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The classic Q&A exchange when looking at a famous book that has been adapted into a film goes, as you all know it:

Q: "Did you read the book?"
A: "No, but I saw the movie."
If there is one current film to which this exchange most appropriately applies, it would have to be the new film version of the musical of Les Misérables.  This film is actually an adaptation at one remove of its original source, of course, per this genealogy:

Victor Hugo: Les Misérables (novel), 1862
Alain Boublil (lyrics) and Claude-Michel Schönberg (music): Les Misérables (musical), 1980 (original French version); 1985 (English version)
Tom Hooper (director): Les Misérables (film of the musical), 2012

This made me wonder what sales of the book are like now.  It's not hard to guess, but you can surmise the reason why I ask: namely, how many who buy the book, having seen the musical, will actually read it?  More below the flip......

First, I checked sales figures on Amazon (the easiest place - sorry) of several editions of the book, as of this afternoon:

(a) Signet Classics paperback (Lee Fahnestock and Norman MacAfee revision of the Charles Wilbour translation), 44
(b) Penguin hardback (Norman Denny translation), 288
(c) Modern Library edition (Julie Rose translation), 4688
(d) Penguin paperback (same Norman Denny translation as Penguin hardback), 826
(e) Modern Library edition (Charles Wilbour translation), 3872

I have the Signet Classics paperback (a), but I've had the copy for several months now, long before I ever realized that there would be a film version of the musical.  Since I was getting ready to travel for the holidays and needed something to read that was long enough to get into but that I wouldn't actually quite finish on the travels out and back, it looked like as good a time as any to take the plunge.

The first thing you have to realize about the Signet Classics edition is that the main text is 1461 pages.  Granted, the print is fairly large-ish for a Signet Classics paperback, but still, 1461 pages is 1461 pages.  I'm now just past page 1000.  Marius and Cosette have finally met.  Thénardier has just escaped from prison, partly witnessed by one of his abandoned sons, Gavroche.  His sister Éponine is starting to take on a larger role, totally separate, of course.

There's obviously not time to discuss everything about what I've read up to this point (and that's not really the point of this diary, such as it is), but this small bit next will illustrate.  It's emotionally frustrating to see, for example, how naive Marius is about how evil Thénardier is, and what Thénardier gets away with, not to mention his wife, with their past exploitation of Cosette and her mother Fantine, by proxy.  But then such is real life, where we all know that lots of bad people get away with lots of bad deeds.  In the musical, that I remember (the only production I saw was 21+ years ago), Thénardier has an element of snark about himself, when he's not being a jerk overall.  But in the novel, there's no snark about him; he is truly rotten to the core.  He has moments where he protests about how bad rich folk can be, but this doesn't justify his own nasty actions against those weaker than him (which invariably is the case; when he tries to entrap Jean Valjean, he has to have hired hoods as backup).

I'll honestly admit that I'm not poring over every word and searching for deeper meanings behind each word, not at all.  I'm pretty much sand-blasting my way through it, if for no other reason than I have so many other books to read.  Plus, I'll admit that it's rather odd to read this beached whale of a novel, knowing the whole time how it's going to end.  Obviously more than usual, reading this book really is about the journey, and not about the ultimate destination.

Given my particular tastes in books, and my own back-of-the-head naggings about reading the novel, which is obviously a huge time and emotional sink, I wonder what it'll be like for people with more "populist" tastes than me, who decide to take on the novel (and who have caused sales to go up at bookstores and on Amazon) in the wake of the movie.  In the most superficial sense, the length of the book, I don't think most people realize what they're in for.  They see that it's a big book, but they just don't realize how big.  If they have the patience, they'll obviously catch a lot of details that aren't present in the musical or any movie version.  There are also a lot of digressions where Hugo philosophizes on matters like the battle of Waterloo, or the nature of argot.

But there's another aspect that many "regular folks" may not be ready for, namely the political aspect.  Hugo was a noted progressive, and peppers the novel with calls for universal education.  How many wingnuts who will go to see the new movie (and many will, to be sure) will figure out that Victor Hugo was their political opposite?  How many of them will realize how inflexible Inspector Javert is in his basic ideology that "once a criminal, always a criminal", especially when it comes to Jean Valjean?

