Skip to main content

No one in American life today proclaims their allegiance to Christ more conspicuously than those who have rejected most of what Christ actually taught: Republicans. The modern Republican Party’s hell-bent embodiment of nearly everything Christ warned against has become so serious that we have to call it out. You cannot be a Republican and a Christian.

Of course, it wasn’t always this way. There was a time, maybe even as recently as the early 1990s, when to support the Republican Party was not altogether evil. And further back, of course, things were even more different. As Garrison Keillor once reminisced, Republicans used to be:

moderate, business-minded civic boosters and unapologetic patriots who were the linchpins and bulwarks of small towns across the Midwest, the enthusiastic backers of projects for the civic good, usually in partnership with the town liberals (the librarian, the bar owner, a lawyer or two, the Methodist minister, the banker’s wife). These Republicans were uniters and diehard optimists and persons of compassionate conscience, inveterate doers of good deeds.
Even today, there are probably some Republicans who still fit that description. The problem is that they are for all practical purposes invisible in American public life, and if their party found out about them, they would be hounded out of it. If they dared to compete in the lunatic talent show of Republican primary politics, they wouldn’t stand a chance.

The reason that you cannot be a Republican and a Christian is that today’s Republican Party doesn’t appear to stand for anything but what Christ strenuously rejected, like organized violence, self-righteous division, and greed. To say the least, this is hard to square with Christ’s teachings and example. I am not a Christian, and I’m certainly no Biblical scholar, but you don’t have to be. It’s not hard to tell the difference between who is and isn’t really a Christian, and Republicans, you’re not.

• In Christ, we’re talking about someone who said turn the other cheek (Matthew 5:39) and that all those who take the sword will perish with the sword (Matthew 26:52).

• We’re talking about someone who warned “judge not, that ye be not judged” (Matthew 7:1) and urged people not to look for a mote in someone else’s eye while they have a beam stuck in their own (Matthew 7:3).

• We’re talking about someone who said, “woe unto you that are rich!” (Luke 6:24) and, “It is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle than for a rich man to enter the kingdom of God.” (Mark 10:25) Did Jesus ever have anything good to say about people who hoard wealth?

I know that many of Christ’s teachings are open to interpretation, but so many of the people who make a point of asking “What would Jesus do?” seem to have no interest at all in the most likely answers. It’s ironic that they have sometimes been referred to as “values voters,” since their values are so devoid of value, at least from the Christian point of view. Their main interest in Christianity seems to be an expectation of being rewarded in the afterlife despite bad behavior while alive. And as for their leaders, beware wolves in sheep’s clothing (Matthew 7:15). Most atheists and agnostics are truer Christians than this crew.

The impossibility of squaring what Christ actually taught with the words and deeds of today’s Republican so-called Christians is what makes this all fair game. These people are hypocrites. These people conveniently ignore most of what Christ actually said. Christ would scold and hold these people accountable for their reckless and downright evil behavior--and many of them, given a chance, would re-crucify Christ if he came back today and taught the still-radical ideas he apparently advocated.

You can’t have it both ways. You have to choose, because, today, you cannot be both a Republican and a Christian.

Originally posted to goodexpectations on Sat Jul 21, 2012 at 12:00 PM PDT.

Also republished by Daily Kos Classics and Street Prophets .

EMAIL TO A FRIEND X
Your Email has been sent.
You must add at least one tag to this diary before publishing it.

Add keywords that describe this diary. Separate multiple keywords with commas.
Tagging tips - Search For Tags - Browse For Tags

?

More Tagging tips:

A tag is a way to search for this diary. If someone is searching for "Barack Obama," is this a diary they'd be trying to find?

Use a person's full name, without any title. Senator Obama may become President Obama, and Michelle Obama might run for office.

If your diary covers an election or elected official, use election tags, which are generally the state abbreviation followed by the office. CA-01 is the first district House seat. CA-Sen covers both senate races. NY-GOV covers the New York governor's race.

Tags do not compound: that is, "education reform" is a completely different tag from "education". A tag like "reform" alone is probably not meaningful.

Consider if one or more of these tags fits your diary: Civil Rights, Community, Congress, Culture, Economy, Education, Elections, Energy, Environment, Health Care, International, Labor, Law, Media, Meta, National Security, Science, Transportation, or White House. If your diary is specific to a state, consider adding the state (California, Texas, etc). Keep in mind, though, that there are many wonderful and important diaries that don't fit in any of these tags. Don't worry if yours doesn't.

You can add a private note to this diary when hotlisting it:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary from your hotlist?
Are you sure you want to remove your recommendation? You can only recommend a diary once, so you will not be able to re-recommend it afterwards.
Rescue this diary, and add a note:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary from Rescue?
Choose where to republish this diary. The diary will be added to the queue for that group. Publish it from the queue to make it appear.

You must be a member of a group to use this feature.

Add a quick update to your diary without changing the diary itself:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary?
(The diary will be removed from the site and returned to your drafts for further editing.)
(The diary will be removed.)
Are you sure you want to save these changes to the published diary?

Comment Preferences

  •  I don't think you can be a Christian, (5+ / 0-)

    unless you are homeless.

    It's inevitably what happens after you sell everything that you have, and give to the poor.

    Pretty high standard.

    I've never met one. I'm sure there are a few. The more severe and poverty-oriented monastics might count.

    •  Exactly (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Garrett

      This is one of the reasons I don't call myself a Christian.

      •  Nietzschian Christianity (8+ / 0-)

        "There has only ever been one Christian, and he died on the cross."

        -Friedrich Nietzsche

        See, you can totally be a follower of the Christian religion, and be a Republican at the same time. The two are practically the same thing. What you can't do, is be a follower of the Christian religion, or a Republican, and also align with the teachings of the Old and New Testament texts. These days, Christianity and the bible are almost diametrically opposed.

      •  "Religion Poisons Everything" Hitchens (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Gram E, Hholly, minox

        Many of whom came to the continent now called North America, particularly the part now known as the United States, were in search of some place to have religious freedom.

        Instead, we have the religious right wing, forcing us to listen to their archaic interpretations of their fundamentalist babbling. Trying to control our lives based on their dogma.

        Just look at the Westboro Baptist Church and their hate mongering. That is just the tip of this ice-burg.

        •  In search of religious freedom? (4+ / 0-)

          If you're referring to the Pilgrim Fathers, then the freedom that they were seeking, that they were denied in Britain, was the freedom to force everyone to be a Puritan.

          Church attendance was compulsory, and the Plymouth Colony was essentially run as a police state where everyone was expected to be an informer.  The modern republicans are the the spiritual heirs of the fundamentalist Puritans in that what is important is not the content or intent of the rules, but that there are rules and people are forced to obey them.

    •  Of course you can be a Christian and be rich. (6+ / 0-)

      Everybody misses the zen-koan-ness of what Jesus taught. You do not actually have to give away every creature comfort you have to notice your own issues with vanity and things, you just have to seriously contemplate your resistance to the suggestion.

