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Jonathan Bernstein (pre-results):

In other words, this is probably the third chance — after South Carolina and Super Tuesday — that Mitt Romney has had to (possibly) end the active nomination fight with a very good night. But remember: The downside here isn't that the nomination will be at risk, only that he'll have to keep contesting primaries for at least a while longer.
Chris Cillizza:
Former Pennsylvania senator Rick Santorum’s twin wins in Alabama and Mississippi Tuesday night are almost certain to give him what he has long wanted: A one-on-one race with former Massachusetts governor Mitt Romney.
Romney badly needs Illinois on Tuesday to keep from being even more embarrassed than now.

Kathleen Parker:

Mornin’, y’all,” said Mitt Romney recently to a Mississippi crowd. He started his day off right, he said, with “a biscuit and some cheesy grits.” That would be cheese grits, but never mind. Would Romney greet an audience at a Jewish Community Center with: “Oy vey, did I ever enjoy my loxies and bagels this morning!”? Or African Americans with: “Yo, dawg, wassup?”

Actually, yes, he might. Forever tattooed in the memory is the image of Romney approaching an African American baby at a 2008 Martin Luther King Jr. Day parade. Pointing to the baby’s necklace, he said: “What’s happening? You got some bling-bling here!”

Yo.

Kathleen forever tries and fails to wrap her head around the fact that her party has so little to offer. But she might want to tackle how many Republicans don't believe in evolution and think Obama's a Muslim for a change of pace.

Reading Jennifer Rubin after a big Romney loss is like a Yankees fan reading the Boston Globe after a Red Sox loss:

The silver lining for Romney is that Gingrich, though coming in second in both races, vowed to stay in the race. It is the competition between Gingrich and Santorum that will help keep Santorum’s delegate count low, allowing Romney to maintain or lengthen his lead.
True. Romney will get the nod eventually, no thanks to conservatives and no thanks to the South. Then he will lose.

TPM suggests politics may play a role in the recovery:

National Journal:
Poll Shows Public Supports Obama on Gas Prices

More Americans trust President Obama than congressional Republicans to make the right decisions to bring down the price of gasoline, according to a new poll, although neither side commands a majority.

What’s more, as prices continue to rise and the specter of $5-per-gallon gas for the summer driving season looms over the political landscape, the latest United Technologies/National Journal Congressional Connection Poll shows the public slightly more supportive of the energy priorities of the Democrats and the president than those of the GOP.

NY Times:
Stocks climbed to new heights in part on rosy retail sales data on Tuesday, pushing the broad market to levels last seen in June 2008 and the Nasdaq composite index to close above the 3,000 milestone for the first time since 2000.
See also NASDAQ shrugs off Obama socialism, hits 3,000.

David Leonhardt:

“If you could know one thing and you had to predict which party was going to win the next presidential election,” Lynn Vavreck, a political scientist at the University of California, Los Angeles, said, “you couldn’t do better than knowing the change in economic growth.”

Particularly important, Ms. Vavreck said, were the first six months of an election year, when many voters form impressions that stick.

Paul Glastris:
In short, when judging Obama’s record so far, conservatives measure him against their fears, liberals against their hopes, and the rest of us against our pocketbooks. But if you measure Obama against other presidents—arguably the more relevant yardstick—a couple of things come to light. Speaking again in terms of sheer tonnage, Obama has gotten more done than any president since LBJ. But the effects of some of those achievements have yet to be felt by most Americans, often by design. Here, too, Obama is in good historical company.
Emily Swanson/Pollster.com:
The available evidence from the broader spectrum of available polls does not so far support the idea of a dramatic drop in Obama's approval, but does suggest that in the last month his rating has either leveled off or turned down slightly.
See Obama's approval rating up to 50 percent: Reuters/Ipsos poll and Gallup: Obama's Job Approval Rating Reaches 49% Over Weekend for more polling data in addition to the CBS/NY Times and ABC/WaPo polls.

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Comment Preferences

  •  some entity somewhere (9+ / 0-)

    is making it worth newtie's while to stick around.  the only result of him staying in is to ensure santorum cannot win it.

    Never forget that the Republican War on Women originated with religion; the GOP is but theocracy's handmaiden.

    by Cedwyn on Wed Mar 14, 2012 at 04:36:01 AM PDT

  •  Since you're such a fan of the CBO, (0+ / 0-)

    and you have highlighted government spending, what do you think of the latest projections from the CBO on the cost of ACA?

    It's up to nearly $1.8 trillion over ten years now, and will go up again next year to at least $2 trillion.

    Why? Because the lying-with-technicalities trick of the 2014 kick-in has less impact as we get closer to the actual beginning data of the act's major provisions.  Instead of spreading six years of costs over 10 years, making the act seem to be 40% cheaper than it is, the CBO now spreads 9 years worth of costs.

    I haven't had a chance to dive in (nor the will), but I would bet some of those deficit "reduction" numbers you like to talk about disappear under scrutiny.

    LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

    by dinotrac on Wed Mar 14, 2012 at 04:36:34 AM PDT

    •  no, they don't actually (10+ / 0-)

      Slower Growth in Medicare Spending — Is This the New Normal? from tis week's New England Journal of Medicine.

      And in January 2012, the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) made a $69 billion downward revision to its 10-year Medicare spending projection — a technical correction that reflects emerging data showing surprisingly slow growth in outlays. Similar slowing trends have led to positive earnings surprises for publicly traded insurers.
      and to your point, and mine: compare to "no action"...
      The Medicare actuary and others have raised questions about the sustainability of the ACA reductions. As the frequent SGR fixes have demonstrated, when sustaining past budget decisions seems like a bad idea, they are not sustained. Similarly, the scheduled ACA cuts could be overridden if there were a broadly held view that continued cuts would either damage the delivery system or pose major barriers to Medicare beneficiaries' access to care. But merely undoing the ACA cuts would mean reverting to the “old normal” of unsustainably high growth in Medicare outlays.

      The framers of the ACA perceived broad provider-payment reform as the best prospect for slowing the long-term spending trend. But they needed scoreable savings, and they could ill afford to alienate backers by forcing through major payment reforms at the same time. The ACA planted the seeds for accountable care organizations (ACOs), bundled payment for episodes of care, patient-centered medical homes, and incentives for reducing readmissions. Now those seeds offer a way forward.

      You'd have to be deliberately dense to not see how ACA saves money. But CBO is very conservative so the actual savings are likely more.

      "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

      by Greg Dworkin on Wed Mar 14, 2012 at 04:47:54 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Hmmm. Arithmetic says that $69 billion is (0+ / 0-)

        less than $200 billion.