New Yorker writer Adam Gopnik, in his foreword to the Julie Rose translation and this blog post for which he recycles (with acknowledgement) some passages, comments further on a difference between Hugo's original and the musical version:

".....it is, crucially, not Inspector Javert's personal malice or mercilessness, as legend has it and the musical suggests, that drives him to hunt down Jean Valjean; it is his absolute commitment to justice, which he interprets as a commitment to rules and their administration, to the parallel paper universe of absolute laws.....

Jean Valjean's generosity towards Javert is what devastates him. 'A benevolent malefactor, a compassionate convict, offering forgiveness in return for hate, favoring pity over revenge, preferring to himself be destroyed to destroying his enemy, saving the one who had brought him down, this loathsome angel, this vile hero, who outraged him almost as much as he amazed him.' Devastating generosity, loathsome angels — what destroys Javert is not his implacable lack of compassion but his absolute certitude, which is inadequate to Hugo's conviction that life is inexorably two-pathed, even when we struggle for just one."

Gopnik makes another point about Hugo and his ideology, of which I wasn't aware before finding his blog post:
"Les Misérables has highly specific politics that aren't simply the politics of popular revolt and 'sentimental' liberty. Hugo's whole life as a writer and statesman was devoted to a single vision, the dream of 'the Concert of Europe,' which is what we now call the European Union. It was Hugo, who, during the International Peace Congress that was held in Paris in 1849, declared, 'A day will come when you France, you Russia, you Italy, you England, you Germany, you all, nations of the continent, without losing your distinct qualities and your glorious individuality, will be merged closely within a superior unit and you will form the European brotherhood.'"....

"....the dream of European union was for Hugo not just a way of preventing the disasters of war and approaching the problem of poverty; it was a larger way of insisting that cultural pluralism — indeed, pluralism of every kind — was essential to freedom. Hugo kept Republican liberalism from seeming fatuous by insisting that the liberal Republican has a singular, mystic insight into the intrinsic doubleness of life. At the height of the twentieth century’s calamities, Hugo's Romantic Republicanism could seem fragile and unconvincing; the Javerts then held the floor. There are many things wrong or encumbering or even foolish about the European Union, but when we watch Les Misérables, we should save a thought for how much of Hugo's vision has now been achieved. What Hugo wanted, and what he used all that melodramatic and storytelling power to promote, was a Europe accepting in its pluralism, and widely based in its prosperity. His ghost now has it."

Or indeed read Les Misérables, not just (or only) watch it.  After all this, you may fairly wonder if 3CM plans to see the movie.  I'll answer that by flipping the opening Q&A:
Q: "Did you see the movie?"
A: "No, I'm reading the book."
In most people's eyes, this probably would make 3CM a loser.  But then he already is one, so no change there.  With that, for this last SNLC of 2012, time for the usual protocol, namely your loser stories of the week, which hopefully don't involve being lost in city sewers.....

Originally posted to chingchongchinaman on Sat Dec 29, 2012 at 06:55 PM PST.

Also republished by Les Miserables.

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Comment Preferences

  •  so, from here...... (11+ / 0-)

    ......over the Xmas holiday, I got sick.  Most of the time with family, I was under the weather.  I'm barely recovering from it now, and had to travel back while sick.  Holidays can be such fun....

    "It's only in books that the officers of the detective force are superior to the weakness of making a mistake." (Wilkie Collins, The Moonstone)

    by chingchongchinaman on Sat Dec 29, 2012 at 06:55:45 PM PST

  •  Reading it in French now (10+ / 0-)

    One chapter a night. That will probably take at least a year, but it'll be worth the bragging rights!

    Certaines personnes disent qu'il y a une femme à blâmer, Mais je sais que c'est ma faute sacrément.

    by RamblinDave on Sat Dec 29, 2012 at 07:07:28 PM PST

  •  Saturday night dilemma (8+ / 0-)

    - You're stuck in some kind of membrane
    - You're being digested
    - What's your move?

    "Mitt who? That's an odd name. Like an oven mitt, you mean? Oh, yeah, I've got one of those. Used it at the Atlas Society BBQ last summer when I was flipping ribs."

    by Richard Cranium on Sat Dec 29, 2012 at 07:09:07 PM PST

  •  Wingers Haven't Figured Out That Public Prayer Was (8+ / 0-)

    forbidden by their Christ, in the only lesson he taught on the subject whose few paragraphs include The Lord's Prayer.

