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Joseph Stiglitz looks at how the widening income gap is making it harder to get the economy rolling again.

Politicians typically talk about rising inequality and the sluggish recovery as separate phenomena, when they are in fact intertwined. Inequality stifles, restrains and holds back our growth. When even the free-market-oriented magazine The Economist argues — as it did in a special feature in October — that the magnitude and nature of the country’s inequality represent a serious threat to America, we should know that something has gone horribly wrong. And yet, after four decades of widening inequality and the greatest economic downturn since the Depression, we haven’t done anything about it. ...

Our skyrocketing inequality — so contrary to our meritocratic ideal of America as a place where anyone with hard work and talent can “make it” — means that those who are born to parents of limited means are likely never to live up to their potential. Children in other rich countries like Canada, France, Germany and Sweden have a better chance of doing better than their parents did than American kids have. More than a fifth of our children live in poverty — the second worst of all the advanced economies, putting us behind countries like Bulgaria, Latvia and Greece.

Are you better off than you were four years ago? The truth is, most workers haven't been able to say yes to that question for forty years.
Adjusted for inflation, real wages have stagnated or fallen; a typical male worker’s income in 2011 ($32,986) was lower than it was in 1968 ($33,880). Lower tax receipts, in turn, have forced state and local cutbacks in services vital to those at the bottom and middle.
Maureen Dowd and Frank Bruni both spend the bulk of their columns focusing on the question that seems to occupy many, many waking hours of NY-based pundits: what will Andrew Cuomo do next? But while one of the columns wonders about Coumo's private life, and the ability of any unmarried person to seek national office, the other concentrates on the governor's skill in directing the legislative process and his actions in steering the first major piece of gun legislation post Newtown.
But with the president privately signaling some pessimism on new gun laws, as his domestic policy aides take a slower, less stringent approach, it’s bracing to see somebody, anybody, actually make government hum. ...

“You have to try to hit a home run,” he said. “Home run hitters also have notoriously high strikeout rates. But it’s like when we tried to pass marriage equality. You have to be willing to fail.” ...

The N.R.A. and Greg Ball, a Republican state senator, denounced the New York law as a product of the governor’s 2016 ambition, although it could hurt Candidate Cuomo in places like Nevada, Colorado and Florida.

The governor doesn’t have the president’s public magnetism. But Cuomo, who devotes a lot of time to wining, dining and wheedling legislators, is far more deft at carrots, sticks and baby-talk than President Obama is. It’s a fascinating — and open — question about whether those skills could work the same way to jolt comatose Washington.

In case you're wondering, it's Dowd's column that concentrates on Cuomo's deal-making skill.

Ross Douthat thinks he knows what President Obama will say on his second inaugural. Reading carefully, it appears that he's going to say that Douthat is an idiot who gets paid to erect straw men and kick them over each week.

Dana Milbank is pre-bored with the innagural.

Obama was reelected less because he inspired the nation than because he discredited his opponent. Most Americans still think that the country is headed in the wrong direction, and just one in five trust their government to do the right thing.

Much of this says less about Obama than about the times. But the president manages to make his own presidency seem smaller by his frequent invocations of our greatest president. Obama, who launched his first presidential campaign in the place where Abraham Lincoln delivered his “House Divided” speech, will place his hand Monday, as he did in 2009, on the Bible Lincoln used for his 1861 inauguration.

You know, Dana, the press at that 1861 inaugural was none too taken with Mr. Lincoln. You may be ready for a nap on Monday, but remember—you're sleeping through history.

David Rothkopf of Foreign Policy magazine has a brief grade card for the president.

Mr. Obama and his team would benefit, as they begin the second term, by acknowledging that many of the biggest problems facing the administration flow directly from the man at the top. Mr. Obama is a lousy manager. As chief executive he gets a “C” — and then only if graded on a curve that takes into account his predecessor’s managerial weaknesses. ...

The administration has not done a good job of delegating to and empowering cabinet officials. Nor does it seem to have built necessary teams and coalitions or anticipated and planned for likely challenges. The Obama team’s failure to make the most of stimulus funding, to make progress on climate change, react swiftly to international crises in Egypt, Libya and Syria, and to maintain good relations with allies on Capitol Hill and beyond stem from lack of managerial skill.

