Skip to main content

(X-posted at ACT NOW)

As for outsourcing, I have a problem: I’m not sure that I believe in such a thing as an “American job.”

As the opening to his re-election campaign, President Obama’s rousing State of the Union address laid out a vision for a renewed American social compact, one in which hard work and responsibility offer everyone a decent life. It was a stirring message, aptly crystallizing the central theme of the 2012 campaign: Does our economy work for everyone?  Or does it just work for the lucky, wealthy, or unusually talented few?

One of the reliable applause lines in the speech – and in politics more generally – was about saving and creating American jobs.  The President assailed American companies that “outsource jobs” and “avoid paying [their] fair share of taxes by moving jobs and profits overseas.” President Obama is absolutely right on that latter point: it’s time for American corporations to stop shirking their tax responsibilities through complex accounting and putting subsidiaries in tax havens like the Cayman Islands.  In fact, as I wrote in a recent blog post, Congress’s latest desire to give these corporations a “tax holiday” to repatriate profits to the United States is both economically foolish and morally unacceptable.

As for outsourcing, though, I have a problem: I’m not sure that I believe in such a thing as an “American job.”  Of course, I believe in the literal fact that there are jobs in the United States, that they are primarily filled by American workers, and that they are at companies with headquarters in the U.S.  But, at a broader level, I worry about the notion of “American jobs”: it suggests that the United States has a moral claim on these jobs, that workers in other countries who do work that was once done by Americans are not entitled to that work.

There is no doubt that outsourcing and technological innovation – especially the loss of close to 6 million manufacturing jobs from 1987 to 2010 – have hurt many American workers.  It has been devastating to cities like Detroit and Philadelphia.  And it has been one of the primary reasons for widening income disparity, which threatens the very core of the American compact.

But, blaming companies that employ people in other countries with better skills or more modest costs is missing the point: American workers are simply not competitive in many industries.  In 1970, the U.S. had the highest high school graduation rate in the developed world.  We’re now 21st in high school graduation and 15th in college graduation.  And we all know that a diploma from many American high schools doesn’t mean nearly as much as one in Singapore, South Korea, France, or Japan.  Moreover, our meager investments in the infrastructure that supports business are no match for aggressive investments in China and elsewhere.  To a significant extent, outsourcing is not the cause, but the result, of years of economic mismanagement and foolish decisions.

Should the U.S. give tax breaks to companies for outsourcing jobs?  Of course not.  But, frankly, this issue is a political canard.  The one-time tax benefit that corporations get for writing off costs related to shutting down U.S operations is a minor factor in their decisions to outsource.  We should close this loophole, if only so that we can stop talking about it and get to the heart of the issue: the United States, led primarily by decades of neglect for investment in public education and infrastructure, has been losing its edge.

On moral grounds, as well, I’m concerned that we do not see the other side of the equation: the shifting of work from the United States to other countries has often been a powerful driver of poverty alleviation in some of the world’s poorest corners.  1.4 billion people around the world continue to live on less than $1.25 a day. But that number has fallen dramatically in recent decades.  In the much-reviled China, the impoverished portion of the population dropped from 85% in 1981 to 16% in 2005.  Over 600 million people climbed into a decent standard of living during that period.  One reason: many mid-skill manufacturing jobs for which Americans were no longer uniquely qualified went to China. The trend is similar, though less pronounced, in India, the heart of supposedly lamentable IT and call center outsourcing.  Can you really tell me that desperately poor people in India or the Philippines or Cambodia do not deserve “American jobs?”

(To be clear, I'm not talking about companies that move operations to other countries so that they can dump toxic pollutants with impunity or exploitatively employ child labor.  Those things happen, and they are morally bankrupt.  But they don't account for the bulk of American job losses.)

Before going back to school, I worked at a New York-based company with a large office in Hyderabad, India.  The firm never specifically “outsourced” jobs to India.  But a large fraction of total staff was in the Hyderabad office.  There’s no question that at least marginally more workers would have been needed in the United States had we not had that office in India.  Was it immoral to employ people in India?  I don’t think so.  In fact, it may be one of the most beneficial things that the company has done for the world.  Those hundreds of people have good jobs, jobs that support families, jobs that pay taxes to the Indian government, jobs that transfer long-lasting skills to the Indian economy.  They have more than earned those jobs, through diligence and a commitment to education.  Over a relatively brief period, their wages rose dramatically, as the Hyderabad area developed and competition for skilled workers among American firms became fierce.  This is how it should be.  I don’t begrudge the Indian friends that I made over those years; I admire them.  Nor do I hold the company’s decisions against it.  Not at all.

I laud all of the energy that President Obama has put into trying to improve our education system, infrastructure, and economic competitiveness.  Republicans, who are so anxious about competitiveness and job creation, must stop obstructing his every move.  And I recognize that beating up on companies that employ people outside of the United States is a powerful political ritual that is inevitable every four years.  It's hard to feel sorry for them. Many large corporations have done an awful lot to destroy whatever goodwill voters might have felt towards them, including avoiding tax payments that actually fund investment in our economy.

But let’s not fall into the trap of thinking that this is a zero-sum game.  People in other countries are not to blame for our losing in the global economy.  We are doing a perfectly good job of losing all on our own.

Currently majoring in Business & Public Policy at The Wharton School's MBA program, Andrew Solomon is one of the founding Board members of ACT NOW. He summarizes his political philosophy as "progressive ends, pragmatic means." You can reach him at solomon [at] actnowny.org.  More by Andrew at http://www.actnowny.org/

EMAIL TO A FRIEND X
Your Email has been sent.
You must add at least one tag to this diary before publishing it.

Add keywords that describe this diary. Separate multiple keywords with commas.
Tagging tips - Search For Tags - Browse For Tags

?

More Tagging tips:

A tag is a way to search for this diary. If someone is searching for "Barack Obama," is this a diary they'd be trying to find?

Use a person's full name, without any title. Senator Obama may become President Obama, and Michelle Obama might run for office.

If your diary covers an election or elected official, use election tags, which are generally the state abbreviation followed by the office. CA-01 is the first district House seat. CA-Sen covers both senate races. NY-GOV covers the New York governor's race.

Tags do not compound: that is, "education reform" is a completely different tag from "education". A tag like "reform" alone is probably not meaningful.

