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Richard Mourdock
Richard Mourdock
National Review, on Sen. Dick Lugar's primary loss last night:
In short: The tea party may be losing popularity, but its power inside the Republican party appears to be growing.
I guess that depends on the definition of the tea party. Does it includes the Club for Growth, which spent $1.5 million attacking Lugar, funded by two investment bankers using the Citizen's United ruling to help buy the election? Does it include the NRA, which spent half a million? What about Dick Armey's FreedomWorks? They spent $100,000. Or how about the nearly $20,000 that Murdoch raised from bank PACs?

In all, big money corporate PACs and Super PACs spent $3 million boosting the newly minted GOP nominee, Richard Mourdock. And he wasn't exactly some insurgent outsider either—he was a twice-elected state treasurer. Heck, Indiana's political establishment was lining up behind Mourdock over a year ago.

There's no doubt that Mourdock was a darling of the tea party, but that's nowhere near enough these days to get one of their candidates anywhere.

The tea party presence was non-existent at the presidential level, otherwise we'd have Michele Bachmann as the nominee. In Utah, the tea party gunned hard for Sen. Orrin Hatch, yet are getting very little traction. In Indiana itself, last night, the tea party's favorite House candidates (like Travis Hankins and Kristi Risk) all lost.

Mourdock certainly had little interest in being associated with the tea party. He refused to call himself a tea party candidate, and he did so repeatedly:

"The headline isn't going to be, 'Tea party candidate to take on Dick Lugar;' it's going to be, 'GOP grassroots dumps Lugar,'" Mourdock said. "There is tremendous unrest and tremendous dissatisfaction, and that's what got me in this race."
Without big outside money, the tea party is helpless to have an impact. As always, it's the guys who write the six- and seven-figure checks who call the shots.

Originally posted to kos on Wed May 09, 2012 at 09:35 AM PDT.

Also republished by Daily Kos.

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Comment Preferences

  •  Yep It's Not Voters or a Movement It's Spenders nt (13+ / 0-)

    We are called to speak for the weak, for the voiceless, for victims of our nation and for those it calls enemy.... --ML King "Beyond Vietnam"

    by Gooserock on Wed May 09, 2012 at 09:38:31 AM PDT

  •  Splitting hairs (15+ / 0-)

    The far ideologically right are asserting themselves against the Beltway insiders who they see as not doing near enough to change the political landscape.

    Whatever you want to call it. the amorphous Tea Party or something else, this thing is pushing the GOP harder right than it's been in a very long time. That is the measure of their success.

    •  Birchers with a new brand (11+ / 0-)

      provided by the big check-writers and a lazy media.

      A public option for health insurance is a national priority.

      by devtob on Wed May 09, 2012 at 10:09:14 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  The damn thing is...Birchers were discredited (13+ / 0-)

        ..in the 1950s and 60s. These new breed of Birchers have found a much wider appeal and real electoral success in a supposedly more liberal era.

        We're deluding ourselves if we think this thing is losing appeal or is not a threat.

        •  yep (7+ / 0-)

          its deeper and wider than people think.  mourdock beat lugar in a massive landslide. money alone doesnt do that unless the money is all working on the same propaganda.

          i would say the lesson is that the teaparty has become the republican party. the  old republicans are mouthing the same thing the teaparty was mouthing. rush limbaugh is still telling you what a worthless jerk obama is, and people in suits are repeating it.

          war is immoral. both parties are now fully complicit in the wars. bring everyone home. get to work.

          by just want to comment on Wed May 09, 2012 at 10:30:36 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Agree-formerly 'tea party' now mainstream repubs (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            devtob, Rick B

            Tea party ideals are now driving republican policy.

            Useful idiots served the purpose of the big corporate money machine. They succeeded in getting the message out-conning a lot of angry low info people into voting against their own interest.

            A lot of these people would never have paid any attention to corporate shills talking at them on the teevee. Instead they manipulated a group of pathetic souls who want to sink their teeth into something/someone and-voila- tea party patriots.

