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Breaking!  ---  Senior space-time dilation writer, Clara Moskowitz, at Space.com, writes  New Spin Revealed on Mysterious Antimatter revealing that Professor Mark Hadley, has advanced a new theory to explain the mysterious imballance of matter and antimatter in the universe.

UPDATE:  Please notice that Clara reports galactic spin, where it seems she should say universe spin.  

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The puzzling prevalence of matter over antimatter in the universe might be related to the bizarre space-time stretching caused by our galaxy's spin, a new study suggests. ...

Though the universe today is almost completely made of matter, scientists don't understand why. The Big Bang that created the cosmos 13.7 billion years ago should have produced equal parts matter and antimatter, which would have annihilated, leaving the universe barren of either. Luckily, it didn't (hence the Earth and the life it supports are here). ...

Physicist Mark Hadley of the University of Warwick in England calculated the effects of the Milky Way's spin on the space-time around it. According to the theory of general relativity, the speed and angular momentum of such a large spinning body twists the space and time around it in a process called frame-dragging.

Because of the mammoth mass of our galaxy, this twisting should have an impact on space-time that is more than a million times stronger than that of Earth's spin, Hadley found.

Here's where this story connects to our previous discussions here of the charge-parity violation, (CP violation) which is the name given to the different decay rates for matter and antimatter, that some here feel strongly about.

UPDATE: Science, who is one of our resident Ph.D., experts in particle physics tells me that Mark Hadley does not mention the "matter/antimatter asymmetry" in his article, and the the following explanation by Clara Moskoswitz is flawed.  Please see comments by Science in my article.  I will leave this here, as part of the history of the discussion.  

These changes to space and time — in particular a stretching of time called time dilation — could in turn affect how particles break down. ...For some time, physicists have measured this asymmetry in decay rates between matter and antimatter, and called the phenomenon charge-parity violation (CP violation). But no one yet has a firm explanation for how the asymmetries came about.

"These [violations] have been measured but never explained," Hadley said in a statement. "This research suggests that the experimental results in our laboratories are a consequence of galactic rotation twisting our local space-time. If that is shown to be correct then nature would be fundamentally symmetric after all."

Hadley thinks that matter and antimatter aren't actually asymmetric at the root of things, but that their differing responses to the changes wrought by galactic rotation simply give this appearance. He says that if the overall big picture of all particles is taken into account, the variation of different levels of time stretching averages out and CP violation disappears.

The data to test this theory may already be available, from the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, in Geneva, and the SLAC particle physics laboratory at Stanford University.

I know from our previous discussion, that several, if not many, Kossacks have been concerned about this mysterious apparent asymmetry in the matter - antimatter balance. Now, it would seem, we are one step closer to resolving this distressing anomaly.  

I will publish updates as they become available.

And, I request that everyone make an effort to be civil  and respectful in the comments.  

3:28 PM PT: FishoutofWater notices that while I talked about universal spin, the article talks about galactic spin, which would not be big or large enough to affect anti-matter in the first seconds of the universe, so I corrected what I believe was an error in the article I linked to.


Science points out a deeper issue with regard to the Clara Moskowitz' explanation of the charge-parity violation and the possible relationship to this new time dilation theory advanced by Physist Mark Hadley.  Please see Science's comment, and I will provide a link to Mark Hadley's original paper.  


 


Originally posted to SciTech on Sun Jul 17, 2011 at 02:33 PM PDT.

Also republished by Pink Clubhouse, The Week In UFO Phenomenon, Hydrant, and DKOMA.

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Comment Preferences

    •  There is a logical inconsistency in the reporting (16+ / 0-)
      The puzzling prevalence of matter over antimatter in the universe might be related to the bizarre space-time stretching caused by our galaxy's spin, a new study suggests

      Our galaxy's spin affects what's happening in our galaxy. It cannot remove anti-matter from the rest of the universe by any sort of logic I understand.

      Something needs clarification here.

      look for my eSci diary series Thursday evening. "It's the planet, stupid."

      by FishOutofWater on Sun Jul 17, 2011 at 02:53:00 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Well, that's why I corrected it to be (11+ / 0-)

        universal spin, -- some angular momentum from the big bang.  Otherwise you are right, galactic spin should not be enough to affect decay rates of antimatter from the original seconds of the universe.

        I haven't read the original report yet, but I suspect the author I referenced wrote it that way.

        If I first read something from an author somewhere, I hate to bypass them and skip over to the original source, which I have done sometimes, by mistake.

        I was trying to put something up quickly, so just stayed to here story.

        But, I will check.

        The means is the ends in the process of becoming. - Mahatma Gandhi

        by HoundDog on Sun Jul 17, 2011 at 03:07:52 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  But is there (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        HoundDog, G2geek

        an anti-galaxy being affected by our galaxy's gravity? Certainly, I don't know!

        Most everything I know about physics I've learned recently on Morgan Freeman's Through the Wormhole series on the Science Channel. Fascinating stuff pretty well told to non-physics audience.

        It's tough for a reporter, even one knowledgeable about the related science, to translate it into a vocabulary accessible to a layperson. I've seen it over and over again in academia, where I sometimes did a little of it. But I had the luxury of asking the researcher to a draft.

