Skip to main content

It is funny how politics can divide us.  Well, it probably should for a little while, the same way cross town high school rivalries can divide a small city during the school year, but whereas we bounce back from a high school rivalry, the wounds of politics fester for a long time.

Listening to Rick Jensen today, (the loser) one could almost hear the sizzle of salt hitting fresh flesh...

Now as a numbers person I'm used to thinking of Red States versus Blue...  It's numbers; that simply is the rule we chose some 223 years ago to use as a tally. So when I look at a map and see the West and Northeast and Rust Belt, versus the South, the Middle Axis, and the Mountain States, I might be inclined to think, "gee our country is really divided".   But, (and it will soon emerge) if one looks at the  individual counties or if someone actually delineates to wards, one sees a purple color descend and take over all of America.

So, to the uninitiated, this is a surprise.  Everyone in Virginia is not blue. It just happens that within those lines on a map, more people support blue ideas instead of red ideas. It just takes one more human being to tip the balance, to turn that state from red to blue.  The same can be said in reverse for Texas.

This was brought to mind last night as those watching early returns sometimes got their hopes up, only to be dashed as more votes came in....
America needs to forget about these divisions (unless they are in charge of a national election campaign).  For the rest of us, they don't matter....

Have you ever stood in line to pay for groceries?  If you have, I want you to visualize standing with 10 people in front of you... Now if you can do that, I want you to imagine half of those people "thinking people over money", and the other half thinking "money over people"... Those of us who have lived real life, know that those values can change depending upon whichever circumstances we find ourselves at the moment...

Now imagine half of them wearing blue shirts, and half of them wearing red... Exactly split, down the middle.... Viola. That is North Carolina, (50-50); it is also Virginia, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Colorado, Florida.
Now imagine that line where one blue shirt was replaced by one red...  Now you are up to states like Tennessee, Alabama, Arkansas, Kansas, Kentucky, Nebraska, and West Virginia... We tend to think of these as really backwards environments full of cut-out Rush Limbaughs driving pickup trucks.  Yet all we did was switch one person's shirt in line, giving us a 6-4 ratio instead of 5-5.... None of those 9 other people changed.  

Now switch that one swing person to a blue, you have... California, Connecticut, Delaware, Illinois, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Rhode Island..  all blatantly called liberal states where no conservative would dare live, .... but ...four out of ten do...

In fact, The only difference statistically between West Virginia and Delaware, is one person's shirt, waiting in line in front of you... If they choose to wear a red shirt, "heaven help us".  If they choose to wear a blue, "hooray for our side",  It is important to note: none of the other nine people change a thing....
So the reality is that in Congress, two diametrically opposing entities, Delaware and West Virgina, have the same makeup in population (statistically speaking) except for one person choosing to wear a blue or red shirt....
There is really no reason those two states can't compromise based on that one person's preference.  The other 9 people all share the same shirts, regardless of what state they come from....
Our national problem is that some nefarious outside influence, is using this one change of a shirt's color, to halt all our nation's progress forward...

EMAIL TO A FRIEND X
Your Email has been sent.
You must add at least one tag to this diary before publishing it.

Add keywords that describe this diary. Separate multiple keywords with commas.
Tagging tips - Search For Tags - Browse For Tags

?

More Tagging tips:

A tag is a way to search for this diary. If someone is searching for "Barack Obama," is this a diary they'd be trying to find?

Use a person's full name, without any title. Senator Obama may become President Obama, and Michelle Obama might run for office.

If your diary covers an election or elected official, use election tags, which are generally the state abbreviation followed by the office. CA-01 is the first district House seat. CA-Sen covers both senate races. NY-GOV covers the New York governor's race.

Tags do not compound: that is, "education reform" is a completely different tag from "education". A tag like "reform" alone is probably not meaningful.

Consider if one or more of these tags fits your diary: Civil Rights, Community, Congress, Culture, Economy, Education, Elections, Energy, Environment, Health Care, International, Labor, Law, Media, Meta, National Security, Science, Transportation, or White House. If your diary is specific to a state, consider adding the state (California, Texas, etc). Keep in mind, though, that there are many wonderful and important diaries that don't fit in any of these tags. Don't worry if yours doesn't.

You can add a private note to this diary when hotlisting it:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary from your hotlist?
Are you sure you want to remove your recommendation? You can only recommend a diary once, so you will not be able to re-recommend it afterwards.
Rescue this diary, and add a note:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary from Rescue?
Choose where to republish this diary. The diary will be added to the queue for that group. Publish it from the queue to make it appear.

You must be a member of a group to use this feature.

Add a quick update to your diary without changing the diary itself:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary?
(The diary will be removed from the site and returned to your drafts for further editing.)
(The diary will be removed.)
Are you sure you want to save these changes to the published diary?

Comment Preferences

Subscribe or Donate to support Daily Kos.

Click here for the mobile view of the site