            Even 10 years ago the mainstream public would have been horrified by the vile nastiness now served up daily by a complicit media.The 'debates' along w/other ugly hate filled comments made openly by the right wingers in positions of power are accepted as a matter of course.

            We have to change this-hope its not too late.  

        •  The Birchers were essentially (5+ / 0-)

          discredited by Bill Buckley.

          And the corporate media back then reported more accurately on right-wing extremism.

          Nothing like that will happen now.

          A public option for health insurance is a national priority.

          by devtob on Wed May 09, 2012 at 10:32:31 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Which will only (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            tb mare, devtob

            help the rise of a dangerous political party like the Tea Party which only creates more chaos in our political system and sometimes I think that is exactly what the corporations want to do when they financially back someone like Mourdock.  If only we still had a decent media the truth about the tea party to put an end to them.

            "During times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolution­ary act. " George Orwell

            by zaka1 on Wed May 09, 2012 at 11:35:30 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

          •  The Birchers discredited themselves in my hometown (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            joe wobblie, devtob

            when they tried to join a number of mainstream churches and take over the board of deacons or whatever the equivalent was called in the late 50's. There was really very little difference in their membership and that of the KKK, the American Nazi Party, and the Texas Republican Party at that time (Texas was a one-party Democratic Party state at that time.)

            Bill Buckley simply saw the handwriting on the wall and announced it. He always went with the winner.

            The US Supreme Court has by it's actions and rhetoric ceased to be legitimate. Whiskey Tango Foxtrot - over

            by Rick B on Wed May 09, 2012 at 12:38:29 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

        •  All conspiracy theories are just rehashed (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          maryabein, devtob

          Its the same shit just in a different package. It always leads you back to the same villians. At the core they tend to be very conservative and very anti-government.

          The "Illuminati" is right in front of our eyes, its the 1 percent. There is a very small group of people pulling all the strings.

          "The Founding Fathers envisioned a robustly Christian... America, with churches serving as vital institutions that would eclipse the state in importance." The Real Ron Paul

          by 815Sox on Wed May 09, 2012 at 11:37:38 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  The Birchers came out of the 50's (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          joe wobblie, peptabysmal, devtob

          when times were really, really good for the upper middle class. The Birchers were easy to discredit.

          Today we are at the end of three decades of stagnant or declining wages followed by the self-destruction of the Wall Street Banks. This also follows a two-generation period of constant social change (desegregation, woman's rights, gay rights) which has frightened the conservative religious leaders tremendously. Don't forget that daddy Koch was one of the founders of the original John birch Society and funded Welch much as his son's today fund Norquist, Armey, and others.

          The US Supreme Court has by it's actions and rhetoric ceased to be legitimate. Whiskey Tango Foxtrot - over

          by Rick B on Wed May 09, 2012 at 12:30:16 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  The Birchers then were largely (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Rick B

            middle-class white types who bought into the Red scare BS propagated by the rich guys who owned the JBS.

            Pretty much like the middle-class white types who buy into the Obama scare BS that is the root of the tea party.

            Welch went too far, for Buckley and the corporate media, when he called Ike a commie dupe.

            The tea party has called Obama a commie, Muslim, illegitimate, etc. -- all lies, and only the left has called them on it.

            So tea party/Bircher extremism is now the mainstream of the Republican Party.

            A public option for health insurance is a national priority.

            by devtob on Wed May 09, 2012 at 04:28:24 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

      •  The Tea party (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        maryabein, devtob, Rick B

        is more than Birchers, they are the new improved KKK, and the Tea Party runs on the same ideology as David Duke.  These people are very dangerous.

        "During times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolution­ary act. " George Orwell

        by zaka1 on Wed May 09, 2012 at 11:30:30 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  And they are pulling dems in their wake. (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      bryduck, maryabein, tb mare, peptabysmal

      And yet when progressives attempt or even suggest something to similarly sway "our" guys they are greeted with disdain, mockery, or being ignored.