      It is like: you climb up the mountain to ask the guru to tell you the true meaning of zen. And the guru says: Kool. But you have to make an offering first before you begin. That will be One Dollar or One Hundred Dollars, take your pick. In your decision process is the first lesson.  

      I used to be Snow White. And then I drifted. - Mae West

      by CherryTheTart on Sat Jul 21, 2012 at 01:36:26 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  That's quite a sacrifice (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      justaHippie

      Garrett I'm uncertain are you claiming homelessness, or are you not christian?
      Of course, you don't have to be either.
      You're not admitting Republicanism are you? Gasp!
      YouTube is rife with people offering genuine, generous, assistance to the homeless. But, until the hand that holds the income inequality lever loosens it's grip that's probably the best were gonna get.
      Oh hell I've lost my train of thought. Happy Bunny Day Garrett!

      George97 Good luck, and goodnight.

      by George97 on Sat Apr 04, 2015 at 09:08:20 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  There is no requirement to "sell eveything" (4+ / 0-)

      All three synoptic Gospels relate the same story (Matthew 19, Luke 18, Mark 10): A wealthy man approaches Jesus and asks what he must do to attain salvation. Jesus tells him to obey the commandments, and lists a few. The man tells Jesus that he has obeyed them since his youth. Jesus then tells him that there is one thing more that he may do, "if you want to be perfect." He then tells the man to sell all of his possessions, give the money to the poor, and come join his followers.  When the man walks away, Jesus uses the occasion to talk about the difficulty the wealthy will have entering heaven.

      There are two notable lessons here. Jesus never tells the man that he must be "perfect" in order to enter heaven. In fact, he expressly says that following the commandments ensures salvation (there is no specific mention of wealth anywhere in the ten commandments). Jesus also gives some excellent instructions on obtaining the kingdom in Matthew 25 (feed the hungry, clothe the naked, care for the sick, visit and comfort the imprisoned).  So selling all possessions is not a requirement, it's simply a final step to perfection that Jesus was asking an already righteous man to consider.

      Second, in his exhortations on the conflict between wealth and righteousness, Jesus also states that "with God, all things are possible."  Yes, it is difficult for a wealthy person to attain salvation, because (as is made clear in many other parables and teachings in the gospels), the habit of accumulating wealth by its nature runs contrary to the habits of righteousness (see Matthew 25).  From one who has much, much is demanded.  One cannot serve two masters, God and money. And so forth.  But it's not impossible for a rich person to be righteous and to be saved.  I think Bill Gates has a pretty good chance of making it.

      Understand that I am not passing judgment here. I am simply paraphrasing the teachings of Jesus Christ, which I myself attempt to follow (not too hard for me since I'm not rich).  The folks who are in jeopardy of losing their eternal souls are the ones who accumulate enough wealth to make Solomon blush, yet seem to believe that their ongoing mission in life is to suck even more wealth away from those who have little and to store it up for... for what?  This is the part that puzzles me. At some point, you can only enjoy so many private islands and private planes and private ocean liners.  And at the end of the day, "from dust you come and to dust you shall return."

      Heck, if I had a spare billion laying around, I'd forego yacht number twelve and spend it bringing potable water to some impoverished locale in Africa. But that's just the Jesus in me talking.

      "Babies, before we're done here, ya'll be wearin gold plated diapers!" - THE Bruce Dickinson

      by BassMent on Sun Apr 05, 2015 at 05:42:57 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  You apparently didn't read far enough (0+ / 0-)

        BassMent, you said:  " Jesus never tells the man that he must be "perfect" in order to enter heaven. In fact, he expressly says that following the commandments ensures salvation (there is no specific mention of wealth anywhere in the ten commandments). Jesus also gives some excellent instructions on obtaining the kingdom in Matthew 25 (feed the hungry, clothe the naked, care for the sick, visit and comfort the imprisoned).  So selling all possessions is not a requirement, it's simply a final step to perfection that Jesus was asking an already righteous man to consider."

        If the man had already attained that righteousness, why did he walk away sorrowful, and why did Jesus say to the disciples who witnessed this exchange afterward "Verily, I say to you that a rich man shall hardly enter into the kingdom of Heaven?"

        I think you are misreading.  I agree that Jesus said "With God all things are possible", but he did not say that the young rich man would enter into the kingdom of heaven.

        See the full text of Matthew 19 below:

        16And, behold, one came and said unto him, Good Master, what good thing shall I do, that I may have eternal life? 17And he said unto him, Why callest thou me good? there is none good but one, that is, God: but if thou wilt enter into life, keep the commandments. 18He saith unto him, Which? Jesus said, Thou shalt do no murder, Thou shalt not commit adultery, Thou shalt not steal, Thou shalt not bear false witness, 19Honour thy father and thy mother: and, Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself. 20The young man saith unto him, All these things have I kept from my youth up: what lack I yet? 21Jesus said unto him, If thou wilt be perfect, go and sell that thou hast, and give to the poor, and thou shalt have treasure in heaven: and come and follow me. 22But when the young man heard that saying, he went away sorrowful: for he had great possessions.

        23Then said Jesus unto his disciples, Verily I say unto you, That a rich man shall hardly enter into the kingdom of heaven. 24And again I say unto you, It is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle, than for a rich man to enter into the kingdom of God. 25When his disciples heard it, they were exceedingly amazed, saying, Who then can be saved? 26But Jesus beheld them, and said unto them, With men this is impossible; but with God all things are possible.

        27Then answered Peter and said unto him, Behold, we have forsaken all, and followed thee; what shall we have therefore? 28And Jesus said unto them, Verily I say unto you, That ye which have followed me, in the regeneration when the Son of man shall sit in the throne of his glory, ye also shall sit upon twelve thrones, judging the twelve tribes of Israel. 29And every one that hath forsaken houses, or brethren, or sisters, or father, or mother, or wife, or children, or lands, for my name's sake, shall receive an hundredfold, and shall inherit everlasting life. 30But many that are first shall be last; and the last shall be first.

  •  Thank you (19+ / 0-)

    I have wrestled with this for a long time. My family is composed mostly of Republican/Christians. I have not rejected the Bible, far from it! It is just that my extensive readings of what the Bible says do not coincide with Republican teachings.

    In Matthew 25 Jesus lists the "Least of these" whom he equates with himself. Foreigners, the sick, prisoners and the homeless. People who treat them well are sent to Heaven. People who treat them badly get sent to Hell.

    Despite how clear that passage is and the warnings contained in it the Republican/Christians persist in treating those very groups of people badly.

    WWJD? He would feed the hungry, clothe the destitute, welcome the foreigner and visit with the prisoner.

    Often I think that the Jesus that many people worship is simply a case of mistaken identity. He has the same name as my God but he is obviously not the same person.

    "Conservatism is the blind and fear-filled worship of dead radicals." Mark Twain

    by southern and liberal on Sat Jul 21, 2012 at 12:32:31 PM PDT

  •  Mote in the eye. (4+ / 0-)

    Democrats have a large one.