    Don't count on them figuring out Hugo before the 2nd Coming.

    BTW I'm not losing on Saturday nights, I'm healing. It takes a helluva long time for programmer and musician to teach himself enough internal medicine to correctly diagnose and treat intestinal disease. --Given that the corporations who pay physicians can't afford to allow them the diagnostic time to use their expertise themselves, and limit them to the 7 or 8 minutes it takes to receive the patient's diagnosis and treatment plan and signing off on it.

    We are called to speak for the weak, for the voiceless, for victims of our nation and for those it calls enemy.... --ML King "Beyond Vietnam"

    by Gooserock on Sat Dec 29, 2012 at 07:19:35 PM PST

    •  wingnuts generally don't figure out..... (8+ / 0-)

      ......anything intelligent as a rule, which allows them to wreak havoc whenever they have power, of course.

      I suppose that I'm "healing" in my own way, in that I feel less obviously awful compared to 24 hours ago.  Still, not fun, which makes one appreciate good health all the more.

      "It's only in books that the officers of the detective force are superior to the weakness of making a mistake." (Wilkie Collins, The Moonstone)

      by chingchongchinaman on Sat Dec 29, 2012 at 07:44:45 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  I am very sorry (6+ / 0-)

        I hope you feel topnotch again very soon.   My daughter and her family have been going through this.  Luckily they were at home.

        Join us at Bookflurries-Bookchat on Wednesday nights 8:00 PM EST

        by cfk on Sat Dec 29, 2012 at 08:33:09 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  if memory serves (which it probably).... (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          cfk, Youffraita

          .....doesn't, my s-i-l said that at least one of her kids was recently sick, and was in recovery.  Doesn't mean that I automatically got something from them, though, since I didn't see the nephews & niece until a day after I got there.  Anyway, I'll at least have an orange before I hit the sack, not to mention a warm salt water gargle (not at the same time, of course).  Did have a kiwi fruit not long ago, speaking of vitamin C.

          BTW, have finished the diaries of Harry Graf Kessler.  His last entry was evidently not long before his death, understandably so.

          "It's only in books that the officers of the detective force are superior to the weakness of making a mistake." (Wilkie Collins, The Moonstone)

          by chingchongchinaman on Sat Dec 29, 2012 at 09:34:15 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

  •  oh you're here (8+ / 0-)

    well, we had a great trip to san diego and got home with 90 minutes to spare.  

    is it true the movie only has two lines of dialogue?  

    i might see a few matinees this week.  lincoln for sure.  

    oh, i have a date for a hobbit matinee monday.  i'm not real sure about this, but heck it's one date.  

    Ted Kennedy: “The work goes on, the cause endures, the hope still lives, and the dream shall never die…”

    by jlms qkw on Sat Dec 29, 2012 at 07:49:58 PM PST

  •  we are watching the doctor who (8+ / 0-)

    christmas special and building some of our lego sets.  

    Ted Kennedy: “The work goes on, the cause endures, the hope still lives, and the dream shall never die…”

    by jlms qkw on Sat Dec 29, 2012 at 07:50:34 PM PST

  •  admirable (6+ / 0-)

    to read when sick

    hope you will feel well soon, traveling while sick is a bear,

    i think i will likely not read les miz and i will probably not see the movie

    i'm distracting myself with finding funny stuff on youtube but there isn't much out there that i find funny

    the closest is this one so far, which someone linked to here on dkos, i think in the berlioz post but i could be wrong

    •  thx 4 the well wishes (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Youffraita, Alexandra Lynch, shari

      Of course, it didn't help that for something like 3 nights straight, I don't recall actually sleeping.  This seems odd considering how warm the bed back @ my folks' place was, but I was wondering if perhaps it was a bit too warm, if that makes sense.  I thought being back in my own bed would help, but not on the 1st night.  Part of the illness this week has included back pain, so last night, I switched to sleeping on my stomach.  1st good night's sleep in a while.  Hopefully 2nd time works as well, post-other stuff to do as noted above.