        In fact, one chairman I worked for insisted the university's PR department send him anything they wrote about our faculty members and their work. It had to have his personal seal of approval, because there'd been so much garbage sent out in the past.

        •  Morgan Freeman's series (6+ / 0-)

          is pretty good.    

          There are no antigalaxies anywhere close to ours--in fact, none anywhere in the supercluster of galaxies we live in.  Galaxies don't just stop--they have material quite a ways out, and if there were antigalaxies around we would see huge numbers of gamma rays from the annihilation with regular matter.

          •  Hey Science, I put your clarifications about (0+ / 0-)

            Clara's Moksowitz's erroneous introduction of the CP violation, both in auto-updates, as well as manual insertions into the text.

            Could you say more about the posible angular momentum energies in the big-bang?

            This is the first I have heard of such a theory. Presumably, would we not expect some equal and opposite force to "push off of?"

            Or, could it be that the pure undifferentiated energy prior to the big bang had "angular momentum" embedded withing (somehow beyond our current theories.)

            What's the official name of the "yo-yo" theory of an infinite cycle of big-bangs, followed by gravity induced recontractions of the whole universe, rather than infinite heat death.

            I read one that if the universe turns out to have just 3 or 4 molecules per cubic meter than we thought then, (about 25 years ago) gravity would be enough to overcome the momentum of the  outword expansion of the universe.

            At which point, entropy would reverse as the total gravity of the universe contracts everything back into a highly contracted ball of pure undifferentiated energy, ready for the next big bang, after some limit of maximum conentration of concentration momentum from all directions cancels out.

            Except the one concentrating momentum that would not cancel out, would be the rotational spiral.  

            If this turned into a wave energy, wouldn't we expect the subsequant big bang to fling out all energy that later "condenses" into photons, and mass, to have angular momentum?

            You mention the lack of microwave turmol  to be counter evidence of this.  

            Could you say more about this?  Is there any possibility that if all photons, microwaves, and other energy, had an an equal influence of angular momentum, we wouldn't obverve it if we are in the same field?

            I guess we would be able to detect this as it would only be in two diminsions, would be affected?

            Please help me out here, as I am at the edge of my knowledge, but would like to know more.

            Your point appears to be that photons and microwaves only have momentum, in the direction they are travelling? Or we would see spirals in their paths?

            Is this, or could it be related to the "curvature of space time" or is that only a matter of perception from a single point in space?    

            The means is the ends in the process of becoming. - Mahatma Gandhi

            by HoundDog on Sun Jul 17, 2011 at 05:13:37 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  No gravitational yo-yo; Cyclic Universe maybe (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              HoundDog

              I wrote a long diary on this question as a book review of Endless Universe by Paul Steinhardt of Princeton and Neil Turok of Cambridge in 2007.

              Observations in 1998 found that the expansion of the universe, rather than slowing due to gravity, has been gradually accelerating for the last 5 billion years or so.  Cosmologists had to postulate a new force, which they call Dark Energy but do not understand, to account for the acceleration.  Steinhardt and Turok have a very provocative hypothesis to explain the Dark Energy; their model does lead to a reconvergence.

              My essay evolved further, if you are interested message me and I can email you the latest version.

              There's no such thing as a free market!

              by Albanius on Sun Jul 17, 2011 at 07:53:33 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

            •  sorry, I didn't have time (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              cotterperson

              last night to look at this.

              As I noted above,

              by "universe", I mean the observable universe, i.e. the region of space which is 13.7 billion light years (roughly) in radius around us.   I don't know how to define angular momentum for something infinite.   One can easily imagine our observable universe with some spin (just like our solar system).   But that would affect the expansion, and thus the microwave background.

              All photons have angular momentum (it's called "polarization"), but if the net angular momentum were nonzero, then the microwave background would be polarized (overall).  It isn't.  So the angular momentum must be small.

          •  then we should also expect to observe.... (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            cotterperson, HoundDog

            .... increased gamma rays in any part of the universe in which antimatter galaxies were present: at the boundaries between the extent of their material and the extent of material from (normal) matter galaxies.  

            I'm not aware of any such observations or we would have heard of the discovery of candidates for antimatter galaxies.

            So if that's correct, then would it be reasonable to say that there are no observations consistent with the existence of antimatter galaxies in our local universe?  

            And if that's correct, and if the universe is assumed to be basically uniform along certain axes of measurement, then would it be reasonable to conclude that there are no antimatter galaxies in this universe?  

            And if that's correct, then where if anywhere, would we expect to find antimatter galaxies?  (And is their hypothetical existence in "other universes" part of the support for a multiple-universes interpretation of the cosmos?)

            •  You sound like Perry Mason putting an errant (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              G2geek, cotterperson

              science fiction writer on trial for violating the laws of physics.  

              In the same Monty Python court they tried the malfeasent translator, who pleaded incopetence.

              The means is the ends in the process of becoming. - Mahatma Gandhi

              by HoundDog on Sun Jul 17, 2011 at 11:47:23 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

      •  Contemporary demonstration vs. early universe (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        HoundDog, G2geek

        The galaxy's spin effect can be tested directly.  The early universe spin effect cannot, and would be a theoretical construct.  That's the way I interpreted it.