Consider if one or more of these tags fits your diary: Civil Rights, Community, Congress, Culture, Economy, Education, Elections, Energy, Environment, Health Care, International, Labor, Law, Media, Meta, National Security, Science, Transportation, or White House. If your diary is specific to a state, consider adding the state (California, Texas, etc). Keep in mind, though, that there are many wonderful and important diaries that don't fit in any of these tags. Don't worry if yours doesn't.

You can add a private note to this diary when hotlisting it:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary from your hotlist?
Are you sure you want to remove your recommendation? You can only recommend a diary once, so you will not be able to re-recommend it afterwards.
Rescue this diary, and add a note:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary from Rescue?
Choose where to republish this diary. The diary will be added to the queue for that group. Publish it from the queue to make it appear.

You must be a member of a group to use this feature.

Add a quick update to your diary without changing the diary itself:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary?
(The diary will be removed from the site and returned to your drafts for further editing.)
(The diary will be removed.)
Are you sure you want to save these changes to the published diary?

Comment Preferences

  •  Globalism is just a modern term for Colonialism (9+ / 0-)

    I don't know why you would see this as beneficial.

    It's the same thing without the pomp and circumstance of setting up colonial infrastructure.

    You'll never convince me that I should feel good watching my home town, once a proud community, turn into an impoverished wasteland full of people on welfare because all the industry was shipped to Mexico and China.

    It isn't good for the Mexicans, the Chinese, or the Indians...it's only good for the capitalists.

    •  The writer sounds like (8+ / 0-)

      someone who hasn't had to worry that it is his job that will be lost.

      •  Is there a good reason for this personal attack on (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        burnt out, ams125

        the diarist?

        If you had read/understood the diary, maybe you would understand that the writer would suggest that people who lose low-trained jobs should receive training so that they can get a job that requires a higher skill level.

        "A candle loses nothing by lighting another candle" - Mohammed Nabbous, R.I.P.

        by Lawrence on Fri Jan 27, 2012 at 08:55:57 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Like what?? High skilled jobs are also being (8+ / 0-)

          outsourced.  Tax accountants, radiologists, computer programmers, engineers, etc.

        •  How about a quote from the Diarist? (8+ / 0-)

          "Many large corporations have done an awful lot to destroy whatever goodwill voters might have felt towards them, including avoiding tax payments that actually fund investment in our economy."
          I believe you can change the word 'Many' to 'Most'. How many iPads or iPhones are manufactured in this country? How many Nike products?
          Aside from automobile and heavy equipment manufacturers where products are 'Assembled' in the US, with parts made elsewhere.
          I can't go on, because this will become a complete attack on the Diarist and that is frowned upon.
          This makes me so frickin' pissed. Speaking of the lousy education our children get, when most of the industrialized world doesn't require someone to take on enormous debt to get a post high school degree or go bankrupt to pay medical bills. Where most pay 10% or less for prescription drugs.
          Large companies incorporate in the US due to stability in government and the impossibility of the Government Nationalizing their business.
          Then they pay big bucks to ensure their politicians get into power and pass laws that limit liability and taxes. They strip our schools of learning tools by using strategies of fear, like the fear of illegal immigrants.
          I'm sorry, but I'm done. I've read a lot of diaries, but this one ranks among the...nevermind,

          "If you tell the truth, you won't have to remember anything", Mark Twain

          by Cruzankenny on Fri Jan 27, 2012 at 09:51:45 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

      •  I'll bet you a dollar the author is a libertarian (5+ / 0-)

        who believes in the myth of "a level playing field". Hmm, and trying to get an MBA? Gee, why can't we ship top management jobs overseas? I'm sure we could find someone in Indonesia that can fire people for 1/10th the salary of an America CEO.

        "What profit a man, if he gain the world, but has to pay taxes on it?" Paul 8:36

        From the Gospel of St. Ron Paul in the Teachings and Misunderstandings of the Words of Adam Smith

        by ontheleftcoast on Fri Jan 27, 2012 at 08:59:42 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  The Problem with "American wannabe Capitolists" (6+ / 0-)

        Greedy, carrion feasting capitalist vultures don't ship American JOBS overseas to take advantage of a highly educated foreign labor force which possesses all the humane benefits such as health insurance, social security, unemployment insurance, etc., ...
        HELL NO!  -  They do it  in order to exploit the labor of poor, ignorant and uneducated workers who are enslaved by foreign countries that also exploit their children!
        China's state sponsered enslavement and exploitation of children is a well known and proven fact!
        http://www.humanevents.com/...
        Since WWII over 40 million good high paying Union JOBS have been shipped overseas by these greedy, vile, inhuman beings!
        (No one knows the exact number...)
        They have managed to turn America into a Nation of 85% service workers!
                                   ! 99ers,Rise UP for America !

         

        ! The swinistic greed and racial hatred of the American ruling elite is abysmal !

        by joe wobblie on Fri Jan 27, 2012 at 10:31:18 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

    •  Actually it is good for some other countries (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Deep Texan

      While the jobs created there and the working conditions are unfathomable by western standards, they usually pay better than average and are pretty good by local standards.  It's not totally horrid for them.

      It's been the old chuckle that for every middle class job you destroy in America you can left several people out of poverty in another nation.

      That's one of the reason's it's had bipartisan support.  The rich capitalists get to increase their profits by slashing their labor costs and not having to deal with their waste properly.  Economic elites win and the do-gooder liberal types get to feel happy about lifting people in third world nations out of poverty.

      Hell, our entire nation loves this, as long as it's not their job.  Cheaper goods!  My 401k is going up!  Helping third world nations!  In fact it was cheered on full bore by educated liberals in the professional classes with college degrees.

      It wasn't until it happened to white people with a college education that people freaked out and screamed stop which is part of the stuff behind OWS now.  Notice it had to be white people with a college education before there was any backlash.  Because crap, those people DESERVE those jobs, they are OWED them.  Because you know, they aren't like those saps that screwed up and didn't go to school and thus landed in manufacturing.

      So don't get it twisted.  This sort of behavior is good for everybody but the person who lost his job.  People in third world nations get out of poverty and rise up a little bit.  People with a job still in the US see better 401ks and spend less money for their goods.  The rich on the top get to see massive boosts and gains.  Corporations get to make more profits.