    "The Global War on Terror is a justification for U.S. Imperialism. It must be stopped."

    by BigAlinWashSt on Sat Jul 21, 2012 at 12:56:50 PM PDT

  •  I have often fantasized about having the money to (7+ / 0-)

    post scriptures such as the ones you quote on billboards in right wing communities, for no other reason than to watch the hypocrites squirm.

    Because stupid people are so sure they're smart, they often act smart, and sometimes even smart people are too stupid to recognize that the stupid people acting smart really ARE stupid.

    by ZedMont on Sat Jul 21, 2012 at 01:00:49 PM PDT

  •  I appreciate your intent (8+ / 0-)

    But I don't find arguments like this helpful.

    Every Christian picks and chooses what parts of the Bible they believe and discards the rest. One has to do that in order to believe- it's a book written thousands of years ago. No one can live up to it in this day and age.

    However, I don't really care about what Christ taught or what he said or what  this passage means or anything else. It simply has no place in politics. End of story.

    You can write this diary- a good one, to be clear, and someone else on Redstate can write a diary about how you can't be a Democrat and a Christian, and they'll also use Bible passages to support that.

    But I'm certainly not inclined to have one party claim the mantle of Christ, even if it's ours, and even if some well-intentioned and reasonable Christians believe it is just. Believe all you want. But government and religion are two separate things, and I don't like it when anyone tries to tie the two together.

    P.S. I am not a crackpot.

    by BoiseBlue on Sat Jul 21, 2012 at 01:04:16 PM PDT

    •  I don't think (0+ / 0-)

      you're a crackpot at all. :)

    •  until the day that the rightwingnuts agree: (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      SquareForceOne
      what Christ taught ... has no place in politics.
      it is fair game to call them out on their hypocrisy
    •  Actually, what Christ taught does belong (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      SquareForceOne

      in politics. For people who consider themselves to be Christians, those teachings belong in every aspect of their lives. The issue isn't whether Christian (or Judaic, or Islamic, or Hindu, or Humanist, or whatever) teachings belong in politics, but whether they should be enshrined as doctrine in law and civil society. It's ultimately a question of humility -- if you believe that you are right, you have none. If you believe that the faith tradition to which you cleave is right, and accept that your understanding of its precepts is at best deeply flawed, you begin to have the humility necessary to allow your religion to inform your actions and public involvement without assuming that everyone should live according to your belief system.

      My Christian faith teaches me many things that enter my politics: the sacredness of human life, hence the vileness of war and the death penalty; the fragility of human persons, thus the need to protect the weak and the impoverished and the disenfranchised; the power of hope, thus the need to work consistently to build a more just and egalitarian society.

      In many ways, the difference between conservative Christians and liberal Christians is less which parts of the Bible we believe in, but how we read it. You can read the words -- the literalist approach -- or you can read behind the words to the intent. I've yet to meet a Biblical literalist who isn't a social conservative; I've met few Intentionalists who are.

      So it's not really useful to claim that religion shouldn't inform our politics; there's no way to prevent it. The question is whether we approach that involvement with humility in our limits or certitude in our convictions.

      "Do it in the name of Heaven; you can justify it in the end..." - Dennis Lambert & Brian Potter

      by pragmaticidealist on Sat Jul 21, 2012 at 06:29:56 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  I agree (0+ / 0-)

        A lot of what Christ taught should inform our politics--it's just that Republicans seem to be getting literally all of it wrong.

      •  Well said. (5+ / 0-)

        I would have clicked on the recommend button, but you made your comment nearly three years ago, so I guess the button was retired.

        I don't quite understand why this diary has been resurrected, but I'm glad it was, because I missed it the first time.

        Your comment is the best analysis of the place of Christianity in public (and private) life that I have read.
        Especially this:

        My Christian faith teaches me many things that enter my politics: the sacredness of human life, hence the vileness of war and the death penalty; the fragility of human persons, thus the need to protect the weak and the impoverished and the disenfranchised; the power of hope, thus the need to work consistently to build a more just and egalitarian society.
        You're my new role model for commentary.

        Light does not remove darkness. It shines against it.
        This is an important distinction...if you are light. Rev. Traci Blackmon

      •  Too late to rec or I would. You NAILED it. ... (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        HSans, justaHippie, IndyDemGirl

        ... Your final paragraph is solid gold.

        Thank you.

        One size of anything NEVER fits all.

        by KDfrAZ on Sat Apr 04, 2015 at 02:14:27 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  May I (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        justaHippie

        I have copied and saved your post and will share it with many people. Where I can I will attribute.

        This is an excellent post.

        Carole Kenney (Facebook 2015-04-02) : Remember that when you throw something awa, there is no "away".

        by HSans on Sat Apr 04, 2015 at 07:51:46 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  Not so. (0+ / 0-)

      Everything in the Bible is correct and true.  Only a fool disregards parts of it who is a true follower of Christ.

       Democrats don't play the Christian card like the Republicans do.  Republicans say they are Christian but their actions don't  support their words.  

      I am a Christian and vote for MODERATE Republicans or Democrats.  The word is MODERATE not the worthless right wing Republican people you all voted into office.

      I feel it's  time Republicans stop using the religion card.  They make us REAL CHISTIANS look bad.

    •  Different Framing (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      justaHippie

      The bible isn't a set of strictures to be lived up to or fulfilled. The bible itself, at least if you take the the New Testament along with it, has been fulfilled, according to the bible itself. It's a guide for personal growth and improvement. You can find a great deal of NT teaching echoed in the Tao Te Ching, or the Bhagavad Gita, or the Buddhavacana, or in a great deal of other major spiritual traditions around the world.

      "You can write this diary- a good one, to be clear, and someone else on Redstate can write a diary about how you can't be a Democrat and a Christian, and they'll also use Bible passages to support that."

      Yes, someone on Redstate can indeed engage in the fallacy of irrelevant evidence. I could argue that I know the sky is blue because dust accumulates on my nightstand. The two simply aren't connected, no matter how much I assert that they are.

      "But I'm certainly not inclined to have one party claim the mantle of Christ, even if it's ours, and even if some well-intentioned and reasonable Christians believe it is just. Believe all you want. But government and religion are two separate things, and I don't like it when anyone tries to tie the two together."

      You won't get any argument from me on that point, but just because a Republican, or a Democrat for that matter, starts talking about religion, philosophy, or tries to make some argument based on a sacred text, doesn't mean we shouldn't engage, explore, and challenge the idea just because they're making said argument in the name of their political party.

      Honestly, there are few things in this world that would make me as happy as reclaiming humanity's sacred texts from the fundamentalist whackos who currently try to monopolize them, and wield them as political tools. Maybe by doing so, we take out the religious pillar of support that Republicans use, thereby removing religion from politics entirely. Sure, we already have laws against it, but we see what kind of effect those are having. Ideas are like diseases; they don't give a shit about laws, and they can spread far and fast.