        That's not being dense, that's understanding addition and subraction.

        You sound like those folks who come back from Vegas talking about the money they won and how far ahead they'd be if only they hadn't lost more in the process.

        LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

        by dinotrac on Wed Mar 14, 2012 at 05:03:12 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  all about the rate of growth, my friend (11+ / 0-)

          that's the proper way to judge. Costs go up as population goes up. This is something you have to pay for.

          The question on the table is "will the ACA bring costs down compared to no ACA" and not "how much does the ACA cost'?

          You can't as a small business person just look at payroll costs w/benefits and nothing else. Benefits cost money. Will making a change cost less?

          Not 'will making a change lower cost to nothing because I don't like spending money?"

          "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

          by Greg Dworkin on Wed Mar 14, 2012 at 05:09:04 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  I'm pretty sure dino's comparing it to... (4+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Sue B, PsychoSavannah, desert rain, askew

            ....killing off medicare and medicaid and throwing old and poor people into the streets to die.

            In that scenario, ACA is more expensive.

            If Obama doesn't deserve credit for getting Bin Laden because he didn't pull the trigger, Bin Laden doesn't deserve the blame for 9-11 because he didn't fly the planes.

            by Bush Bites on Wed Mar 14, 2012 at 05:10:55 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  No, I'm not. (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              DemFromCT

              Although it would be very nice to get actual health care reform so that we could kill off Medicare and Medicaid and just have -- drum roll, please -- health care instead of putting certain populations into health care ghettos.

              LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

              by dinotrac on Wed Mar 14, 2012 at 05:34:15 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  how would you pay for it (8+ / 0-)

                without medicare (most people are happy with it) and medicaid (safety net insurance)?

                You can't wish costs away. Which of us is the conservative, anyway?   ;-P

                Actual health care is very good. Most people are satisfied with it. But ACA offers evidence based reforms. That's good. Go where the data shows things work.

                So, what exactly DO you want? Aside from little cost? That's like asking for more services and lower taxes. Nice, but not real.

                "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

                by Greg Dworkin on Wed Mar 14, 2012 at 05:38:47 AM PDT

                [ Parent ]

                •  Umm...taxes, just like now. (1+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  skohayes

                  That's how the government gets revenue, is it not?

                  And yes -- it IS exactly like asking for more and better service with lower costs (whether tax or out of pocket).

                  If France can deliver the world's best health care to its entire population for half the GDP bite that we do, I think we can do better.

                  LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

                  by dinotrac on Wed Mar 14, 2012 at 05:48:11 AM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

                  •  we can (0+ / 0-)

                    with single payer medicaid for all.

                    thanks for asking.

                    PS, this is a brief review of what CBO said:

                    CBO: Obama's health law to cost less, cover fewer people than first thought

                    President Obama's healthcare reform law coverage provisons will cost less but cover fewer people than first thought, the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office said Tuesday.

                    The revised estimate of the law's coverage provisions shows about 2 million fewer people gaining coverage by 2016, reducing the number of uninsured Americans by 30 million instead of the 32 million projected a year ago. That would leave about 27 million people uninsured in 2016, two years after the law's insurance exchanges go online.

                    http://thehill.com/...

                    "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

                    by Greg Dworkin on Wed Mar 14, 2012 at 05:54:25 AM PDT

                    [ Parent ]

                    •  Ah -- So saving a little money by not doing what (0+ / 0-)

                      it's touted to do!

                      That's a win, I guess.

                      LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

                      by dinotrac on Wed Mar 14, 2012 at 06:00:41 AM PDT

                      [ Parent ]

                      •  lower costs and signup (0+ / 0-)

                        are estimated due to the ongoing downturn. That's not an argument that it didn't work.

                        See the graph posted. Invest more in government and the downturn ends faster.

                        "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

                        by Greg Dworkin on Wed Mar 14, 2012 at 06:16:40 AM PDT

                        [ Parent ]

                  •  taxes???? (1+ / 0-)
                    Recommended by:
                    PinHole

                    on who?  the republicans have reduced the amount of taxes for the rich and corporations so low and decided that those cuts DON'T NEED TO BE PAID FOR, so the tax revenue has gone down, because the middle class can't make up for those losses!!!  

                    You can't pay less and get more.  That's all there is to it.  

              •  The insurance companies make the ghettoes. (2+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                mdmslle, dinotrac

                If you want to kill them off, I'm right with you.

                If not, you're just blowing smoke.

                If Obama doesn't deserve credit for getting Bin Laden because he didn't pull the trigger, Bin Laden doesn't deserve the blame for 9-11 because he didn't fly the planes.

                by Bush Bites on Wed Mar 14, 2012 at 05:42:26 AM PDT

                [ Parent ]

          •  Except that it's not. There is also this notion (0+ / 0-)

            of cost/benefit -- ie, does our health care system actually deliver the goods at a price that is not double the cost of the world's best?

            You use the cost of Medicare and Medicaid, both programs that cut costs at the expense of patient care.  Overall, we pay twice what the world's best health care systems cost for nowhere near the coverage and care.

            ACA doesn't fix that problem.

            LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

            by dinotrac on Wed Mar 14, 2012 at 05:37:25 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  myu husband is on medicare and it's damned good. (4+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              foolme1ns, skohayes, PinHole, askew

              I have no idea what you mean by "at the expense of patient care". My husband, who has quite a complicated medical history and current condition, gets treatment everywhere we go. We own a home in FL but have been in DC for a year now looking after my dad and dying step mom. He can get quality care anywhere he is in the entire country. And HAS.

              I have NO idea what you mean by "at the expense of patient care". I wish my private policy was as good as his. I had to forego a mammogram this year because I can;t see my primary care doctor, who in IN FLORIDA until I can get down there again and get the referral/script.

              Meanwhile, my husband has a whole new set of doctors here in DC. Didn't miss a beat.

              Pfft.

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              by mdmslle on Wed Mar 14, 2012 at 05:49:19 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  My mother's on medicare and it's damned bad. (0+ / 0-)

                So is my mother in law, and, in a few years, I'll be there, too.

                Eye of the beholder, I guess.

                LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

                by dinotrac on Wed Mar 14, 2012 at 05:52:34 AM PDT

                [ Parent ]

                •  example???? (0+ / 0-)

                  a for instance????

                  •  Difficulty getting doctors, long waits for (0+ / 0-)

                    care.

                    She's lucky in one regard -- she is the widow of fighter pilot killed in the line of duty.  Sometimes she is able to get VA care, but that's it's own mess.

