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Sorry, Republicans, but saying his name three times
does not wash your sins away
Oh, look. It's the third Monday in January. And you know what that means. It's not just the perfect time for a Republican presidential candidate debate hosted by Fox News and the Wall Street Journal. It's also the one day of the year when Republicans purge themselves of their racist sins by humbly bowing their heads to give thanks for the courage and sacrifice of Martin Luther King, Jr., whose life was tragically cut short in the service of liberating job creators from the burdens of taxes in the name of Jesus and Ayn Rand. Or something not even remotely like that.

But it is a great time to casually invoke and exploit the name of Dr. King, as if, with a little magical Republican fairy dust, their bigotry of yesterday will be purified and made clean.

Exhibit A: Rick Perry. Yes, the same Rick Perry who spent many a fond summer at Niggerhead Ranch, the name of which is, according to Republican logic, so obviously benign and "just a name" that Republicans were outraged when Herman Cain went all angry black man and said it was "insensitive."

But today:

He urged the audience to take the opportunity to send messages that highlight the same values that King espoused and pointed to his action as governor of Texas to appoint Wallace Jefferson, the descendant of slaves, as the first African-American justice to the Texas Supreme Court and later to elevate Jefferson to the position of chief justice.

“That is our challenge as Americans,” he said. “Don’t just talk to me. Show me! Show me the power of Martin Luther King. Show me the power of what you believe in your heart.”

That's right. Rick Perry once appointed a black guy to something—just like Dr. King would have done if he'd been the Niggerhead Ranch-vacationing governor of Texas. And the best way you can honor Dr. King's legacy, and show what is in your heart, is to vote for Perry. Because ... well, because MLK, that's why!

Not to be outdone, of course, we have Exhibit B: Newt Gingrich. That would be the same Newt who said, just two weeks ago:

"I will go to the NAACP convention, and tell the African-American community why they should demand paychecks instead of food stamps."
This, of course, was his follow-up to months of declaring Barack Obama a "food stamp president" (because food stamps is a "black" thing, and also bad scary stuff); pausing briefly to suggest that poor kids get after-school jobs as janitors so they'll develop a work ethic, since they certainly don't learn such a thing from their lazy poor parents (because poor people are lazy and black, so bad scary stuff); and then returning again to that whole "food stamp president" thing again, just to really drive home that message to all the racists out there that Newt's their kind of guy who sees the world their way.

But today:

Gingrich told the audience that the first bill he co-sponsored when he came to Congress was to create the King holiday. He praised King for the “passion of his vision” and noted that King, as both a political activist and a pastor, was “totally committed to freeing human beings and saving human beings.”

Obviously, Newt is the natural heir to Dr. King's legacy, since Newt also believes in freeing human beings. Like, from the shackles of matrimonial commitment if one partner happens to get sick and the other partner happens to spot a really hot intern ...

Gingrich also pointed to King and other civil rights leaders’ persistence in the face of danger and resistance as they faced beatings and jailing in the segregated South. “No matter how often they were knocked down, they came back,” he said.

Newt, who has also been knocked down, has come back, a la Dr. King. Or at least he'd like to come back, if only the Republican primary voters would recognize, frankly, that he is the Smartest Guy Who Ever Lived and, on this one day only, he's an awful lot like Dr. King, except for the part about being committed or giving an eighth of a crap about saving human beings who aren't named Newt Gingrich. But other than that, you know, Newt and Martin are practically interchangeable.

Not to be outdone, Mitt Romney is also honoring Dr. King's legacy in his own special way:

Mitt Romney plans to tout his extreme immigration positions during a campaign stop in South Carolina today — with Kris Kobach, the author of Arizona’s and Alabama’s immigration laws, at his side. He will attack his competitors Newt Gingrich and Rick Perry for their softer immigration stances, which could resonate with South Carolina voters who support that state’s harmful immigration law.

Yeah, because nothing says "honoring the legacy of a civil rights hero" like stumping around South Carolina to talk about how his policies will discriminate against brown people way more than the half-hearted policies of his opponents, Mr. Niggerhead and Mr. Food Stamps. Gives you chills, doesn't it?