That level of criticism might make you disinclined to read the full article, but I'd recommend you get... re-inclined, if only for the discussion of differing management styles across various administrations.

David Maraniss doesn't expect a repeat of the last innagural. After all, we have a new president.

It took one of the best days of his political career and the worst day of his presidency, in combination, to push his evolution to another stage. These were his reelection on Nov. 6 and the tragedy in Newtown, Conn., 38 days later. His unlikely rise had been shaped by his study of power, beginning with his days as a community organizer in Chicago, and an uncanny ability to avoid traps that would diminish power. The 2012 election, in essence, was his last trap. But the shootings at Sandy Hook Elementary School forced him to reconsider the moral balance of what he had done, or failed to do, to reach that point.
Laura June has a terrific piece up on the history of arcades. Why is this important? Because she shows how the tendency to blame video games for society's ills has been there for as long as there have been games... and maybe even longer. Well worth your time.

Every animal that lives above ground is solar-powered to some degree. We either eat things that get their energy from sunlight, or we eat the things that eat them. But one salamander has a more direct approach.

Originally posted to Devil's Tower on Sat Jan 19, 2013 at 10:43 PM PST.

Also republished by Daily Kos.

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Comment Preferences

  •  Don't Get Me Started On Video Games (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Youffraita, skohayes, Egalitare

    I know you finished with that but it is a pet peve of mine.

    I have been playing video games since the 70s. Now I generally like more puzzle type games. Things like Little Big Planet then FTS (first person shooter). But I own some of them.

    I might have a game where the goal is a head shot but I don't then dream of shooting somebody in the head.

    Ugh!!!!!!!!!!

    When opportunity calls pick up the phone and give it directions to your house.

    by webranding on Sat Jan 19, 2013 at 11:00:21 PM PST

    •  Oh One Other Thing (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Youffraita, skohayes, Egalitare

      As a kid my parents were told it was terrible for me to play D&D with my friends. I had to be using drugs to play that. Satan might be involved.

      My parents were smart enough to know this wasn't true. That maybe their kid reading and playing a game was a good thing, also let me play video games. Heck we played them together.

      When opportunity calls pick up the phone and give it directions to your house.

      by webranding on Sat Jan 19, 2013 at 11:10:38 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  I've been playing video games (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      webranding, Egalitare

      since Pong started it all...and I miss pinball machines, too.

      Generally I agree with you on puzzle games...but for the D&D player, for me, the best ones have been the Elder Scrolls series.  Unfortunately my computer isn't powerful enough for Skyrim -- I really, really want to play Skyrim.  It's fun to explore the world in this series, and there's something cathartic about taking a war axe to a villain who really, really deserves it.

      :-)

      To make the argument that the media has a left- or right-wing, or a liberal or a conservative bias, is like asking if the problem with Al-Qaeda is do they use too much oil in their hummus. Al Franken

      by Youffraita on Sat Jan 19, 2013 at 11:15:04 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  One Of My Favorite Games Is Black (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Youffraita

        a PS2 game. Where the sole goal is to just go kill folks. Game play.

        But is is a darn game. I don't play it and think well tomorrow I will go kill people.

        When opportunity calls pick up the phone and give it directions to your house.

        by webranding on Sat Jan 19, 2013 at 11:24:01 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Well, of course not. (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          skohayes

          I don't think I would enjoy a game whose sole purpose is killing, although I certainly understand the rush one gets from battling through and winning.

          (Then I go off and pick some flowers to make more potions...heh.  In The Elder Scrolls games, alchemy is an excellent skill to develop, even if you're mostly a fighter, not a magic user.)

          Nevertheless, I don't believe games and movies cause people to become berserk mass murderers.  Comics, either, despite what was said in the 1940s & 50s.

          Our politicians want a convenient "evil" to blame, against all evidence.

          Have you seen the diary by the person in Japan?  They play the same games, watch the same movies, and have almost zero gun violence -- mainly b/c few people have guns.

          http://www.dailykos.com/...