                    LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

                    by dinotrac on Wed Mar 14, 2012 at 06:12:40 AM PDT

                    [ Parent ]

                •  yeah. ok. right. (2+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  PinHole, askew

                  then your mom would be the very small percentage of people ONE MEDICARE who don't like it. She's perfectly free to go get herself a private policy, Dino. Why don't you encourage her to do that? It's a free country.

                  Maybe she can even get a 7000 coupon to offset the monthly costs if the GOP can pass the money-saving ryan plan.

                  Or can she not afford private insurance? Or does she have some condition that would preclude her being able to get it? Why does she keep medical coverage she hates? It's a free country. Have her call Humana or someone. I'm sure they'll be happy to sell her a plan. Or of course, if its SO bad, she can just  refuse medicare coverage. That's within her right as well. No one is forcing her to use medicare. Or is SOMETHING better than NOTHING?

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                  by mdmslle on Wed Mar 14, 2012 at 06:12:08 AM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

                  •  Ah -- the old fallback? Who cares if we deliver (0+ / 0-)

                    shit?  The customer has no choice but to take it.

                    The Democratic Party philosophy.

                    LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

                    by dinotrac on Wed Mar 14, 2012 at 06:13:46 AM PDT

                    [ Parent ]

                    •  not at all. your solution is to eliminate it. (0+ / 0-)

                      Something is better than nothing. And excuse me, she HAS a CHOICE is she hates it so much.

                      why don't you true answering my questions?

                      if she hates it why doesn't she just PAY for private policy OR pay cash for doctor's visits?

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                      by mdmslle on Wed Mar 14, 2012 at 06:15:26 AM PDT

                      [ Parent ]

                      •  You dissemble mightily. (0+ / 0-)

                        First, I only talk about elminating the Medicare program by eliminating the need with a compreshensive health care system that doesn't create segregated ghettos for poor folks and old folks.

                        With regard to choice...hello?

                        A 78 year old woman living on a pension doesn't really have much choice.  Go back and study up some of the original justifications for Medicare, and the fact that elderly folks can't get affordable care is one of them.

                        Yes -- Medicare is absolutely better than nothing, so long as you can find a doctor willing to treat you.

                        Gotta say, though, "Better than nothing" isn't a very inspiring bumper sticker.

                        LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

                        by dinotrac on Wed Mar 14, 2012 at 06:46:11 AM PDT

                        [ Parent ]

                        •  better than nothing is the reality. it doesn't (1+ / 0-)
                          Recommended by:
                          PinHole

                          preclude improvement, dino. and you yourself started it with the ridiculous canard about "liberal fallback" of something always being better than nothing.

                          of course a 78 year old woman can't get private insurance. that's the entire point of the ridiculous argument that started with "cost savings". And many 48 year olds and 28 year old and 18 year old can't get private insurance either. That's why we need something that provides it. ACA costs money. But it also saves money in the long run because when that 28, 48, or 58 year old presents at an ER with some condition, we have to pay for it anyway. Unless, we just adopt a policy of letting people die because they have NO coverage. The GOP would cheer such an idea, and did. But we liberals actually value human life. So yes, it costs a few bucks to get people enrolled and covered. ACA needs a substantial amount of improvement to be something I embrace fully. But yes, something is better than nothing and yes, it will cost a few bucks on the front end.  

                          I need your help for the NN booth for People-Powered Public Television (ppptv.org). Please help me out with your vote! CLICK HERE

                          by mdmslle on Wed Mar 14, 2012 at 07:05:48 AM PDT

                          [ Parent ]

                •  DT (3+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  dinotrac, PinHole, askew

                  My Dad and stepmom are in Florida, and with my dad's huge amount of health problems (stroke in 1999, leukemia, diabetes, etc, etc), he sees a lot of doctors, but still, without the help of Medicare, they would be living on the streets.
                  Why do your mom and MIL have such a hard time?
                  I know here in the boonies, finding specialists can be a real aggravation, as most are at least 3-4 hour drive away and that can be a pain, but there are lots of resources out there to help people having problems.

                  If you can separate sex from procreation, you have given women the ability to participate in society on an equal basis with men. -Gloria Feldt

                  by skohayes on Wed Mar 14, 2012 at 06:37:27 AM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

                  •  I'm sure that some places are better than others, (0+ / 0-)

                    but the reality is that more and more doctors are refusing to treat Medicare patients as we keep trying to control costs by cutting back on reimbursements for procedures.

                    That's not how you get quality care.

                    LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

                    by dinotrac on Wed Mar 14, 2012 at 06:49:09 AM PDT

                    [ Parent ]

                    •  I can tell you at the medical end (3+ / 0-)
                      Recommended by:
                      PinHole, askew, skohayes

                      a shortage of docs is a much bigger problem.

                      "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

                      by Greg Dworkin on Wed Mar 14, 2012 at 07:08:14 AM PDT

                      [ Parent ]

                      •  Great, so...starting out with a shortage, and then (0+ / 0-)

                        knocking a third from that.

                        Even worse.

                        LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

                        by dinotrac on Wed Mar 14, 2012 at 07:58:10 AM PDT

                        [ Parent ]

                        •  bullshit comment akin to (0+ / 0-)

                          "look, the sky is blue, see, proves my point."

                          "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

                          by Greg Dworkin on Wed Mar 14, 2012 at 09:08:32 AM PDT

                          [ Parent ]

                          •  How so.... (0+ / 0-)

                            You acknowledge a doctor shortage to begin with, and doctors dropping out of Medicare is not exactly a secret.

                            Your comment is the one reeking of bullshit.

                            Must admire the  power of your rose-colored glasses, however.

                            Too bad they can't actually manufacture the needed care.

                            LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

                            by dinotrac on Wed Mar 14, 2012 at 09:46:28 AM PDT

                            [ Parent ]

                          •  doctors dropping out of medicare (0+ / 0-)

                            is greatly exaggerated. You use a single anecdote to wrongly describe 16% of the economy.

                            Bullshit is exactly right. This is a year old, but still true:  

                            The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services says that 97% of doctors accept Medicare. The agency doesn’t know how many have refused to take new Medicare patients, Deputy Administrator Jonathan Blum told USA Today. “Medicare beneficiaries have good access to physician services. We do have concerns about access to primary care physicians.” This is not a new problem, but an ongoing workforce issue—the need to increase the number of primary care practitioners available, especially as 31 million more Americans obtain health care benefits under reform legislation, is pressing.
                            http://thehealthcareblog.com/...

                            when a practice becomes full, all patients are refused, not just medicare patients. OTOH, the idea that docs won't take Medicare patients is a very common, and untrue, conservative scare tactic, oft repeated, rarely documented.