      The TP candidates may not be an electoral success but if the remaining politicians who win still move in the TP's direction out of fear of primaries like this one it is stupid and ignorant to say they are losers.

  •  It takes a lot of cash to get people (6+ / 0-)

    to like a second rate juvenile fantasy fiction villain.

    •  And think of the money they're going to have to (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      followyourbliss, devtob, sockpuppet

      spend in the general to get that "second rate juvenile fantasy fiction villain" (love that phrase, BTW) elected? The more the moneybags have to use their bags of money propping up losers like Mourdock (is that pronounced 'Murdoch'?) the better. Make them pump as much money into the economy as possible. Finally! Trickle down economics will actually happen!

      All my sig lines are hand-crafted by demented elves living in my skull.

      by ontheleftcoast on Wed May 09, 2012 at 09:49:50 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Heard it on NPR this morning too. (5+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    devtob, sockpuppet, Krush, eXtina, Rick B

    "Lugar's defeat signals a resurgence of the tea party."  

    I laughed and choked a little bit on my tea.

    Corporations are driven by the bottom line, not by concerns for health, safety or the environment. This is why we need government regulations.

    by the dogs sockpuppet on Wed May 09, 2012 at 09:44:45 AM PDT

  •  It's Hilarious..... (4+ / 0-)

    Mourdock actually thinks he's going to change Washington.  He'll fall in line just like the rest of the Freshman party Republicans.  

    Before he knows it, he'll be attending fundraisers, schmoozing w/ lobbyists & selling out.  He'll succeed in gumming up the works, filibustering right & left & becoming a nuisance to Boehner & Paul Ryan.

    He doesn't get it.  The Republican establishment doesn't give a sh*t about this guy.  

  •  The question for Lugar is, does he want to (9+ / 0-)

    ass-kiss the people who ran him out of office, or finish his term as Senator with his head held high by helping overcome GOP filibusters.

    Once in a while you get shown the light, in the strangest of places if you look at it right. I'm riding in the Tour de Cure. You can donate here.

    by darthstar on Wed May 09, 2012 at 09:49:06 AM PDT

    •  Make no mistake, Lugar is not (8+ / 0-)

      a "centrist" or a "moderate." He has no desire to help Democrats either. He's just not as blunt about it as Mourdock is. He simply found out that old-style crazy right wing doesn't play anymore in a world where total annihilation of one's political enemies is the goal.

      "Lone catch of the moon, the roots of the sigh of an idea there will be the outcome may be why?"--from a spam diary entitled "The Vast World."

      by bryduck on Wed May 09, 2012 at 09:58:09 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  I agree, but he is less crazy than the current (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        darthstar

        crop of Republicans. It would be great if on at least a couple of issues in the lame duck session, he broke with the Republicans. I'm not holding my breath but I have a little bit of hope.

        We're not perfect, but they're nuts! -- Barney Frank

        by Tamar on Wed May 09, 2012 at 10:22:24 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  You really can't prove he's not (0+ / 0-)

          crazy judging by his voting record. He's just as non-functional (in the larger, "We--the US--need(s) to stop killing the planet and a lot of its citizens directly" sense) as the rest of the Republicans. Being crazy or not is hardly a useful criteria these days, given that none of the Republicans in office help us govern the country.

          "Lone catch of the moon, the roots of the sigh of an idea there will be the outcome may be why?"--from a spam diary entitled "The Vast World."

          by bryduck on Wed May 09, 2012 at 10:38:28 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

  •  These are powerful words: (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    followyourbliss, devtob, sockpuppet, Tamar
    Without big outside money, the Tea Party is helpless to have an impact. As always, it's the guys who write the six- and seven-figure checks who call the shots.
    They point to a real pickle the Koch brothers, et. al., are in right at the moment: the Tea Party has basically outlived its usefulness. So how's an oligarch to sell the masses on his toxic agenda, instead? Does he just choke the Tea Party off and start something new? No, what the hell does he do with these loons and their crazily misspelled signs and their tri-cornered hats now? How does he shape-shift for mass consumption?