          To make the argument that the media has a left- or right-wing, or a liberal or a conservative bias, is like asking if the problem with Al-Qaeda is do they use too much oil in their hummus. Al Franken

          by Youffraita on Sun Jan 20, 2013 at 12:13:33 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

        •  Oh -- one more thing (4+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          skohayes, JayRaye, Ohkwai, janmtairy

          This is tangentially related: NY used to ban pinball machines b/c it was officially considered "gambling" and of course gambling was illegal until the state instituted Lotto.

          Then somebody took it to court.  And a pinball wizard went into that court, announced his shots, made his announced shots, and generally proved to the judge that it's more a game of skill than of pure luck.

          And that is why pinball is legal in NY today.  (I read it in the NYT so it must be true! ;-)

          To make the argument that the media has a left- or right-wing, or a liberal or a conservative bias, is like asking if the problem with Al-Qaeda is do they use too much oil in their hummus. Al Franken

          by Youffraita on Sun Jan 20, 2013 at 12:22:36 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

    •  everyone knows it is comics that is to blame (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Dogs are fuzzy

      with all those exploding heads in every panel.  Fred Wertham told me so

    •  I play FIFA 13 every day (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      wintergreen8694

      I've had no problems at all... except I have this terrible urge to cheer for Manchester United.*

      * - For the non-football-inclined folks in the house (And, yes, it's called football), think Dallas Cowboys, New York Yankees -- essentially a huge, iconic sports-related corporation almost everyone hates. :)

      "If you're going to go down with the ship, make it a submarine." - Wayne Shorter

      by Oliver Tiger on Sun Jan 20, 2013 at 05:39:02 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Trouble in River City (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      DRo, wintergreen8694, ybruti
      Laura June has a terrific piece up on the history of arcades. Why is this important? Because she shows how the tendency to blame video games for society's ills has been there for as long as there have been games... and maybe even longer.
      "Trouble, oh we got trouble,
      Right here in River City!
      With a capital "T"
      That rhymes with "P"
      And that stands for Pool,
      That stands for pool.
      We've surely got trouble!
      Right here in River City,
      Right here!
      Gotta figger out a way
      To keep the young ones moral after school!
      Trouble, trouble, trouble, trouble, trouble..."

      Going to see The Music Man today.

  •  Any doubts about how difficult the battle will be (5+ / 0-)

    to shut down some of the gun cult, with any type of regulations, is seen right here:

    Pro-Gun Rally At Capitol Draws 1,000

    This is in Hartford,CT  the state where Sandy Hook is....

    Says all you need to know what we're up against.

    •  I'm with Kagro. (3+ / 0-)

      Let's just tell them all that their guns are dirty, and let them shoot themselves trying to clean them.

      "Michael Moore, who was filming a movie about corporate welfare called 'Capitalism: A Love Story,' sought and received incentives."

      by Bush Bites on Sun Jan 20, 2013 at 01:23:26 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  It may be worthwhile to point out that (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Phil S 33, hulibow

      any legislative change will more than likely to require the cooperation of gun owners, before all gun owners are painted with a single broad brushstroke.

      •  Well, I certainly agree that probably 75% of (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        tb mare

        gun owners are not the problem; but I would venture that most at that rally yesterday are your fierce 2nd A rights defenders...against ALL regs...

      •  Where are the sensible gun owners? (0+ / 0-)

        The broad brushstroke is hard at work with monster guns on backs of men at JC Penney & our beautiful Capitol hallways - it is making it extremely hard for me to feel like having a reasonable discussion about gun rights.

        I'm pretty tired of being told what I care about.

        by hulibow on Sun Jan 20, 2013 at 05:21:44 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  would I be considered sensible? (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          hulibow, Mark Sumner, Dogs are fuzzy

          I consider myself reasonable and years ago was one of the leaders of the charge against "road hunting" in my state.  At that time it was legal to release deer hounds in the road right of way onto adjoining property and then to shoot the deer as they were driven out of the woods into the roadway.  I was one of those who worked on a governor's commission to find a compromise and, yes, I received death threats.  I find it somewhat confounding to find myself now lumped in with those who in those days, dumped trash in my yard, left deer guts on my doorstep and cherrybombed my mailbox.  