                            "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

                            by Greg Dworkin on Wed Mar 14, 2012 at 11:03:22 AM PDT

                            [ Parent ]

                          •  You should like this, then: (1+ / 0-)
                            Recommended by:
                            DemFromCT

                            http://newoldage.blogs.nytimes.com/...

                            It supports your contention of a slower decline, though the Medicaid numbers are pretty bad.

                            LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

                            by dinotrac on Wed Mar 14, 2012 at 11:24:17 AM PDT

                            [ Parent ]

                          •  indeed, it does support my contention (0+ / 0-)

                            facts do that, y'know ;-0

                            But Medicaid is a completely different kettle of fish. it is not Medicare, not designed like Medicare, doesn't cover what Medicare covers and is not financed like Medicare.

                            It is far better than nothing and like SCHIP (for children), is designed to fill a needed gap. That it does.

                            Ultimately, Medicare and Medicaid will need financial adjusting because of aging baby boomers. as you know, i wrote a series about that.

                            But there is no future in negotiating it with the Paul Ryans of the world, whose goal is to end it, not amend it.

                            "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

                            by Greg Dworkin on Wed Mar 14, 2012 at 11:35:06 AM PDT

                            [ Parent ]

                          •  Not a fan of Medicare, but (1+ / 0-)
                            Recommended by:
                            DemFromCT

                            there is a reason why we need something to do what it does.

                            I need only think back to last year when I couldn't buy any insurance because of my weight -- even though I rarely get sick, and have only spent one night in the hospital (for observation) in the last 50 years.

                            There is no getting around the need for the government to ensure that care is available for older people.  Everybody who doesn't die first gets old.  It's something we're designed to do, not something we can be blamed for.  It's also one reason why insurance makes a lousy care model for the elderly.

                            LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

                            by dinotrac on Wed Mar 14, 2012 at 12:38:15 PM PDT

                            [ Parent ]

                          •  we all have the potential to get ill (1+ / 0-)
                            Recommended by:
                            skohayes

                            and an illness can bankrupt you.

                            Hence, Medicare, Medicaid, SCHIP and ACA. Since there's no getting around the need, why the hostility towards the programs? The alternatives, alas, are:

                            1. nothing (unacceptable)
                            2. entirely commercial insurance (the Ryan plan) where you'd be weaned out to only take care of the profitable well.
                            3. tweaks to current system
                            4. single payer/Medicare for all

                            I prefer 4 but only 3 can pass. But in any case, someone has to pay, someone has to benefit.

                            "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

                            by Greg Dworkin on Wed Mar 14, 2012 at 12:49:50 PM PDT

                            [ Parent ]

                          •  "The programs" (0+ / 0-)

                            The plethora of programs is precisely the problem.

                            There is, frankly, no reason for a doctor to know that somebody is a Medicare, Medicaid, SCHIP, etc patient, and, in a rational system, no need for the programs.  Budget lines? Sure.  But care is care and ensuring people get decent care should be "the" program.

                            You may correct me if I am wrong about this, but my understanding is that France works that way.  Employers and/or individuals are required to contribute according to their ability, but there is no differentiation when they go to get care.

                            LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

                            by dinotrac on Wed Mar 14, 2012 at 12:55:34 PM PDT

                            [ Parent ]

                          •  i am no expert on how France works (0+ / 0-)

                            but from an office based doc perspective, it matters not whether it's SCHIP, medicare, etc or aetna, cigna and blue care. in fact, the former is easier to work with.

                            as far as I am concerned, it can all be replaced with single payer.

                            As for the previous points made, check out Jon Cohn:

                            When the Affordable Care Act became law, CBO estimated that the net result of all these changes, taken together, would be to reduce the deficit. Now, with this revised estimate, CBO has decided the law will reduce the deficit by even more money.

                            Yes, you read that right: The real news of the CBO estimate is that, according to its models, health care reform is going to save even more taxpayer dollars than previously thought.

                            and
                            CBO now projects the number of people with employer-sponsored insurance will drop by 4 million people, on net. It’s still a small effect, representing less than 2 percent of the total population with employer-sponsored coverage. That’s well within the margin of error of these models. It’s also difficult to tell why CBO thinks this will happen—whether it’s fewer employers offering insurance, fewer employees accepting coverage, or workers moving into firms that are less likely to provide benefits. Any of those would be consistent with lower economic growth, as CBO now expects.
                            http://www.tnr.com/...

                            "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

                            by Greg Dworkin on Thu Mar 15, 2012 at 07:51:56 PM PDT

                            [ Parent ]

              •  My mother is on Medicare and Medicaid (4+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                mdmslle, skohayes, PinHole, askew

                and living in a nursing home and they cover just about all of her very expensive costs.  the only thing they don't pay for is dental care.  There is no way we would be able to afford the care she is receiving with these two very necessary good programs.  

            •  I don't think I heard anyone say that ACA was (3+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              DemFromCT, skohayes, One Opinion

              perfect, or that it was the end of the job. I heard a lot of people say that it was just the start of a long complicated process that involved 300 million people, 50 state governments and private businesses in all those states, the massive and complex federal governmnet, and a sizeable chunk of Wall Street.

              It got the ball moving, and it also woke up a large segment of the population who were just sleepwalking toward bankruptcy due to illness, and just assumed it was god's plan or fate. Now the electorate is much more aware and much more involved, and they realize that problems can be fixed.

              As for the health ins. industry, Rick Ungar of Forbes is among those who think single payer (or at least a public option and a massively reduced in power ins. industry) is inevitable, thanks to the ACA's long term effects.

              If you're one of those who think that Obama could have ushered in single payer with just a flip of his magic wand, you are delusional.

              I don't fault you for criticizing, though, the game isn't over and it will take a lot of critics to push the changes that need to be made.

              I'd rather have a buntle afrota-me than a frottle a bunta-me.

              by David54 on Wed Mar 14, 2012 at 06:25:32 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

        •  yah and the Ryan plan actually saves the govt (0+ / 0-)

          900 billion. That's a fact.

          But yes, when you're covering people, it costs less.

          So you can't use absolute cost as the only factor. This is the error conservatives often make. Yes, cutting everything lowers expenditures. But that's not the question. the question is: how can we provide services that people need and/or want as efficiently as possible. Not: how can we eliminate expenditures and lower our costs.

          come on dinotrac. you're smarter than this.

          I need your help for the NN booth for People-Powered Public Television (ppptv.org). Please help me out with your vote! CLICK HERE

          by mdmslle on Wed Mar 14, 2012 at 05:45:01 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  And then there's the error liberals make... (0+ / 0-)

            Something is better than nothing, even if it kills you.