        If you ask "what color is the poster" when someone criticizes the President's policy or track record, you are probably a racist. If you assume white progressives don't like the President's policies because of his skin color, you are definitely a racist.

        by Celtic Pugilist on Sun Jul 17, 2011 at 03:32:18 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  But, are we spinning or not? I guess we will (0+ / 0-)

          know soon from the CERN LHC data.

          Goodness gracious I love learning about science.

          I can not beleive these sad, uninspired Republicans want to strip out our NASA, NSF, and other science funding.

          How to we get them back on board.

          Maybe I'm going to have to create a new sock-puppet UID, and go write science diaries over at Red - State and Little Green Footballs.

          And, never tell them I'm really an uncover operative for NASA, NSF, and the major universities to keep up bipartisan support for science funding.

          Hounddog  - goddnouh !

          That's it.  noone will suspect anything.

          I'll spread the meme that those gosh darn, Democrats are trying to win over mariginal independents with their support for science funding.

          Polls already show, independents are more alligned with Democrats on science issues.

          I'll say, even though I, goddnouh, secretly hate science, we have to outsmart those dang Democrats, and appear to support it.

          Bwa, ha, ha.  

          This is great.  I've been totaly lost for a purpose since the cold war ended.  

          I feel young again.

          Que "Born Free" music.  

          Yikes, if this were a novel, this is just the time an asteroid would come down and squash me, as I have realized  my life-long ashardic, Karmic patterns.

          I better keep a low profile for a while.

          Palantir, is probably looking for the long hook stick to pull me off the stage.  "HoundDog, take your fingers off the keyboard, and step away from the computer.  Your are getting silly again. Go clean up your house, or something."

          Sorry, I found the total amazingness of the cosmos leaves me so awestruck, my normal somber discipline becomes unglued as my mind expands.  

          Can you believe what an amazing universe we live in.

          And, how small humans are in this place?

          There have to be millions of other planets with life on them.

          Some of them intelligent.

          So, when we destroy ourselves here, it will not be quite as tragic. Because somewhere else there must be another intelligent species, smart enough, to stop green house gas production, and foster peace amongst it's own people, and live in sustainable harmony with the ecosystems they need to survive.

           

          The means is the ends in the process of becoming. - Mahatma Gandhi

          by HoundDog on Sun Jul 17, 2011 at 05:26:34 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  For cosmic "you are here" sign... (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Nowhere Man, HoundDog

            Try an observing session at night on Mauna Kea in midsummer on a moonless evening.  I did that once and the still clear skies were spectacular, even though I frequently observed in dark skies elsewhere.  

            The Milky Way was incredibly bright, several planets were visible long the ecliptic and the zodiacal light was so obvious that it was like staring out along a vast disc with a "you are here" sign pointed down at you.  The sense of being a tiny spec in that enormity was unlike any I had experienced before or since.

            To give you an idea of how good the skies were:  6th magnitude skies are considered the normal limit in average clear weather in a rural setting.  Drier air in winter skies often reaches 6.5 mag and the dark sky sites I favor often will get me down to 7th mag when the seeing and clarity are good.  I've had 7.5 mag skies in West Texas before.  I brought a limiting magnitude chart with me for that night on Mauna Kea, but didn't look at it until after I examined a patch of sky carefully.  The chart went to 8th magnitude and I had noted the 8th mag stars in the patch I observed.

            If you ask "what color is the poster" when someone criticizes the President's policy or track record, you are probably a racist. If you assume white progressives don't like the President's policies because of his skin color, you are definitely a racist.

            by Celtic Pugilist on Sun Jul 17, 2011 at 05:58:47 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  Wow this sounds cool celtic pugilist. (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              Celtic Pugilist

              I've only seen the stars from places away from city lights a few times.

              Our elementary school science club went up to Mount Diablo in California to look at stars with telescopes and binoculars.  

              It was awesome and the first time I could really see the Milky Way.

              Then another time, when my family drive across the country from California to Pennsylvania there was a section of the Rocky Mountouns that was spetacular.

              But, where I live now, in Massachustts, there is so much ambient light, I can't even see the Milky Way.

              Which is why I keep posting those rotating time lapse star maps and things.

              I think this is super cool, and I'm trying to relive these two nights of glorious star viewing.

              The means is the ends in the process of becoming. - Mahatma Gandhi

              by HoundDog on Sun Jul 17, 2011 at 11:09:22 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

      •  could the spin of our galaxy affect.... (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        HoundDog

        ... our perception or detection of matter and antimatter in the universe beyond our galaxy?

        Even to a small degree but sufficiently to cause the appearance of an anomaly, even an "apparent anomaly that does not in reality exist"?

  •  Cool (11+ / 0-)

    Thanks for the info.  But a question...has this sort of comment

    And, I request that everyone make an effort to be civil  and respectful in the comments.  

    become necessary even in this sort of diary?

    "Empty vessels make the loudest sound, they have the least wit and are the greatest blabbers" Plato

    by Empty Vessel on Sun Jul 17, 2011 at 02:37:33 PM PDT

    •  You are a careful reader. No, I was actually (16+ / 0-)

      being a little snarky here, empty vessel.  One group has proposed that bad history, or bad science should be an offense worthy of banning.