      "It's only in books that the officers of the detective force are superior to the weakness of making a mistake." (Wilkie Collins, The Moonstone)

      by chingchongchinaman on Sat Dec 29, 2012 at 09:39:18 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  I've read "Les Miserables" twice (6+ / 0-)

    and was an avid fan of "The Fugitive."  

    •  I was about 11 years old I think (7+ / 0-)

      when the final episode of the series showed on ABC.  My family and I were at a high camp site in Yosemite.  One of the other campers had a little teeny weeny tv and a generator so he could watch the final episode.  I can't remember anything that happened with it (I guess they caught that damned one-armed guy, otherwise, what was the point, right?)  but I do remember being surrounded by lots of people crouching in the leaves looking at that little itty bitty tiny winy screen.

    •  I remember "The Fugitive" airing.... (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Youffraita, Alexandra Lynch, cfk, oculus

      .....in reruns on NJN while I was in my teens.  It was interesting to see the Brit character actor Laurence Naismith pop up in a few episodes here and there (he was Lord Stanley in Olivier's film of Richard III; wonder how LN wound up in America).

      "It's only in books that the officers of the detective force are superior to the weakness of making a mistake." (Wilkie Collins, The Moonstone)

      by chingchongchinaman on Sat Dec 29, 2012 at 09:40:31 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  I remember reading it, but I don't remember (6+ / 0-)

    finishing Les Mis.  

    One of the insufferable things about Hugo is the long essays/diatribes that he puts in his novels between chapters.  Hunchback of Notre Dames was the same way.  It was a more enjoyable book, though.

    Same thing with Moby Dick, by Herman Melville, which was 50% Moby Dick and 50% essays on how boats are built and things like that which.  It was frustrating reading.

    I remember the Thenardiers.  I LIKED THEM.  More than Jean Valjean, in fact.  So many of the nice-guy characters were cartoonish.

    Did you know Les Mis was Ayn Rand's FAVORITEST BOOK IN THE WHOLE WIDE WORLD EVER IN HISTORY?  Yup, no kidding.  Remember, I was a Randite when I was a tot.  In her book on writing and art, The Romantic Manifesto, she goes off on multiple swoonfests over Victor Hugo.  A bit odd when you consider the strong left-wing socialist tilt of Les Mis.  She made various attempts to cope with the cognitive dissonance of that.

    I've been listening to audiobooks this past week.  My eyes are so messed up that it's become difficult for me to watch tv or spend much time on the internet or read books, so, having a killer headache, I decided to listen to one of the free audiobooks online.  I must have picked THE VERY BEST ONE!  Treasure Island, read by a guy with a British accent who did a magnificent job on the pirate voices and made them unique to the character.  And he was great at making Long John Silver's flattery sound insincere.  

    I tried another audiobook, The Scarlet Plague by Jack London, but didn't like it at all.  The reader wasn't nearly as lively and the pace of it was too fast.  I'm starting to think that if I listen to more, I should stick to 19th century Victorian type novels because of the longer, slower sentence structures.  They can be a little annoying to read, but when they are read aloud, they are much more enjoyable.  

    My heartless bitch semi-feral cat is slightly less feral this week.  She decided she didn't like the weather and came in from the cold.  Good thing, too.  We have rain coming.

    •  Not at all surprised about Rand (6+ / 0-)

      I've been saying for a while, Fantine is no doubt every wingnut's favorite fictional character. Faced with an unplanned pregnancy, she toughed it out and had the baby...and then once she became an unwed mother, she was appropriately shamed into desperation, humiliation and death. Meanwhile, the factory foreman was free to make a rational decision - much like that dentist in Iowa - to fire an employee whose approach didn't mesh with his, without any restrictive federal regulations getting in his way.

      Certaines personnes disent qu'il y a une femme à blâmer, Mais je sais que c'est ma faute sacrément.

      by RamblinDave on Sat Dec 29, 2012 at 08:38:12 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  No, I don't think that part would have (5+ / 0-)

        appealed to her.  She would have seen Fantine as a self-sacrificer, and she despised that.  Remember, Ayn Rand was an outspoken pro-choice atheist pacifist.  She doesn't have any exact intellectual parallels in today's neocon or teabagger or fundamentalist communities.