            Come on, mdmslle, you're smarter than this.

            LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

            by dinotrac on Wed Mar 14, 2012 at 05:51:19 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  more often than not, something is better than (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              One Opinion

              nothing.

              especially when it comes to things tat can effect your health and life.

              I'd rather have SOME coverage than NO coverage. I'd rather have SOME freedom than NO freedom. I'd rather have SOME electricity than NO electricity. I'd rather have SOME food than NO food. Id; rather have SOME money than NO money.

              That's not a error, dino. That's common fucking sense.

              I need your help for the NN booth for People-Powered Public Television (ppptv.org). Please help me out with your vote! CLICK HERE

              by mdmslle on Wed Mar 14, 2012 at 06:08:01 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

            •  Republicans are trying to kill women (3+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              mdmslle, PinHole, askew

              with several of the bills and laws that are being passed in many states.  There are two states who have passed bills that allow or mandate doctors to lie to their female patients about their health because their information might lead to an abortion!!!!!  Even if that information has a devestating or deadly effect on the woman or the baby!!!!!  In GA, they just passed a bill forcing a woman to carry a fetus to term, after 20 weeks even if it is dead!!!!

              If you want to talk about a party killing people, then you need to be talking about the republicans.  Saving people is the least of their concerns, and medical care is a moral issue as much as it is an economic issue.  Saving money by throwing people out of programs that provide needed medical care is wrong, and deadly.

              •  There's a reason I don't belong to a party. (0+ / 0-)

                And this kind of simple-minded binary narrative is part of  it.

                ie,

                "Yeah, we stink.  So what? THEY stink worse. How dare you ask for more?"

                LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

                by dinotrac on Wed Mar 14, 2012 at 07:01:54 AM PDT

                [ Parent ]

          •  I am not interested (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            mdmslle

            in saving the government money at the expense of the people who rely on the government for their basic human needs, that business will not take care of because there is not profit in it.  that is why we have the government!!!!  It is there to serve the people.

    •  PS you cannot just look at cost (absolute) (9+ / 0-)

      because it always is a big number, growing with the population and the GDP.

      You have to compare cost (action) to cost (no action).

      "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

      by Greg Dworkin on Wed Mar 14, 2012 at 04:53:50 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  No argument at all. (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        DemFromCT

        I guess that's pretty good all around:

        Hey look, I know your car caught fire and nearly killed you, but look -- if we hadn't built the car you wouldn't have what's left of one now!

        LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

        by dinotrac on Wed Mar 14, 2012 at 05:09:49 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  you wanna walk to work? (5+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          mdmslle, gchaucer2, skohayes, johanus, askew

          fine by me. But people drive. If you don't like it, sitting on your lawn yelling 'get a horse' and telling 'car on fire' stories won't do the country much good, and by the way, isn't real.

          Or you can invest in mass transit.   ;-)

          "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

          by Greg Dworkin on Wed Mar 14, 2012 at 05:14:28 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Sure they do, but they wouldn't thank (0+ / 0-)

            the maker for building a piece of junk that caught fire

            AND ---

            better than no car?

            Not exactly, because they are now out money AND car.

            If they hadn't bought the flaming pile of crap, they might be in position to buy a set of wheels that understands ignition is meant for the fuel, not the car.

            LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

            by dinotrac on Wed Mar 14, 2012 at 05:42:54 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  Imagine what we could have produced (0+ / 0-)

              had we had a GOP that was actually concentrating on making good policy instead of making Obama a one term president?

              If you can separate sex from procreation, you have given women the ability to participate in society on an equal basis with men. -Gloria Feldt

              by skohayes on Wed Mar 14, 2012 at 06:42:27 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

    •  You talk like there is something different (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      dinotrac, mdmslle, skohayes

      about the ACA's spending projections than any other spending bill - especially health care spending bill - that's ever passed congress.

      It would be nice if it had been possible to pass a health care bill that bypassed the health insurance industry and actually brought down health care costs, but that wasn't to be.  Health care and health insurance costs are going up for both the public and private markets and will continue to do so, ACA or no ACA, until congress acquires the spine to do something about it.

      The Republicans' plan is to throw everyone into the private market with fewer government subsidies so that the government spends less and has less economy of scale bargaining power.  That just shifts the cost onto the backs of the individual.  Nobody is talking about bringing down costs.

      "In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican." - H. L. Mencken

      by SueDe on Wed Mar 14, 2012 at 05:01:30 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  bringing down rate of growth (5+ / 0-)

        not bringing down costs.

        Still, if that's what you want..

        http://www.cbpp.org/...

        "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

        by Greg Dworkin on Wed Mar 14, 2012 at 05:03:54 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Yeah. I've known more than a few Medicaid (0+ / 0-)

          patients, and it's true --

          Crappy insurance can definitely cost more than good insurance.

          You're definitely comparing apples and worms.

          LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

          by dinotrac on Wed Mar 14, 2012 at 05:07:58 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  no, covering your 'costs above all' (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            mdmslle, skohayes

            concerns. You are almost right about medicaid. it's not premium insurance. But it is cheaper. And for those with nothing, better than nothing.

            "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

            by Greg Dworkin on Wed Mar 14, 2012 at 05:16:51 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  Ummm...I have NEVER been about costs (0+ / 0-)

              above all.

              I DO, however, care a bit about the truth.  You have pimped deficit reduction as a benefit of ACA, based on figures that artificially reduce it's cost by using ten year costs for provisions that aren't in effect for the full ten years.

              LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

              by dinotrac on Wed Mar 14, 2012 at 05:39:56 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  I have accurately pointed out that ACA reduces (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                skohayes

                rate of growth of one of the single biggest cost programs (Medicare) compared to no ACA.

                That's a hard fact and a big deal that you can't wrap your head around.

                Want better than that? Give us a better Congress with no conservative republicans trying to end medicare in favor of private insurance.

                "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

                by Greg Dworkin on Wed Mar 14, 2012 at 05:58:11 AM PDT

                [ Parent ]

          •  medicaid is the only thing keeping my step mom (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            One Opinion

            alive right now. She HAS blue cross blue shield. She's also on my dad's kasier policy. And she just turned 64 and now has medicare. but medicaid is the only thing that pays for her long term care.

            so, yea. it's "crappy".

            You know dino, you opinions are all good. everyone has one. but they are just opinions and they have about zero basis in fact or in the real lives of real people.