    Helluva bind, and nicer people couldn't have found themselves in it :):)

    It's here they got the range/ and the machinery for change/ and it's here they got the spiritual thirst. --Leonard Cohen

    by karmsy on Wed May 09, 2012 at 09:54:02 AM PDT

  •  is the tea party real? (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    devtob, ahumbleopinion, dinotrac, bryduck

    Since the Tea Party is a construct of the groups you name it's hard to seperate them...

    I guess that depends on the definition of the Tea Party. Does it includes the Club for Growth, which spent $1.5 million attacking Lugar, funded by two investment bankers using the Citizen's United ruling to help buy the election? Does it include the NRA, which spent half a million? What about Dick Armey's FreedomWorks? They spent $100,000. Or how about the nearly $20,000 that Murdoch raised from bank PACs?
    what you have is the radical far right of the GOP which altogether make up the bogus "Tea Party".

    America could have chosen to be the worlds doctor, or grocer. We choose instead to be her policeman. pity

    by cacamp on Wed May 09, 2012 at 09:55:42 AM PDT

    •  My thought on the tea party (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      joe wobblie

      Really, what is the current definition of the tea party?

      I think it started out in 2009 as a populist reaction to the bail outs of the Wall Street Banks, but it was quickly dominated by Dick Armey's Freedom Works (money and busses, probably organizers) and FOX (publicizing events and probably helping organize them.) FOX backed off the events organizing after the 2010 elation as I understand it, so the tea party is largely organized by Freedom Works since then even as the attendance in events has sharply decline. Remember, much of Freedom Works' funding has been Koch money.

      Then you mention Club for Growth, but Grover Norquist has been funded by the Koch brothers from the very start. The only thing that seems to keep the tea party alive is radical right-wing funding, but it's kept alive now as a brand name rather than as a popular movement.

      The advertising brand name "tea party" is the target that the big funders through the PACs are using. It's their focus. But the funders are selecting the candidates and having them all vetted by Grover Norquist.

      The tea party does not seem to me to be an independent populist movement any more, and probably hasn't been since the 2010 election. Today it's just a corporate brand name being used by the conservative big money "borg" in which Armey, Norquist and the Koch brothers are central players.

      This is just my impression and I am open to adjusting it if given different information or interpretations.

      The US Supreme Court has by it's actions and rhetoric ceased to be legitimate. Whiskey Tango Foxtrot - over

      by Rick B on Wed May 09, 2012 at 12:47:09 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  I agree with most of what you said (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Rick B

        except I'm much more cynical about its beginning, I think it was astroturf from the beginning. I've read too much about how it was run by lobbyists from the first day and then Dick Armey jumped in front as their leader. Dick Armey, a decades long GOP insider running the show proved to me how phony the "grassroots" bullshit was.

        I think the TP was a brilliant move to counter the grassroots GOP hatred for Bush. They were facing an internal revolt and the tea party channeled that anger away from the GOP and directed it towards liberals etc. It certainly worked, it gave them the House and continues to pay dividends.

        America could have chosen to be the worlds doctor, or grocer. We choose instead to be her policeman. pity

        by cacamp on Wed May 09, 2012 at 04:45:30 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Do we really disagree? (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          cacamp, joe wobblie

          I think there were a bunch of frightened people angry at the Banks to begin with who objected to the government bailing them out of the idiocy they had created, and they were found and organized by lobbyists looking for fresh angry idiots they could use to pad the numbers when the TV cameras rolled on their "spontaneous" demonstrations.

          Prey, meet hunters. The lobbyists were in control from the first time someone needed the phone number of a bus line and someone to write the check.  