      But yeah, the person who got screwed is now screwed.

      "Foolproof systems don't take into account the ingenuity of fools."

      by overclocking on Fri Jan 27, 2012 at 09:01:12 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Go ahead, make this about race!! n/t (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        joe wobblie, jabney, blueoasis

        "If you tell the truth, you won't have to remember anything", Mark Twain

        by Cruzankenny on Fri Jan 27, 2012 at 09:56:32 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  It partly is, mostly class though (5+ / 0-)

          Keep in mind how little outrage there has been about minority unemployment.  There has also been shockingly little about white unemployment provided it was people with an HS diploma or less.

          First the farming jobs were lost.  But nobody cared because food was cheaper.  Then the mom and pop shops were lost.  But nobody cared because things were cheaper at the super store.  Then the manufacturing jobs were lost, nobody cared because TV's and computers were cheaper.  All while Hispanic labor was used and abused and black unemployment refused to go down.

          Then the jobs for people with college degrees were lost.  And professional class whites had a collective shit fit and demanded that something be done right now because that was totally unfair and a tragedy.

          We've been savaging our workers for decades now.  And it wasn't until the entitled college educated, and yes MOSTLY WHITE, people had a problem that something has to be done to fix it.

          So yes, there is a racial angle to this and a class angle to it.  To say otherwise is silly.

          "Foolproof systems don't take into account the ingenuity of fools."

          by overclocking on Fri Jan 27, 2012 at 10:08:09 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  Yes, it has a lot to do with class issues. (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            burnt out

            And class issues have been closely tied to race issues in the U.S.

            As long as it was just the poor and the lower middle class suffering, the majority of voters were happy to vote in people like Reagan/Bush and Bush/Cheney.

             

            "A candle loses nothing by lighting another candle" - Mohammed Nabbous, R.I.P.

            by Lawrence on Fri Jan 27, 2012 at 10:32:18 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  Using that argument, why isn't McCain President? (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              joe wobblie, blueoasis

              Race and class are not interchangeable nor are they synonymous.
              To try and draw a parallel is inflammatory and grossly wrong!
              So please keep your mind on the prize and leave race as an issue, only when it's a true issue.  

              "If you tell the truth, you won't have to remember anything", Mark Twain

              by Cruzankenny on Fri Jan 27, 2012 at 12:35:19 PM PST

              [ Parent ]

          •  Critical Mass (8+ / 0-)

            It finally reached the stae where the effect was wide spread enough that no one could say oh those dumb (fill in the blank) it' their own fault they should have known.

            I came from a town that was devistated in the 90s by the decision of Bill Clinton with a democratic majority to allow the export of raw logs. Unemployment hit 40% with in a month, people started killing themselves. But it was all good because we were creating jobs in Indonesia!

            No it is not okay. It never has but it has been spun to be a good thing for so long people believe it.

            It is the heart that makes a man rich. He is rich according to what he is not what he has -Henry Ward Beecher

            by PSWaterspirit on Fri Jan 27, 2012 at 10:41:14 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  Do not bring this down to a level of race! (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              joe wobblie

              It is only going to minimize and diffuse the argument into so many factions, we won't be united.

              "If you tell the truth, you won't have to remember anything", Mark Twain

              by Cruzankenny on Fri Jan 27, 2012 at 11:50:22 AM PST

              [ Parent ]

              •  We aren't united you do know that? (0+ / 0-)

                Let's get real, look at OWS.  It's mostly white, middle class, college educated.  And one of their major gripes, pay off student loans.  Major complaints they "did everything right" and there is are still no jobs.

                It's entitled as hell.  And these are the same sort of people that shat all over the poor and working class as long as it meant cheaper electronics and better 401ks.

                United, no, hell no.  Those people do not get to shit all over everybody else for 30 years and then call for unity when the shit finally hits them as well.  The arrogance and entitlement of it all is just sick considering how vicious they were to everybody else up until it hit them as well.

                "Foolproof systems don't take into account the ingenuity of fools."

                by overclocking on Fri Jan 27, 2012 at 12:07:20 PM PST

                [ Parent ]

                •  Whoa, fella! You're going to denigrate OWS because (2+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  joe wobblie, blueoasis

                  I quote you:,"It's mostly white, middle class, college educated.  And one of their major gripes, pay off student loans.  Major complaints they "did everything right" and there is are still no jobs." Talk about stereotypical right wing bull s**t. Does Faux News send a patch for you to wear?

                  You're telling me to get real? You get real and pull your perceptions out of Bill O'Reilly's ass.

                  If you are not the 99%, then you must be a 1%er. Congratulations! That doesn't explain why you want to make this a racial issue.

                  "If you tell the truth, you won't have to remember anything", Mark Twain

                  by Cruzankenny on Fri Jan 27, 2012 at 12:18:02 PM PST

                  [ Parent ]

                  •  Not because of that (0+ / 0-)

                    But for being arrogant and entitled classist assholes.  If they really cared about the rest of the "99%" they would have been out there in the 70s, 80s, 90s, early Bush years while everybody beneath them's job was flying off American shores and paying less.

                    But they WEREN'T, nobody from that socio-economic strata was.  It wasn't until THEY started to feel the heat personally that they cared.  And then they ran out and demanded everybody jump up and back them up and that we were all in it together.

                    Bullshit.  We weren't all in it together till you got hurt, and now we are?  Horse crap, you were happy sticking it to everybody else for decades and reaping the rewards.  So we sure as hell aren't all in this together, in fact we are all on our own.  Well, we are all on our own until it affects you guys and then we are all in it together.... but your concerns come first.

                    Though I'm sure once things are OK for upper middle class yuppies we can go back to screwing everybody else and then berating them for not supporting your "screw the poor but let's have some socially liberal stuff come down the pipeline" agenda.

                    Many people want something different.  Less on the college educated professional class and more for the blue collar working class.  More focus on income inequality across ethnic groups.

                    Up until the college hipster freak out known as OWS, it wasn't just the 1% screwing people over, it was a LOT more people screwing the poor over and cheering it on.

