the community" - John Dewey

    by teacherken on Fri May 06, 2011 at 04:42:46 AM PDT

    •  You beat me to it! (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Samer, ccasas

      That must have been a hell of a job, MB.

      If a free society cannot help the many who are poor, it cannot save the few who are rich. John F. Kennedy ( inaugural address, January 20, 1961)

      by Outraged Mom on Fri May 06, 2011 at 05:14:50 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Good to practice on something... (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Kev, Samer

      ....nobody else is going to read, I guess.

      Ideology is an excuse to ignore common sense.

      by Bush Bites on Fri May 06, 2011 at 05:17:20 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Unfortunately, while I was editing him... (4+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Samer, vets74, ccasas, adios

        ...or supervising other editors who were editing him, he was the No. 1 syndicated political columnist in the United States and still appears in hundreds of daily newspapers.

        Don't tell me what you believe. Tell me what you do and I'll tell you what you believe.

        by Meteor Blades on Fri May 06, 2011 at 06:31:47 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Shame you didn't have complete editorial freedom (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          ccasas

          for even one editorial.

          I'd love to see him begin one of his columns by admitting the truth: "I admit, I'm a complete jackass. . . ."

          We don't want our country back, we want our country FORWARD. --Eclectablog

          by Samer on Fri May 06, 2011 at 07:00:48 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  The fact-checking was horrendous... (3+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            adios, Samer, Timbuk the Second

            ...and unlike most of the other columnists I edited or supervised the editing of, his column always bumped up against the drop-dead deadline for transmission to newspapers because it arrived with so many factual errors that had to be fixed without forcing him to change his overall premise.

            Don't tell me what you believe. Tell me what you do and I'll tell you what you believe.

            by Meteor Blades on Fri May 06, 2011 at 08:47:47 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

        •  He also had 8,312 dedicated readers. (0+ / 0-)

          Otherwise, his columns serve magically well to collect shit in the nation's chicken coops.

          He celebrates the Gokaicho festival by getting some obscure political factoid down correctly exactly once every 7 years.

          (Not a fan, here. Cal and Clarence are the ultimates for dirt cheap sell-outs.)

          Financial criminals + Angry White Males + Personality Disorder dreamers + KKKwannabes + George Will =EQ= The GOPer Base (-4.38,-3.74)

          by vets74 on Fri May 06, 2011 at 07:39:52 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

  •  interesting Fried op ed lacks something (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    gchaucer2, p gorden lippy, Dave925, vets74

    the identification of Charles Fried as Solicitor General of the US under . .

    wait for it. . .

    the "sainted" Ronald Reagan

    "what the best and wisest parent wants for his child is what we should want for all the children of the community" - John Dewey

    by teacherken on Fri May 06, 2011 at 04:44:11 AM PDT

  •  Tom Wright should (15+ / 0-)

    submit that scenario for an award in bad fiction.  I just looked up the extradition treaty between the U.S. and Great Britain and the only imbalance is that Great Britain can refuse to extradite someone who may be subject to the death penalty.  His whole fabrication is utter nonsense.  Is he saying Great Britain = Pakistan?  Is saying that the U.S. would give aid and comfort to IRA terrorists who just blew up a part of London.  Bollocks.

    " My faith in the Constitution is whole; it is complete; it is total." Barbara Jordan, 1974

    by gchaucer2 on Fri May 06, 2011 at 04:48:08 AM PDT

  •  I'm with Tom Hayden. (4+ / 0-)

    http://www.dailykos.com/...

    Hopefully we'll see more movement towards leaving Afghanistan in the next couple of weeks.

  •  MB? (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Samer, ccasas

    You actually had to edit that miserable POS, Cal Thomas (R-Politically & Religiously Insane)?

    My ghawd how many showers did you have to take after these sessions? I can only imagine the horror of having to treat this cretin like a professional. Whenever I have had the misfortune to read one of his ridiculous screeds, I felt soiled, but mostly homicidal. ;)

    How did you ever manage?

    "The rich will strive to establish their dominion and enslave the rest. They always did... they always will. . ." Governeur Morris

    by Dave925 on Fri May 06, 2011 at 05:04:15 AM PDT

  •  Note to the Star Tribune (6+ / 0-)
    A Minneapolis Star Tribune Editorial says the Republican-pushed bill requiring voters to show a photo I.D. is a bad idea, not least of all because some 440,000 voting-age Minnesotans have no driver's license or state-issued identity card.