      I've written a few places pointing out how sad, contentious, and unworkable this would be.  

      Imagine if you were required to have a Ph.D. in particle physics to feel safe to discuss things here?  

      No, the SciTech diaries are like a lovefest.  I was too young to be at the Woodstock Rock Festival.  But, from what I've read, SciTech comments, seem to be the closest thing going on here.  

      Feel free just to say "far out, man, this is cool."  And, everyone will nod approvingly.

      So, I need to be more disciplined.  

      The means is the ends in the process of becoming. - Mahatma Gandhi

      by HoundDog on Sun Jul 17, 2011 at 02:44:43 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Good, I was scared. (6+ / 0-)

        And this shit really is cool, though I come nowhere near the mathematical skills to understand it.  I'm a social scientist, so not a real scientist per se.

        "Empty vessels make the loudest sound, they have the least wit and are the greatest blabbers" Plato

        by Empty Vessel on Sun Jul 17, 2011 at 02:48:16 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  There may be a handful of people with the (10+ / 0-)

          mathematical and scientific knowledge here to fully understand all this empty vessel, but, not very many.

          Not me.

          And, I do not believe people of goodwill should have to worry, about making such mistakes, on a progressive blog, that should be manifesting progressive values, such as egalitarianism.

          But, forgive me, as I may be the guilty party.

          Let's just enjoy the wonders of the universe.

          I was trying to add a zesty verve to what otherway, might seem like a subversive way to introduce physics education into the blog.

          That's why I opened with "Breaking --- "   believe it out not, that represented the high water mark of my creative contribution to DKOS so far all day.   lol  sad, but true.

          Normally, I try to close with funny polls, but I've got to clean the whole house, before 900 when my housemates return from a week away, and I had my son and his friends over.  So, I slept in, and didn't have my coffee.

          You don't even want to know.  So, when I decided to punt on the poll, this was all I could think of for a humorous close.  

          Yike, only now to I see the error of my ways.

          If I can think of anything else, I will take it out.  Sorry.

          The means is the ends in the process of becoming. - Mahatma Gandhi

          by HoundDog on Sun Jul 17, 2011 at 02:57:20 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

      •  I mean "sorry," I need to be more disciplined. (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        palantir, science

        The means is the ends in the process of becoming. - Mahatma Gandhi

        by HoundDog on Sun Jul 17, 2011 at 02:50:26 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  Well you can always (7+ / 0-)

        lurk around some of the physics blogs (which I will not name) Things can often get quite heated.  Look for the usual academic condescension.  I've never seen a DKOS style exchange of FU's, but it can get close.

      •  Well, HoundDog, I do have a PhD (13+ / 0-)

        in theoretical particle physics.    And, yes, sometimes discussions can be quite heated.   They usually only get nasty when dealing with cranks---people who know nothing about the Standard Model, quantum field theory, etc. who claim to have a theory of the Universe that is being suppressed by the establishment.

        Well, Mark Hadley is not a crank.    His work has been published in a decent journal.  I count six published papers in the past 15 years (most particle physicists publish an average of four papers per year, so he has a VERY low publication rate).    Still, I would have to read the paper in detail to understand it, but certainly wouldn't dismiss it out of hand.

        But the problem is that CP violation is not sufficient to make matter or antimatter.   One also needs "baryon" or "lepton" number conservation, and that can only really occur with sufficient strength in the early Universe.   Galaxies don't exist that early.   To his credit, Hadley knows this and doesn't mention the matter/antimatter asymmetry---he obviously knows that his idea would have nothing to do with it.  Unfortunately, the reporter, Clara Moskowitz, screwed up the reporting (which is not uncommon), and said many, many things that aren't correct.   Not Hadley's fault.

        His model is unlikely, but certainly interesting.  I need to think about it....

      •  the place where I would draw the ban line.... (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Nowhere Man

        ... is where people are promoting as science or as ontologically true, ideas that have been conclusively and overwhelmingly disproven, and using that as the basis for political platforms or public policies.  

        Here we also need to make the distinction between "mythology," and "religion as such," and "apparent anomalies that are subject to skepticism," and "fringe theories that are not generally accepted but have not been conclusively falsified," on one hand, and "overtly false statements that are provably overtly false."  

        For example if someone wants to promote the belief that "God created the universe in seven days" as part of religious mythos, saying that this is a metaphorical statement or an item of religious faith, that's OK.  

        But if they want to promote that statement as being literally true in the sense of "measurable facts about reality," that's Not-OK due to the contradiction with a range of observations from Carbon-14 dating of fossils to the cosmological red-shift.  And where, to my mind, it crosses the ban line, is when it is used as a basis for promoting political platforms or public policy items.  

        So, for example, someone can believe in a theistic influence in the origin and development of living organisms, but it's not acceptable to insist on that belief being taught in public school biology classes.  (Though it would be acceptable to have classes in comparative religion where various beliefs about the origin of life are studied.)