          Yes, it was clearly a rebranding move. Bush had discredited the Republican brand to where it was trash and the conservatives themselves were in the same crapper. So give the media an all-new independently motivated group to follow and give them tea bags make them tea partiers. (The joke remains funny. "Tea Baggers" and they don't recognize the joke.)

          The media fell for it completely, of course.

          Regarding your sig line, you do realize that Castro's Cuba chose to be the world's doctors. I'm told they trained American MD's for free on the promise they would return to America to work in poor medically underserved areas. This is something else the US media does not bother telling the American public about.

          The US Supreme Court has by it's actions and rhetoric ceased to be legitimate. Whiskey Tango Foxtrot - over

          by Rick B on Wed May 09, 2012 at 06:40:32 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  yes, Cuban doctors are been all over the world (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Rick B

            Too bad this country won't do the same isn't it. But being the worlds cop takes a lot of resources too. :(

            America could have chosen to be the worlds doctor, or grocer. We choose instead to be her policeman. pity

            by cacamp on Wed May 09, 2012 at 07:23:51 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

  •  Mourdock (4+ / 0-)

    Sounds like the name of a villain in a superhero comic book.

    It is better to light one candle than to curse the darkness - Eleanor Roosevelt

    by Fish in Illinois on Wed May 09, 2012 at 09:56:09 AM PDT

  •  We want to tie the Tea Party around his neck! (6+ / 0-)

    I don't think we want to distance this guy from the Tea Party, we should be claiming he's one of them and the Tea Party owns him.

    Obama's campaign was suggesting the strategy was going to be Republican extremism.  I think we should be tying ALL the Repugs to the Tea Party.

  •  If it wasn't for Citizens United (0+ / 0-)

    these people would die instantly.

    The reason they call it the American Dream is because you have to be asleep to believe it. --George Carlin

    by Charles Garnaat on Wed May 09, 2012 at 10:12:14 AM PDT

    •  Like they did in 2010? (0+ / 0-)

      Before the CU decision?

      And, really, just how different are things now?

      2008 - Obama campaign raises $750 million.

      That's the campaign, not Super PACs, etc.

      LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

      by dinotrac on Wed May 09, 2012 at 11:15:33 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Tea Party is viewed very different now (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        dinotrac, Rick B, Charles Garnaat

        And the situation has changed. The Tea Party is just another flash in the pan. Extremists tend to constantly want to rebrand themselves, Tea Party is just the latest incantation.

        "The Founding Fathers envisioned a robustly Christian... America, with churches serving as vital institutions that would eclipse the state in importance." The Real Ron Paul

        by 815Sox on Wed May 09, 2012 at 11:41:14 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Agreed on Tea Party. Was really referring to (0+ / 0-)

          Citizens United, which is basically a lot of people making mountains out of -- well, not molehills, but not the game-changer people are pretending it to be.

          LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

          by dinotrac on Wed May 09, 2012 at 12:37:36 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

  •  fantasy agenda is winning (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Aquarius40, peptabysmal

    a republican election board member from lafayette, an establishment republican said , "lugar supported obama's agenda at every turn."

    it doesnt have to be true to gain traction.

    this is what propaganda is, take a 5% truth and turn it into the truth. ANYTHING  that is anti-obama is likely to win. its deep and its wider than you think.

    war is immoral. both parties are now fully complicit in the wars. bring everyone home. get to work.

    by just want to comment on Wed May 09, 2012 at 10:23:08 AM PDT

  •  "Tea Party" sounds better than the reality (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    devtob

    The term "Tea Party" is still able to be asserted (without regard to truth and reality) as some sort of 'grassroots' or at least grassroots-flavored 'movement' and such.

    That sounds a lot better than "Big Money" vengeance and plutocratic loyalty discipline campaigns.

  •  Seriously though (0+ / 0-)

    what the fuck is up with NPR? Every time I tune in, I think I've turned on right wing hate radio. All I hear on there now is the Republican perspective and talking points. WTF, people??

