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From Public Policy Polling

-Voters in Ohio are still opposed to gay marriage, but they've moved quite a bit on the issue over the last eight months. 37% think it should be legal to 50% who believe it should be illegal. That -13 spread is a net 10 point increase in support compared to our poll in the state last October when 32% thought it should be legal and 55% illegal.

...

Although it's a small sample the movement has been particularly acute among black voters. They opposed gay marriage by a whooping 63/16 margin on our October poll but now express support for it by a 42/35 spread. That's reflective of the movement we've seen everywhere among African Americans since Barack Obama announced his support for gay marriage.

In bullet form
Last October:
* General voters, 32% in favor/55% against
* African-American voters, 16% in favor/63% against

Now:
*General voters, 37% in favor/50% against
* African-American voters, 42% in favor/35% against

Can the blanket generalizations about "the more homophobic African-American community" stop finally?  I know, I know... If the dynamics of the marriage equality fights in  Maryland and D.C. didn't stop the sentiment from popping up here and there, one poll out of Ohio probably won't either.  But it'll help.

Standing together makes us strong.

Originally posted to dirkster42 on Thu Jul 05, 2012 at 09:58 AM PDT.

Also republished by LGBT Kos Community, Invisible People, and Milk Men And Women.

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Comment Preferences

  •  Tip Jar (20+ / 0-)

    If religion means a way of life, and life's necessities are food, clothing, and shelter, then we should not separate religion from economics. - Malcolm X

    by dirkster42 on Thu Jul 05, 2012 at 09:58:08 AM PDT

  •  Thank you dirkster (7+ / 0-)

    Although...really all we have to wait for is the next black pastor to start saying homobigoted stuff.

    The the flood of comments about how all black people feel will start again.

    Was, rinse, spin and repeat.

    •  word up. (5+ / 0-)

      This comment is dedicated to my mellow Adept2U and his Uncle Marcus

      by mallyroyal on Thu Jul 05, 2012 at 10:26:03 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  I know... (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      mallyroyal, Larsstephens

      the predictability is distressing, but you gotta do what you can.

      I still think every Kossack needs to read Sexuality and the Black Church by Kelly Brown Douglas.  It lays it all out so clearly.

      If religion means a way of life, and life's necessities are food, clothing, and shelter, then we should not separate religion from economics. - Malcolm X

      by dirkster42 on Thu Jul 05, 2012 at 10:34:36 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  We have plenty of homophobic blacks pastors here (0+ / 0-)

      But I honestly believe that next November (2013), we can and will win this one. (I am sure Freedom to Marry Ohio already has its signatures, but they are going for next year, in part to spend time educating people as the circulate petitions and in part because the year after a presidential election in Ohio features urban mayors as the marquee races, significantly upping the percentage of Democrats who turn out and putting the GOTV burden on the bigots. I disagree with the established, more conservative LGBT groups who think it should wait until a perfect future. You work toward a better future.

      Take the "Can't(or)" out of Congress. Support E. Wayne Powell in Va-07. http://www.ewaynepowell.com/

      by anastasia p on Thu Jul 05, 2012 at 05:12:05 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  This is good news. (9+ / 0-)

    Also, I republished this to LGBT Kos Community.

    Thanks Dirk. Hope you are well.

    Santorum: Man on Dog; Romney: Dog on Car. Mrs. Romney: Fraud on Horse. equalitymaine.org

    by commonmass on Thu Jul 05, 2012 at 10:17:15 AM PDT

  •  Now wait a minute... (4+ / 0-)

    Back in 2004, Ohio's anti-gay-marriage amendment passed with 61.7% of the vote.  So 38.3% voted against it nine years ago, in an election in which Democratic-leaning precincts had a shortage of voting machines.  (Thank you, Ken Blackwell.)  I can't believe current support is as low as these two polls indicate it is, given the nationwide trends over the past few years.

    It's constitutional, bitches.

    by KTinOhio on Thu Jul 05, 2012 at 10:18:24 AM PDT

    •  a few points (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      lgmcp, dirkster42

      (1) One of the arguments against Prop 1 was that it was pointless because same-sex marriage was already illegal in Ohio. So, a vote against Prop 1 didn't necessarily indicate support for same-sex marriage.