  •  These results are only temporary. (6+ / 0-)

    The Internet is, relatively speaking, in its infancy and I predict that the "anti" preponderance on political blogs (and, really, the 'net in general) will tip the balance in universal terms.

    I'll Rochambeau you for it.

    by Rich in PA on Sun Jul 17, 2011 at 02:38:07 PM PDT

  •  Hah - looking at his CV makes me.... (6+ / 0-)

    wax nostalgic for my academic days.

    In summer 2006 I offered a project visualising and extending the work on space time manifolds that are not time-orientable.

    I miss shit like that, sometimes.


    Kevin dropped his ice cream and blames Obama? He's gone hamsher!

    by punditician on Sun Jul 17, 2011 at 02:43:57 PM PDT

    •  Ah, to be young again, eh, punditician. Me too. (10+ / 0-)

      What an exciting time to be growing up.

      Other than the economic devastation, unemployment,  fatal STDs, wars, breakdown of the environment, and open class warfare, this must be the best of all possible times to grow up.

      The means is the ends in the process of becoming. - Mahatma Gandhi

      by HoundDog on Sun Jul 17, 2011 at 03:00:09 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  The best of all posiible times (5+ / 0-)

        in the best of all possible worlds.

        •  It could be nothing else. (5+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          xgy2, palantir, side pocket, Dom9000, HoundDog

          "Empty vessels make the loudest sound, they have the least wit and are the greatest blabbers" Plato

          by Empty Vessel on Sun Jul 17, 2011 at 03:03:38 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  PS (5+ / 0-)

            It might speak very badly of me that my favorite book is Candide, and my favorite movies are Brazil, Dr. Strangelove and Barton Fink.

            "Empty vessels make the loudest sound, they have the least wit and are the greatest blabbers" Plato

            by Empty Vessel on Sun Jul 17, 2011 at 03:06:47 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  Well, this explains a lot of things, doesn't it, (3+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              Empty Vessel, xgy2, Dom9000

              Empty Vessel,  lol

              :-)

              The means is the ends in the process of becoming. - Mahatma Gandhi

              by HoundDog on Sun Jul 17, 2011 at 03:10:52 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

            •  Voltaire (3+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              HoundDog, sfbob, Empty Vessel

              was making fun of Leibniz and that principle, written into canon law as "the principle of least action", lies at the very heart of physics.  It started as an assumption, one of Leibniz fundamental principles of philosophy: God always chooses the best.  It stuck around because it works.  Why ?  That is still an open question.

              •  although made famous by Leibniz (4+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                xgy2, Empty Vessel, HoundDog, Pithy Cherub

                and caricaturized by Voltaire in his depiction of Dr Pangloss in Candide, the argument that this is (and must be) the best of all possible worlds is already found in the medieval scholastics (for example, Bonaventure).

                Just thought I'd "flash" my erudition, before I go back to my little garden.

                We're shocked by a naked nipple, but not by naked aggression.

                by Lepanto on Sun Jul 17, 2011 at 03:35:57 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

                •  This has been an impressive flash Lepanto. (1+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  Lepanto

                  You've done well bringing glory to yourself and our site.

                  I propose a toast from all Kossacks.

                  Too, "Lepanto, and all other passionate, and knowledgable Kossacks, who bring glory and honor to our site, by demonstrating knowledge of history, science, politics, and general scholarly pursuits."

                  Here, here.  

                  I just bought a bottle of "Rebel Yell, Wiskey for my son's 21st birthday, which he left here.

                  I'm going to raise my glass to you know, Lepanto.

                  May you inspire others to such boldness!

                  :-)

                  You may have just fired me up to do another diary.  When I was looking for Mark Hadley's original article I came across a number of really cool pictures, of CERN, LHC atom smashing trails.

                  The means is the ends in the process of becoming. - Mahatma Gandhi

                  by HoundDog on Sun Jul 17, 2011 at 05:38:24 PM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

                  •  Ah yes, Rebel's Yell, old fav of mine (1+ / 0-)
                    Recommended by:
                    HoundDog

                    I usually have to content myself with the Maker's Mark

                    HoundDog, be assured that I'll look forward with great interest to any future diaries on this theme - extremely fascinating, though quite beyond me, even though I do try in my own little way to keep up with these themes as far as possible.

                    The pics are great, aren't they? They really fire up the imagination...

                    We're shocked by a naked nipple, but not by naked aggression.

                    by Lepanto on Sun Jul 17, 2011 at 06:03:40 PM PDT

                    [ Parent ]

                    •  That's my favorite part, Lepanto. (0+ / 0-)

                      Truth be told, these are beyond me too.

                      I mostly look for really cool science pictures, than make up a little banter as intros, and exits.  

                      I just found some really cool pixs I know you will enjoy tomorrow.

                      Check out Hydrant too.

                      Whenever, I can't keep up to the standards of SciTech, I turn them into humor pieces and dump them into Hydrant.

                      But, the pictures are just as good.

                      :-)

                      The means is the ends in the process of becoming. - Mahatma Gandhi

                      by HoundDog on Sun Jul 17, 2011 at 06:29:00 PM PDT

                      [ Parent ]

        •  The 18th century!!! (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          HoundDog
          •  Can you beleive it is the 21st century already? (0+ / 0-)

            Why only just over ten years ago, it seemed like it was the 20th century.

