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Last year around this time, the New York Conservative Party essentially launched the campaign of Wingnut Wendy Long for US Senate, against Senator Kirsten Gillibrand, at its annual winter meeting in Albany.

Long made a good impression on the most conservative old white men in the state, who endorsed her and helped her win the GOP primary against Congressman Bob Turner.

In the general election, Gillibrand won 72 percent of the vote -- the highest for any statewide politician ever.

But the Conservatives still love Wingnut Wendy, for her ultra-Catholic no-exceptions position on abortion, stated refusal to attend a same-sex wedding, and demonstrated fealty to the far right.

And they want more of her -- she'll be speaking at the Conservatives' confab Sunday (right before Grover Norquist) and their latest newsletter encourages her to get landslided again.

More, below.

The newsletter article, headlined "A Long Run", recalls the thrill that Long generated a year ago:

Conservatives were committed to the one candidate who excelled in January at their conference. Wendy Long’s interview awoke a genuine excitement many had not felt for a long time for a candidate.

Mrs. Long was an indisputable conservative, natural and comfortable with people, and completely at ease with the principles of the conservative movement.

Sure she was essentially unknown, hadn't raised any money, and was the most conservative candidate for US Senate from New York in at least four decades, but she was the 100-percent, non-RINO conservative that the Conservative Party has always wanted, and rarely found, for a major statewide race.

So how could a Conservative champion lose in the worst NY landslide ever?

Mrs. Long traveled the state and encountered great enthusiasm for her
genuine nature, her ability to relate to their problems, and how her years of playing rugby prepared her for the rough and tumble game of politics (!?).

Unfortunately, no preparation can prepare you for the media blackouts of
your events or the catch-22 the lack of media attention brings to a campaign.

Of course, it was all the librul media's fault, for not covering every event attended by a few dozen teabaggers and not treating her press releases as news.

There's a reason the media didn't publish/broadcast much about Long -- she never got within 30 points of Gillibrand in any poll, was an unexpectedly lousy fund-raiser ignored by Rove, DeMint and the Kochs, and clearly had little appeal to voters outside the Republican base.

Not to worry, she's still viable as a future candidate, in the NY Conservative hive mind:

Wendy Long did all she could do with the hand she was dealt. Senator Jim
Buckley did not win his first time out either, but did lay the groundwork for his next run.

We can only hope that someday Wendy Long will once again be willing to make the sacrifices every candidate makes when they run for office.

One thing is certain, if Wendy Long ever decides to run for public office again, she will have a place on our line. Wendy Long is a woman who is honest, understands the issues and understands the Constitution.

Whatever office she might seek, her integrity will be her guide — and we will know she has the drive and determination needed to make the tough decisions that will restore
America and New York to a society that relies on itself, not government.

Wendy Long is one of us.

I don't agree with the Conservative Party on anything but this -- Wingnut Wendy Long should run for office again.

Maybe next time she'll crack 30 percent, but she won't get anywhere near winning.

And that will demonstrate, again, that the NY Conservative Party can't win with their preferred wingnut candidates, and only exist to trade their ballot line for patronage jobs from Republicans.  

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Comment Preferences

  •  Tip Jar (8+ / 0-)

    A public option for health insurance is a national priority.

    by devtob on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 04:37:13 PM PST

  •  Wow. (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    devtob, MRA NY, RonV, PinHole

    It's amazing that they are that out of touch with reality.

    Gillibrand will remain a tough challenge, but the GOP will have to find a serious candidate to make an impression. Wendy ain't it.

    "The marriage fight is over when we say it's over, and it's over when we win."
    —Dan Savage

    by Scott Wooledge on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 05:36:54 PM PST

    •  Their reality is different from ours (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      MRA NY, Scott Wooledge

      When they can rouse their rabble to defeat, in one way or another, two Republican state senators for the sin of voting for marriage equality, they figure they're a force to be reckoned with.

      Despite the Long debacle.

      A public option for health insurance is a national priority.

      by devtob on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 05:58:40 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  At the local level (4+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        MRA NY, devtob, Scott Wooledge, PinHole

        they are in fact a force to reckoned with... at least... their ballot line is. They can make a difference in state senate and lower level races.