But it's cool. There's nothing special on the calendar about the third Tuesday in January, so tomorrow, they should all be back to just openly, blatantly hating people who aren't exactly like them.

Originally posted to Kaili Joy Gray on Mon Jan 16, 2012 at 09:00 AM PST.

Also republished by Daily Kos.

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Comment Preferences

  •  Oh, dear, I would say something but (5+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    lyvwyr101, maf1029, Matt Z, Loge, Eric Nelson

    I would get HR'd for my 'hood "behind the Veil" speak.

  •  Thank goodness (8+ / 0-)

    we haven't passed a Harvey Milk Day in congress. Can you imagine the hypocrisy?

    Score Card: Marriages won by me, 1. Marriages destroyed by me, 0.

    by Steven Payne on Mon Jan 16, 2012 at 09:19:03 AM PST

  •  Buu, buu, buu --- (7+ / 0-)

    But what about Ron Paul? Did he have nothing to say about the GOP revered Dr King? I'm shocked!

    •  in one of the debates, (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Marie, Chitown Kev

      Dr. Paul  -- whose son claims title II of the '64 Act was unconstitutional -- argued that King's message was libertarian and based on self-reliance.  While he certainly made it very clear that black people would not and should not wait for white people to get tired of segregation, the march on Washington, the federal capital, was explicitly to demand a federal civil rights law as a moral imperative.  

      I wish these fuckers would go back to calling King a philandering communist instead of trying to insult his message by making it so insanely anodyne.  He wasn't a goddamn kindergarten teacher.  

      "This world demands the qualities of youth: not a time of life but a state of mind[.]" -- Robert F. Kennedy

      by Loge on Mon Jan 16, 2012 at 11:10:09 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Rightist only discover a social conscience when... (13+ / 0-)

    it is something that affects them directly.

    Its like Nancy Reagan only supporting stem cell research because it was a benefit to Alzhiemer research.

    The GOP only give lip service to MLK when he is in the news for the same reason.

    “Tax and Spend” I can understand. I can even understand “Borrow and Spend”. But “Borrow and Give Tax Cuts to Billionaires”? That I have a problem with.

    by LiberalCanuck on Mon Jan 16, 2012 at 09:33:11 AM PST

  •  Oh don't worry, they'll happily... (21+ / 0-)

    smear Ben Jealous today, since King WANTED people to be judged by their character, not their color.  Not attacking him today would be racist.

    After all, King believed in peaceful lawful protests.  Not like those Nasty OWS folks who break laws.  

    Oh, I mean, sure he was breaking a law or two, but those Jim Crow laws were WRONG...  Our new and improved Jim Poor laws are FAR more fair and eglatarian.

    /snark

    One of these days, I'm gonna learn that I'm only really good at convincing people when I'm being a wiseass. Reviewtopia.net

    by detroitmechworks on Mon Jan 16, 2012 at 09:34:03 AM PST

  •  The doctor's dilemma (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    lyvwyr101, shoeless

    It's kind of like the problem that doctors have.....

    A large percentage of Americans are immensely, grotesquely fat.  

    But doctors can't tell their patients, "Hey, you're fat.  Stop eating so much and exercise".  People will stop going to a doctor that says that.

    The Republican base may be racist but in this day and age when an accusation of racism means the end of finding employment; no one will listen.

    •  It's more like this. (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      thenekkidtruth

      I was at a lecture at Wash U by Theaster Gates. He's an emerging artist who is also black.  

      Part of his project is to renovate houses in very shitty neighborhoods. He gets students and vols to put in time fixing up property to be community art centers. He also gets unis and philanthropists to bankroll. It's basically worthy even if it's a tad exploitative. He ends up with all the credit and doesn't put any capital up himself.  It's a form of "relational aesthetics". Very art world.  

      Anyway,  a female architect from Persia stood up and Challenged Theaster for being a bit self  aggrandizing  And exploitative: A bit system friendly and cynical. She realized this might sound a bit racist so she went off on a tangent for about 5 minutes saying how much she liked Obama.

      It was skin crawling to listen to it all.

      He chuckled a bit.      