          •  I get it (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            tb mare, Dogs are fuzzy

            my husband is a gun owner, a hunter. He was so disgusted by the obnoxious show of whatever it was at our statehouse today that he mentioned giving up his gun in favor of going back to the bow. I have no issues coming up with some solutions to the gun violence problem that satisfy all, but the NRA going batshit and people walking around town with AK47's on their backs is totally turning me into STFU mode, which is not helpful to finding common ground.

            I'm pretty tired of being told what I care about.

            by hulibow on Sun Jan 20, 2013 at 06:03:06 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

        •  I'm thinking the same place sensible GOPhers are (3+ / 0-)

          Okay, okay, Kos gun owners, don't have a cow -- that's only partially snark.

          But seriously, it seems like the only place "sensible gun owners" gun owners exist is in the polls. There needs to be a concerted, unified effort by gun owners who are okay with what Obama's doing  to stand up and say, "Look, we own guns, we like them, and we're not giving them up. But Newtown was horrific, Wayne LaPierre is a loon, and the NRA is more concerned with weapons manufacturers' profits than it is the safety of our children and our neighbors!"

          It would be good if the Brady Campaign or Gabby Giffords & Mark Kelly's new group could do outreach or set up a companion operation with you. But if they don't do that, I wish some of you would grab onto that entrepreneurial spirit GOPhers say Obama is killing and literally go into business for yourselves! Establish a nonprofit, build a web site, find someone who's willing to go on a talkshow or two, and just do it! You'll feel better, and so will your country!

          "If you're going to go down with the ship, make it a submarine." - Wayne Shorter

          by Oliver Tiger on Sun Jan 20, 2013 at 05:52:12 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

    •  that's not very many (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Dogs are fuzzy

      considering how much noise they make.
      iI  suspect the true number of '2nd amendment' believers is much smaller than they want to believe or admit.

      (Srsly, shouldn't there have been tens of thousands out yesterday in all the urban areas, given how dangerous they believe cities are?)

      (Is it time for the pitchforks and torches yet?)

      by PJEvans on Sun Jan 20, 2013 at 08:54:02 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Righty-o! (0+ / 0-)

        Why not have a day for those of us who SUPPORT Obama on new gun laws, protest?

        In spite of the fact that almost every single progressive gain, from women getting the vote, to the civil rights battles, to labor laws, gay marriage, and Occupy...

        ALL were won because people TOOK TO THE STREETS!

        Demonstrations are fun. I've been in quite a few myself. You get to meet new people, shout meaningful slogans, and make a political point that people notice.

        The internet is fine, but it is NO SUBSTITUTE.

        Don't believe me?

        When was the last time you heard ANY major news outlet headline, "Thousands take to mouse to click link."

        Exactly.

        What separates us, divides us, and diminishes the human spirit.

        by equern on Sun Jan 20, 2013 at 03:55:43 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

    •  Wait a minute, do you mean to tell me... (0+ / 0-)

      that Hartford couldn't scrounge together 1,000 to SUPPORT new gun restrictions???

      1,000 concerned parents, teachers, kids...??

      Really?

      What separates us, divides us, and diminishes the human spirit.

      by equern on Sun Jan 20, 2013 at 03:47:57 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Makes sense. (6+ / 0-)

    A greater part of our national wealth is being hoarded rather than spent, so that's bound to hurt our attempts to juice the economy.

    "Michael Moore, who was filming a movie about corporate welfare called 'Capitalism: A Love Story,' sought and received incentives."

    by Bush Bites on Sun Jan 20, 2013 at 01:21:57 AM PST

  •  Sorry, personal charisma is very important. (4+ / 0-)
    The governor doesn’t have the president’s public magnetism. But Cuomo, who devotes a lot of time to wining, dining and wheedling legislators, is far more deft at carrots, sticks and baby-talk than President Obama is.
    We can all wish that wasn't so, but Mondale, Dukakis, Gore, Kerry AND Clinton and Obama show us that it is.