    Ummm, that's the point, to literally disenfranchise such voters who are most likely heavily Democratic. That's the entire point of all these "voting reform" laws we're seeing coming out of Puke controlled state legislatures. They don't want to make it easy to vote for those most likely to vote against their anti-american, anti-human and re-distributionist policies and the execrable candidates.

    I really would appreciate it if "news" organizations would at least get the obvious elitist efforts of the Pukes right. Whining that it will make voting harder for a lot of people is only stating the obvious while missing the point entirely.

    "The rich will strive to establish their dominion and enslave the rest. They always did... they always will. . ." Governeur Morris

    by Dave925 on Fri May 06, 2011 at 05:13:32 AM PDT

    •  They kiss up to Bachman, don't they? (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Dave925, vets74, Dr Colossus

      Ideology is an excuse to ignore common sense.

      by Bush Bites on Fri May 06, 2011 at 05:18:48 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Ewwwww (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Bush Bites, msmacgyver, Samer

        The Horror. The Horror.

        "The rich will strive to establish their dominion and enslave the rest. They always did... they always will. . ." Governeur Morris

        by Dave925 on Fri May 06, 2011 at 05:20:54 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  I gotta htink somebody's screwing the ballot boxes (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Dave925

        up there.

        Bachmann ?????? From a highly educated state. Really.

        Birthers, 9/11 conspirators, Warren commish freaks -- got nothing on that. BTW: did Saddam's neck really get stretched ?

        Financial criminals + Angry White Males + Personality Disorder dreamers + KKKwannabes + George Will =EQ= The GOPer Base (-4.38,-3.74)

        by vets74 on Fri May 06, 2011 at 07:43:28 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  Good Jersey sig line there....... (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Dave925

      Financial criminals + Angry White Males + Personality Disorder dreamers + KKKwannabes + George Will =EQ= The GOPer Base (-4.38,-3.74)

      by vets74 on Fri May 06, 2011 at 05:31:32 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Thanks for noticing (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        vets74

        "The rich will strive to establish their dominion and enslave the rest. They always did... they always will. . ." Governeur Morris

        by Dave925 on Fri May 06, 2011 at 06:10:30 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Familiar with Helene Stapinki ? (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Dave925

          "Five Finger Discount."

          Financial criminals + Angry White Males + Personality Disorder dreamers + KKKwannabes + George Will =EQ= The GOPer Base (-4.38,-3.74)

          by vets74 on Fri May 06, 2011 at 07:47:34 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Not at all until you mentioned it (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            vets74

            I looked it up and it seems like a good read. Jersey City, I know it by reputation all the way over here on the Southern California coast.

            We have loads of corruption here too, always have and it's almost always done very surreptitiously and has been since the 1880's. This type of corruption all centers around greasing the skids for the relentless development that took a small slice of paradise and in half a century turned it into concreted suburban sprawl.

            And prior to the mid-1950's, Los Angeles was possibly the most corrupt city in America. It's entire Police force was on the take to mafia front men repping the Genovese Family mostly. Meanwhile its politicians were reaping their payoffs from the big developer interests who took a city of 100,000 in 1910 and by 1970 had turned it into an 800 square mile 3 million behemoth.

            Even with the housing crash, there are new tracts being built right now on formerly pristine coastal chaparral as far from the coast as the Cleveland National Forest while the developer interests relentlessly push a toll road right through one of the last Southern California rivers with a native steelhead population. This abomination would have been a done, rubber stamped deal if left to the County supervisors. Luckily it has to be approved by the voters. We keep voting it down and year after year they double down with the propaganda and put it to the vote again.

            Last week they were paying day laborers to put door hangers on every door here where I live and probably all over South Orange County. Get this, their latest pitch involves the fear card because you see right now there's only one way out of town if the San Onofre Nukes go all Fukushima on us. So, the proposed toll road is now a life line and doesn't open up untouched land to further development, oh no that's not what it's there for at all!

            They always pitch freeways as "congestion relievers" but their true purpose is to open up yet more land to development and before you know it you have two congested freeways instead of one. I've watched this happen over and over since I was a kid in the 60's.

            Just a quick run down on corruption, Southern California style. There are some really great individual tales but I could write all day on those. Without the time though, all I can give is an overview.

            "The rich will strive to establish their dominion and enslave the rest. They always did... they always will. . ." Governeur Morris

            by Dave925 on Fri May 06, 2011 at 09:13:40 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

    •  You expect the editorial board that endorsed (0+ / 0-)

      norm coleman over Al Franken because he was so bipartisan, even though he voted with the republican majority over %90 of the time one year, to actually explain to their readers what republicans are actually doing?  The strib used to do real reporting and they used to have a real liberal editorial board.  Those days are long gone.