      A Catholic, Jew, Muslim and Buddhist walk into Al Aqsa Mosque. Buddhist immediately exclaims: "excuse me I appear to be in the wrong joke."

      by Salo on Mon Jan 16, 2012 at 09:59:03 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  So I think mentioning MLK like this... (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        shaharazade, Loge

        ... Is a clumsy shield to protect against charges of racism.

        The Doctor btw ought to tell people to Work out a bit and cut a few calories. What dilemma? That's standard advice for
        the overweight.

        A Catholic, Jew, Muslim and Buddhist walk into Al Aqsa Mosque. Buddhist immediately exclaims: "excuse me I appear to be in the wrong joke."

        by Salo on Mon Jan 16, 2012 at 10:02:42 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  It's ok. (0+ / 0-)

        I'm sure she has lots of African-American friends.

        Killing jobs is what Mitt does. It's who he is. 'Jobkiller' should be on his business card.

        by thenekkidtruth on Mon Jan 16, 2012 at 10:09:03 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  She's Persian (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          thenekkidtruth

          It was kinda Strange seeing her go onto the tangent.

          Most of the audience probably didn't register any racial motivation for her critique. Until she started blabbering.  

          A Catholic, Jew, Muslim and Buddhist walk into Al Aqsa Mosque. Buddhist immediately exclaims: "excuse me I appear to be in the wrong joke."

          by Salo on Mon Jan 16, 2012 at 10:33:24 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

        •   (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          thenekkidtruth

          It was kinda Strange seeing her go onto the tangent.

          Most of the audience probably didn't register any racial motivation for her critique. Until she started blabbering.  

          A Catholic, Jew, Muslim and Buddhist walk into Al Aqsa Mosque. Buddhist immediately exclaims: "excuse me I appear to be in the wrong joke."

          by Salo on Mon Jan 16, 2012 at 10:36:23 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

  •  Rick Perry on "Show Me!" (17+ / 0-)

    Rick Perry:

    “Don’t just talk to me. Show me! Show me the power of Martin Luther King. Show me the power of what you believe in your heart.”

    Me:

    "Okay! I will -- by voting for Barack Obama for president a SECOND time in four years. Oh, and I'm also going to vote a straight Democratic ticket in 2012."

    That oughtta hold you all for a bit...

  •  They are all disgusting (7+ / 0-)

    "Rick Perry talks a lot and he's not very bright. And that's a combination I like in Republicans." --- James Carville

    by LaurenMonica on Mon Jan 16, 2012 at 09:44:41 AM PST

  •  Newt and Perry (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    SammyJames, lyvwyr101, shoeless, Matt Z

    have so much more in common with Dr. King than Obama.  We all agree with that, don't we?

    Progressives are on the right side of history every time.

    by on the cusp on Mon Jan 16, 2012 at 09:45:15 AM PST

  •  And George "Maccaca" Allen is jumping on the MLK (14+ / 0-)

    bandwagon too: Link

    My favorite quote:

    Herein lies the brilliance of Dr. King’s dream—that one’s diversity should not be considered a liability, but rather an asset to be valued. And that all of us should be measured, not by the color of our skin, but by the content of our character.  

    With this tribute to Dr. King, we I think can all agree that Mr. Allen practices a remarkable diversity of panderings.

    Courage is contagious. - Daniel Ellsberg

    by semiot on Mon Jan 16, 2012 at 09:45:23 AM PST

  •  It would be much more interesting if ... (8+ / 0-)

    ... A Republican said:

    "the civil rights movement got what it wanted, and it has devastated America"

    then there would actually be a debate.

    Instead it's obvious they have surrendered the terms of debate.

    MLK was beginning to stump for socialist/ at least social democratic  policy beford he was shot so I really don't understand why they would want to claim him.

    It would be more honest on their part (and principled) to spurn his legacy.  

    A Catholic, Jew, Muslim and Buddhist walk into Al Aqsa Mosque. Buddhist immediately exclaims: "excuse me I appear to be in the wrong joke."

    by Salo on Mon Jan 16, 2012 at 09:48:01 AM PST

    •  Interesting. (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Loge

      Newt Gingrich

      was beginning to stump for socialist/ at least social democratic policy beford he was shot

      by the GOP orthodox conservative hardliners.