                    I'm a populist and I'm for solutions for those on the bottom who are royally screwed and have been for decades.  The cheer leading professional classes who thought this was all OK till they got hit as well have historically been just as nasty and destructive to the rest as the 1%.  Frankly if you didn't care till it was your neck on the gallows as well I don't trust your twisted but to give a crap the second your neck is out of the noose.

                    "Foolproof systems don't take into account the ingenuity of fools."

                    by overclocking on Fri Jan 27, 2012 at 12:53:21 PM PST

                    [ Parent ]

                    •  You are an over assuming a**hole, (2+ / 0-)
                      Recommended by:
                      joe wobblie, blueoasis

                      Where were you in the 70's, 80's and 90's?
                      You talkin' to the wrong man Bruddah, and I use the term loosely.
                      My question is, where were you during the 70's thru the 2010's. Are you saying it took some self entitled white students, with heavy student loans to make a stand for the 99%, which obviously does not include you, in 2011 to make an impact?
                      I don't know what hole people's heads have been in, but the problem didn't start yesterday, so my question still stands.

                      What were you doing about it that makes you someone who can minimize the efforts of those who were pepper sprayed, denigrate those who were arrested, limit the  expectations of those who are facing Felony charges for the 99%? Are you opting out of any political advantages gained by their struggle and the future struggles? If so, there should be a list other than a GOP party photo ID card.
                      Good luck, I hear the work is easier in the house.

                      "If you tell the truth, you won't have to remember anything", Mark Twain

                      by Cruzankenny on Fri Jan 27, 2012 at 01:12:10 PM PST

                      [ Parent ]

                      •  take them down (0+ / 0-)

                        make the top 30% earn as much as the bottom 60%, and like it.  Then lets get back to the top 1%.  but they won't agree to it.  So shove you and OWS elitest yuppie crap out the window along with rMoney's shit, you are both as bad and should be dealt the same fate.

                        As for what I've done, eh, a vet and worked in a few service jobs to get a taste and things correct.  Trust me, hipsters and yuppies are just as much the problem as the 1%, if not more.  We need to take them out first and fast.

                        "Foolproof systems don't take into account the ingenuity of fools."

                        by overclocking on Fri Jan 27, 2012 at 10:04:04 PM PST

                        [ Parent ]

                        •  Me' son, I'm a Vet and you'll never read where I (0+ / 0-)

                          make a decision or conclusion about a person based on whether or not they're people of color, their religion or sexual preference. These are all a ridiculous basis upon which to build any form of logical premise, unless it is a health decision.
                          You're going to need more than racism to back up your reasoning. Nobody should wish a person receive less than another. It's reasoning like this, where you wish a people have less so they can experience what you feel, rather than wishing and striving so all can share in the bounty, as small as it might be.
                          As a Vet, you get the GI Bill, something over 90% of the population doesn't get. You are also eligible for VA health care.
                          What have you done with it and why are you working service jobs alone?

                          "If you tell the truth, you won't have to remember anything", Mark Twain

                          by Cruzankenny on Sat Jan 28, 2012 at 05:56:04 AM PST

                          [ Parent ]

                        •  Your anger is getting in the way of your (0+ / 0-)

                          Communication.

            •  Have you heard of the (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              joe wobblie, blueoasis

              "Law of unintended consequences"? It seems to be a tripping point for many who have done something on the macro side, where they haven't seen the effects on the micro side.
              We've all experienced it on one level, especially if we have children.
              Unfortunately, when you're President, these effects have much more drastic consequences.
              Supposedly we pay people to see these consequences.
              No excuse, but abject apology.

              "If you tell the truth, you won't have to remember anything", Mark Twain

              by Cruzankenny on Fri Jan 27, 2012 at 12:47:10 PM PST

              [ Parent ]

    •  Disagree. (0+ / 0-)

      Globalization, in its current form, does entail a lot of colonialist elements, but globalism, per sé, is not a bad thing.

      What matters is how it is done.

      A lot of it is, of course, done pretty badly right now.

      "A candle loses nothing by lighting another candle" - Mohammed Nabbous, R.I.P.

      by Lawrence on Fri Jan 27, 2012 at 10:26:12 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  An interesting take on things. (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    burnt out, PSWaterspirit

    As someone who has lived in multiple countries, I tend to agree.

    People who think that outsourcing is merely due to other countries having cheap labor are ill-informed, imo.  Especially since the cost of labor is an ever decreasing factor in many production processes due to tremendous advances in automation.

    The U.S. needs to initiate a lot of long overdue reforms in order to be more globally competitive again, and a better infrastructure, better education, more efficient/less expensive health care, and better govt. regulatory structures and incentives would move us a good ways towards that goal.

    And taxing the rich at levels comparable to other industrialized nations is absolutely imperative in order to finance all of that.

    "A candle loses nothing by lighting another candle" - Mohammed Nabbous, R.I.P.

    by Lawrence on Fri Jan 27, 2012 at 08:44:16 AM PST

    •  And this is why (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Clues, blueoasis

      I train all of the top tier engineers for the largest chineese computer chip manufacturer in China? Yes thats right the top floor guys get their training in the United States, that would include their college education.

      It is the heart that makes a man rich. He is rich according to what he is not what he has -Henry Ward Beecher

      by PSWaterspirit on Fri Jan 27, 2012 at 02:15:30 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  And this is also why (3+ / 0-)

        so many employees about to become offshored are given the humiliating responsibility of training their offshore replacements.

        It is very hard to buy the argument that when a company offshores 1k, 5k, or 30k existing jobs that the people who had been doing those jobs (sometimes for decades) are suddenly unqualified to do them.

        It's even harder to buy the argument when you can look at the help wanted ads for those jobs remaining in the US, and find things like IBM and HP hiring "systems security experts" with an educational requirement of "GED".

        People who think this isn't about money and labor regulations are poorly informed, imo.

  •  Sorry, Hamilton Had This Figured Out. (11+ / 0-)

    Since nations aren't businesses that can deport whole sectors of population that have skills and talents the nation can't support in a global free trading environment, they have to protect their economic sectors to some degree.

    Trade isn't binary, the borders aren't limited to open and shut.

    I manufacture and export to Germany, Japan, China, South America and more. All my wares face tariffs at their destination which reduces but hardly eliminates my ability to compete.

    However none of my competitors in those places faces a tariff selling to my customers here. That helps limit my earning potential to below the US median. There's nothing about my sector.