            I need your help for the NN booth for People-Powered Public Television (ppptv.org). Please help me out with your vote! CLICK HERE

            by mdmslle on Wed Mar 14, 2012 at 05:53:32 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

      •  No, there is nothing different about it. (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        DemFromCT

        Dem -- and Democrats -- have tried to push the fiction of ACA as a deficit trimming device when it isn't.

        Personally, I don't believe the CBO projections anyway.  The way the bill is written, I expect employers -- escpecially those who employ people making at or near the national median wage -- to start dropping health care as a matter of competitive necessity.  The penalties for failing to provide coverage are substantially less than the escalating cost of coverage, a cost which is capped for their employees but not for them.  It will be cheaper for many of them to pay the penalty, give their employees a raise, and let the government pick up 75% of the costs.

        LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

        by dinotrac on Wed Mar 14, 2012 at 05:06:33 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  except as I've posted (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          mdmslle, skohayes, askew

          the surveys from small business health admins say you're wrong. And you know that. You just reject data that doesn't agree with your wrong conceptions.

          Further, you completely ignore what you get for your money - health coverage for millions of people who do not have it - as if that does not matter.

          Finally, you very stubbornly ignore that these costs, particularly medicare, really do go up over time.

          Just head in sand on your part.

          "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

          by Greg Dworkin on Wed Mar 14, 2012 at 05:21:24 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  I know what the surveys say. Surveys once (0+ / 0-)

            said Herman Cain was the leading contender for the GOP Presidential nomination.

            Kind of interesting question , though -- who are these small business health admins and what happens to their jobs if their companies stop offering health care benefits?

            What's the old HL Mencken quote?

            Never argue with a man whose job depends on not being convinced?

            Maybe the sample population is representative and unbiased.  Even if it is, companies will face significant pressure if their competitors cut costs by ditching health-care and raising employee salaries -- something the ACA makes possible.

            LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

            by dinotrac on Wed Mar 14, 2012 at 05:59:02 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  if you want to end employer based health care (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              skohayes, askew

              and take that out of the equation, look at Wyden's proposals or look at single payer and medicare for all. But it would never pass a Republican House, so it's off the table.

              Once again, the issue isn't ACA vs perfection and a program that can't pass congress, it's ACA vs what we had before ACA, which is 30 million less insured.

              "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

              by Greg Dworkin on Wed Mar 14, 2012 at 06:21:24 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  I do, really badly. (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                DemFromCT

                It doesn't work very well and it really discriminates against small employers, sole proprietorships, and individuals.

                LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

                by dinotrac on Wed Mar 14, 2012 at 06:40:32 AM PDT

                [ Parent ]

                •  give us a better congress (0+ / 0-)

                  and it will get fixed.

                  "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

                  by Greg Dworkin on Wed Mar 14, 2012 at 06:44:21 AM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

                  •  You had your congress and gave us ACA. (0+ / 0-)

                    I despair.

                    LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

                    by dinotrac on Wed Mar 14, 2012 at 06:49:51 AM PDT

                    [ Parent ]

                    •  That silly meme needs to be stopped (2+ / 0-)
                      Recommended by:
                      askew, One Opinion

                      We needed at least 60 Senators to overcome the Republican filibuster on everything that Democrats were trying to pass. We had 58 for most of Obama's first two years in Congress.
                      What we ended up with was a health care program that as little as ten years ago would have passed with resounding Republican support.
                      However, Mitch McConnell's stated goal of making Obama a one term president turned the GOP into the party of no- and the ACA bill is the result.
                      That doesn't mean that we can't make it better over the next decade or so, just as they did with Social Security and Medicare.
                      Rome wasn't built in a day.

                      If you can separate sex from procreation, you have given women the ability to participate in society on an equal basis with men. -Gloria Feldt

                      by skohayes on Wed Mar 14, 2012 at 07:00:29 AM PDT

                      [ Parent ]

                    •  we had A congress (0+ / 0-)

                      give me reagan's congress.

                      "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

                      by Greg Dworkin on Wed Mar 14, 2012 at 07:09:12 AM PDT

                      [ Parent ]

                      •  And you know what -- Reagan actually managed (0+ / 0-)

                        to get some things done with that Democratic Congress spearheaded by the uber-partisan  Tip O'Neill.

                        Very different from the current administration and Democrats in Congress who would rather whine about not holding all the seats.

                        LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

                        by dinotrac on Wed Mar 14, 2012 at 08:00:30 AM PDT

                        [ Parent ]

        •  asdf (0+ / 0-)
          I expect employers -- escpecially those who employ people making at or near the national median wage -- to start dropping health care as a matter of competitive necessity.
          What's stopping them from dropping coverage now?  
    •  so now we're the party of "smaller government" and (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      mightymouse, mdmslle

      "less spending"?

      Why don't we just adopt the entire Republican program and save the country the trouble of elections?

  •  I am looking for info on how many fewer voted (0+ / 0-)

    in AL and MS than in 2008, and why MS has so many more delegates than AL when so many fewer voted. I know there are a lot of gifts of delegates to states who meet certain criteria, but is Mississippi just tired of it all? Or is AL that much more "Saintly"?

  •  Do independents know how to read graphs? (7+ / 0-)

    If they do, that TPM graph is another one that needs badly to go viral. The main reason for Reagan's economic successes IMO is not his cut in the marginal tax rates, but his massive increase in defense spending, which sparked growth in Silicon Valley and elsewhere.

    "The only thing we have to fear - is fear itself." - Franklin Delano Roosevelt

    by orrg1 on Wed Mar 14, 2012 at 04:40:15 AM PDT

  •  GOP dilemma: 'Question Mr GOP....why do you hate (3+ / 0-)

    Obama?'.......'Cause he's a socialist'......'No he isn't'.....'Yes he is'......'No he isn't'......'Yes he is'...'Who told you that?'.....'Rush and Sean'

  •  We would all do well to remember this: (10+ / 0-)
    In short, when judging Obama’s record so far, conservatives measure him against their fears, liberals against their hopes, and the rest of us against our pocketbooks. But if you measure Obama against other presidents—arguably the more relevant yardstick—a couple of things come to light. Speaking again in terms of sheer tonnage, Obama has gotten more done than any president since LBJ. But the effects of some of those achievements have yet to be felt by most Americans, often by design. Here, too, Obama is in good historical company.
    A keen observation by Glastris.  Now imagine how much we could get done with a second Obama term and a solid Democratic Congress to go with it.

    "A candle loses nothing by lighting another candle" - Mohammed Nabbous, R.I.P.

    by Lawrence on Wed Mar 14, 2012 at 04:43:09 AM PDT

  •  Mitt won Hawaii and American Samoa. (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    mdmslle, skohayes

    Must be a furiner.....