  •  Didn't realize some liberals wanted to eliminate.. (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Egalitare, Mistral Wind

    ....the Homeland Security Administration.

    Not sure I agree...

    Ideology is an excuse to ignore common sense.

    by Bush Bites on Fri May 06, 2011 at 05:16:21 AM PDT

  •  They can use National IDs in voting... (5+ / 0-)

    once they have issued them to all eligible citizens. You can't require people to have a photo ID who don't drive and don't get an optional State ID.

    Either all must have them, or forget it.

    I personally have a passport used to travel outside of the country. So a National ID ain't a big thing for me to use domestically. Other countries use them, why not us?

    Simple. Once a National ID is required, poor people will have them and be empowered. Mountain Men will reject them and the conservative vote count will go down.

    Ugh. --UB.

  •  Bullshit Framing on Front Page of New York Times (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Tuba Les, Mistral Wind, Samer
    G.O.P. Rethinking Bid to Overhaul Medicare Rules
    By CARL HULSE and JACKIE CALMES
    The decision to pull back shows the difficulties involved in trying to address the nation’s long-term fiscal problems.
    When NYT reporters start talking about the Ryan Medicare Plan as "trying to address the nation's long-term fiscal problem" you know that the NYT is either part of the GOP messaging machine or so damned stupid they have been co-opted by that messaging machine.  

    Suppose you were an idiot. And suppose you were a Republican. But I repeat myself. Harry Truman

    by ratcityreprobate on Fri May 06, 2011 at 05:24:43 AM PDT

  •  Republicans Screwed up Big Time (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    msmacgyver, Samer, liberte

    They went from scaring seniors by lying about Democratic Health Care Reform's affect on Medicare to REALLY scaring seniors about Medicare.

    Classic overreach.

    The daily floggings will continue until morale improves.

    by Tuba Les on Fri May 06, 2011 at 05:40:30 AM PDT

  •  I think Ann Coulter (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    vets74, liberte

    also writes under the nom de plum Ed Anger.

    "Beer is living proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy." -Benjamin Franklin

    by hotdamn on Fri May 06, 2011 at 05:41:19 AM PDT

  •  Regarding Krugman's comment... (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    vets74, Mistral Wind, foufou

    BREAKING NEWS: Economy created higher-than-expected 244,000 jobs in April; jobless rate at 9%...

    per MSNBC banner right now.

    OK.

    Join us at the Amateur Radio Group. Serving the Left Side of the Dial since 2011.

    by briefer on Fri May 06, 2011 at 05:46:25 AM PDT

  •  The Ta-Nehisi Coates piece is brilliant. (7+ / 0-)

    The Longest War

    and on down in the text..........

    After getting over my initial shock that the First Lady was at least vaguely familiar with a dance that I might sloppily attempt in a nightclub, I thought about how familiar the image was to me. She reminded me of my aunts at our family cook outs, where they get up and try to do the new dance, but then school all of us with the Electric Slide (or in this case, the Running Man).

    That thought brought me back to your comments about why Donald Trump's comments feel so offensive, how his comments undercut all of the things that Black parents say to children about how they will be respected if they study and work hard.

    Maybe it's unfair, but I now realize why I am more offended by comments about the President and First Lady than I was about comments about President and Mrs. Clinton. It's not just that they are Black and I am too. I think it has more to do with the fact that they are so familiar, they remind me of people I know, which causes a more personal reaction.

    There's a lot more, all of it in the bulls eye.

    I am sorely tempted to say "This boy can write" to self-parody the racial stereotypes, but I won't.

    Coates gets Five Gold Stars today. That's for nailing Trump as a race-baiting KKKwannabe-pandering whore.

    Financial criminals + Angry White Males + Personality Disorder dreamers + KKKwannabes + George Will =EQ= The GOPer Base (-4.38,-3.74)

    by vets74 on Fri May 06, 2011 at 05:50:00 AM PDT

  •  Ann Coulter's Column (5+ / 0-)

    A bit transparent, in the same column, to absolve Bush for 9/11 and give him credit for catching Bin Laden.  Jejune.

  •  Best line in Krugman's column (0+ / 0-)

    >It would be nice if someone in Washington actually cared.

    That pretty much sums up the whole thing for me.

    If there is a quibble -- and it's not a minor quibble -- it's Krugman's reference to misguided inflation fears.  It's obvious that Krugman's socio-economic standing renders rising food and energy prices a mere annoyance.  It's a serious piece of hurt for some of us.

    LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

    by dinotrac on Fri May 06, 2011 at 06:08:56 AM PDT

    •  I believe there are plenty who care, but (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      dinotrac

      some have no idea what to do and know it, many think they know but have no clue, and others have great ideas that stand zero chance in todays political reality.

      •  I'm sure that's true, but wonder how many of (0+ / 0-)

        those people are within shouting distance of actual power.

        It was very telling to me the way that Democratic leaders kept saying "We're going to focus on jobs like a laser" and never did.

        It's not that Republicans were any better, just that the talk made the lack of actual caring so obvious.

        LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

        by dinotrac on Fri May 06, 2011 at 10:28:37 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  Tom Wright is wrong (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    ComradeAnon, Jim J, Adam AZ

    The very first thing you need to do to win an argument is to establish a valid premise. He fails to do that. The true comparison should be, imagine the US sending in a team to Britain, not Pakistan. And the US would not do that.

    And, needless to say, I'm sure the Brits, given the same capabilities, would have done the same thing we did. Historically, they've done much worse.

    Call it Western exceptionalism, or the exceptionalism of the rich, and I'd probably buy it. But it's not a strictly American thing.

  •  To answer Ta-Nehisi's question (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    foufou
    Who among us would they ever believe?

    No one, obviously. That's what bigots do..

    We don't want our country back, we want our country FORWARD. --Eclectablog

    by Samer on Fri May 06, 2011 at 06:53:17 AM PDT

  •  WOW --the Coates Piece (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    foufou

    WELL SAID!!!!

  •  Ed Quillen writes about Salida, CO, (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Meteor Blades

    my adopted home town. He is correct that there were no public celebrations on F street or at Riverside Park, but if he had listened closely, he could have heard me whooping and hollering in my house Sunday night as we got the news.

  •  American exceptionalism (0+ / 0-)

    We are exceptional in one aspect: stupidity.
    Nothing will change while we sit on our ass in front of the TV.

    Time for an attitude change.

    by Agent420 on Fri May 06, 2011 at 08:22:37 AM PDT

  •  If in Wright's senario the UN voted (0+ / 0-)

    on resolutions to allow Britain to pursue the terrorists across any nations boarders then I would say the British would have every right to violate US soverienty if we were harboring those international terrorists.

  •  Tom Wright clearly doesn't know Boston (0+ / 0-)

    It's not nearly as Irish as he thinks it is.  Also, eastern Massachusetts is not "the hinterlands" and never has been.

    pah

  •  I'm going to have to admit (0+ / 0-)

    that I am somewhat horrified by the response to Wright's column here.  I'll be charitable and assume that people are being distracted by the details of the analogy rather than the general principle.

    The fact is that the US undertook a military operation in another country without securing that country's permission or making some sort of formal declaration of aggression.  As a Canadian (although I live in the US) - this bothers me (without considering the specifics of the mission).

    This kind of action makes people in other countries, even those closely allied to the US, angry and nervous.  The US is taking an action it feels is justified that, if the same action were taken against it, would cause outrage in this country across the political spectrum.  It is saying our action is good we can do it, any similar action taken against us would be unjustified.  If that isn't exceptionalism I don't what is.

    And the comments about the aid to Pakistan seem pretty colonial in attitude.  If you don't like what Pakistan is doing with the money then stop providing it.  The idea that we have bought the right to invade the country ought to be repugnant.

    "We are normal and we want our freedom" - Bonzos

    by matching mole on Fri May 06, 2011 at 09:41:37 AM PDT

  •  Started reading Coulter. (0+ / 0-)

    The first sentence.....huge lie.

    The second sentence.....huge lie.

    I stopped reading at that point.

    Freedom has two enemies: Those who want to control everyone around them...and those who feel no need to control themselves.

    by Sirenus on Fri May 06, 2011 at 10:20:42 AM PDT

  •  Re ID card to vote. (0+ / 0-)

    Most states don't want to issue voter ID cards to all registered voters. Too expensive.

    So they say: Driver's license or photo ID.

    What is the most common form of photo ID? A credit card.

    So....people who don't own cars and people who don't have credit cards are going to have to figure out some way to get a photo ID if they want to vote.  This is certainly going to cost them time and/or money.

    Who is least likely to have a driver's license? A poor person. An elderly person. Minorities.

    Ditto with credit cards.

    The Democratic "base." Putting up roadblocks to their being able to vote.

    Brilliant!

    Freedom has two enemies: Those who want to control everyone around them...and those who feel no need to control themselves.

    by Sirenus on Fri May 06, 2011 at 10:26:48 AM PDT

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