    "Michael Moore, who was filming a movie about corporate welfare called 'Capitalism: A Love Story,' sought and received incentives."

    by Bush Bites on Sun Jan 20, 2013 at 01:27:09 AM PST

  •  What's the over/under on Roberts.... (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    OleHippieChick, gritsngumbo

    ....screwing up the oath again?

    "Michael Moore, who was filming a movie about corporate welfare called 'Capitalism: A Love Story,' sought and received incentives."

    by Bush Bites on Sun Jan 20, 2013 at 01:28:26 AM PST

  •  Guess we need another MBA president, like W. (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    I love OCD, Minnesota Deb, TomFromNJ

    (snark)

    Part of managing is controlling what you can, and not wasting time on what you can't.

    "Michael Moore, who was filming a movie about corporate welfare called 'Capitalism: A Love Story,' sought and received incentives."

    by Bush Bites on Sun Jan 20, 2013 at 01:32:40 AM PST

  •  Dana Milbank's an idiot. (6+ / 0-)

    What more needs to be said?

    "Michael Moore, who was filming a movie about corporate welfare called 'Capitalism: A Love Story,' sought and received incentives."

    by Bush Bites on Sun Jan 20, 2013 at 01:34:33 AM PST

  •  Damn. It's a bit early in the year for MoDo... (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    bontemps2012, skohayes, ybruti

    ..to write one of her half dozen per anum worth reading entries, isn't it?

    Shock me, woman: make it a new trend, because when you don't stoop to "gossip girl" you do this writing thing rather well.

    When you are right you cannot be too radical; when you are wrong, you cannot be too conservative. --Martin Luther King Jr.

    by Egalitare on Sun Jan 20, 2013 at 03:20:08 AM PST

  •  I have to wonder if salary erosion is not (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    DRo, tb mare

    even deeper than Stiglitz notes.  For example, in 1972, a Chevy Impala cost approximately $3500 and a gallon of milk about $1 (from memory)  While the argument is made, for example, that the latest Chevy is so much more valuable than its 1972 ancestor, I note that the 1972 had AC, power windows and door locks, a V-8 though it was a relative gas hog.  It also had a full frame and was a tank in terms of safety.  Question is if the current model with its safety features and bells and whistles is worth the differential paid, in terms of percentage of a worker's average annual salary?

    •  Also, as I recall (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Van Buren, tb mare

      TV was free and I only had one phone bill that was about three dollars a month.

      Be the change you want to see in the world. -Gandhi

      by DRo on Sun Jan 20, 2013 at 04:56:15 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Only if you're willing to pay for it (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      TomFromNJ

      You're paying for more safety, more emission control and better gas mileage, as well as a computer controlled engine.
      You can still find those 72 Impalas around (gas hog is an understatement), but it would be very expensive to drive!

       photo 1972-impala_zps307a0644.jpg

      “We are not a nation that says ‘don’t ask, don’t tell.’ We are a nation that says ‘out of many, we are one.’” -Barack Obama

      by skohayes on Sun Jan 20, 2013 at 05:11:57 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  And HELL to park! (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Mark Sumner, Egalitare, skohayes

        I owned a 77 Ford LTD -- about the size of Wisconsin, except Wisconsin got better mileage. I hit a deer coming home from a job interview (Watched one deer in the trees for too long, didn't see his partner until it was too late), and thought my radiator would be all over the road. Not only was my radiator intact, the wheels weren't even out of alignment.

        True story: I sold the car to a junkyard when the steering got literally dangerous -- getting the car to go left or right was like turning the Exxon Valdez. I was a radio announcer in central NY at the time (This is WAY back in the day!), and six months later, I was doing a personal appearance at a truck pull. At the end, they brought out two non-famous monster trucks to crush cars they'd bought at a junkyard.

        You got it. My old LTD was the fourth car they brought out, and they turned that sucker into a convertible in five minutes. I had the best time.

        "If you're going to go down with the ship, make it a submarine." - Wayne Shorter

        by Oliver Tiger on Sun Jan 20, 2013 at 06:02:04 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  I know someone (0+ / 0-)

        with a full-sized Chevy Caprice. They describe it as getting yardage, not mileage.