    If Obama doesn't deserve credit for getting Bin Laden because he didn't pull the trigger, Bin Laden doesn't deserve the blame for 9-11 because he didn't fly the planes.

    by Bush Bites on Wed Mar 14, 2012 at 05:06:21 AM PDT

    •  Guam!!1! you forgot Guam!!1! {urk} (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Bush Bites, mdmslle, skohayes

      And the Cyborg is headed to Puerto Rico next.
      Distinctly furrin, if'n you ask me.

      Actually, that's not fair. The revised numbers showing that Mittens actually lost Hawaii, too (like Maine, Iowa, and somethingsomething) haven't been released yet. When they are, it will show that Unit #CYMR68453 is in fact, a blue-hydraulic-ed American.

      Class war has consequences, and we are living them.

      by kamarvt on Wed Mar 14, 2012 at 05:19:56 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Mississippi.....the GOP Machine must have not (0+ / 0-)

    gotten the memo.

  •  Poll Shows Public Supports Obama on Gas Prices (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    skohayes, One Opinion

    I can't help but remembering something I read last Friday and it had to do with what the Administration is waiting for as far as gas prices.  With gas going up (and believe me, being retired it takes a pretty big bite from my fixed income) American citizens will cut back.  

    Speculators (oil companies included) are waiting for prices to go up, they’re betting on futures, they’re holding oil in container ships offshore and when the price hits their magic number that's when they’ll make their profits.  BUT, if the prices go down (due to market demand) they're on the line to lose billions.  This will ruin their life style, arrogance, and damage their reputation.  

    Is this risky for the Administration? Yes!  
    Does it hurt the consumer? Yes!
    But if it hurts and damages those arrogant speculators, Good!  It’s about time.

    My Dad always taught me that sometimes you have to go through extremely painful times before you can reap the benefits.  He’s been right so far.  Let’s hope this approach works here.

    I'm completely in favor of the separation of Church and State. My idea is that these two institutions screw us up enough on their own, so both of them together is certain death.

    by cobaltbay on Wed Mar 14, 2012 at 05:12:06 AM PDT

    •  Market demand pushes price up, not down (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      mdmslle, Lawrence

      President Obama was on point in his speech two weeks ago:

      But over the long-term, the biggest reason oil prices will rise is growing demand in countries like China, India, and Brazil. Just think — in five years, the number of cars on the road in China more than tripled. Nearly 10 million were added in 2010 alone. Ten million cars in one year — think about how much oil that requires. And those numbers will only get bigger over time.

      An ambulance can only go so fast - Neil Young

      by mightymouse on Wed Mar 14, 2012 at 05:36:07 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Is Romney a Moron? (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    mdmslle, skohayes

    Kathleen Parker's piece made me think what kind of person would make the endless gaffs that Romney makes, daily?  The only word I can think of is moron!

    The grits and bling comments are really stupid but check this one out:

    Said Romney: "Planned Parenthood, we're going to get rid of that."
    Has the man ever heard of Rush?  Does he realize he is running for President of the whole United States?  Does he know women have the right to vote?

    There I said it Mitts a moron...

    Anyone who thinks they're important is usually just a pompous moron who can't deal with his or her own pathetic insignificance and the fact that what they do is meaningless and inconsequential.
    William Thomas

    All morons hate it when you call them a moron.
    J. D. Salinger

    •  And Planned Parenthood is a private organization (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      mdmslle, skohayes, One Opinion

      how does Mitt intend to get rid of it?

    •  He's not a moron. (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Sue B, TFinSF, mdmslle, skohayes

      You can tell, because he sometimes trips himself up when he's trying to sound conservative but ends up sounding liberal -- like when he said cutting spending during a recession is bad, then had to retract it.

      Bush was a moron. He never tripped himself up because he believed all the conservative idiocy.

      If Obama doesn't deserve credit for getting Bin Laden because he didn't pull the trigger, Bin Laden doesn't deserve the blame for 9-11 because he didn't fly the planes.

      by Bush Bites on Wed Mar 14, 2012 at 05:25:36 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Mitt is a guy (6+ / 0-)

      who has never had to interact with or relate to people who are not like him (rich, white, privileged). So he has to get the Cliff's Notes: "Quick, what do Southerners like?  Grits?  What are those?  Um, OK, include cheese, got it."

      ....no longer in SF.... -9.00, -7.38

      by TFinSF on Wed Mar 14, 2012 at 05:26:32 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  He's doubly insular. (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        TFinSF, mdmslle, middleoftheroadDem

        It's not like Mormons spend a lot of time outside their own either.

        If Obama doesn't deserve credit for getting Bin Laden because he didn't pull the trigger, Bin Laden doesn't deserve the blame for 9-11 because he didn't fly the planes.

        by Bush Bites on Wed Mar 14, 2012 at 05:31:23 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  Hogwash. (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        middleoftheroadDem, skohayes

        Mitt has run for governor of a state and for president once before.  If he hasn't learned anything about connecting with people by now, he's beyond teaching.  Even Republicans who want to connect with him can't bring themselves to do it.

        Not that his clumsiness in dealing with the little people will stop the Republican machine from handing him the nomination, but I doubt his people skills will improve one whit during the general election campaign.

        "In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican." - H. L. Mencken

        by SueDe on Wed Mar 14, 2012 at 05:55:11 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  he IS beyond teaching. TFin SF is right. (0+ / 0-)

          The guy is over 60.

          He's never lived a regular life. Ever. A few weeks campaigning in MA and the US can't undo 60 years of insulation. Sorry. It would be like someone raised by wolves suddenly at age 60 being introduced to modern civilized life: electricity, cooking, grocery stores, running water, standing upright.

          he's THAT awkward around regular people.

          and you're right in that he IS beyond teaching just as a wolf-raised man would be beyond teaching. Same thing.

          I need your help for the NN booth for People-Powered Public Television (ppptv.org). Please help me out with your vote! CLICK HERE

          by mdmslle on Wed Mar 14, 2012 at 06:01:14 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

      •  Have You Ever Said "Cheesy Grits?" (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        PsychoSavannah, TFinSF

        I have a very average IQ.  Went to a 2 year college yet I've lived/been/worked all over the US and in Europe.  How come I manage to fit in?  How come I quickly learn the local culture? Mitts not running for President but CEO and you know what they are like.

  •  How did Mitt keep a straight face (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    ratcityreprobate, skohayes

    when he accused "desperate  loser" Santorum of lying to win?