            I can't beleive how fast the time of my life has pased by.

            It's almost enough to get me to diet and exercise so I can stick around longer.

            The means is the ends in the process of becoming. - Mahatma Gandhi

            by HoundDog on Sun Jul 17, 2011 at 05:39:58 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

  •  I think it was in "Death By Black Hole" (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    HoundDog, palantir, Pithy Cherub

    by Neil DeGrasse Tyson that there was a chapter about this.  

    "Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity." --M. L. King "You can't fix stupid" --Ron White

    by zenbassoon on Sun Jul 17, 2011 at 02:52:41 PM PDT

  •  Wibbly Wobbly Timey Wimey (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    HoundDog, cotterperson, ShadowRunning

    "Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity." --M. L. King "You can't fix stupid" --Ron White

    by zenbassoon on Sun Jul 17, 2011 at 02:54:11 PM PDT

  •  Makes sense (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    James Allen, HoundDog, Empty Vessel

    Not that I have the slightest knowledge basis for making that claim.

    Don't panic. Demonstrate.

    by Quicklund on Sun Jul 17, 2011 at 02:55:15 PM PDT

    •  That OK here. :-) (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Quicklund

      The means is the ends in the process of becoming. - Mahatma Gandhi

      by HoundDog on Sun Jul 17, 2011 at 03:00:46 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  it makes sense in the same way that a solution (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Empty Vessel, HoundDog, Quicklund

      to a problem on an episode of Futurama or Star Trek does.

      "every time we start a pie fight a wingnut gets his wings"- MinistryofTruth -6.38, -4.15

      by James Allen on Sun Jul 17, 2011 at 03:01:19 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  A bit more sense than a Heisenberg Compensator (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        HoundDog, G2geek

        I imagine that this hypothesis assumes the time dilation interacts with matter/AM 's different spin direction so as to make the decay rates for AM much faster to our non-relativistic reference frame.  But that relies on a chain of dimly remembered details that at their best were understood at roughly the level my dog understands the new mattress is the softest bestest bed ever.  

        Don't panic. Demonstrate.

        by Quicklund on Sun Jul 17, 2011 at 03:31:30 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Most of my science knowledge comes from (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Quicklund

          Futurama, Star Trek, StarGate, and Asimov science ficiton novels.

          A little knowledge is better than none at all.  Well, except when it leads to choatic confusion.

          But, when it comes to understanding Quantum Mechanics,. 99.99% of the human race is like the dog in the Gary Larsen comic.

          "Oh, isn't it cute when dogs try to understand quantum mechanics?"

          The means is the ends in the process of becoming. - Mahatma Gandhi

          by HoundDog on Sun Jul 17, 2011 at 05:43:44 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Quantum Mech might prove the existence of God (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            HoundDog

            Big Guy:  "Oh Me, look what they've cooked up now to explain things.  Time to create some new subatomicrumbs to sprinkle over their CERN collider to keep them thinking they're on the right track.

            I haven't had this much fun since I ran across Job.  Me, I was a Jerk in those days.  Glad I got off the sauce."

            Don't panic. Demonstrate.

            by Quicklund on Sun Jul 17, 2011 at 08:39:53 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

          •  Bohr said " If quantum mechanics... (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            HoundDog

            hasn't profoundly shocked you, you haven't understood it yet."

            But Feynman said "I think I can safely say that nobody understands quantum mechanics."

            There's no such thing as a free market!

            by Albanius on Sun Jul 17, 2011 at 10:58:44 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

  •  In the southern hemisphere does it (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    HoundDog, Empty Vessel

    spin the other way?

    "every time we start a pie fight a wingnut gets his wings"- MinistryofTruth -6.38, -4.15

    by James Allen on Sun Jul 17, 2011 at 02:57:07 PM PDT

  •  Does it really matter? (5+ / 0-)

    Or anti-matter?

  •  Y'know, I was wondering if this was at the root (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    HoundDog, G2geek

    ...of the difference a few months ago (no, really I was), but figured something so seemingly obvious would have already been considered and rejected by folks who could understand the math--which is well beyond my skill level.  I got to thinking about this when I was searching for an answer about the half life of the anti-neutron (which hasn't been measured as best I can tell.)  

    Spin on a universal scale seemed a reasonable hypothesis for the differences observed in other cases, but I couldn't come up with an underlying reason that would be so.  I was hoping the linked article would explain the "why."  However, it looks as if they are only at the first step of merely observing the correlation and don't have a "why" for it worked out.

    If you ask "what color is the poster" when someone criticizes the President's policy or track record, you are probably a racist. If you assume white progressives don't like the President's policies because of his skin color, you are definitely a racist.

    by Celtic Pugilist on Sun Jul 17, 2011 at 03:28:13 PM PDT

  •  Isn't "spin" here just a metaphor? (0+ / 0-)

    We're shocked by a naked nipple, but not by naked aggression.

    by Lepanto on Sun Jul 17, 2011 at 03:38:51 PM PDT

    •  This is where physics gets weird. (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Lepanto, HoundDog, G2geek

      (And weirder still the further you go.)

