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According to a report released on Wednesday, Palestinians living in refugee camps in Lebanon are living in the worst conditions of any Palestinian refugee population in the region.

"The Palestinian refugee camps in Lebanon are considered the worst of the region’s refugee camps in terms of poverty, health, education and living conditions," said the American Near East Refugee Aid (ANERA) in a report released on World Refugee Day.

ANERA cites discrimination, isolation, poverty, joblessness, poor housing and a lack of proper schools, clinics, hospitals and sewage systems as problems affecting Palestinian refugees in Lebanon.

"Lebanon has the highest percentage of Palestinian refugees living in extreme poverty. Two out of three Palestinian refugees subsist on less than $6 a day," the report said.

Lebanon has proven to be an unfit place for Palestinian refugees to reside and it is well past time for preconditions to negotiations of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict to end. Peace through a two-state solution is the viable path to ending these squalid living conditions.

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Comment Preferences

  •  Let's not forget... (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Lib Dem FoP

    why they live in these refugee camps in the first place.  Israel needs to stop settlement activity immediately and return to negotiations.

  •  Ha (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    soros, FG

    For some reason, Palestinians living in Jordan don't have this problem. What the diarist doesn't seem to want to say is that Lebanon is an Apartheid state that discriminates against their Arab brothers.

    Language professors HATE me!

    by Zornorph on Thu Jun 21, 2012 at 08:49:23 AM PDT

  •  Here is a link to the report (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Zornorph

    http://www.anera.org/...

    Sadly, even those with nationality are denied their basic human rights by their hosts to choose where they wish to live and settle.

    •  Their choice (0+ / 0-)

      is to live in the family homes they were driven from in 1948

      Fight poverty, oppression, hunger, ignorance, disease and aggression wherever they occur.

      by Lib Dem FoP on Thu Jun 21, 2012 at 09:44:18 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  I find that assertion highly problematic... (0+ / 0-)

        because I doubt you speak for all these individuals. Indeed, that sounds just like something the PA would offer up.

        Those born in Lebanon are Lebanese nationals and are entitled to such nationality.

        Refugee law encourages re-settlement if the individual so chooses. It is Lebanon and the PA that have interfered with international law as it pertains to refugees.

         

        •  Do not show your ignorance (0+ / 0-)

          of international law. I am afraid your Amero-centic response is completely wrong. Unlike the USA, citizenship is not confered by place of birth in many countries but also requires that the parents be residents of that country.

          They are not simply Lebanese becuae they were born in a refugee camp in Lebananon. The refugee status of their parents, or even grandparents, means they are stateless persons which is why the UNHCR has responsibility for the camps.

          The same applies to Palestinians born in camps in Jordan. It is not the Lebanese or the PA interfering with international law but applying it, albeit that the Lebanese have kept the allowable emergency restrictions in place for far too long.  

          Perhaps you would like to point to the chapter in the United Nations Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees that requires contracting parties to give nationality to the children of refugees.

           

          Fight poverty, oppression, hunger, ignorance, disease and aggression wherever they occur.

          by Lib Dem FoP on Thu Jun 21, 2012 at 01:03:18 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

  •  And more problems in Lebanon camps (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Zornorph, JNEREBEL, Mortifyd

    Official: Islamists to blame for Lebanon camp unrest

    Fatah leaders and PLO factions have been speaking to Lebanese officials in a bid to control the security situation in Palestinian refugee camps, notably Nahr al-Bared and Ain el-Hilweh, al-Ahmad said....

    Tensions have not subsided around the coastal shantytown since 2007, when the army moved in to fight the al-Qaida-inspired Fatah al-Islam group.

    More than 400 people were killed, 170 of them soldiers, and 6,000 homes were flattened.

    Palestinian refugees in Lebanon have long suffered discrimination and are deprived of basic rights.

    "'Touch it dude' - President Barack Obama"

    by volleyboy1 on Thu Jun 21, 2012 at 08:53:38 AM PDT

  •  There is a Law of Return./Right of Return part (0+ / 0-)

    to this situation which should not be ignored.

    But part of the problem as well is the diarist's and some of the commenters assumption that the Palestinians are of a status called Arab brothers, persons who should be recognized by Lebanon as their own and taken in as their own. That is a dubious idea driven principally by the notion that the refugees are not enough like Israelis to be accorded their own respect, so they are simply someone else's problem.

    The history of Lebanon is to the contrary. It has for centures been an amalgam of various cultural groups, whose  actual blood or  relationship to those who lived in  Palestine is not at all clear and who have held their particular groups separate from other Lebanese groups the whole time. For millenia, the mediterranean coast in that area has been used as home for a variety of otherwise not related groups, remember the Philistinies, and the Phoenicians for example, who were not kin to those inland of them. Remember the Greeks getting there, and the Romans, and people from what we now call the Fertile Crescent, all there in 1 BCE.

    And since. It is not an accident that Lebanon has both sunni and shi'ite muslims, Christians, and other smaller groups such as Druze and Turks, whose home that is, and whose home is divided up in tiny areas in which each dominates. All a well known situation since before 1948.

    Lebanon is also tinier than pre independence Palestine by a lot.

    And remember that even the Bibilical claim of Israelis comes from a tiny single family coming from the north, and then a long passage of something, I can't call it history because proving it is not doing so well in a literal sense, and then a large group entering the area from the south, Egypt. I don't say this to pick at the Israelis' traditional origin, but to point out that such a history also suggests that various people got there from different places in various ways even that far back, and were never alone there once they did.

    And everyone who entered encounters other people already there and almost invariably not like the entrants in various cultural and ethnographic ways.

    The idea that this overcrowded postage stamp of a place that is Lebanon should simply, automatically, accept people that another country has chucked out by miitary force without assets or any prior connection to Lebanon, because the chuckers insist that Lebanese and not they are responsible for those chucked out,  is the one which needs challenging here, especially when on the claim by the chucking group that "other people" ought take responsibility for those it chucked out by military force and told they would die if they tried to come back.

    •  I make no such assumption. (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      volleyboy1
      But part of the problem as well is the diarist's and some of the commenters assumption that the Palestinians are of a status called Arab brothers, persons who should be recognized by Lebanon as their own and taken in as their own.
      Palestinians deserve to be treated fairly, whether they live in Lebanon, Jordan, Israel or any other locality.
      Peace through a two-state solution is the viable path to ending these squalid living conditions.

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