      Sound familiar?

      H'mm. I'm not terribly into this, anymore.

      by Knarfc on Mon Jan 16, 2012 at 10:07:23 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Ron Paul wants to repeal the Civil Rights Act. (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Matt Z, Loge

      He just won't come out and say it. I always point this out to Ron Paul supporters. They never believe me.

      A conservative is a man with two perfectly good legs who, however, has never learned how to walk forward.- Franklin D. Roosevelt

      by shoeless on Mon Jan 16, 2012 at 10:24:59 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Ron Paul wants to repeal the Civil Rights Act. (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Matt Z

      He just won't come out and say it. I always point this out to Ron Paul supporters. They never believe me.

      A conservative is a man with two perfectly good legs who, however, has never learned how to walk forward.- Franklin D. Roosevelt

      by shoeless on Mon Jan 16, 2012 at 10:27:11 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Just watch them... (6+ / 0-)

    .. run around mouthing their commitment to "civil rights" in the same breath that they deny the civil rights of gay Americans and women.  

    Do they even understand what the term civil rights means?  

    •  No..... (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Eric Nelson, Marie

      civil rights are the rights of citizens to political and social freedom and equality, according to my Oxford dictionary. This is in direct conflict with their belief in the God given  supremacy of those who are born white, are rich, and preferably male.  All freedom is derived from their authority. Equality is an alien concept to them and freedom is power and only theirs to use as a means of suppression. They deserve the freedom to enslave anybody who isn't them. Rights belong only to those who are not 'other'.            

  •  Or that Gingritch brags about Welfare Reform where (5+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    semiot, maf1029, Janet 707, Matt Z, Loge

    ...he persistently presented welfare recipients in the media and everywhere he could as African American when in fact more whites were then and now on public assistance.  

    God forbid that we actually give a leg up to anyone much less "those people"! He eagerly jumped on that bandwagon when  his friend Robert Rector of the Heritage Foundation encountered a bunch of uppity Black mothers in college who were "using the system" to get their education so they could adequately provide for their families.  

    These women were moms who had fled the Virginia countryside where racism and classism had existed for over 300 years to come to DC and go to college.  Rector met them while in a town meeting and then ran home to write "The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunities Act" so Gingritch could wave it in front of the American people, talk about the "limosine welfare mom" and then force low income women into working McJobs for his corporate friends at minimum wage so that their families live in poverty for the rest of their lives.

    Of course Gingritch and Rector thought nothing about all the goodies their rich friends get collecting their tax free dividends and bennies off the government while sitting around their heated pools.  THAT is not "using the system for their own benefit" that is different doncha know!  

    So why don't you kiss the boot of MLK all you disingenuous Repugs and reflect on how much suffering you bring not only because of your racism, but for which you use racism as an excuse to implement classism (involving especially white woman) and other minorities as well) as well?  

    Goddam you!  

    Cat Sullivan

    First they ignore you, then they ridicule you, then they hurt you, then you win ~ Mahatma Gandhi

    by mntleo2 on Mon Jan 16, 2012 at 09:51:17 AM PST

    •  even if he weren't totally factually wrong, (0+ / 0-)

      Gingrich's views represent an attempt to be the benevolent but condescending white liberal that King tried to go around, the type of people who thought they meant well but insisted on delaying integration until blacks were "ready."  Gingrich buys into that, but of course, doesn't mean well.  He thinks social and economic integration would happen as a matter of course, if only black people were "ready."  He can't conceptualize middle class blacks, mostly because they don't scare his dwindling constituents.

      "This world demands the qualities of youth: not a time of life but a state of mind[.]" -- Robert F. Kennedy

      by Loge on Mon Jan 16, 2012 at 11:15:15 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Looks like Scott Walker is celebrating with cake. (9+ / 0-)

    His tweet today, commemorating Dr. King:

    @GovWalker Governor Walker

    Happy Rev Dr Martin Luther King Day!

    4 hours ago via Twitter for BlackBerry® Favorite Retweet Reply

  •  The parade of crazies that the right wing has put (4+ / 0-)

    forth as potential candidates has at least exposed the racial hatred and bigotry that much of the right secretly holds dear to their hearts.