  •  not exactly... (0+ / 0-)

    an inspiring message for people  working for better Democrats. Money rules both sides.

    As a nation, the U.S. consumes the most hot dogs per capita. So you'd be wise to never underestimate our powers of denial.

    by jbou on Wed May 09, 2012 at 10:42:47 AM PDT

  •  this mans name it looks like MORLOCK to me (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Rick B


    "Orwell was an optimist"

    by KnotIookin on Wed May 09, 2012 at 10:46:05 AM PDT

  •  "The Tea Party," "Jesus" and "The Constitution" (0+ / 0-)

    What's the connection between the three?

    All three are meaningless ciphers.  Empty mirrors by which wingnut cultists see whatever they want to see.

    All three are phantasms invoked by right wing delusional nutjobs so untethered from facts and reality, they can invoke any specter they like to justify the illusions dancing in their brains.

  •  Tea Party Termite infestation? (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    a2nite

    I think the GOP has been infested by the Tearmites, eating it from inside.

    All power to them.

    And what's with the name "Mourdock"?  Does not ring pleasant memories, somehow...

    "Corruptio Optimi Pessima" (Corruption of the best is the worst)

    by zenox on Wed May 09, 2012 at 10:48:05 AM PDT

  •  "Vy a Mourdock?" (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    greenomanic

    OK, I understand all that.  The only thing I don't understand is: Vy a Mourdock?

    Pro-Occupy Democratic Candidate for California State Senate, District 29 & Occupy OC Civic Liaison.

    "I love this goddamn country, and we're going to take it back." -- Saul Alinsky

    by Seneca Doane on Wed May 09, 2012 at 10:48:14 AM PDT

  •  It is certainly the meme (0+ / 0-)

    even disapointingly on NPR.

    But it is laughable to think an election in Indiana indicates anything any sort of change in national politics.

    Tomorrow the meme Indiana leads the Nation will be forgotten in lieu of some other ridiculous assertion. The media pisses me off.

  •  Lugar didn't help himself (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    devtob, maryabein

    with not owning a house in the state. He didn't help himself with his arrogance. Or his foreign policy cred.

    And it certainly didn't help, in this year of Congreesional polularity ranking below serial killers, that he'd been there three decades either.

    I don't honestly know how much you can read into this. And my only question is, how conservative is Indiana? If they're as conservative as Kentucky where Rand Paul was elected, he stands a good chance. If they're only as conservative as Nevada or Delaware, or even Alaska, then Dems ought to start pumping a lot of resources into his Democratic rival's campaign.

    •  Indiana is more conservative than the surrounding (0+ / 0-)

      states.  Which has always confused me, since demographically and economically it is extremely similar to Ohio, but up until 2008, which I fear was a fluke, it was a GOP vote so reliable that serious campaigning never took place late in the cycle.

      "The first drawback of anger is that it destroys your inner peace; the second is that it distorts your view of reality. If you come to understand that anger is really unhelpful, you can begin to distance yourself from anger." - The Dalai Lama

      by auron renouille on Wed May 09, 2012 at 11:04:41 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Yes it is (0+ / 0-)

        I always felt that Indiana felt like a conservative Illinois. I lived in South Bend for a year and quickly got the hell out of there. Southern Indiana has some of the highest KKK membership numbers in the nation. Furthermore, entire towns were run by KKK members for quite awhile in Indiana.

        My father likes to tell a story of how he was refused a beer in the 70s because they thought he was black. We are Irish, but we have very curly and somewhat nappy hair, especially when its long.

        "The Founding Fathers envisioned a robustly Christian... America, with churches serving as vital institutions that would eclipse the state in importance." The Real Ron Paul

        by 815Sox on Wed May 09, 2012 at 11:33:56 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  My response to the tea party: (0+ / 0-)

    evolve (in the Darwinian sense) already.

    I'll always be...King of Bain...I'll always be...King of Bain

    by AZphilosopher on Wed May 09, 2012 at 10:53:05 AM PDT

  •  It's called Plutocracy folks. (0+ / 0-)

    and we're living in one.  