      Some subatomic particles have a characteristic that is adequately described in mathematical terms as "angular momentum"--or "spin," as it's commonly called. There has long been a debate over whether or not these objects actually spin, or if they merely exhibit a property that's most conveniently described as such (some, for example, believe in wave/particle duality: that an electron, say, can be either a particle or a wave, depending on one's observation (See? Weird!). But how can a WAVE have spin?).

      So in one way, yes: spin IS a metaphor. But other times, it isn't. As usual, everything depends on what the observer is looking for regarding the answer she gets.

      Too weird now. Brain hurts.

      There are two types of Republicans: millionaires and suckers.

      by Phil T Duck on Sun Jul 17, 2011 at 04:01:47 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Brain hurts alright, but quite wonderful really. (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        HoundDog, G2geek

        I'm an old history hack myself and find it all quite beyond me, but I thoroughly enjoy reading about modern cosmology. Been reading about string theory recently and can't make any sense of it whatsoever...

        We're shocked by a naked nipple, but not by naked aggression.

        by Lepanto on Sun Jul 17, 2011 at 04:16:15 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Awestruck confusion based on knowledge is (0+ / 0-)

          a great experience to have every know and then.

          The capacity for such experience-emotion requires a certain kind of intelligence-curiousitiy-joy that is not homogenously distributed.

          More like an inverse bell-curve, to the usual bell-curve used to portray intelligence.

          Joy at awe-inspired knowledge based confusion appears to be greater at the tails of the distrubution rather than in the middle, where the value of  agressive normalness, seems to be wiegh down folks ability for awe, joy, and unabashed curiousity.

          The means is the ends in the process of becoming. - Mahatma Gandhi

          by HoundDog on Sun Jul 17, 2011 at 05:50:39 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

      •  angular momentum and spin: (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        HoundDog

        Angular momentum is known by virtue of certain observables.  It occurs to me that what we are considering to be angular momentum in particles, and calling "spin" for convenience, could just as well be some other actual characteristic that produces a similar or same observation purely as a result of the way in which we make the measurement.  

        That speculation would be nonsense in the event that well-suported theory converged with the conclusion that what we observe as angular momentum, really is angular momentum and not some other "hidden characteristic that merely appears to us as angular momentum."  

        So the question is, do we have well-supported theory that the observed effect really is identical with angular momentum in the more conventional sense of the term?

        •  Recent research may resolve this. (0+ / 0-)

          Experiments with tiny silicon beads that "bounce" on the surface of water reveal behavioral dynamics strikingly similar to particle/wave characteristics. The tiny silicon bead, as it dances on a liquid surface, produces waves in the liquid itself that both follow and lead the bead. This arrangement was even sent through a classic double-slit experiment...with results eerily similar to those found in quantum mechanics.

          This implies that electrons--particles--are "bouncing" on the (extradimensional?) surface of spacetime itself, thereby creating the "waves" that we also observe. The particles cannot be separated from their attendant waves, so we can consider them to be more-or-less the same thing.

          "Through the Wormhole" did a little piece on this in last week's episode ("How Does the Universe Work?"), and it was truly mind-blowing.

          As for angular momentum/spin, the jury's still out on that one.

          There are two types of Republicans: millionaires and suckers.

          by Phil T Duck on Mon Jul 18, 2011 at 09:15:04 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

  •  Didn't Paul Ryan use this to balance the budget? (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    aznavy, blue in NC, HoundDog

    Didn't he claim that you could slash taxes and raise revenues at the same time because of the Charge-parity violation?  The imbalance between cutting taxes and rising deficit would be accounted for with the massive Republican spin given to his budget proposals, which would cause space-time warping in the minds of the media and Tea Baggers alike.  This would in turn cause the annihilation of the increasing deficits, in favor of tax cut inflation, leaving only tax cuts for the entirety of the existence of this universe?

    •  By Jove, that's it! You've articulated the (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      HoundDog, pollwatcher

      unifying theory of the Teabagiverse!

      I always thought that Ryan was simply corrupt, and a little bit stupid...who knew that he was actually a particle physicist?

      "Bernie Madoff's mistake was stealing from the rich. If he'd stolen from the poor he'd have a cabinet position." -OPOL

      by blue in NC on Sun Jul 17, 2011 at 04:20:44 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Hey pollwatcher didn't I already as you to be a (0+ / 0-)

      blog admin/editor of Hydrant.  

      If not you must join up and lead us forward.

      You've got the talent.

      You could turn this comment into a hydrant piece in a few minutes of editing.

      And, we can be much sillier at Hydrant.

      I have to be on my good behavior when I'm writing under the SciTech banner.

      But, at Hydrant we have no pride, or self-respect, so anything goes.

      The means is the ends in the process of becoming. - Mahatma Gandhi

      by HoundDog on Sun Jul 17, 2011 at 05:53:51 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Far out man. (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    JHestand, HoundDog

    Cool shit.

    Aren't they amazing? They could go on forever, aimlessly talking about pointless subjects. Even I'm beginning to admire them for it. -- Nagisa, A Lollipop Or A Bullet

    by Dom9000 on Sun Jul 17, 2011 at 03:52:14 PM PDT

  •  so the next question becomes (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Albanius, HoundDog

    spinning in what?