    •  Absolutely! (0+ / 0-)

      Carole Kenney (Facebook 2015-04-02) : Remember that when you throw something awa, there is no "away".

      by HSans on Sat Apr 04, 2015 at 07:37:32 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  wish i could rec this diary an infinite # of times (5+ / 0-)
    so many of the people who make a point of asking “What would Jesus do?” seem to have no interest at all in the most likely answers.
    And as for their leaders, beware wolves in sheep’s clothing (Matthew 7:15). Most atheists and agnostics are truer Christians than this crew.
    many of them, given a chance, would re-crucify Christ if he came back today and taught the still-radical ideas he apparently advocated.

    "Politics is like driving. To go backward put it in R. To go forward put it in D."
    Mitt Romney is not the solution. He's the PROBLEM

    by TrueBlueMajority on Sat Jul 21, 2012 at 01:55:48 PM PDT

  •  perhaps so in the mid-west, (0+ / 0-)
    As Garrison Keillor once reminisced, Republicans used to be:

    moderate, business-minded civic boosters and unapologetic patriots who were the linchpins and bulwarks of small towns across the Midwest, the enthusiastic backers of projects for the civic good, usually in partnership with the town liberals (the librarian, the bar owner, a lawyer or two, the Methodist minister, the banker’s wife). These Republicans were uniters and diehard optimists and persons of compassionate conscience, inveterate doers of good deeds.

    in the south, they supported segregation, jim crow laws, second-class citizenship for women, etc., etc., etc.

    while it's true that republicans didn't used to be the raging loony toons of today, they were never as mr. keillor describes, solely, unless, of course, you were male, white, a WASP and reasonably well off. oh yes, and anti-semitic as well.

  •  The Repug Dr (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Timaeus

    who spent 10 years saving my life is the best Christian I know.

  •  Isn't this a more dressed up version (0+ / 0-)

    of the "no true Scotsman" fallacy?
    You can't be a "real" Christian if you're a Republican, because of this, this and this.
    However, a Christian isn't necessarily one who follows what Jesus teaches (according to dogma, that's what they should do, of course), but a person who believes in God and that Jesus was the son of that god.
    So, yeah, Republicans can be Christians, I'm afraid.

    “We are not a nation that says ‘don’t ask, don’t tell.’ We are a nation that says ‘out of many, we are one.’” -Barack Obama

    by skohayes on Sat Jul 21, 2012 at 03:41:42 PM PDT

    •  I think there's a difference (0+ / 0-)

      between a definition like "Scotsman," which is a sort of arbitrary—whose definition of a "true" Scotsman is better than anyone else's? Christianity, though, had a founder, who laid out some pretty clear, basic tenets. That's different, and provide more of a basis for saying what counts as "true" and what doesn't.

    •  Really? (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      SquareForceOne
      However, a Christian isn't necessarily one who follows what Jesus teaches (according to dogma, that's what they should do, of course), but a person who believes in God and that Jesus was the son of that god.
      I can't even find words to articulate how utterly meaningless this is as a spiritual reality.

      "Political ends as sad remains will die." - YES 'And You and I' ; -8.88, -9.54

      by US Blues on Sat Jul 21, 2012 at 05:28:09 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Meaningless Indeed (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        justaHippie

        I know, right? I wonder what the New Testament had to say about this.

        Thou believest that there is one God; thou doest well: the devils also believe, and tremble. James 2:19.

        Well, simply believing that God exists doesn't actually do or mean a damn thing. On the otherhand...

        “Not everyone who says to me, ‘Lord, Lord,’ will enter the kingdom of heaven, but the one who does the will of my Father who is in heaven.  Matthew 7: 21-23

        What's the will of the Father?

        "Therefore whosoever heareth these sayings of mine, and doeth them, I will liken him unto a wise man, which built his house upon a rock"

        Matthew 7:24

        So, belief is meaningless, according to James 2:19, and even calling Jesus Lord doesn't do shit, but hearing the teachings and carrying them out gets you in. Looks like you're in the clear atheists.

    •  Different Definitions (0+ / 0-)

      Depends on which definition of the word "Christian" you're using. If you define it as someone who follows biblical teaching, then there isn't a dot of text in the bible that is compatible with Republican ideology today.

      No, I'm being 100% serious. There really isn't, and anyone who says otherwise is either ignorant, or a liar. The teachings of Yeshua of Nazareth sure as shit aren't compatible with Republican ideology, and everything else in the New Testament is basically Taoism/Buddhism repackaged for the western world, and Republicans are even more opposed to Taoist teaching than they are opposed to helping the sick and the poor. Try to tell them it's not about good and evil and they need to stop following God's law, and suddenly you're the fucking devil incarnate or the antichrist, even though it's right there in their own damn book.

      If you're talking about Republicans being adherents to the Christian religion, then being one just about makes you the other and vice versa.

      Biblically speaking, as in looking at the text, there is no single time the word "Christian" ever appears in the original text. Ever. The early church members were simply called, "the followers of The Way," with the T and the W capitalized. If anyone here is a Taoist, and/or knows what the word "Tao" means, that should be setting off some bells in your brain. Not even the "followers of Jesus," but the "the followers of The Way." In fact, Paul got on someone's case for saying, "You follow x? Well I follow Christ." No, follow The Way, not the person. Alternatively, you could just quote Buddha when he said kill anyone who gets in your way, standing between you and following the path, even if that someone is himself or God.

  •  I don't necessarily like the whole vibe here, (0+ / 0-)

    but I rec and tip this as an accurate diary.

  •  Jesus (0+ / 0-)

    would certainly have never believed in borders.

  •  what is missing is the LYING the gop uses every (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    US Blues

    day.  there si no excuse to excuse a liar.

  •  Tipped, but one question... (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    linkage

    Is saying "to support the Republican Party [is] altogether evil" really what you are trying to say? I can understand saying that the actions and policies of some Republicans seem cruel, but I'm not sure that ascribing such a word to all who support the Republican Party - which as you say has changed dramatically in a rather short period of time - is helpful to productive dialogue. I know many, many well-meaning people who have been Republicans for decades, who think that the policies and attitudes you find anathema just as you do, but remain to try to change the party back. Calling them evil seems a bit over the top. Otherwise, strong diary.

    "Mitt Romney isn't a vulture capitalist: vultures only eat things that are dead." -S. Colbert

    by newinfluence on Sat Jul 21, 2012 at 06:20:41 PM PDT

    •  Thanks (0+ / 0-)

      I did try to acknowledge that there are some Republicans who probably remember or think of their party as something other than what it has become today, or who wish it were. And I think that if they're trying to change the GOP by voting, volunteering, or donating to more traditionally moderate candidates, that's good, except that it might help preserve Republican majorities.