    Just give me some truth. John Lennon--- OWS------Too Big To Fail

    by burnt out on Mon Jan 16, 2012 at 09:54:05 AM PST

  •  One of the republican party's greatest strengths- (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Steveningen, Janet 707

    lies in the fact that they have absolutely no integrity of any kind.

    If that weren't such common knowledge--it could've been their secret weapon-too.

    "Power is a fleeting thing. One day your souls will be required of you." Bishop Peter Storey---Central Methodist Mission, Johannesburg, June 1981

    by lyvwyr101 on Mon Jan 16, 2012 at 09:57:16 AM PST

  •  Snarkily delicious! nt (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Matt Z
  •  Romney's Mexican Roots (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Utahrd, shoeless, Janet 707, Matt Z

    Considering since Romney's father was born in Mexico, which means he could have duel citizenship, you'd think he would be kinder about immigrants.  Look at his sons.  Good looking yes, but they sure look dark to me.

  •  And wait for it (7+ / 0-)

    At some point during the next debate, one of the candidates (I'm guessing Perry on this one) will bring up the number of Republican votes for passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 without indicating that none of those Republicans could win a Republican primary today OR that some of the Democrats voting against it are now Republicans.

    All it takes is security in your own civil rights to make you complacent.

    by Dave in Northridge on Mon Jan 16, 2012 at 10:02:18 AM PST

  •  Tecbnically once the Republicans (0+ / 0-)

    nominated Clarence Thomas to the Supreme Court, and (stage)managed to get him confirmed, they don't need to talk about civil rights or Martin Luther King's legacy anymore. I don't know why they even bother. Really. They already have paid for Justice Thomas' vote.

    But how does Justice Thomas spend his MLK Day? Is that the day he shreds his tax papers, or does he instead volunteer at the Federalist Society? Or is it maybe both, at the same time?

    H'mm. I'm not terribly into this, anymore.

    by Knarfc on Mon Jan 16, 2012 at 10:04:13 AM PST

    •  Herman Cain says there's no racism (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      thenekkidtruth, Knarfc, Matt Z, Loge

      So they can do whatever they want.

      "Who let the dogs out . . . [Romney laugh]"

      When we stop putting leaders from the past up on pedestals and ignoring their flaws, we can start seeing our present leaders for what they really are.

      by PhillyJeff on Mon Jan 16, 2012 at 10:10:17 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  It's about as logical as a claim there (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Loge

        was no lynching because one black man didn't see it. Or because one black mad didn't get lynched.

        Or the idea that slaves fought to defend the honor of the South.

        Or that Martin Luther King supported the Wars in Vietnam so that poor blacks and whites could learn fight together.

        Or that tax cuts to the wealthy "job creator class" will result in the creation of jobs.

        Etc., etc.

        H'mm. I'm not terribly into this, anymore.

        by Knarfc on Mon Jan 16, 2012 at 10:45:18 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Or that only the liberal slaves (0+ / 0-)

          escaped from the plantation in search of big government and big government coddling; or that the conservative slaves never left the plantation but stayed to worship at the alter of free market capitalism rather than struggle in the free market for labor.

          H'mm. I'm not terribly into this, anymore.

          by Knarfc on Mon Jan 16, 2012 at 10:57:06 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

  •  My sad confession (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    thenekkidtruth, Janet 707, Matt Z, Marie

    I want to unsay every mitigating word I've said about the region of the south today. I won't, only because the world is too vast, but, as an MLK day gathering showed up at the local courthouse, a high school junior in the local diner told me that she disapproved of interracial dating, because God doesn't approve of it.

    I asked, "Hunh?" She said that it was because "they," Black people, are descended from monkeys.

    She was serious and unaware of her statements having the potential to offend.

    Why did the racists want onto the school boards? Why did they want stickers on textbooks? J. B. Stoner's garbage "race science" was always floating around, and they knew that they only needed to get the comprehensive scientific narrative out of schools to allow whatever bullsh*t they wanted to creep in.

    I'm furious.

    (yes, of course I unleashed a world of learning on her.)