        I bookmarked this because I knew it would be useful some day.  It's a clip from the unauthorized 1942 Italian version of her novel We the Living.  We the Living is a good novel!  But every time I say anything nice about Ayn Rand's fiction writing, somebody invariably gets mad at me.

      •  in the case of Fantine and the factory..... (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Dumbo, Youffraita, Alexandra Lynch

        ......I don't think that Valjean/M. Madeleine was fully apprised of the facts at the time of her dismissal.  This becomes clear after he has learned the truth about her situation.  By contrast, that Iowa dentist is just being a jerk, pure and simple (Oscar Wilde notwithstanding).

        "It's only in books that the officers of the detective force are superior to the weakness of making a mistake." (Wilkie Collins, The Moonstone)

        by chingchongchinaman on Sat Dec 29, 2012 at 09:43:23 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  No one said anything about Valjean (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          chingchongchinaman, Youffraita

          The foreman fired Fantine because he found out she had a daughter right after she had rejected his sexual advances. In other words, he fired her because she said no to him when she had said yes to someone else.

          Certaines personnes disent qu'il y a une femme à blâmer, Mais je sais que c'est ma faute sacrément.

          by RamblinDave on Sun Dec 30, 2012 at 01:34:21 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

        •  David Hume, on natural vs. artificial sympathy (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          chingchongchinaman, Youffraita

          We feel natural sympathy directly, when we observe another person suffering, feel their suffering as our own, and want to alleviate their suffering.  We feel artificial sympathy indirectly, as a rational calculation, as when we demand strict universal justice on the grounds that an unpunished offense against one is potentially an offense against all.

          Natural sympathy is the foundation of mercy, artificial sympathy is the foundation of justice. One derives from feeling, the other from calculation. Often they reinforce each other, but sometimes they stand in contradiction.

          Jean Valjean embodies the former, Javert the latter.

          Jean Valjean committed a crime (stealing a loaf of bread) to feed his family. He was spared by an act of mercy in violation of the law, when the priest lied to Javert about having given him the candlesticks as a gift. (If all witnesses lied, even out of a spirit of mercy, would justice not be subverted?) Later Valjean as factory owner/dismisses Fantine from employment out of his concern for preserving order in he factory: this may be an act of justice, but it is not an act of mercy, and he comes to the realization that he must expose his identity and flee the law in order to save Cosette and exercise mercy. Later still he spares Javert's life out of mercy, even though this puts him and his friends at the barricades in great danger.

          Javert is not a snarling malevolent villain. He has seen suffering himself, was even born, like Cosette, to a prostitute who died in prison. But he clings desperately to the certitude of universal, standardized justice which makes no exceptions even in the name of mercy. The Law is everything to him. (At one point he even notifies Mayor Madeleine--Valjean-- that he, Javert, must be reported and arrested for having filed a false denunciation). When Valjean spares his life again his world of certain justice is destroyed and he thinks only anarchy is left. So he commits suicide. In this sense the mercy Valjean had shown him has cruel consequences.

          Valjean and Javert are both tragic heroes, illustrating the difficulty of reconciling mercy and justice.

          The Thenardiers, by contrast, respect neither mercy nor justice and act entirely from self-interest. Yet sometimes their self-interest results in some unwitting acts of good. They sheltered Cosette, even if it was to exploit her; they sold Cosette to Valjean, to get some cash in hand; M. Thenardier enables Valjean and Marius to escape from the sewers, if only to spare his own life; the Thenardiers reunite Valjean and Cosette in the course of trying to blackmail Marius. The Thenardiers are villainous; justice would condemn them utterly, but they earn some kind of mercy because their crimes have some unwittingly good consequences. Gavroche and Eponine are both Thenardiers, even if abandoned by their parents.

          Les Miserables is wildly sentimental, emotionally unrestrained because it is trying  above all to reawaken human sympathy; it is trying to demand justice be tempered by mercy.    

    •  that's scary that..... (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Youffraita, Alexandra Lynch, Dumbo

      .....you actually liked the Thenardiers, given what heartless scum they are in the novel, which Hugo doesn't whitewash from the start.  Just about everyone else in the novel is fooled, of course, which I suppose is part of the point.