  •  confusing article until i read... (0+ / 0-)

    "Without big outside money, the tea party is helpless to have an impact."  and here i had been equating big-money with the tea-party.   If one imagines them to be different entities, then this posting makes sense.

  •  It's more that the tea party has devoured the GOP (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    a2nite, maryabein, peptabysmal

    from within.  Like some sort of sci-fi parasite - teabagger demands were picked up by the big GOP fundraising powers-that-be and pretty soon teabagger talking points became mainstreamed as GOP talking points.

    Teabagger candidates don't need to win anymore - most GOP candidates, even longstanding insiders, are now prostrating themselves at the tea party altar.  I can't think of a time in recent history when a political insurgency co-opted the larger movement it sought to alter so rapidly.

    "The first drawback of anger is that it destroys your inner peace; the second is that it distorts your view of reality. If you come to understand that anger is really unhelpful, you can begin to distance yourself from anger." - The Dalai Lama

    by auron renouille on Wed May 09, 2012 at 11:01:18 AM PDT

  •  oh sweet red bell peppers... that guy looks like.. (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Krush, maryabein

    Photobucket

    "It is horrifying that we have to fight our own government to save the environment." *Ansel Adams* ."Even if you are on the right track, you'll get run over if you just sit there."*Will Rogers*

    by Statusquomustgo on Wed May 09, 2012 at 11:07:51 AM PDT

  •  The Tea Party is concentrating in the one area... (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    a2nite

    ...where it will do the most damage.  The Republican Party.  But everywhere else, they are in decline.

  •  Liar, liar (0+ / 0-)

    Romney's exaggerations and lies will turn against him if history is any guide. It certainly worked against Al Gore who was ridiculed for claiming to have invented the internet, inspiring the character of Oliver in Erich Segal's Love Story, breaking the story of Love Canal, etc. Doesn't matter if there was truth to it, it sounded like BS. And Gore wasn't the most well liked person, so his critics delighted in poking at him with these stories.
    Romney is a similar case. He still hasn't shaken that dog-on-the-roof-of-the-car story. More obvious exaggerations and artless boasts like saving the car industry will make this not particularly popular politician look like the big windbag full of himself that he is.  

  •  Why is it that we hear of so many diferent (0+ / 0-)

    factions as if those factions werent part of the gop?

    It was neo-cons. Now its baggers. Whats next?

    All these fucks are one thing. Republican. Period.

    "Refuse to believe in the Culture of Fear"-Thievery Corp.

    by A Runner on Wed May 09, 2012 at 11:31:00 AM PDT

  •  Fact: TP is one of the most disliked groups in US (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    maryabein, peptabysmal, Rick B

    Also, the TP was always funded by big money. They are nothing more then the mouth breathing angry old white social conservatives rebranded. They see the homogenous society quickly diversifying and are scared of it because they are stupid. No nice way of putting it, they are racist.

    "The Founding Fathers envisioned a robustly Christian... America, with churches serving as vital institutions that would eclipse the state in importance." The Real Ron Paul

    by 815Sox on Wed May 09, 2012 at 11:31:42 AM PDT

  •  The GOP needs an intervention ... (0+ / 0-)

    and older moderate former congressional members of the republican persuasion need to step up to the Mic and tell the truth about what has and is still happening to their party.

    I saw a few minutes of that Morlock guy talking about bippartisanism...   he thinks it means WE need to agree with everything HE says...  he also said his job is to inflict his opinions on everyone else... inflict? as in 'its painful to hear that much stoopid at one time' inflicting?

    Does this teapublican have a good chance to win Lugars seat? and if so OY OY OY  we do not need more people in the senate who are dumb as it gets about our Democracy and get to enshrine their dumbest in our laws.