        (Is it time for the pitchforks and torches yet?)

        by PJEvans on Sun Jan 20, 2013 at 08:55:20 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

    •  I had a 72 Mustang (0+ / 0-)

      Black & gold, with air. I wasn't the original owner (it had been repo'd) but I remember my price tag -- $2500. Even working weekends as a high school student, I could make the payments.

      However, there's a additional cost that every 70's car I owned -- every car my family and friends owned -- demonstrated regularly: repairs. Sure, a lot more things went wrong that I knew how to repair (I could replace a fan belt or radiator hose in ten minutes flat) but the number of fuel pumps, tie rods, etc. that went into those cars was just amazing.

      In contrast, I can't tell you the last time I had a car in for repair.

    •  It probably is deeper because... (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      DRo, Mark Sumner

      ...what we hold in common is also diminished. A significantly fewer percentage of people completed higher education with debt that couldn't be retired in a handful of years. Schools employed armies of workers to prepare actual meals on premises and paid them living wages. Waste collection was performed more than once a week.

      We can all compile lists that would be many lines long, but in short our Financial Overlords have decided that no matter how stressed our lives are, we have it "too good." Their spreadsheets tell them that there is still blood to be harvested from turnips. That is, if their future projections of profitability are to be believed in their Gilded Echo Chambers, and that's really all that matters.  :-p

      When you are right you cannot be too radical; when you are wrong, you cannot be too conservative. --Martin Luther King Jr.

      by Egalitare on Sun Jan 20, 2013 at 05:51:42 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  in 1971 my parents (0+ / 0-)

      paid $2000 for a brand-new Toyota Corona. They wrote a check for the full amount. (No AC, no power doors or windows - but it was still on the road in 1988: I was driving it. It was still getting 30mpg on the highway.)

      (Is it time for the pitchforks and torches yet?)

      by PJEvans on Sun Jan 20, 2013 at 08:58:37 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Stiglitz at the macro level. Hirsch at the (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    DRo, ybruti, Dogs are fuzzy

    how-do-we-raise-our-kids level.

    This is over at City Journal, published by the sometimes-sane Rightie Manhattan Institute. They have four of five writers over there worth reading for middle-length pieces. Gelinas's pieces on New Orleans are worth a couple hours, going back and reading through them, if you want to understand what's happening with NOLA and Ray Nagin's environment.

    A Wealth of Words

     E. D. Hirsch, Jr.
    A Wealth of Words
    The key to increasing upward mobility is expanding vocabulary.
    Winter 2013

    A number of notable recent books, including Joseph Stiglitz’s The Price of Inequality and Timothy Noah’s The Great Divergence, lay out in disheartening detail the growing inequality of income and opportunity in the United States, along with the decline of the middle class. The aristocracy of family so deplored by Jefferson seems upon us; the counter-aristocracy of merit that long defined America as the land of opportunity has receded

    ...But we should factor in another cause of receding economic equality: the decline of educational opportunity. There’s a well-established correlation between a college degree and economic benefit. And for guidance on what helps students finish college and earn more income, we should consider the SAT, whose power to predict graduation rates is well documented. The way to score well on the SAT—at least on the verbal SAT—is to have a large vocabulary. As the eminent psychologist John Carroll once observed, the verbal SAT is essentially a vocabulary test.... Vocabulary size is a convenient proxy for a whole range of educational attainments and abilities—not just skill in reading, writing, listening, and speaking but also general knowledge of science, history, and the arts. If we want to reduce economic inequality in America, a good place to start is the language-arts classroom.

    And if we have children, that is where the start needs be, if we are to protect our children going forward.

    A 15-minute read. 4,300 words. Bump up the typeface to TNR 16-point and it goes to 10 pages. Priceless.

    "The Wealth of Words" is a road map that references just why and how these processes work.

    It also explains a large part of why minority students get hammered. Get to 12th Grade on the outside, it's a tough life. For any kid, immersion in no-reading entertainments is a frightening competitor to the processes that transfer civilization.