      When I was in HS, and I read Moby Dick, I had the same reaction as you.  I haven't read it since, but now I think that I should give it another try, since I know that it's about much more than mere plot.  VH's asides in Les Miserables are far from subtle, to be sure, but they are what they are, so if I want to read the whole novel, I have to take it all in.

      "It's only in books that the officers of the detective force are superior to the weakness of making a mistake." (Wilkie Collins, The Moonstone)

      by chingchongchinaman on Sat Dec 29, 2012 at 09:46:45 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Real correspondence between Hugo... (7+ / 0-)

    ...and his publisher:

    While waiting, Hugo sent only:

    "?"

    The response was simply

     "!"

    This was from the shortest correspondence from an old Guiness Book of Records.

    Preparing for the Mayan doomsday prophecy by hastily trying to get in the good graces of snake-bird god Q’uq’umatz

    by dov12348 on Sat Dec 29, 2012 at 08:36:30 PM PST

  •  hi (8+ / 0-)

    Happily not doing much.  Just resting up.  

    Not sure which movie hubby will want to watch on New Year's Eve.  It is a tradition to stay home with our yearly bottle of Asti and a special coffee cake hubby makes.

    We do have snow here.  And it is heading for zero degrees a couple of nights from now.  True Michigan weather.

    This is my time of year to count my blessings and this group on Saturday night is one of them.  :)

    Best wishes to ccc and to everyone here for a good New Year!

    Join us at Bookflurries-Bookchat on Wednesday nights 8:00 PM EST

    by cfk on Sat Dec 29, 2012 at 08:41:06 PM PST

    •  I'm wondering what will happen.... (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      cfk, Youffraita, Alexandra Lynch

      ......for myself on NYE.  I do have plans, but the illness and recovery (fingers x'ed) might scotch all the plans.  We'll see.

      "It's only in books that the officers of the detective force are superior to the weakness of making a mistake." (Wilkie Collins, The Moonstone)

      by chingchongchinaman on Sat Dec 29, 2012 at 09:48:39 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  I hope you're feeling well enough (3+ / 0-)

        to enjoy yourself, 3CM.  It really sucks to be sick on New Year's Eve.  It sucks to be at work, too, but not quite as much.

        To make the argument that the media has a left- or right-wing, or a liberal or a conservative bias, is like asking if the problem with Al-Qaeda is do they use too much oil in their hummus. Al Franken

        by Youffraita on Sat Dec 29, 2012 at 10:44:05 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  so we now know..... (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Youffraita

          .....your plans for NYE, which you probably mentioned elsewhere here, if not last week.  I guess time & 1/2 doesn't apply here, does it?  Unless it's on NYD itself.

          It's literally been hot soup for a few days straight (Progresso, FWIW), along with baby carrots, kiwi fruit, and an orange a day, more or less, on the fruit & vegetables side.  I wonder if it helps, but at the least, it doesn't hurt.

          "It's only in books that the officers of the detective force are superior to the weakness of making a mistake." (Wilkie Collins, The Moonstone)

          by chingchongchinaman on Sun Dec 30, 2012 at 05:59:17 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  Chicken soup! (0+ / 0-)

            It has to be chicken soup -- Jewish penicillin -- to be most effective.

            I know that's folklore, but I do remember seeing a piece in the NYT a number of years ago about a study that confirmed the folklore: chicken soup is great if you have a cold.

            And, of course, the fruit & veggies are good for you.

            When I had my cold last month, for two days all I wanted was chicken broth (Swanson) -- heated it up and drank it like tea.

            On the money front, I'm working 10 hours on NYD, so that's where the money comes in.  I think it's probably my reward for volunteering to work NYE (hey, somebody had to, and everyone else wanted to work the Day, so I was gonna work Eve whether or not I was a good sport about it).

            To make the argument that the media has a left- or right-wing, or a liberal or a conservative bias, is like asking if the problem with Al-Qaeda is do they use too much oil in their hummus. Al Franken

            by Youffraita on Sun Dec 30, 2012 at 10:48:34 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

    •  Have fun, cfk! (3+ / 0-)

      I'll be at work both Monday and Tuesday (but on Tues. it's time & a half, w00t).  Monday night will probably be hectic: there's something going on in the minor league stadium a block away, and also something going on downtown -- blocks away but the main road leads directly to us.