      But I would draw a line at general financial support for the party, or support for the top of the ticket. Overall, I think we need to call a spade a spade: this political party truly has become a force for evil. Once you get past bland generalities, like "We believe in the power and opportunity of America’s free-market economy," it's hard, at least for me, to think of general Republican policies or specific actions that aren't doing great harm.

  •  Thank You ... (0+ / 0-)

    scheduled to be republished to Street Prophets.

    JON

    "Upward, not Northward" - Flatland, by EA Abbott

    by linkage on Sat Jul 21, 2012 at 09:46:26 PM PDT

  •  I blame Republicans (0+ / 0-)

    for turning a small town kid into an adult  Democratic voter. But I have to take issue with the opinion expressed in this diary. It takes more than charity,  peaceable behavior & few scriptural quotes to be Christian. Anyone can have good ethics. You have to believe that through Jesus you can be born again into a new life. You have to believe this even if you believe the Resurrection is a metaphor for rebirth rather than a literal event.

    "There ain't no sanity clause." Chico Marx

    by DJ Rix on Sun Jul 22, 2012 at 06:29:12 PM PDT

    •  Well, what I'm trying to say (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      DJ Rix

      is that belief in rebirth or salvation without much interest in Christ's ethical teachings sounds like a pretty hollow Christianity to me.

      •  It is all matter of degree. (0+ / 0-)

        Nobody cuts it. In a nutshell, that's the story of Martin Luther's  despondency, that he could neither buy nor behave his way to salvation.  I'm  more  concerned with what the Christian right wants from  government than what it doesn't want  from government.  Tearing down the New Deal & Great Society is an old conservative agenda that never went away.  Theocratizing  [sic] the Constitution is something else.

        "There ain't no sanity clause." Chico Marx

        by DJ Rix on Sun Jul 22, 2012 at 11:50:25 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  I dispute one point. I believe that a large swa... (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Desert Scientist, FredFredZ, Pagu

    I dispute one point. I believe that a large swath of Christians no longer believe their rewards are withheld for the life beyond. Many of them, who also, conveniently it seems, overlap with the Republican Party, believe God rewards you, here and now, for your belief. Ergo, those who do not succeed absolutely deserve their failure. For government to provide assistance of any sort is unchristian. Withholding assistance is, in their minds, the only truly Christian response. If I'm right, then you can certainly understand why the liberal appeals to conscience fall on deaf ears.

  •  "You can't be a good Mormon and a liberal Democrat (0+ / 0-)

    Ezra Taft Benson, Apostle of the Mormon Church, 1974
    http://exmormon.org/...

  •  I stopped calling myself a Christian because of... (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    justaHippie

    I stopped calling myself a Christian because of them. Christian means "Christ like" they are.not like Christ. He is about love and helping each other. Like the Democrats.

  •  Republican Hypocrisy (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    justaHippie

    Great piece. For a detailed look at the hypocrisy entailed in Republicans calling themselves Christian - Hypocrisy, Inc.: How the Religious Right Fabricates Christian Values and Undermines Democracy by Rosemary Agonito (me, myself, I)

  •  I gave a the bakery a LIKE on (0+ / 0-)

    facebook.  Feel bad for her.

  •  On the other hand (0+ / 0-)

    Jesus didn't advocate much of what Democrats advocate, either, most of which serves to elevate government (Caesar) over the individual.

  •  http://caesarsmessiah.com Jesus is a myth inven... (0+ / 0-)

    http://caesarsmessiah.com Jesus is a myth invented by Rome to get people to pay taxes and be passive.

  •  So true (0+ / 0-)

    Conservatives and Republicans are not Christian, Christ-like, at all.

    Please stop calling conservatives Christians. There is nothing Christ like about them.

    by bldudas on Sat Apr 04, 2015 at 01:37:48 PM PDT

  •  No, not true - many Christianities exist (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    justaHippie

    Depends on which type of Christianity, and which part of the Bible you love. Two common types in the USA:

    1. Gospel lovers, the words of Christ, some lovely passages from the Epistles. That's one kind of Christianity, and the one you claim is the only Christianity.

    2. Revelation lovers, along with Deuteronomy. Some prefer the violent vengeance-loving Jesus of Revelation (often called the Apocalypse because that's what it describes). And, as Muslim jihadist believe that the later Suras abrogate the earlier one, these Christian jihadists believe that the last book of the Bible reveals the real meaning of the others: God will take vengeance and enjoy it. Revelation reveals the real Jesus, the stern judge who will come to torture with glee most of humanity, and rapture up the real Christians into the sky so that they can look on and cheer. Pretty damned bloody, but there is is.

    Deuteronomy: "Thous shalt have no other gods before me."  Billy Graham preached that any government assistance to the poor or the middle class made them dependent on the government and therefore made the government into a substitute for God, an idol. Right wing Catholics as well as right wing Protestants believe this. But good Christians are allowed to worship the government as an instrument of war because US military actions always derive directly form the will of God.

    •  when it says this: (0+ / 0-)

      "Deuteronomy: "Thou shalt have no other gods before me."  "
      What most people miss about this is that it is the God of Abraham and Jesus admitting that other gods exist.  Earlier in the bible, in Genesis, it happens again, more subtly -- "Elohim" means "gods" -- it's plural.  
      Just thought that was amusing.  

  •  Exactly. The GOP Faux Christian movement began ... (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    justaHippie

    Exactly. The GOP Faux Christian movement began under Reagan (who was an adulterer per Christ's words), gathered steam under Gingrich (definitely not a Christian by any standard), and then went apeshit crazy under W ( a liar and mass murderer based on his lies and illegal invasions of both Afghanistan and Iraq). The super-rich such as Koch Bros, Pete Peteson, and other super-rich are backing the right-wing religious fanatics and their shills in Congress to dominate our democratic energies. However, when you look behind the curtain what you see are the super rich plotting and laughing about keeping environmental regulations dirty, keeping effective tax rates lower than their secretary's, paying almost nothing (as a percentage of total income), having working class paying to offshore their jobs by paying taxes when the owners get a tax deduction for the costs of offshoring, wanting to reduce Social Security (an insurance program, not an entitlement paid for by the budget, and the list goes on.

    Just think of Wash DC as Emerald City and the uber-rich as a combination of Wizard and Wicked Witch with GOTP as the flying monkeys.

  •  God = me (0+ / 0-)

    God is just another word for me.

    •  There is only One God and One Me (0+ / 0-)

      Since everyone refers to "me" there is only one "me" and  in the same way there is only one Mind and only one God.

      "The owners of this country know the truth: its called the American Dream because you have to be asleep to believe it." ~ George Carlin

      by Gregory Wonderwheel on Sat Apr 04, 2015 at 01:58:22 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Our minister said this (0+ / 0-)

    Our minister made this statement several years ago during a discussion - to which we all agreed.

    Amen to this article!

  •  Baloney on Republican Party recent history. (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Kimrdhbsms, justaHippie

    "There was a time, maybe even as recently as the early 1990s, when to support the Republican Party was not altogether evil."  
    Baloney!