        But nothing above that. They don't have anywhere near the juice.

        "Do what you can with what you have where you are." - Teddy Roosevelt

        by Andrew C White on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 06:09:23 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  I doubt that votes on the Conservative line (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Scott Wooledge

          make any difference at all, in any race where the Republican has that line.

          Because any Conservative vote would surely be a Republican vote, if the Conservative line were not available.

          Occasionally, the Conservatives run one of their own, who almost always loses and sometimes helps elect a Democrat -- the Saland-Gipson state senate race this year, the Owens-Scozzafava-Hoffman Congressional special in 2009, and way back when Ned Pattison got re-elected to Congress in 1976.

          I'm sure there are a few others I'm unaware of.

          A public option for health insurance is a national priority.

          by devtob on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 06:38:02 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  Well... this argument can be made (4+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            devtob, Scott Wooledge, PinHole, slothlax
            Because any Conservative vote would surely be a Republican vote, if the Conservative line were not available.
            But the counter argument is that if you look at race after race after race comparing just numbers on the D and R lines and they are either neck and neck or, quite often, the Democrat is winning... but that when you add in the C and I lines the Republican ends up winning by anywhere from a couple thousand to 10k or more.

            Now you are right that many of those would have simply voted R had they no other choice but that is not guaranteed. A lot of those folks might have passed on that race. Fusion balloting is a really screwy way of doing things but those ballot lines are incredibly important. When the Democratic candidate succeeds in either capturing one of them or at the least denying it to the Republican the difference is tangible and sometimes makes the difference between winning and losing.

            "Do what you can with what you have where you are." - Teddy Roosevelt

            by Andrew C White on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 07:00:06 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  Yeah, a D with an I (or especially a C)= win (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              devtob, Andrew C White

              at least in most cases.  WFP always runs behind C and competes with I for fourth place.

              I love fusion balloting, it allows me to show Democrats that I have their back, but I'm on their left.

              There is truth on all sides. The question is how much.

              by slothlax on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 11:00:11 PM PST

              [ Parent ]

              •  Which is exactly why those lines (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                slothlax

                are important. People that don't want to pull the D or R lever can still vote for one of the mainline party candidates without voting on the party line. Often, as devtob points out, those votes would occur on the main line anyhow. But often enough they are voters for the opposite party that don't like their parties candidate for some reason but won't vote on the opposing party line but will vote for the opposing parties candidate on a third party line.

                "Do what you can with what you have where you are." - Teddy Roosevelt

                by Andrew C White on Sat Jan 26, 2013 at 09:15:33 AM PST

                [ Parent ]

          •  I'm not so sure (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            PinHole, devtob

            They run in local races against Republicans and win.  I think that kind of actual power builds loyalty and allows voters on the C line to really think that they are not Republicans.  If every local election is for an unopposed Republican and every state or national election is for a relatively moderate Republican, the people who feel conservative enough to vote Conservative year after year might just stay home.  I think it helps turnout.

            There is truth on all sides. The question is how much.

            by slothlax on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 10:56:13 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

    •  No serious Republican (5+ / 0-)

      runs for US Senate in New York.

      They run for state senate, they run for Mayor, they run for county executive, they run for the US House, and if they are reall feeling their oats they run for Governor and hope they run against a second tier Democrat.

      But they don't run for US Senate. Not even 2nd tier Republicans run for US Senate.

      "Do what you can with what you have where you are." - Teddy Roosevelt

      by Andrew C White on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 06:06:29 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  We've had Republicon US Senators (3+ / 0-)

        But they were liberal Republicons.  The current Party candidates cannot be elected in New York.

        Never be afraid to voice your opinion and fight for it . Corporations aren't people, they're Republicans (Rev Al Sharpton 10/7/2011)

        by Rosalie907 on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 08:21:23 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Not in a long, long time (0+ / 0-)

          and the state was vastly more Republican back then. Combination of the state demographic becoming more Democratic and the Republican party becoming more radical and less the liberal sort that New Yorkers might have voted for in the past.