      We got snow today -- about two inches, I'd guess.  But our weather should be a lot warmer than yours -- thirties, probably.

      To make the argument that the media has a left- or right-wing, or a liberal or a conservative bias, is like asking if the problem with Al-Qaeda is do they use too much oil in their hummus. Al Franken

      by Youffraita on Sat Dec 29, 2012 at 10:42:56 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  I bet it will be hectic (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Youffraita, chingchongchinaman

        Best wishes for that!

        Join us at Bookflurries-Bookchat on Wednesday nights 8:00 PM EST

        by cfk on Sat Dec 29, 2012 at 11:30:03 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  Not sure what happened to my reply (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Youffraita, chingchongchinaman

        sigh...so if it turns up as a repeat...sorry.

        Just said that I imagine it will be hectic for sure.

        Best wishes for getting through it!

        Happy New Year!

        Join us at Bookflurries-Bookchat on Wednesday nights 8:00 PM EST

        by cfk on Sat Dec 29, 2012 at 11:33:26 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Not a repeat! (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          cfk, chingchongchinaman

          Well...not in my comments thread anyway, which is where I'm replying to you from.  

          (Yo, Youff, can you write a more awkward sentence than that one?  Sure, self, IF I try really, really hard I'm sure I can outdo myself in awkward sentence construction.)

          To make the argument that the media has a left- or right-wing, or a liberal or a conservative bias, is like asking if the problem with Al-Qaeda is do they use too much oil in their hummus. Al Franken

          by Youffraita on Sun Dec 30, 2012 at 12:14:50 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

      •  yup, per my above comment..... (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Youffraita

        ......shows what happens when I don't read all the way to the bottom before replying above, regarding your NYE and NYD.  But I suppose that at least things will be busy on NYE, and hopefully busy in a good way.

        "It's only in books that the officers of the detective force are superior to the weakness of making a mistake." (Wilkie Collins, The Moonstone)

        by chingchongchinaman on Sun Dec 30, 2012 at 06:02:51 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  The best thing about NYEve is (0+ / 0-)

          we have four scheduled until ten, and three until eleven, so work can get done while customers are served.  Ya can't do that with a staff of two, both stuck on cash register duty b/c it's busy as all hell.

          Now, that's scheduled.  The one scheduled to work until ten came down with a nasty cold/cough today.  I'll be surprised if she can make it through a ten-hour shift.

          She and I will both be surprised if I don't catch the nasty cold/cough from her spreading germs today.

          To make the argument that the media has a left- or right-wing, or a liberal or a conservative bias, is like asking if the problem with Al-Qaeda is do they use too much oil in their hummus. Al Franken

          by Youffraita on Sun Dec 30, 2012 at 10:53:50 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

  •  A quiet evening. (4+ / 0-)

    I am waiting for a trap to go SNAP! in the kitchen, heralding the death of Mouse #6. Not that I KNOW there is a Mouse #6, but when one has removed the corpses (trap 4, cat 1) of Mouse 1-5, it is not such an intellectual leap. The trap is there for maybe.  Peanut butter is the best bait.

    We go through this every year when it gets properly cold. It's the downside of owning an old house.

    Otherwise I am sitting still and breathing pretty shallowly, for there is raging and gnashing of teeth in my lower abdomen, and I am thinking, "Menopause can kick into a higher gear Any Time Now...."  I mean, I appreciate that I am not vomiting with pain any more at this point, but it still is not particularly fun.

    Am attempting to focus on party munchies for six for New Year's Eve, when allowing for: Several people have autistic notions about new food and textures, one has most of his teeth gone and can't chew raw vegetables, one must have protein with her sweet, and two are bottomless pits of teenage boys.

    When you come to find how essential the comfort of a well-kept home is to the bodily strength and good conditions, to a sound mind and spirit, and useful days, you will reverence the good housekeeper as I do above artist or poet, beauty or genius.

    by Alexandra Lynch on Sat Dec 29, 2012 at 08:45:58 PM PST

    •  sorry about the mice.... (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Alexandra Lynch, Youffraita

      .....although mice are doing what creatures would generally do in cold weather, i.e. search for someplace warmer.  Of course, they can't predict the cat or mousetrap factor.