    The Republican Party has been this way since 1865.

    Here's what H.P. Lovecraft wrote in a 1936 letter that rings as true today as it did 80 years ago:

    “As for the Republicans—how can one regard seriously a frightened, greedy, nostalgic huddle of tradesmen and lucky idlers who shut their eyes to history and science, steel their emotions against decent human sympathy, cling to sordid and provincial ideals exalting sheer acquisitiveness and condoning artificial hardship for the non-materially-shrewd, dwell smugly and sentimentally in a distorted dream-cosmos of outmoded phrases and principles and attitudes based on the bygone agricultural-handicraft world, and revel in (consciously or unconsciously) mendacious assumptions (such as the notion that real liberty is synonymous with the single detail of unrestricted economic license, or that a rational planning of resource-distribution would contravene some vague and mystical ‘American heritage’ …) utterly contrary to fact and without the slightest foundation in human experience? Intellectually, the Republican idea deserves the tolerance and respect one gives to the dead.”

    "The owners of this country know the truth: its called the American Dream because you have to be asleep to believe it." ~ George Carlin

    by Gregory Wonderwheel on Sat Apr 04, 2015 at 01:55:38 PM PDT

  •  being Christian (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    justaHippie

    I don't  believe Christ was against having money and power ,but rather against the abuse and obsession with wealth and power that destroyed our humanity and our souls.

  •  Afterlife (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    BeninSC, justaHippie

    A major reason these people are more concerned with the next life and unconcerned with the present is because they all expect to be "raptured" with the return of Jesus, which means the rest of us heathens will be left to deal with the mess that the world will be in (is in? that these people have helped to create?). There is no biblical support for the term "rapture" and no support for the act. Fundamentalist millenialist dispensationalists made up the term--and the event--for self-succor. This is incredibly selfish behavior, and done while claiming it's what God commands. Bullshit. If these people would bother to read the bible at all, they might notice that God really has handed us only two commandments: Love God with your whole heart, soul, mind, and strength, and love your neighbor as yourself. The rest is either commentary or made-up BS.

    •  Good news for the Fundamentalist millenialist disp (0+ / 0-)

      The rapture is right now where ever someone dies out of love of others.

      The last scheduled train was in Europe around 1939 and 1945 and there has been numerous sighting since, in Vietnam, Latin America, Africa. Rumors have it that another train is boarding right now in the Middle East. Rapture lovers better buy their tickets soon, they do sell out quickly.

      "L'homme n'est ni ange, ni bête, et le malheur veut que qui veut faire l'ange fait la bête."

      Pensées, Blaise Pascal

      sourve: http://fr.wikiquote.org/...

    •  Thanks for this first comment on Daily Kos. (0+ / 0-)

      You can see we have real adversaries, marjtusu (though not as great as the ones they have, many of which are internal).

      Welcome to Daily Kos. If you have any questions about how to participate here, you can learn more at the Community Guidelines, the Knowledge Base, and the Site Resource Diaries. Diaries labeled "Open Thread" are also great places to ask. We look forward to your contributions.
      ~~ from the DK Partners & Mentors Team.

      "The opposite of war isn't peace, it's CREATION." _ Jonathan Larson, RENT -9.62, -9.13

      by BeninSC on Sat Apr 04, 2015 at 03:17:34 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Christian values (0+ / 0-)


    I don't subscribe to any religion, but growing up in England with a Mother who regularly attended the Church of England, I learned that Christianity was mainly about love, compassion and understanding.  The fundamentalist Christians I've met here, have me scratching my head and wondering if this is the same religion as the one I grew up with, even though it has the same name.  I don't see much love and tolerance practiced here:  Just hate and hypocrisy.

  •  Christian is a cover for the worst! (0+ / 0-)
  •  I've read a lot of bullshit comments here .. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    justintime

    I don't really believe in Jesus or God, so I'm really not much of a Christian, myself.

    I do think some of the ideas attributed to Jesus are good. But I think the central idea is the "Golden Rule" - Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.

    I try to live by this rule and I think many Democrats also try. Republicans used to live by this rule, too. Now they don't. They seem to hate this rule and they ignore it at all times.

  •  Why would anyone want to be either? (0+ / 0-)
  •  republicans are not christians (0+ / 0-)

    yes, yes and yes.

  •  Today's GOP = Yesterday's Pharisees (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    justaHippie

    Many of today's Republicans and those within organized religion are what were once referred to as the Pharisees.

  •  GOP (The Party of Greed, Oligarchy, and Profit) (0+ / 0-)

    Why do you think that the GOP is also known as the "Late, Great, GOP"?   What existed in the late 60s is a far cry from the Right Wing GOP today.  

    Sooner or later, the American People will wake up and get out the vote.  Once that happens, 17% of all registered voters will not be able to hand the GOP control of the House or Senate.

  •  True Christianity (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    rkief, VirginiaJeff

    Hypocrisy seems to be a fundamental characteristic of western religions which have dualistic systems.  In Judaism you seem to have the tension between occupier/occupied.  Throughout Jewish history they were one or the other.  Currently they have ghettoized the palestinians just like they were for centuries in Europe.  This is perhaps the most clear cut case.  
    In Christianity you have a similar factor - except it is the tension between the politically, economically, or socially disenfranchised, who Jesus loved, and those few "masters" of manipulation: political, economic, and religious elites who manipulated them for their own ends.  Currently, the political and economic elites in America have succeeded in sabotaging progress by manipulating a huge sector of the US population into passively accepting the domination of market forces - the one thing Jesus seems to have disliked most acutely.  It can even be convincingly argued, I believe, that the Beast of Revelations is greed or man's lower nature and the Prostitute is the United states, which is riding it enthusiastically into the gates of perdition - and it would be to an even greater degree if conservative Republican elites were to have their way.
    When Christ returns (some say very soon) one can expect him to have stern advice for those who have led the faithful away into a cul-de-sac of isolation, selfishness and paranoia.  Thankfully, the evidence points to a Christ who works outside the bounds of any religion or ideology - championing the cause of the poor, educating about the inner nature of man, and making the case for love on a global scale.  An organization called Share international gives regular updates along these lines, and a number extraordinary signs point to it - most recently the birth of an extraordinarily rare white elephant.  The election of a truly Christian pope also seems to point to the possibility of a new era of rapprochement, peace and economic justice.                

  •  ANOTHER PERFECT ILLUSTRATION (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    rkief

    (excerpt from a previous post)

     "This is [another] perfect illustration explaining why I hate Americanized Christianity! Actually I want nothing to do with any religion in any form.
      The issue is that greedy, lying, bigoted, homophobic, criminally inclined, cowards, who hide behind "the good book" only to prey on the ignorant, are welcomed, with open arms, into the "god fearing", fantasy, community, by those who have been brainwashed, since birth, into believing in and supporting these, so-called, pastors. Christianity in America is jammed packed with millions of like-minded, ill-informed victims who wouldn't know a rational thought if it jumped up and bit them.
    Americanized religion is a huge, multi-billion dollar industry and all of that income is tax-free! No wonder thieves and con-artists of all strips wrangle themselves into "god's work" and dupe the masses. Hell, for $29.95 you can easily obtain an ordination... online or by snail mail. It is very easy to do. Just calling yourself a pastor or minister and starting your own church is protected by law. Take away that tax dodge and see how many "men/women of god" find some way [and somewhere] else to fleece [the] pockets [of desperate people].

