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by WALTER BRASCH

Wednesday, I called the newsrooms of Pennsylvania’s two largest newspapers.

All I got were disembodied voices telling me no one was available and to leave a message.

It was 11 a.m., and I thought someone—anyone!—should have answered their phones. But, with publishers doing their best to “maximize profits” by cutting news coverage and reporters, I figured they either didn’t have anyone capable of answering a phone or figured no one would be calling with any news that day.

So I left a message. It was a routine question, specific for each newspaper and related to verifying information from their papers for a book I was completing.

I left another message the next day. I would have called individual assignment reporters, but unlike the websites of many smaller newspapers, the metros’ websites didn’t have that information. Apparently, they don’t want readers to know who does what at their newspapers.

Nevertheless, no one called back. I wasn’t important enough.

Calls and emails to an agent for an actor, who I was trying to get for a public service announcement for a national organization, a few weeks earlier weren’t returned. Nor were calls and emails to a national talk show host I was trying to secure for a paid speech to a different national non-profit organization.

Nor were several calls and emails to the producers of pretend-folksy “Ellen” ever returned. In that case, I had a “straight-A” student, who was a mass communications major with minors in marketing and dance. She was one of the best students I had ever taught. She wanted to be an intern. You know, the kind who don’t get pay or benefits but get experience. There were jobs available. It took several calls to others who were affiliated with the show just to find out the names of producers or contacts. But no one from the show returned any of my communications, whether by email, letter, or phone calls. Not even to say my advisee wouldn’t be considered.

Celebrities and their companies get thousands of emails and phone calls. To the average citizen that would be overwhelming. But, to corporations, especially those who deal with the public, there should be sufficient funds in an operation that makes millions a year to hire staff to respond to viewer communications.

Most of the smaller media take pride in returning phone calls or responding to letters from readers and viewers. But something must happen when reporters and producers move into the rarified atmosphere of large media.

It’s too bad. Big Media show arrogance to the people, and then spend countless hours wondering why the people don’t trust them.

Unfortunately, the loss of civility isn’t confined to those who are celebrities or part of the Big Media Morass.

A call to a company that installs home generators went to voice mail, and then wasn’t
returned. A call to an individual who advertises that he cleans out gutters and water spouts also wasn’t returned. A call to a university department was answered. The receptionist said the lady “isn’t around.”

“When will she be around?” I asked.

“Don’t know,” came the response.

“Do you think she’ll be available later today?”

“Maybe. You could call back.”

In many cases, the people are left with the belief that others just don’t care. Or, maybe they’re too busy. Or maybe they just forget. Or maybe they’re too busy texting and tweeting to have time to deal with people. Unless, of course, they think we’re at least as important as they are.

Then, they fall all over themselves to talk with us.

Even with these annoyances, most calls are answered; most times, I (and I would hope others) are treated with respect. Most times, receptionists and staff take extra time to try to solve problems.

Nevertheless, more and more we see a loss of civility by people and organizations that may think they’re just too important to deal with the people. For the large corporations and the celebrities that have multi-million dollar budgets, perhaps their PR and marketing efforts should first be focused on dealing with the people rather than splashing us with large-scale media campaigns to convince us that they matter. Failure to do so will leave us believing that they, not us, are the ones who don’t matter.

[Walter Brasch is an award-winning syndicated columnist, author, and former multimedia writer-producer and university professor. His latest book is Before the First Snow: Stories from the Revolution.]

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Comment Preferences

  •  it is communication exhaustion as Americans (5+ / 0-)

    demand that all of us be available 24 hours a day, 365 days a year and even be available simultaneously to multiple people.  The pity is that some 99% of such communication appears to be unnecessary.  for a six year old to have a cell phone for safety reasons makes sense; for said tot to burn hundreds of hours a month texting and talking does not.

    Perhaps the ultimate was the other day in a restaurant where I observed a young couple with two phones each, unable to talk to each other while they talked and texted simultaneously on their two instruments.  Romantic that I am, I considered that maybe they were calling and texting each other and only suffered from terminal shyness  

  •  I don't answer my personal phone (4+ / 0-)

    if I don't recognize the number; I don't answer my front door if I am not expecting a visitor.  Why?  Because it's always someone trying to get money from me, or, in the case of the front door, someone trying to get a look in my house or bring me to Jesus.

    I don't consider that uncivil though.  It's uncivil for strangers to come into my space and rely on my culturally ingrained politeness and unwillingness to be confrontational, to twist something out of me.

    Do you not see that it is the grossest idolatry to speak of the market as though it were the rival of God?

    by kismet on Mon Jan 14, 2013 at 04:51:40 AM PST

  •  I will not answer the phone (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    penguins4peace

    to any "private", "withheld", "unavailable" or out of area number, unless I am expecting a call.

    Texts will usually get a response, as will virtually all emails sent to me, not me and a million others :)

    I am deeply unhappy with the current free-for-all with telephone numbers, and the "Do Not Call" list is useless.

    If your number starts with an 8 ... don't bother. If that means I miss a fabulous cruise, or the best satellite system in the world, I'll live with it.

    Other than that, I am really quite pleasant and polite on the phone :)

    I hope that the quality of debate will improve,
    but I fear we will remain Democrats.

    Who is twigg?

    by twigg on Mon Jan 14, 2013 at 05:43:50 AM PST

  •  Hmm, so computerized answering systems (0+ / 0-)

    are rude?   Or am I reading this incorrectly?

    Just don't let the likes of the Terminator find out about that - after all - he'll be back!  And, according to recent advertising on TV, seems to have kept that vow.

  •  got a call today from someone I don't know (0+ / 0-)

    asking to share a Bible verse of encouragement. I said no because I was waiting for a call back from a hospital (i've a friend in surgical recovery) and she said she'd call back later. I said, "Please don't!" and hung up my phone.

    LBJ, Lady Bird, Anne Richards, Barbara Jordan, Sully Sullenberger, Ike, Drew Brees, Molly Ivins --Texas is no Bush league! -7.50,-5.59

    by BlackSheep1 on Mon Jan 14, 2013 at 10:22:35 AM PST

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