      "It's only in books that the officers of the detective force are superior to the weakness of making a mistake." (Wilkie Collins, The Moonstone)

      by chingchongchinaman on Sat Dec 29, 2012 at 09:49:45 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Yeah, it is what it is. (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Youffraita, chingchongchinaman

        At least when my cat IS in a mood to kill the mice, she just breaks their neck and brings them over, meowing loudly, then drops it in front of me.  The cats I grew up with removed the head and gutted their kills and left them where they'd be stepped on in the wee hours when someone made a trip to the bathroom.

        When you come to find how essential the comfort of a well-kept home is to the bodily strength and good conditions, to a sound mind and spirit, and useful days, you will reverence the good housekeeper as I do above artist or poet, beauty or genius.

        by Alexandra Lynch on Sat Dec 29, 2012 at 10:15:51 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  My Buddy has brought me (2+ / 0-)

          dead mice twice: one he caught outside (I made him drop it on the fire escape before I let him in) and one he caught inside (it's an old house converted into apartments).

          Then there was the dead mouse on the bathroom floor.  It wasn't there when I went to bed...woke up in the a.m. and there it was, in a dust bunny that also had not been in the middle of the bathroom floor the night before.  Buddy came in to greet me, saw it, and would have made a beeline for it if I hadn't stopped him.  Needless to say, I suspect he's the reason for it (and the dust bunny).

          To make the argument that the media has a left- or right-wing, or a liberal or a conservative bias, is like asking if the problem with Al-Qaeda is do they use too much oil in their hummus. Al Franken

          by Youffraita on Sat Dec 29, 2012 at 10:50:31 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

  •  Sorry you were sick, 3CM (3+ / 0-)

    I actually did read Les Miserables in high school, for fun.  I don't remember much of it lo these many years later, and probably wouldn't have the patience for it anymore, unless the translation was superb.  (OTOH, I still like Dickens...)

    My loser story today is literal: I got on the bus to go to work, and put my gloves on the seat next to me.  Got off said bus w/out picking them up...ergo, lost gloves.  sigh

    To make the argument that the media has a left- or right-wing, or a liberal or a conservative bias, is like asking if the problem with Al-Qaeda is do they use too much oil in their hummus. Al Franken

    by Youffraita on Sat Dec 29, 2012 at 10:27:47 PM PST

    •  ouch, I did that years ago..... (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Youffraita

      .....on MetroLink.  I guess someone else is happy with a new "found" pair of gloves (I don't expect anyone to have turned them in to the bus line's Lost & Found).

      "It's only in books that the officers of the detective force are superior to the weakness of making a mistake." (Wilkie Collins, The Moonstone)

      by chingchongchinaman on Sun Dec 30, 2012 at 06:00:53 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  There WAS a Mouse #6. (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    chingchongchinaman, Youffraita

    Trap now reloaded for Potential Mouse #7.

    Meanwhile the cats have been assiduously keeping the futon couch from rising up and getting caught in the ceiling fan. (rolls eyes)

    When you come to find how essential the comfort of a well-kept home is to the bodily strength and good conditions, to a sound mind and spirit, and useful days, you will reverence the good housekeeper as I do above artist or poet, beauty or genius.

    by Alexandra Lynch on Sat Dec 29, 2012 at 11:08:25 PM PST

    •  LOL. Sorry about the mice, but... (0+ / 0-)

      LOL on the cats vs. ceiling fan while mice play in your house.

      To make the argument that the media has a left- or right-wing, or a liberal or a conservative bias, is like asking if the problem with Al-Qaeda is do they use too much oil in their hummus. Al Franken

      by Youffraita on Sun Dec 30, 2012 at 11:01:38 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  GRRRR. (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    chingchongchinaman, Youffraita

    I can't go to bed until an hour and a half after my husband goes to bed.

    He stayed up til three thirty am. (weeps in fatigue)

    I wanted to go to bed at one am.

    When you come to find how essential the comfort of a well-kept home is to the bodily strength and good conditions, to a sound mind and spirit, and useful days, you will reverence the good housekeeper as I do above artist or poet, beauty or genius.

    by Alexandra Lynch on Sun Dec 30, 2012 at 12:45:39 AM PST

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