    "We have done nothing to be ashamed of. We have nothing to apologize for." NRA 12/14/2012 "Have you left no sense of decency, sir, at long last?" Army/McCarthy 1954

    by bontemps2012 on Sun Jan 20, 2013 at 05:15:56 AM PST

  •  Why GOP hates northeast Republicans: Toomey, (0+ / 0-)

    Fitzpatrick, and Meehan are all making sounds (granted probably mostly for show) about oppenness to some general gun control measures. I imagine Toomey is already worried about reelection in 2016 in a presidential year (could be against a popular in Pa. Hillary Clinton or likeable Joe Biden).

    "They will not collect a ransom in exchange for not crashing the American economy. The full faith and credit of the United States of America is not a bargaining chip."

    by TofG on Sun Jan 20, 2013 at 05:42:14 AM PST

  •  The fact is that (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    matching mole

    the right's blame on media violence alone and the left's blame on guns alone are both sadly - but expected - simplistic views by ideologues.

    Neither extreme takes into account how complex modern society is, and both refuse to acknowledge those aspects they happen to dislike/disapprove of.

  •  Doing Better (0+ / 0-)

    "Children in other rich countries like Canada, France, Germany and Sweden have a better chance of doing better than their parents did than American kids have."

    This claim is completely wrong.

    Due to the inevitable laws of mathematics, in relative terms, that chance is the same everywhere.  The chance  is, up to effects of ties, 1/2.  Every time someone moves up into the next quintile, someone else automatically moves down.

    So far as can be foreseen, in absolute terms, almost all children have an excellent chance of being much better off than their parents.

    We can have change for the better.

    by phillies on Sun Jan 20, 2013 at 06:33:46 AM PST

  •  So Obama is a lousy manager. (0+ / 0-)

    Why should we be surprised by that?

    Frankly, nobody who's ever met a law school professor should be surprised by that.

    LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

    by dinotrac on Sun Jan 20, 2013 at 07:57:54 AM PST

    •  The article in Foreign Policy magazine (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      dinotrac

      by David Rothkopf is enlightening about Obama's faults as a manager. My right-wing relative is always complaining about Valerie Jarrett, perhaps deservedly so, according to the article. Rothkopf applauds Eisenhower's managerial skills learned as a general, but he doesn't mention the three dubious major "gifts" Ike gave us: the interstate highway system, which has destroyed neighborhoods and contributed to our suburbanization; the St. Lawrence Seaway, which has introduced destructive non-native species to the Great Lakes; and "atoms for peace", a very expensive experiment in nuclear energy for us taxpayers. Ike thought businessmen were the world's ablest people and stocked his cabinet full of them. "At the pinnacle of his value system were the great captains of industry," says William Manchester in The Glory and the Dream, p. 648.

      The spirit of liberty is the spirit which is not too sure that it is right. -- Judge Learned Hand, May 21, 1944

      by ybruti on Sun Jan 20, 2013 at 09:12:39 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Interstate highway system was a national defense (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        ybruti

        initiative and a good thing besides.

        Did it do a lot of damage along the way (including the death of route 66)? Sure.  How many major government infratstructure programs (think Hoover dam, others) don't?

        The others have to be viewed through a 1950s glass. Truth is, he got a lot of things done -- including the integration of Little Rock schools, the destruction of Joe McCarthy, the Civil Rights Act of 1957, and the creation of NASA.

        LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

        by dinotrac on Sun Jan 20, 2013 at 10:11:40 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  meh, Milbank admited being a repub & voting romney (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    KayCeSF

    weeks ago

    WAPO carried his piece admitting such right after the election

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/...

    I voted Republican on Tuesday.

    While I am coming clean about my biases, I should probably also confess: I haven’t voted for a Democrat in any of the past four presidential elections.

    Yeah, he isnt a foaming at the mouth teahadist and more like an andrea mitchelle type of repub but in the end per his own written and published admission he is a repub and voted romney so what do you expect when he writes about Obama, Dems, liberals, progressiveness, etc
    •  wow. Milbank. I have always had my suspicions (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      DEMonrat ankle biter

      that he was a Republican. Thanks for confirming what I felt was true.  

      I would rather spend my life searching for truth than live a single day within the comfort of a lie. ~ John Victor Ramses

      by KayCeSF on Sun Jan 20, 2013 at 08:25:08 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

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