    "Orwell was an optimist"

    by KnotIookin on Wed May 09, 2012 at 11:32:27 AM PDT

    •  As of now (0+ / 0-)

      It's polling about 50/50.  Not a sure thing like Luger was, but ye gods...

      I'm from Indiana, and it makes me seriously ponder the sanity of those around me that this idiot got the nomination.

      And make no mistake, he's a wholly owned operation of Club for Growth.  They basically paid for his campaign.

      He spent something like 2.7 million dollars (state dollars, mind you) trying to sue to stop the auto bailout...and in the meantime, helped cut funding to schools.

      His comments about his attitude if he is elected are pretty much par for the course.  He's not just a clown, he's a true believer in the idea that compromise means "do things my way or else"

      I like your Christ, I do not like your Christians. Your Christians are so unlike your Christ. Mohandas Gandhi

      by DouglasH on Wed May 09, 2012 at 12:59:34 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  They ARE the "Tea Party" (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    peptabysmal

    Did it even credibly exist outside of the schemes of precisely these fat cats? Remove the Club for Growth types, and you have a few poor suckers who thought they were joining something..

  •  apropos the check-writers ... (0+ / 0-)

    Another example of The Golden Rule, as applied to our failed polity --

    "The guy with the gold makes the rules".

    jwa13 in Colorado

    by jwa13 on Wed May 09, 2012 at 11:50:32 AM PDT

  •  Richard Mourdock --- NOT!!! (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    JBraden, greenomanic

    The Democrats have been given a major gift in ending Senator Lugar's tenure in the Senate.

    Joe Donnelly would have never stood a chance against Dick Lugar.

    Joe Donnelly is just as important as Elizabeth Warren.

    The big picture is a filibuster proof Senate to put Mitch McConnell out of business.

    We want Richard Mourdock to keep right on talking...

  •  This is encouraging how exactly? (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    maryabein
    Without big outside money, the tea party is helpless to have an impact. As always, it's the guys who write the six- and seven-figure checks who call the shots.
    The so-called Tea Party is a sideshow, and only a threat in their own little minds. Citizens United and the SuperPacs are another story altogether.

    The social safety net has essentially been replaced by the prison system, with the U.S. “getting rid of the superfluous population through incarceration -- Noam Chomsky

    by Anthony Page aka SecondComing on Wed May 09, 2012 at 12:01:02 PM PDT

  •  Club for growth (0+ / 0-)

    Has a woodie for Indiana?

    The current of the CfG is Chris Chocola was defeated by Joe Donnley for his seat in Congress on his second try.

    I met him in person, once.  He was hitting up my boss for a big campaign contribution.  What was the main thrust of that campaign?  That his opponent didn't live in his district.

    Sounds eerily familiar to this primary campaign.

    He stands for almost everything that I'm against, his voting record while he was in the house is proof enough of that, and now he's putting Mourdock in his pocket.  

    I'm hoping that people remember who Chocola was, and that Donley can remind them why they kicked his butt to the curb, and then do so with his new lapdog.

    Lugar would have been the tougher fight.  He may not be a centrist, but he at least appeared sane.

  •  Geez...all that seniority (0+ / 0-)

    down the tubes. If he wins, Mourdock can start out as the junior member on the Post Office Dedication subcommitee.

    The United States is unusual among the industrial democracies in the rigidity of the system of ideological control - "indoctrination," we might say - exercised through the mass media. Noam Chomsky

    by perkinwarbek on Wed May 09, 2012 at 04:00:39 PM PDT

  •  i hear a lot of talk AGAINST the tea's (0+ / 0-)

    seriously. i love to read the debate blogs and the news blogs and The Republicans are sadly aware that the Ts are driving independents away from the gop.

    they were a fad where a lot of - face it - old fat middle age crisis crack pots had a last fling with politics. probably these were bullies in their younger days and it felt good to relive old times for them.

    either way, they're fading fast. i almost never hear anything positive about the Ts from either party. my guess is they're attritioning away too, like the rest of the old white man's club GOP...

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