          But the last serious candidate the Republican fielded for US Senate was D'Amato and he lost 14 years ago now. Since then they have all been third tier candidates at best.

          "Do what you can with what you have where you are." - Teddy Roosevelt

          by Andrew C White on Sat Jan 26, 2013 at 09:19:21 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

      •  Not anymore... (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        devtob, Andrew C White

        Last time a GOP won statewide and won was Pataki. The Republican party's statewide viability is becoming a thing of the past.

        "The marriage fight is over when we say it's over, and it's over when we win."
        —Dan Savage

        by Scott Wooledge on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 09:10:38 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

    •  Conservative is not GOP (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      devtob

      In New York its two completely separated, yet closely allied, parties.  Don't think the Republicans are on board for this.  The Conservative Party normally just backs the Republican, but sometimes they run their own candidate.  And every once in a while they get to run the actual candidate in a race like this, because the Republicans know they are going to lose big.  I wouldn't read too much into this.

      There is truth on all sides. The question is how much.

      by slothlax on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 10:51:05 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  I Played Rugby (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    devtob, Rosalie907, Scott Wooledge

    and I've refereed it for a lot longer than I played.  I've loved almost all of it and enjoy (mostly) the company of the players.  It takes an amazingly stupid person to claim that there is any   comparison between politics and rugby.

    Eat, drink, and be fat and drunk.

    by Ref on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 06:12:37 PM PST

    •  Some marriage equality opponent (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      devtob

      in Rhode Island House gave some rambling, incomprehensible speech about how football isn't soccer and soccer isn't football....

      My friend tweeted, "Gays can't get married because soccer."

      LOL.

      "The marriage fight is over when we say it's over, and it's over when we win."
      —Dan Savage

      by Scott Wooledge on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 09:13:40 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  The Cons aren't stupid, I think (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    PinHole, devtob
    And that will demonstrate, again, that the NY Conservative Party can't win with their preferred wingnut candidates, and only exist to trade their ballot line for patronage jobs from Republicans.
    I hope those guys already understand this.  That's the best way to use a minor party ballot line in NY politics, not actually run your own candidates.  Unless you want to play a decades long game like the Greens.

    By the way, I checked the results for the Senate race to see if maybe Long at least got a bump for the Conservative line in her race.  She did a bit perhaps, if you compare her votes to Romney's.  She came close to parity with Romney on the Conservative line, but fell far short of his total on the Republican line.  So a much larger share of her vote came from the Conservative line.

     Actually, Gillibrand got more Working Family votes (including mine) than Long got Conservative votes!  I've never seen WFP beat the Cons on a ballot, in any race ever.  Not saying I've reviewed the results of every race in all of NY that both parties have had a line, but in the many races I have looked at the results, I've never seen that.

    There is truth on all sides. The question is how much.

    by slothlax on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 10:47:36 PM PST

  •  The Conservative Confab (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    slothlax, devtob

    in Albany will also feature Annie M Buerkle, late of NY #25 (Syracuse area)   She's a clone of Wendy Wingnut (or the other way around).  

    Annie will be traveling from DC where she is trying to land a job to keep her oar in the water after loosing the election.   She excelled at doing nothing, pushing her forced birther agenda, naming a PO, following the talking points of Paul Ryan, and saying "no".

    I'm surprised they didn't bring in another Annie or Allen West - they both did cameo fundraising appearances across upstate in the fall.  Rousing the hate meters.

    Fortunately Dan Maffei is now the Rep in Congress for the redrawn #24.

  •  Co-incidence? (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    devtob

    In an article on new gun show rules in NYS in the Syracuse paper, it is pointed out that one of the first gun shows having to follow the new rules, will be in Albany, this week-end.

    Is this a co-incidental scheduling with a gathering of Conservatives  ????
    ********
    The new procedures will be in effect for the Albany Gun Show being held at the Empire State Plaza Convention Center on this Saturday and Sunday.

    NYS Attorney General Schneiderman commends the NY Arms Collectors Association for its cooperation with the new gun show regulation. Mostly tightening up background checks and monitoring parking lot sales.  

    Maybe some who have worried that the sky and the Governor were going to fall on them and confiscate their guns will find out that will not happen.  

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