    Let's not YOU types not fall into the zero sum trap. Let us protect our economy and still trade. We have computers, we can do fractions.

    Even the framers understood that much.

    We are called to speak for the weak, for the voiceless, for victims of our nation and for those it calls enemy.... --ML King "Beyond Vietnam"

    by Gooserock on Fri Jan 27, 2012 at 08:50:46 AM PST

  •  Your diary points to the fact that issues are (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Lawrence, ams125

    seldom as simple as they appear on the surface. There are in fact many reasons that so many of our jobs have gone overseas, as you pointed out. Another aspect of this that I rarely see discussed is the fact that those people in other countries that are now earning a living due to those jobs you speak of  are, because of those jobs, able to purchase goods that are still being made here and exported over there. Which further illustrates that this isn't a zero sum game.  There are both winners and losers and it's not as easy to measure the total as many believe it to be.

    Just give me some truth. John Lennon--- OWS------Too Big To Fail

    by burnt out on Fri Jan 27, 2012 at 08:53:20 AM PST

  •  I have been a software engineer for over thirty (11+ / 0-)

    years.  I also hold undergraduate and graduate degrees in computer science.  If you honestly believe that Indian software developers are more qualified than their U.S. counterparts, you have to be one of the most gullible people that I have met in my entire life.   A senior-level software engineer in India usually has less than five years of professional experience whereas his American counterpart usually has ten or more years of professional experience.   That experience delta makes a huge difference in the level of complexity that can be handled by a software development group, as experience is the key to risk mitigation.

    The outsourcing of software development jobs has nothing to do with our educational system.  That meme was created by the Information Technology Association of America.  The top computer science (CS) programs in the world are in this country.   The top performing CS students are almost always native born, even at the graduate level.  The outsourcing of hi-tech jobs and the insourcing of hi-tech labor on work visas is about arbitraging labor costs.   Anyone who believes otherwise is living in a fantasy world.

    •  I would agree (4+ / 0-)

      People seem to believe that education alone is enough. Enducation is a set of tools, going to work and actually using those tools takes practice.

      This goes for almost any job including those that do not require formal education and can really only be learned on the job.

      Our industries and products get better through a chain of experience. One person teaching the next all he knows that person adding to that and teaching the next and so on. Out sourcing has all but destroyed that chain.

      If we hope to thrive as a nation we will need to realize our government is about looking after the welfare of all our people to do so we have to be creating jobs at all levels.

      It is the heart that makes a man rich. He is rich according to what he is not what he has -Henry Ward Beecher

      by PSWaterspirit on Fri Jan 27, 2012 at 10:22:57 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Wharton MBA. (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Dirtandiron, jabney, blueoasis

      None of these guys ever addressed the reality except to discount it when it interferes with their fantasy models.

      "Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities." - Voltaire

      by Greyhound on Fri Jan 27, 2012 at 10:33:12 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Lovely (0+ / 0-)

        I'm glad you know me so well, Greyhound.  You should be proud of yourself.

        •  I don't know you, I know your school. (0+ / 0-)

          Nearly qualifies as the center of the parasitic universe.

          It will grant you access (assuming you do not already have it) to the very center of the world that is killing the world. If you have the means to continue on the traditional path through Harvard and then pick up a post doctorate at Cambridge, you too can work on Wall Street and maybe even the White House.

          Or, you can think for yourself, see what  the lessons you've been taught, have wrought, and eventually become a real human being. Of course, this course is much less profitable and those that follow it are permanently exiled...

          "Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities." - Voltaire

          by Greyhound on Sat Jan 28, 2012 at 12:08:56 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

  •  One thing the diarist misses (10+ / 0-)

    is that the function of a government is to take care of its people.

    Why should our government subsidize companies that fail to provide jobs for our citizens that carry with them a living wage and decent benefits?

    The first thing I look for in any discussion of American labor is whether the author describes the current environment too simply - discussing businesses and where they choose to locate as simply a business decision, based on labor pools and costs.  In reality, American taxpayers fund American business to an amazing degree, with tax incentives on the local, state, and federal levels, and other incentives to provide a favorable environment for these companies.  When you consider the contributions made by Americans for some of these companies, then the "problem with American jobs" becomes the fact that many large companies do not reciprocate our largesse and provide any.

    •  American taxpayers also subsidize outsourcing (5+ / 0-)

      via the Overseas Private Investment Corporation.  The risk associated with OPIC-backed investments is underwritten by U.S. taxpayers.  There is nothing private about OPIC.

    •  Very good reminder (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Dirtandiron, PSWaterspirit

      Thanks, Clues.  It's really important to keep those benefits in mind, especially when talking about tax policy.  Corporations should pay their fair (large) share.

      •  It's not so much about paying their fair share (4+ / 0-)

        It's more about the fact that many corporations, especially the large ones, benefit greatly from the laws and policies made here.  How many have government contracts?  How many have favorable zoning?  How many have received tax reductions for opening up premises in a certain location?

        How can we have a situation where our country is nearly entering the second Great Depression, so we spend our money on what we hope are worthwhile projects to stimulate the economy, and we find that some of this money is going to buy products or hire people in other countries?  In what universe does that make sense?

        We have a very bad habit in this country of bestowing gifts upon corporations with a vague assumption that we will receive something in return.  We never get a contract, we never get anything in writing.  We dump money on "job creators", draw a black box in the middle and hope something comes out the other end of the diagram.  When you examine the black box, you find the CEO moneygrab, the "value to stockholders", the money-fiddling to get the stock prices up.  What you DON'T find is any sense of responsibility to the taxpayers to provide value in the form of good jobs.

        Make no mistake -  you can talk about education and job training and infrastructure and anything else you want.  But given 2 employees; one who makes .50 per hour and one who makes $25.00 per hour, without any restrictions to prevent it, a company is going to take the .50 labor.  (Especially if that comes with no benefits, and no labor or environmental regulations).

        We can see this happening within our own country, for pete's sake.  Look at all the manufacturers scrambling to move to "right-to-work" states.  They aren't doing this because of outstanding SAT scores in Ala. and Tenn.