    Every reductio ad absurdum will seem like a good idea to some fool or another.

    by The Geogre on Mon Jan 16, 2012 at 10:06:32 AM PST

    •  I've got an MLK confession too (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Matt Z, The Geogre, Loge

      Portland OR in circa 1990 had a controversy - rename a major street MLK Boulevard or not?

      Too young and naive, I bought into the well-funded ads and endorsed a 'no' vote.  Soon afterwards, when I discerned the level and motive of the deception, this incident had the net effect of instantly turning me hard Left.

      And the street is now called MLK Boulevard, btw.

      Killing jobs is what Mitt does. It's who he is. 'Jobkiller' should be on his business card.

      by thenekkidtruth on Mon Jan 16, 2012 at 10:14:53 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  taht racis is teh basis of the Christain Identity (0+ / 0-)

      movement which was revisited with the militia moevment in the  90s.

    •  Interesting . . . so, religious nut cases (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      The Geogre

      Do believe in evolution?

      On a less snarky note, I generally have hopes that each new generation will be more tolerant and compassionate than the prior.  I see it in my own children and in the majority (although certainly not all) of my nieces and nephews and their friends.  

      Instances like you describe above however, make me incredibly sad.

      Can't never did nothin'; Can Do did!

      by susanWAstate on Mon Jan 16, 2012 at 10:30:50 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  The generations WERE improving (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        susanWAstate, Bill W

        However, that stopped with the "local control" movement and "states rights" emphasis of the 1980's, at least when there is a local poison. I have had college students tell me that "science proves that evolution is false." They told me that they "learned that in high school."

        I have had many students take this "very nice" Christian identity crap. (To answer Bernbart, I did know that. It predates the contemporary Christian Identity movement. When I mentioned J.B. Stoner, I was referring to a genuine Klan offshoot of the 1970's who merged with the Stormfront skinheads later; he had a bunch of magazines his thugs would throw at high schools with the "truth" about how "negroes can mate with monkeys" and "the negroe's cranial size is diminished" and other bullcrap straight from the Klan of the 1910's. In the 1970's, we laughed at him. We thought he was a pustule faced red neck. Then again, we had actual science in school.)

        I get furious when I see all the blood and toil of generations spit upon by these chin drooling morons.

        Every reductio ad absurdum will seem like a good idea to some fool or another.

        by The Geogre on Mon Jan 16, 2012 at 11:02:27 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  I remember JB Stoner. (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          The Geogre

          Haven't heard his name in years, but I remember a family vacation to South Carolina when I was a kid, and he was on some local tv station.  And we did laugh at him.  I couldn't believe he was for real, I thought it must be some kind of comedy sketch.  My folks knew he was for real, though.

      •  Do they believe in evolution? (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        susanWAstate, Marie

        That was also interesting.

        I said to her, "Either everyone is from Adam and Eve or everyone is from apes." She thought perhaps we might all be from apes (but The Blacks more recently), but They weren't from the same branch as Us.

        She'd rather give up Genesis than race.

        Now, she was for full integration, mind you. The conversation came up because of agreement that the habit of places have segregated proms was wrong. She just thought that one race was one, the other was the other, and they ought to stay that way. [I did give her a full barrage of genetics, diversity, genetic drift, Africa have no "race," no one ever thinking of calling the continent a "race" until they wanted to enslave some portion of it, etc.]

        Every reductio ad absurdum will seem like a good idea to some fool or another.

        by The Geogre on Mon Jan 16, 2012 at 11:06:46 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  Oh, geeez . . . . (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Eric Nelson

    Panderublicans.

    Killing jobs is what Mitt does. It's who he is. 'Jobkiller' should be on his business card.

    by thenekkidtruth on Mon Jan 16, 2012 at 10:07:02 AM PST

  •  professor newt (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Janet 707

    Newt, in keeping with his historian image, invokes the founding fathers by only giving 3/5ths of a crap about MLK.

    We keep electing whores to congress, and we wonder why we get screwed while the money flows to their pimps.

    by papa monzano on Mon Jan 16, 2012 at 10:07:55 AM PST

  •  Republicans put the "K" in MLK (0+ / 0-)

    Actually more like 3 "K's," but that's pretty close right?!