      (2) ...and that's assuming that people knew what they were voting on. When in doubt, people tend to vote "no" -- and some people may have assumed that a "no" vote indicated opposition to same-sex marriage.

      (3) All that said, polled support for same-sex marriage can vary a lot depending on the question wording. I don't have data for Ohio at my fingertips right now. (I suspect a few Kossacks do....)

  •  The details on the sample (6+ / 0-)

    are here: http://www.publicpolicypolling.com/...

    PPP surveyed 673 Ohio voters from June 21st to June 24th. The margin of error for the
    survey is +/-3.8%.

    Q11 If you are white, press 1. If African-American,
    press 2. If other, press 3.
    White .............................................................. 84%
    African-American ............................................ 10%
    Other............................................................... 6%

    So the change was measured among about 60 black voters -- a small sample, for sure.   But an encouraging one.   I hope it's true that the President's bold move has catalyzed a lasting shift among voters who support him on other matters.  

    "The extinction of the human race will come from its inability to EMOTIONALLY comprehend the exponential function." -- Edward Teller

    by lgmcp on Thu Jul 05, 2012 at 10:20:26 AM PDT

  •  republished as well, dirkster (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    dirkster42

    You might want to compare this to the polls from Maryland, where this is an actual live issue, which are even more damaging to the idea of an anti-gay black vote. Thanks for writing this.

    -7.75, -8.10; All it takes is security in your own civil rights to make you complacent.

    by Dave in Northridge on Thu Jul 05, 2012 at 11:56:56 AM PDT

  •  Interesting. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    dirkster42

    Thanks for sharing this.

    Tipped and recced.

    "A candle loses nothing by lighting another candle" - Mohammed Nabbous, R.I.P.

    by Lawrence on Thu Jul 05, 2012 at 12:19:32 PM PDT

  •  I am grateful to see the change (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    dirkster42

    I am grateful to see the change in African-American attitudes toward marriage equality.  And I agree with the poster above that President Obama's full-throated support, and the support of the NAACP, have had major positive effect.

    But I am a bit confused by this:

    Can the blanket generalizations about "the more homophobic African-American community" stop finally?
    Because, as you show, just last October:
    Last October:
     * General voters, 32% in favor/55% against
     * African-American voters, 16% in favor/63% against
    This certainly seems to show that as recently as October, the feeling that the African-American vote was very anti-LGBT was justified.  Is it changing?  I certainly hope so, and all appearances, both statistical and annecdotally, agree.  But to show the poll for last October and then complain that people still think African-Americans are anti-equality seems counter-intuitive.

    I have said before that one reason that there are complaints about the African-American community is that, while they poll fairly equal to the population's view on marriage equality, they do not poll equal to other Democrats.   There hurt feelings come from the ideal that the African-American community is 80% Democratic, but their support for marriage equality is much lower than being 80% Democratic implies.

    PS: Does anyone know the margin of error for a sample of 67?  I think it's 12.2% or so?

    Minority rights should never be subject to majority vote.

    by lostboyjim on Thu Jul 05, 2012 at 12:51:12 PM PDT

    •  African-Americans in Ohio (0+ / 0-)

      are not African-Americans in Maryland, are not African-Americans in D.C., are not African-Americans in Tennessee...

      The problem comes when you start looking at "African-Americans" as a homogeneous block, rather than a diverse constituency.  Washington D.C. is a majority African-American city, which had no trouble getting marriage equality passed.  That doesn't fit the narrative of "African-Americans are more homophobic."

      In other words, people are people and not labels.  The labels are useful for some things, but after a while, they get in the way.

      Also, it seems that statistics is useful for a lot of things, but also gets in the way of thought, insofar as the tendency to ignore anything under 50% leads to crass overgeneralizations generally speaking.

      If religion means a way of life, and life's necessities are food, clothing, and shelter, then we should not separate religion from economics. - Malcolm X

      by dirkster42 on Thu Jul 05, 2012 at 01:04:31 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

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