        Some business sectors have been pushing the meme of the undereducated American for quite a while.  There was a video making the rounds for a few years of a company that made a living teaching big corporations how to craft a help wanted ad such that no American would qualify for the job, and they could justify a visa.  (Of course THAT person didn't really qualify either, but that was the person they wanted.)  We're pretty well past that stage of the game now.  These companies just offshore and don't feel they have to justify it to anyone.

  •  O look, Tom Friedman posts on Daily Kos (6+ / 2-)

    to tell us once again how peachy Globalism is and how we're being mean to poor third worlders if we miss our jobs. Oh but Americans are stupid and useless and didn't deserve them anyway, right?

    The American government should set policy encouraging American companies to hire American workers, for the benefit of the American economy. Paid mouthpieces for global elites who say that it will hurt Bashir in Bangalore's feelings if we put any restrictions on the continued flight of global capital towards the lowest common denominator, are obvious shills and should be ignored.

    I support torturous regimes! Also, I kick puppies.

    by eataTREE on Fri Jan 27, 2012 at 10:15:35 AM PST

    •  This comment should be hidden, because: (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      ams125, martinjedlicka

      it is not ok here on DailyKos to accuse someone of being paid shill for no good reason.

      Extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence.

      And don't even get me started on the crappy "Bashir in Bangalore" b.s...

      That's the kind of degrading talk that minutemen use when they talk about hispanics, and it is not ok here.

       

      "A candle loses nothing by lighting another candle" - Mohammed Nabbous, R.I.P.

      by Lawrence on Fri Jan 27, 2012 at 11:11:01 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  So is it your thesis that Tom Friedman doesn't get (4+ / 1-)
        Recommended by:
        Dirtandiron, joe wobblie, PSWaterspirit, blueoasis
        Hidden by:
        Lawrence

        paid to write crap just like this, or that business-school up-and-coming members of the elite (and none of the 99%) aren't going to profit handsomely from the continuation of the "Money talks, people walk" global economic order, to which this essay is a hymn?

        Paid. Shills.

        Go ahead and HR me; if it doesn't happen every so often I start worrying I've fallen prey to groupthink. I will, however, be sure to tell Bashir that I'm a racist Minuteman for mentioning him. Speaking of extraordinary claims and ad hominems.

        I support torturous regimes! Also, I kick puppies.

        by eataTREE on Fri Jan 27, 2012 at 11:22:22 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  HR for doubling down on the assertion that the (0+ / 1-)
          Recommended by:
          Hidden by:
          PSWaterspirit

          diarist is a paid shill without an iota of evidence to back that claim up.

          I'm also going to be notifying DKos Admin of the ratings abuse going on with the uprates of these comments.

          "A candle loses nothing by lighting another candle" - Mohammed Nabbous, R.I.P.

          by Lawrence on Fri Jan 27, 2012 at 11:30:16 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  Don't worry about it, Lawrence (0+ / 0-)

            It's unfortunate that these folks undermine their arguments with their rhetoric to the point that we can't actually have a discussion.  It's their loss and mine.  Sad.

          •  Gee, Tom, get up on the wrong side of the bed? (3+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            joe wobblie, PSWaterspirit, blueoasis

            Whether the diarist is paid directly or not, and I don't suppose s/he was, s/he is still shilling for the perpetuation of an economic order which will be good for him or her and bad for you and me, and using our feelings of guilt towards third world poverty so that we don't notice that that is what is happening. If I own mega stock in TransCanada, and advocate for the expansion of the Tar Sands project, maybe no one is paying me directly by the word, but I am nevertheless shilling for my own economic interests, and saying so is not wrong.

            By the way do you have any actual arguments in defense of the Friedman Position or does your bag of rhetorical tricks consist only of a series of increasingly hysterical threats to tell Teacher on me?

            I support torturous regimes! Also, I kick puppies.

            by eataTREE on Fri Jan 27, 2012 at 11:47:34 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  This is a really simple issue, and you've been (0+ / 0-)

              around DailyKos long enough to know that accusing fellow Kossacks of being paid shills is not ok and should be hr'd.

              "A candle loses nothing by lighting another candle" - Mohammed Nabbous, R.I.P.

              by Lawrence on Fri Jan 27, 2012 at 12:15:59 PM PST

              [ Parent ]

              •  Let me explain slowly and clearly, again... (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                blueoasis

                When Tom Friedman gets paid to sell "globalization" to us, meaning world domination by financial elites, he is a shill.

                When prestigious-business-school wunderkinds who are junior members of said financial elites borrow old Tom Friedman columns to lecture us about how we're bad people if we oppose world domination by the likes of him, he is shilling. He is motivated by his own financial interests and hopes his argument will make you ignore yours.

                None of this has anything to do with accusing anyone of being an undisclosed paid agent of a candidate or political group, which is the thing that's actually against the rules, and has nothing to do with what I said.

                I support torturous regimes! Also, I kick puppies.

                by eataTREE on Fri Jan 27, 2012 at 02:25:41 PM PST

                [ Parent ]

                •  Sorry dude, you can't just call someone a paid (1+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  Keninoakland

                  shill just because they're getting an MBA and write something that you don't like.

                  He is motivated by his own financial interests and hopes his argument will make you ignore yours.

                  That's your opinion and not fact, and it's not a valid reason for you to insinuate that he's a paid shill.

                  I read this diary completely different from the way you did, and I don't think that economic growth and income equality in industrialized countries are unattainable even when there is globalization, as long as it is socially and environmentally responsible .

                  I really wish you had just stepped back for a second and apologized for the paid shill accusation instead of doubling down.  I would have gladly removed my hr if you had done so.

                  "A candle loses nothing by lighting another candle" - Mohammed Nabbous, R.I.P.

                  by Lawrence on Fri Jan 27, 2012 at 07:19:53 PM PST

                  [ Parent ]

          •  My HR is for your abuse (0+ / 0-)

            of HRs and taking away from the converstion with your sniviling. I finally got to the point where I am past annoyed.

            This is the United States of America where we get to have opinions and even express them, kos says we can.  We are allowed to like what we want and rate things as we choose. We are even allowed to suggest someone is a paid shill if that is what we believe. Others are free to accept or reject the idea as they see fit.

            Wear the donut with pride it is the only one I have handed out in two years.