    When we stop putting leaders from the past up on pedestals and ignoring their flaws, we can start seeing our present leaders for what they really are.

    by PhillyJeff on Mon Jan 16, 2012 at 10:08:46 AM PST

  •  Seriously, Newt really (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Vita Brevis, Loge

    is comparing himself to MLK, isn't he?  After this campaign, Chutzpah is going to have to be buried right next to Irony.

    “No matter how often they were knocked down, they came back,” he said.

    On the other hand maybe he just got confused and thought today was Chumbawamba Day.

    -- Stu

  •  It just sickens me to hear any of these (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Matt Z, Loge, Marie

    people talk about Martin Luther King Jr. Truly sickens me.

    We view "The Handmaid's Tale" as cautionary. The GOP views it as an instruction book.

    by Vita Brevis on Mon Jan 16, 2012 at 10:12:12 AM PST

  •  MLK was a lot more than a "civil rights leader." (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Matt Z, Eric Nelson, Marie

    As in "way more." Lookie here:

    http://www.fair.org/...

    And in another frame:

    Communism forgets that life is individual.  Capitalism forgets that life is social and the kingdom of brotherhood is found in neither the thesis of communism or the antithesis of  capitalism but in a higher synthesis.  It is found in a higher synthesis that combines the truths of both.  Now, when I say question the whole society it means ultimately coming to see that the problem of racism, the problem of exploitation, the problem of war are all tied together.  These are the triple evils that are interrelated.
    http://hinterlandgazette.com/...

    And look where that clarity of vision might get you...

    "Is that all there is?" Peggy Lee.

    by jm214 on Mon Jan 16, 2012 at 10:13:59 AM PST

  •  Well that changes everything (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Matt Z, AllanTBG, Eric Nelson

    Perry appointed an African American insurance defense lawyer to the Texas Supreme Court.

    But how many African American teachers and government employees lost their jobs because he wouldn't use existing funds to save their jobs?

    "Mr. President, I'm not saying we wouldn't get our hair mussed." General Buck Turgidson

    by muledriver on Mon Jan 16, 2012 at 10:15:46 AM PST

  •  Credit to the woman who questioned Gringrich (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Matt Z

    at a church in South Carolina recently:

    One woman pointedly asked Gingrich if traveling with Sharpton had any impact on him.

    "Does that change your way of thinking, or are you still known throughout the country as a racist and a bigot?" the woman asked.

    Gingrich said he is not known as a racist or a bigot, but the woman persisted in her tough questioning, reminding Gingrich of his characterization of Obama as "the food stamp president."

    "Do you still think of President Obama as the food stamp president?" the woman asked. "How can you say that?"

    Gingrich didn’t back down.

    "I say that because more Americans today are on food stamps than ever before," Gingrich said.

    Figures from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, which administers the food stamp program, back up Gingrich’s assertion. But many black Americans were offended when Gingrich said he would attend an NAACP meeting and tell people there that black Americans should demand paychecks instead of food aid.

    Many black Americans saw Gingrich’s remarks as an overtly racist and an inaccurate effort to connect black Americans with food stamps. Most of those who receive food assistance in the U.S. are white.

    Note the lame analysis by the Boston Herald writer (where I added bold): only black people see Gingrich as overtly racist.  What a joke.

    •  The rates of foodstamp use however. (0+ / 0-)

      Please make sure you recognize that rate and absolute quantity are two different statistical markers.

      The main argument against gingrich's point is that black folk occupy a very low socioeconomic strata and are thus more likely to require some help. So any difference in rates us sort of grandfathered in by other factors.

      It's a bit rich to complain about people being fed though. Given the trough that most busnessmen like Newt  feed at.