    Can something "infinite" spin? How can you know we are spinning without a reference point?

    •  I briefly thought I had it figured out (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      HoundDog

      after listening to a public radio discussion of conservation of charge, it occurred to me that the M-antiM asymmetry, and the apparently exact equality of electrons and protons, could be explained by the well-known asymmetry of the weak interaction, as follows (omitting neutrinos):

      if the reactions e+ ->W+and W+ +d ->u
      are slightly more likely than the anti reactions
      e- ->W-  and W- + u -> d.

      e+ the positron, and W+ the charged weak boson, both carry a charge of +1.  

      The u (up quark) has a charge of +2/3, the d (down quark) has a charge of -1/3 so the difference is one electron charge, which is conserved.

      So after equal numbers of electrons and positrons (e+) had been created, the great majority would mutually annihilate making photons.  But  a small fraction, something like 10^-9 more of the positrons than electrons would undergo the weak interaction, leaving the electrons in existence and converting the same number of d's to u's, and thus neutrons (ddu) to protons (duu).

      After some reading, however, I learned that the existence of 3 generations of leptons (electron, muon, tau) is necessary for the asymmetry of the weak interaction. Furthermore the proportion of electrons that would survive seems to be wrong,  so the problem remains open.  

      But I suspect that some more complicated variant of the model I sketched might explain the preponderance of matter.  I rejected my previous wild hypothesis, that by a random drunkard's walk, more antimatter than matter happened to fall into black holes in the very early universe. Unfortunately, in that case dark matter in the form of black holes would outweigh visible matter by a much higher proportion than is observed.

      There's no such thing as a free market!

      by Albanius on Sun Jul 17, 2011 at 05:09:20 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Thanks for clearing this up Albanius. (0+ / 0-)

        I was concerned we were veering awfully close to the "schoals of confusion" there for a moment.  But, you got the ship back on course.

        Thanks.

        The means is the ends in the process of becoming. - Mahatma Gandhi

        by HoundDog on Sun Jul 17, 2011 at 05:56:40 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  Briane Greene discussed a similar spin problem (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      HoundDog

      In his book, The Fabric of the Cosmos.

      I don't have my copy handy, but he addressed a related problem of whether the surface of water in a spinning bucket would curve if there were no other matter in the universe bending spacetime with gravitational fields.

      BTW my other comment on matter-antimatter asymmetry  and the weak interaction was intended as a standalone, but may appear as a reply to qazplm

      There's no such thing as a free market!

      by Albanius on Sun Jul 17, 2011 at 05:21:23 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  I think an easier explanation is (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    HoundDog

    an earlier, more advanced, civilization harvested al the anti-matter for an energy source. I believe it happened a long long time ago in a galaxy far far away. Or in all galaxies far far away. Also all the ones near near close by.

    This comment may not be reproduced or excerpted on other sites without my express written permission.

    by psilocynic on Sun Jul 17, 2011 at 04:29:24 PM PDT

  •  A frame-dragging effect (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    HoundDog

    on a much smaller scale might be why space probes making gravitational slingshot passes around the Earth are subjected to a minutely greater acceleration than expected if you assume things like, oh, the mass of the Earth and other celestial bodies acting on the object.

    It's a variable amount and seems to have something to do with orientation relative to the rotational plane of the Earth.

    Gets better - a similar effect appears to produce a slight sunward acceleration on outbound space probes - well, the Pioneers anyway. For some reason, not so the Voyagers but - if the Earth fly-by data is any suggestion, attitude relative to the Solar Ecliptic could be a factor.

    The other (perhaps co-existing) scenario is that, like galaxies, stars and planets have a bit o dark matter loitering about (though it raises interesting implications why there is so LITTLE of it in our vicinity if that is the case.

    And - I'm actually puzzling over this stuff already - I think there is a tie-in to the noted assymetry in currently-detectable particles.

    Oh - crazy theory for "Dark matter" or at least some of it - it's baryonic but it's bound up in leftover compressed space metric from the Big Bang, locked in at extremely high time dilations. That's why nearly nothing effects it - it does.. .it just does very, very very slowly from the external observer's point of view.

    And that is also why it is nearly non-self interacting too...again, from external perspectives.

    As for the gravitational lensing effects we can use to detect dark masses indirectly - those require needed "wrapped" matter or standalone compressed metric.

    I just think the compressed metric notion is interesting - it would also provide a replacement for the missing (sic) graviton - the metric is its own gauge boson.

    I'll hand this off to the experts... let me get a glass of wine before the beatdown begins. :)

    •  Dang, cskendrick, Just when we had cleared up all (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      cskendrick

      the confusion you throw in this curveball.

      Well, actually, this is good, like the detective mystery novel that has the surprise plot twist.

      Okay, Kossacks, get out that glass of wine, and put your thinking caps back on.

      The plot thickens and the game is afoot.

      Thanks for spicing up the discussion cskendrick.

      Cheers, my friend.

      :-)

      The means is the ends in the process of becoming. - Mahatma Gandhi

      by HoundDog on Sun Jul 17, 2011 at 06:03:20 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

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