            It is the heart that makes a man rich. He is rich according to what he is not what he has -Henry Ward Beecher

            by PSWaterspirit on Fri Jan 27, 2012 at 02:05:12 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  Nope, you are not: (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              fcvaguy
              We are even allowed to suggest someone is a paid shill if that is what we believe.

              Furthermore, it's not ok to hr someone because you disagree with a hr.

              If you have a problem with the hr that I gave, then feel free to notify site admin.

              "A candle loses nothing by lighting another candle" - Mohammed Nabbous, R.I.P.

              by Lawrence on Fri Jan 27, 2012 at 05:14:13 PM PST

              [ Parent ]

              •  You HRd someone (0+ / 0-)

                I  am prefectly within my right to HR someone who is abusing their privileges because they disagree with what others wish to uprate.

                You accused people of all sorts of things that only you seemed to see to stifle conversation you didn't like because you didn't agree with thier opinions. I simply got tired of it.

                It is the heart that makes a man rich. He is rich according to what he is not what he has -Henry Ward Beecher

                by PSWaterspirit on Fri Jan 27, 2012 at 06:23:16 PM PST

                [ Parent ]

                •  No. (0+ / 0-)

                  I hr'd comments that were accusing the diarist, a fellow Kossack, of being a paid shill without a single shred of evidence, which is %100 HR worthy.

                  "A candle loses nothing by lighting another candle" - Mohammed Nabbous, R.I.P.

                  by Lawrence on Fri Jan 27, 2012 at 06:35:01 PM PST

                  [ Parent ]

            •  Read the FAQ (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              Lawrence
              We are even allowed to suggest someone is a paid shill if that is what we believe. Others are free to accept or reject the idea as they see fit.

              This is wrong. You are not allowed to accuse someone of being a paid shill. Read the rules. You've abused HR. Reconsider.

      •  HR abuse. n/t (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        joe wobblie

        Where are all the jobs, Boehner?

        by Dirtandiron on Fri Jan 27, 2012 at 11:45:12 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Nope. (0+ / 0-)

          Unfounded accusations of paid shilling are HR worthy and should be hr'd.

          You are, however, committing ratings abuse by uprating unfounded accusations of paid shilling.

          "A candle loses nothing by lighting another candle" - Mohammed Nabbous, R.I.P.

          by Lawrence on Fri Jan 27, 2012 at 11:51:39 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

      •  I have no way of knowing if the diarist is (3+ / 0-)

        paid or not, but advocating globalization on DKos sure seems trollish to me.

        Where are all the jobs, Boehner?

        by Dirtandiron on Fri Jan 27, 2012 at 11:50:28 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  There is no way in a global capitalistic economy (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    eataTREE

    to protect any job anywhere in the world.  There are simply too many people for the jobs that really need doing.  The majority of humans on planet Earth will eventually be jobless and poor.  Unless there is a global war or plague that substantially reduces the population.

    •  That argument has been made for centuries (0+ / 0-)

      And, while we have a long way to go and plenty of injustices to deal with, the history of the last few hundred years has been a slow, fitful, sometimes painful improvement of human life.  No doubt, there are tons of individual, powerful counter-examples, ones that I would never defend as fair, just, or desirable.  

      But, would you rather be living today or in the 17th Century?

    •  How piffling! (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Dirtandiron, eataTREE, blueoasis

      I can certainly spot a Malthusian negativist!
      (No, that isn't a dog...)

      ! The swinistic greed and racial hatred of the American ruling elite is abysmal !

      by joe wobblie on Fri Jan 27, 2012 at 10:59:11 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  You've completely ignores the most basic fact (7+ / 0-)

    behind this disaster. The entirety of "globalism" has been funded by the American Worker without her consent. Raj has a tech job in Hyderabad because Mitt & Co. didn't like dealing with citizens that can say "no" and had a system to fight back. Period.

    "Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities." - Voltaire

    by Greyhound on Fri Jan 27, 2012 at 10:39:07 AM PST

  •  The quantity and emotion of the comments (4+ / 0-)

    suggest that I'm doing something right.  I appreciate those who've spoken against uninformed personal attacks.  Those attacks don't benefit anyone.  They don't elevate or even permit the discussion to continue.  It's sad to me how many people seem to be looking for diaries that simply agree with every one of their views.  The personal attacks reveal far more about the attacker than they do about the object of the attacks.

    I'm interested in engaging in a real discussion of these ideas.  And I think that some of the counter-points offered by people who disagree with my diary have been interesting and provocative.  I appreciate them!  

    But I've also been surprised by how much vitriol, shallowness, and outright racism ("Bashir in Bangalore" -- really, eataTree?) there is here as well.

    •  Yes, the personal attacks in this diary by some (4+ / 0-)

      Kossacks have been way out of line.

      Most here on DailyKos are not like that, but some just can't seem to help themselves.

      It also disturbs me to see a level of jingoism from some who are supposedly liberals that I am used to otherwise seeing from rightwingers.

      My advice to you would be to ignore the hateful comments and engage those who are at least attempting to have a conversation.

      "A candle loses nothing by lighting another candle" - Mohammed Nabbous, R.I.P.

      by Lawrence on Fri Jan 27, 2012 at 11:04:14 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  I second that. (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Lawrence, martinjedlicka, ams125

        Had to run an errand, came back and was sorry to see all the attacks being leveled at the author. It's sad that a thoughtful person such as the diarist can offer us a little different perspective on an issue and some respond with a meanness that reminds me of the teabagger mentality. And then the pile on starts and soon the entire diary degenerates into just another pie fight when a civil discussion might have been beneficial to those who are able to look at things from more than one angle. But that's just me, unlike some, I don't know all the angles and I don't have all the answers, guess that's why I'm always interested in different points of view and why I appreciate this diary.

        Just give me some truth. John Lennon--- OWS------Too Big To Fail

        by burnt out on Fri Jan 27, 2012 at 11:42:10 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  It's not about "jingoism", it's about (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        joe wobblie, Brooke In Seattle

        people who worked hard and/or studied to live a decent life and provide for their families, fired by assholes like Mitt Romney and replaced by people who earn so little one can only wonder how they stay alive. Oh, and after your job is outsourced, if your kids can't afford college, they will be disparaged as unfit to work, then enabling more outsourcing.