    "Faith answers no questions; it prohibits us from asking them"

    by OldSickandTired on Sat Apr 04, 2015 at 05:04:48 PM PDT

  •  It's like one of Shakespeare's characters said, (0+ / 0-)

    almost 500 years ago, "Methinks thou dost protest (or "attest,") too much," implying that those who criticize others the most loudly and/or often  -  or blow their own horns in the same way  -  are often the worst offenders.  Ergo, in this case, the super-religious talkers of Christianity are often its most anti-religious practitioners.

  •  Another good passage is Matthew 25:31-46— (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Santargh, VirginiaJeff

    which most "conservative Christian Republicans" could stand to heed. Of course, they go on about private/church social care, but that has limited potential for fair, equitable outreach (even though it can function as an auxiliary to government programs):

    31 “When the Son of Man comes in his glory, and all the angels with him, he will sit on his glorious throne. 32 All the nations will be gathered before him, and he will separate the people one from another as a shepherd separates the sheep from the goats. 33 He will put the sheep on his right and the goats on his left.

    34 “Then the King will say to those on his right, ‘Come, you who are blessed by my Father; take your inheritance, the kingdom prepared for you since the creation of the world. 35 For I was hungry and you gave me something to eat, I was thirsty and you gave me something to drink, I was a stranger and you invited me in, 36 I needed clothes and you clothed me, I was sick and you looked after me, I was in prison and you came to visit me.’

    37 “Then the righteous will answer him, ‘Lord, when did we see you hungry and feed you, or thirsty and give you something to drink? 38 When did we see you a stranger and invite you in, or needing clothes and clothe you? 39 When did we see you sick or in prison and go to visit you?’

    40 “The King will reply, ‘Truly I tell you, whatever you did for one of the least of these brothers and sisters of mine, you did for me.’

    41 “Then he will say to those on his left, ‘Depart from me, you who are cursed, into the eternal fire prepared for the devil and his angels. 42 For I was hungry and you gave me nothing to eat, I was thirsty and you gave me nothing to drink, 43 I was a stranger and you did not invite me in, I needed clothes and you did not clothe me, I was sick and in prison and you did not look after me.’

    44 “They also will answer, ‘Lord, when did we see you hungry or thirsty or a stranger or needing clothes or sick or in prison, and did not help you?’

    45 “He will reply, ‘Truly I tell you, whatever you did not do for one of the least of these, you did not do for me.’

    46 “Then they will go away to eternal punishment, but the righteous to eternal life.”

    "The patriarchal form of government readily becomes despotic, as each person may see in his own family. Fathers…behold with impatience a new character and way of thinking… An empire is an immense egotism." ~Ralph Waldo Emerson, 'The Young American'

    by JuDGe3690 on Sat Apr 04, 2015 at 05:24:56 PM PDT

  •  I myself AM a Christain ... (0+ / 0-)

    ... and I wholeheartedly concur with the basic premise of this article.
    For decades, I have been struck by the "un-Christian-ness" of  the average "religious-conservative" person in the U.S..

  •  SquareForceOne (0+ / 0-)

    Judge not lest ye be judged.

  •  I am so very thankful (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    justaHippie

    that this was reposted. I missed it in 2012. The essay itself and the ensuing comments have been a really enlightening, and mostly civil, discussion. Way to go, Daily Kos members. I feel gratefully enlightened. I am not kidding.

  •  being His follower (0+ / 0-)

    Amen, you got it right. These folks are more like the Pharisees and Sadducees who were constantly trying to pervert His teachings...Thank you for your thoughts

  •  You Cannot Be A Republican And A Christian (0+ / 0-)

    Yeah, but it sure looks good sitting  upfront in the very first pew, nearest to God on the Altar and within continual sight of the priest or pastor - and all the rest of the poor schmucks making up the rest of the faithful.....

  •  I am pretty sure you right (0+ / 0-)

    SMH

  •  You cannot be progressive (0+ / 0-)

    if you are religious.

    •  That's just not true (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      CharlesII, justaHippie, VirginiaJeff

      It is precisely my faith in Jesus that has made me a progressive and animates my belief in the preferential option for the poor.  It is because of him that I support the rights of immigrants.  It is because of him that I support prisoners.  It is because of him that I want sufficient funding for healthcare, food stamps, education, poverty programs.  

    •  Wrong (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      justaHippie, VirginiaJeff

      Indeed, progressive Christians often are accused of being Marxists and even killed for their beliefs, because they share what they have with the poor and do not bow their knee to the powerful.  

      Allow me to quote myself:

      I know a church that five years ago had no homeless members or even visitors. A country club church.

      The depths of the recession brought in a few men trying to find shelter from the cold for an hour. They weren't much. Often hung over, sometimes drinking in the bathroom, one not just drunk but talking in a loud voice in church...talking about how the congregation disrespected his ethnic group.

      The church was not of one heart. Some people left the church rather than tolerate the homeless. But others started talking to them, doing small helps for them, and feeding them.

      More and more homeless came. Women, living in deep fear on the street. Men, some of them mentally ill. And the congregation responded with compassion. They discovered that among the poor were not just drunks and the mentally ill, but many talented people. All living in desperate conditions. They began to see the people of the street as human beings. Their fear of the world diminished.  

      The services they provide, while considerable, are not enough. One homeless man lost all the toes on his feet in winter. Another was stabbed to death. Another ended up in jail, trapped by a system that labeled him as a sex offender because he had no place to go to the bathroom and so exposed himself in what is technically a public place.

      All that is left now is for God to respond, to provide not just the poor to feed, but the wealthier hands to give time and money. The church may well cease to exist if it does not get those hands. It had been declining when it was carrying no such burden, and now it has this, too. Sadly, there are probably many liberals so alienated from the church that they won't even visit to see what is going on.

      It is a small story of hope in a nation that has lost its way.  

      While a lot of Republicans are selfish a--holes, a lot of progressives are as well. A lot of people calling themselves Christians are selfish a--holes, but they aren't doing what Jesus did: feeding people, healing people, giving people hope in the midst of an oppressive occupation, giving respect to women, condemning no one...

      Pretty progressive guy, that Jesus.

    •  You mean like Jesus was? (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      VirginiaJeff

      Jesus was the original progressive. So radical they had to kill him. Idiots.

    •  And yet (0+ / 0-)

      here I am. Along with many, many others.