      A Catholic, Jew, Muslim and Buddhist walk into Al Aqsa Mosque. Buddhist immediately exclaims: "excuse me I appear to be in the wrong joke."

      by Salo on Mon Jan 16, 2012 at 10:51:56 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  well, it is the Boston Herald (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Calvino Partigiani

      about what I would expect from them

  •  I was thinking today (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Marie

    about how history repeats but never in a good way. If you imagine GWB to have been a kind of Warren Harding, a vacuous servant of wealth, and Obama to be something of a Woodrow Wilson, professorial internationalist, then perhaps we will see Romney take the Presidency as a full-on Herbert Hoover, destined to become the mouldering face of the corpse of the gilded age. But such a scenario presages an awful calamity, even worse than what we have been through. That calamity ahead may be the all but inevitable default by Greece. I must admit to a failure of imagination on this subject. I never thought it possible that Greece would default but now I can see that it's extraordinary likely. The chaos this would bring to the world economy would be swift and brutal. If it unfolds over the next few months, Romney may have the one issue that would make hm President: a plunge into a worldwide depression. Just when we need an FDR, we may be handed a Hoover.

  •  It's so nice of Fox News and Wall Street Journal (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Matt Z, Loge, Marie

    to provide the debate and clowns for MLK Day. I hope they do balloon animals!

    "There's nothing in the dark that's not there when the lights are on" ~ Rod Serling

    by jwinIL14 on Mon Jan 16, 2012 at 10:18:26 AM PST

  •  just discussing wiht my hsuband MLK and republican (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Marie

    the racism that has bubbled up in the republican party, I think the coded racists remarks are even worse than the outward use of 'Obamacare' racism. Mitt Romeny keeps saying over and over again. I have nothing against Obama he is  a nice gut but  Obama is "just over his head'.

    This reminds me of statements made in the 60s about interracial marriages that went something like this 'Well he is a nice guy, but my daughter is not ever going to marry a black guy".

    or

    When affirmative actions was passed,  over and over again conservatives who opposed it would say... he or she got that job or got into school not because they were qualified but because they were women or black.

    I'm sure the social conservatives will use the fact that MLK was a minister more than anything.  They like the 'content of his character' part  more than they do the 'color of his skin'. They will overlook that the conservatives in 50 & 60s called MLK a communist and socialist the same way they do Obama, or overlook that MLK was against the Vietnam Conflict". Ever heard his great speech on War?

  •  Wait a second -- none of them... (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Matt Z, Calvino Partigiani

    ...trotted out the old line about Dr. King being a registered Republican?  
    I know, the day is young, but still, you'd think at least one of them would have gone there by now.

  •  Surprisingly, Newt didn't lie this time: (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Loge, Eric Nelson
    Gingrich told the audience that the first bill he co-sponsored when he came to Congress was to create the King holiday.

    Wonder if any reporters out there bothered to check or unlike me, they just took it for a fact?

    H.R. 15 Bill Summary.  The companion Senate version was S. 25.  The legislation was sponsored by 37 members of the Senate and 124 members of the House.  This 1979 legislative action fell five votes short in the House.

    Powerful Senate opponents were:

    Thurmond, Hatch, Simpson, Laxalt, Thad Cochran, DeConcini.

     

  •  Lets not forget that Kobach wrote Kansas Voter (0+ / 0-)

    laws that require people to disclose gender changes to obtain the right to vote.

    This is the guy that Mitt Romney accepted an endorsement from.  This is the wing of the party that is backing Romney.

    Romney's views are not mainstream or even middle of the road...

    He has moved to the dark side... to the most vile, hate filled side of the republican party.

    Don't forget this... Romney is selling his soul to hate groups so he can be the nominee.  Kobach is a shining example.

    Radical Activist Homosexual Agenda: 1. Equality 2. See #1

    by skip945 on Mon Jan 16, 2012 at 01:14:03 PM PST

  •  Oppression (0+ / 0-)

    I wrote this poem today, Mitt is an oppressive SOB, as are most GOPers!

    Oppression

    Times are changing and differences exist
    yet with some folks racism will persist
    abuse of states rights is oppression missed
    hate and bigotry are like a dark cyst
    bursting putrid words, good folks would resist
    wanting purity, making their short list
    to oppress, differences to be dismissed
    though sameness is boring, some will stay pissed
    Martin Luther King challenged to desist
    he gave his life, so we could co-exist
    life is wicked and twisted, love's a tryst
    tie a yellow ribbon around the wrist
    in brotherhood we challenge the blacklist
    show some love, hate and greed make an iron fist.

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