        Where are all the jobs, Boehner?

        by Dirtandiron on Fri Jan 27, 2012 at 11:49:12 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  I appreciate that, Lawrence (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Lawrence
        •  And I'd appreciate if you would write a diary on (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          ams125

          how we might be able to bring fairness to the globalization process.

          One idea that's been popping around in my head is that industrialized nations could set certain environmental standards for products or they get hit with a punitive tariff.

          "A candle loses nothing by lighting another candle" - Mohammed Nabbous, R.I.P.

          by Lawrence on Fri Jan 27, 2012 at 11:56:28 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  A very good question (3+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            PSWaterspirit, burnt out, Lawrence

            I think that would be smart.  The question is whether global trade agreements would permit that.  If not (and I think they might not), then those agreements need to be amended.

            There have been some efforts within the developed world to try to punish companies that take advantage of developing countries' weak environmental or worker rights laws (or lack of enforcement thereof).  One case that we studied in school concerned Barrick Gold.  Their record in Tanzania, Papua New Guinea and elsewhere has been horrific.  The Canadian Liberals tried to pass a law that would give the Canadian government some regulatory role over the foreign subsidiaries of Canadian companies, but it was blocked by companies like Barrick and the Conservative government.  Really terrible.  But I don't think that this issue is going away -- bills like that will continue to be proposed, and will probably be passed in more leftist countries in Western Europe.

            http://www.miningwatch.ca/...
            http://protestbarrick.net/...

    •  A real guy, whom I really work with. (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      joe wobblie

      But that's neither here nor there. Why is it racist to refer to "Bashir in Bangalore" but not racist to talk about "Cecil in London" or "Gunther in Berlin"? Do all hypothetical people have to be white or else it's racist?

      I support torturous regimes! Also, I kick puppies.

      by eataTREE on Fri Jan 27, 2012 at 11:56:09 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  If you wonder just why the crowd is so hostile... (3+ / 0-)

      ...it's because these are the same damned arguments that were used to sell us globalization to us back in the 1990s. Twenty years later, however, we now understand globalization's promise of prosperity for all to be a hollow lie; what we got instead was vast enrichment of a very small international elite to the detriment of almost everyone else. So coming back to us with the same list of reasons of why we should allow ourselves to be screwed over in the name of Global Progress does not get you a warm reception.

      I support torturous regimes! Also, I kick puppies.

      by eataTREE on Fri Jan 27, 2012 at 12:00:38 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Uprated for inappropriate HR (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Lawrence, burnt out, ams125, Keninoakland

    As a union member who has witnessed his own livelihood outsourced first to Canada and now to India, I have much to disagree with this diary, but I do not feel the diarist is a Paulista or similar quasi-libertarian and would never stoop to personal attack for his well-reasoned and intentioned approach.

    This diarist seems aware that there never has been and never will be a 'free market'.  And like him I'm appalled by the blatant racism expressed toward foreign workers.  It's the kind of sentiment that fuels so much of the right-wing anti-immigration movement and is hardly progressive or liberal.

     

    An investment in knowledge pays the best interest. -Benjamin Franklin

    by martinjedlicka on Fri Jan 27, 2012 at 11:41:14 AM PST

    •  Thank you - I'd be interested to hear more (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Lawrence

      I appreciate your decency and openness to discussion.  I'm entirely fine with -- and welcome -- your disagreement.  That's exactly the sort of interaction that I'm looking for.

  •  Do you have the ability to walk in someone else's (6+ / 0-)

    shoes?

    Before going back to school, I worked at a New York-based company with a large office in Hyderabad, India.  The firm never specifically “outsourced” jobs to India.  But a large fraction of total staff was in the Hyderabad office.  There’s no question that at least marginally more workers would have been needed in the United States had we not had that office in India.  Was it immoral to employ people in India?  I don’t think so.

    This sounds so ingenuous to me.  It sounds like a Coke commercial, with everybody holding hands.
    Let's make your example a little more real.

    After graduating from school with 45k in student loans, you go to work for a NY-based company.  The company has offices around the world and you enjoy working with co-workers from around the globe.  You work hard, even when it means sacrificing time with your family and friends, because you have a bright future ahead of you.

    On Tues., you come into work and you see that the guy in the next cubicle is sitting with a group of 5 guys whose names you recognize from the office in India.  They've come on a "visit",  "a technical exchange", or some other excuse.  What they've really come for is to learn everything they can about your job in 4 days. It's not your job anymore, it's theirs because they're cheaper than you.

    And let's say, in our example, that you are not a privileged young man, off to pursue a wonderful business degree, but a middle-aged one.  Someone who has put in the time, worked the late hours (often for free).  Someone who has a mortgage and a sick kid, and someone who knows that the unemployment rate is going through the roof.

    You're someone who's read the latest missive from the CEO about how fabulous the profits are, and heard the details about the executive bonuses.  You've read about the big new contract everyone is working on because of the president's stimulus bill.  Maybe you're someone who has seen your CEO standing next to the president while he's giving a speech about supporting our great business leaders so that they can create jobs.

    I think you'd have a different perspective.  I think you'd get a bit angry at people who insinuate that you lost your job because you're not good enough, and not as smart as workers from other countries.  I think you'd collect your first unemployment check, note the deductions for taxes, and realize you just subsidized your own offshoring.

    Was it immoral to employ people in India?  I don’t think so.
    -  a strawman, stated so innocently....

    Nobody has a problem working for a multinational company with employees around the world, when they are being treated fairly and not being constantly told someone can do the job cheaper.

    People in other countries are not to blame for our losing in the global economy.

    I know very few people who blame workers in other countries for this.  I know quite a few who feel sorry for them, because as soon as their standards of living start to rise, these companies will grab those jobs and run to the next cheapest place.  I hope that the workers of India have learned a lesson from us about being in debt.  It will help them when the work moves to China (which is already happening).

    In conclusion, I don't think you understand this issue well enough to write about it yet.  You certainly haven't felt it viscerally, and it's pretty clear you haven't looked at a number of the games these companies have been playing over the past 10 years or so.  The big companies flock together like sheep following business trends, which makes it easy to see what they're doing.  Here's a hint -  next up is the systematic downgrading of jobs that are left here in the US, with corresponding wage depression.

Subscribe or Donate to support Daily Kos.

Click here for the mobile view of the site