      "I find it interesting that DK members declare they're leaving the Democratic Party, yet they can't bring themselves to leave DailyKos." -virginislandsguy

      by VirginiaJeff on Sun Apr 05, 2015 at 05:46:17 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  The red words in the bible (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    VirginiaJeff

    seem to be the only ones republicans have never seen or heard.

    They are the one ones even slightly interesting, so I don't know why republicans ignore them, probably because there is no money in it for them and no hate, we all know how much republicans love to hate.

  •  Sure you can (0+ / 0-)

    You can be a Republican and a Christian.

    You just have to be incredibly stupid.  

  •  This is all fine and well (0+ / 0-)

    but as I see it religion, in general, seems to be the practice of impostition more than anything else. Seems a lot like politics except politics has more dire, real world consequences. Both seem to agressively want to stuff down one's gullet their ideas as the final word. I may have it wrong however...I'm not a fan of either and might be too sarcastic to be approached.And religion seems to be cutting a lot of heads off as of late so my idea of dire consequences might need some fine tuning.

  •  Hell Will Be Full Of Christians (0+ / 0-)

    Excellent article. Of course, they've heard it before but they don't care. You can't possibly believe what the Bible teaches and spend most of your time purposely ignoring it unless hell is your ultimate goal. Happy Easter, scumbags.

  •  Ha ha! I beat you to it! :P (1+ / 2-)
    Recommended by:
    raptavio
    Hidden by:
    scoop, despaminate3000

    Just kidding. But really, I did. And it's in multiple parts!

  •  so now its about old 2012 diaries (0+ / 0-)

    wake me in 2018 so I can read this years diaries.

    This Rover crossed over... Expat-American, dont even start with the nonsense about that.

    by Karl Rover on Sun Apr 05, 2015 at 06:11:24 PM PDT

  •  All because of Fox News and rt wing radio (0+ / 0-)

    They follow Ian Rand now not Jesus.. Republicans have become the very thing they despise.  They have become so dumb from all of the fear mongering propaganda by Fox News and the Pastors in the Churches they don't even realize what they are doing.  They have are so anti government, anti science, anti NORMAL that they truly are a threat to the WORLD..   Ever explain something to a religious right wing Republican? They are a bunch of brain dead zombies.. You could rub their face in the evidence and they still wouldn't believe you. Even my dog can figure it out.. So they think laws or people that try and protect any type of equality is the enemy to the point that when they are the perpetrators and called out on it they play the victim.  Can't discriminate against gays? Then their religious rights are infringed upon.. Frat boys get caught singing a 50 years raciest song and it's the Rap music.. Black people say the N word all the time.. They think Obama is taking over the world by trying to provide at least Some regulations so the Banks wont destroy the economy, Or net neutrality,  while the Zombies pass laws that censor books and history and laws making it legal to prosecute teachers or be able to use firing squad in Utah to kill gays.    

  •  Journalism 101 (0+ / 0-)

    You Cannot Be a Journalist and Not Know How to Properly Capitalize a Title or Headline.

  •  I came to this conclusion many years ago... (0+ / 0-)

    I have a magnet on my fridge that states that Republicans like less regulations like criminals like less police.

  •  The best example (0+ / 0-)

    is God hates a liar and these conservative right wing fanatical Republicans are nothing but liars.

    Love thou neighbor and these conservative Republicans are filled with hate.
    I could go on and on but you get the point.

    However they have fooled many so called Christians who join in with their lies and hate.

  •  What's needed is a liberal televangelist ... (0+ / 0-)

    ...to call out the rest of these greedy, hate-filled charlatans.

    I'm an atheist but I've long felt that winning elections in America depends upon gathering the Christian constituency rather than trying to fight it head-on.

    (We can worry about bursting their bubble later.)

  •  Thank you! (0+ / 0-)

    Thank you for sharing this as a #‎DailyKosClassic‬.

    I just regret that it seems even more true than when I originally wrote it. The showiest Christians (like the ones who rushed to defend Indiana's antigay "Religious Freedom" law) don't seem like they would know a real moral example or insight if they saw one.

  •  Quote: "Republicans used to be: moderate, busin... (0+ / 0-)

    Quote: "Republicans used to be: moderate, business-minded civic boosters and unapologetic patriots who were the linchpins and bulwarks of small towns across the Midwest, the enthusiastic backers of..."

    And then the pagans, apostates, queers and the n-words elected a "black" President and everything changed.

    The reality became apparent, this was an insidious plan to destroy the status-quo of white privilege and domination, something had to be done, we have to fight back, we won't take this lying down, even though some of our white women are. 

    We started to lose America. The coloreds, the spics and the queers started taking over. White males started to became emasculated as they see the chastity of their pure white women being violated as a growing number of them opted for inter-racial marriages and as consequence started breeding more and more brown babies like the one occupying the White House today.

    The threat is so obvious, how can the rest white America be so blind. Yes, "we want our country back" has become our mantra. Back to a time when America was America. A time when the coloreds and "non-whites" knew their place.

    I want my country back, to slavery, to lynchings, to segregation, to no healthcare, to robber baron monopolies, to the red-scare, to the nuclear threats, to workhouses, to sweatshops, to genocide, to shantytowns, to indentured servitude, to debtors prisons, to persecution of the weak, to intervention abroad and worldwide Manifest Destiny, to bring "civilization" to the savages or as we call it today "freedom and democracy.

    Yes, I want my country back, back to a time when America was America and America was good.

    This post is meant to be satirical.

  •  xtianity versus moral values (0+ / 0-)

    Anybody who disagrees with the premises of this article needs some 'schooling' with the philosophy of George Carlin....

  •  Took the words right out of my mouth.... (0+ / 0-)

           If baking a pizza or making a flower arrangement for a gay couple is somehow a sin, do they also refuse service to other types of sinners?  I'm a divorced adulterer, would I be refused service?
             If paying an insurance company which pays for birth control is somehow a sin, tantamount to murder, do those folks pay taxes?  I bet they do.  Do they realize that their tax dollars are used, at every level of government to imprison and kill people?  Why aren't they opposing taxation on the same grounds?  The federal government kills thousands, or more on a yearly basis.  Why is paying for that not sinful?  How is institutionalized murder not murder, yet preventing a pregnancy is?  
         The answer is simple: if you don't pay your taxes you go to jail.  It's much safer to bully helpless women who can't fight back.  
         As I recall, one of the Ten Commandments exhorts us to "love thy neighbor as thyself".  It doesn't say "love thy neighbor if he's just like you, or the same color, or the same faith, of if he's rich."  It says: " love thy neighbor as thyself".  If every line in the bible is the truth, then that line is just as true as the one that says "man shall not lie with man, nor woman with woman".  
          And this line is also true: "Do unto others as you would have them do unto you."  But my personal favorite and the one I've found from my own personal experience to be true is:  "As ye soweth, so shall ye also reap."   Sow hatred and you will reap likewise.  There is a time and a season for all things.  The season is changing.

Subscribe or Donate to support Daily Kos.

Click here for the mobile view of the site