  •  Whoopie Deja Vu Doo! (0+ / 0-)

    Does anyone else suspect that dems are contributing to Santorum's campaign?

  •  You don't need ... (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    skillet, mdmslle

    ... X-rays to spot the fracture in the Republican Party ... it's wide and it's deep.

    The south bathes in Santorum while Romney scores just enough votes elsewhere to trudge toward an unenthusiastic nomination by the party establishment. Cheap entertainment and hardly a winning formula.

    Speaking of cheap, this is all good news for Sarah Palin ...

    •  Caribou Barbie has become so emboldened (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      megisi, skohayes

      she is now calling for Obama to debate her.  And wouldn't that be something to see?!

      What I can't figure out is why the president's campaign staff spent the time or money to make an ad calling out her stupidity - do they really think she has a sufficient following or anything coherent to say that could affect the election?

      "In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican." - H. L. Mencken

      by SueDe on Wed Mar 14, 2012 at 06:05:13 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  LOL This Morning---$$$ Up In Smoke (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    skohayes

    This is the first election where the billionaire boys' club has been able to spend unlimited money. And think of how much of it (at least 5/6) has been wasted! The casino guy (Adelson) wants to start a war with Iran, and thinks Newt is his guy. He dumps more money into that hole than he does at a backroom poker game. And of course, it's all for naught and not even tax deductible. Ultimately, Santorum's "sugar daddy" will be in the same place, but may consider it a good investment since he's gotten some real far right social conservative conversation on the news. The Mormon bucks behind Romney will probably get him the nomination in the end, but he will certainly be short for the election.

    And if Rasmussen and others stop playing with the polls (or run out of ways to push poll Romney into the lead to make the "sheep" think they have to fall in line) the other boys may either decide to put their money into local House elections or wait until Jeb emerges in '16.

    As they said in Nam, "I love the sound of burning money in the morning."

    •  the GOP establishment will owe adelson BIG. (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Wayward Son

      With his financial support of Newt, he's the only thing keeping their guy (romney) in the race.

      I think adelson will get more than his ROI for the Republican party. They own him at this point.

      I need your help for the NN booth for People-Powered Public Television (ppptv.org). Please help me out with your vote! CLICK HERE

      by mdmslle on Wed Mar 14, 2012 at 06:03:56 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  You may be right (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        mdmslle

        In conversations I've argued that Santorum is very good for the Dems, because he is too ocd to lie about his positions. I've had conversations with folks about things like Medicare and repro health, and they say (listening to Romney) that "The GOP would never do something like that." The problem is that they simply lie and Luntz (which I think is a linguistic synonym).

        There simply has to be a bottom to this money pit if they have honest consultants who tell them it's hopeless. Meanwhile, it's lovely to see Romney have to spend so much for so little.

  •  Cheesy grits - what is Mittney, the marketing (0+ / 0-)

    guru for Taco Bell?

    "I'm sculpting now. Landscapes mostly." ~ Yogi Bear

    by eXtina on Wed Mar 14, 2012 at 06:03:29 AM PDT

  •  Slouching Toward Apocalypse (0+ / 0-)

    The End Times cometh for the GOP. Their existential panic has reduced their politics to passionate hate for Obama. Their membership prefers suicide by principled dignity over embarrassed survival.

    Trickle down economics, global warming denial, human rights for zygotes, illegal aliens in every voting booth and the perpetual war against Muslim infidels are false gods and, unconsciously at least, the Party knows it.

    "The skeleton in the closet is coming home to roost!" Tom Stoppard

    by Apotropoxy on Wed Mar 14, 2012 at 06:04:45 AM PDT

  •  Romney should drop out (0+ / 0-)

    Romney should drop out of the GOP race to allow the republican party to become the Christianist party that their base so desperately wants.  Then Romney should vow to start a third party campaign devoted entirely to corporate interests.

    The Christianists would have their own party and the 1 percent would have their own party.  Everyone is happy.  

  •  I read the Kathleen Parker piece... (0+ / 0-)

    and what jumped out at me was the following tripe:

    The South was "invaded and conquered."

    YOU were "invaded and conquered"? RILLY?

    Even Southerners all agree that the South attacked first. What they sometimes claim is that somehow, they were "provoked" into doing so, because supposedly, trying to occupy Fort Sumter was somehow "egregious" and an "affront" to Southern hegemony over South Carolinian territory.

    The point is that they fired first. Period! End of story! If you fire first, then you have ceded all right to claim that you are being invaded.

    (By the way -- this is also true of the American "Revolutionary" War. Believe it or not, the "Americans" were really British subjects who wanted to -- yup, you guessed it -- secede from their union with Britain!!!.)

    And it gets better -- because although a lot of folks believe that somehow, we inherited this entire country when we finished up writing the Constitution way back in 1787, uh... there was a problem.

    The problem was that most of the rest of the continent was still dominated by -- believe it or not -- Natives and Hispanics!!!

    It's amazing how history proves fucking assholes to be a bunch of fucking assholes.

    Oh -- and end of lie about how the "South was invaded." You weren't. Shut up and eat your grits.

  •  The one thing we absolutely know.. (0+ / 0-)

    ..is that Romney's only chance to get the nomination depends upon Gingrich staying in the race for another month or so.  A long run of Santorum victories would broker the convention, and Romney isn't winning anything on a convention first ballot.

    Luckily for Mitt, Newt has the biggest ego this side of Donald Trump, and knows his chances at a VP nod depend on him playing this game out to the end.

    "To pass these defendants a poisoned chalice is to put it to our own lips as well." Justice Robert Jackson, Chief Prosecutor, Nuremberg.

    by Wayward Son on Wed Mar 14, 2012 at 07:33:12 AM PDT

  •  diction (0+ / 0-)

    PLEASE TPM editors and everybody, stop using any form of the verb 'to believe' with respect to scientific principles, e.g. "...believe in evolution..." or "...belief in global warming...".

    'belief' is a religious term and is inappropriate to a discussion of science. its use only serves to reinforce the claims of the the right wing that these are somehow religious dogma for the atheistic left. One can accept or not accept scientific theories, hypotheses, and facts. One does not "believe in" them.

    think how ridiculous it is to talk about "belief in the theory of relativity" - einstein's theory has been tested and affirmed by numerous investigators. with the recent and unconfirmed exception of faster-than-light quarks, it has never been contradicted. its testing continues.

    it's pretty much the same thing for the current understanding of neo-darwinian evolutionary theory and close for the science relating to climate change/global warming.

    "The time has come," the Walrus said, "to talk of many things:"

    by one you can live with on Wed Mar 14, 2012 at 09:45:34 AM PDT

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