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Rick Perry signing something official with his tongue sticking out.
Rick Perry, seen here designing a new printed circuit board
Texas Gov. Rick Perry is continuing his efforts to poach California jobs instead of creatin' some of his own, but I have to think it's mostly for show. The California governor insulted him, so now he's gonna double up his previously lame efforts:
Texas Gov. Rick Perry is stepping up efforts to woo the California business community, even as his earlier attempts were dismissed as “barely a fart” by the Golden State governor.

The GOP governor of the Lone Star State will leave on Sunday for a swing through San Francisco, Silicon Valley, Los Angeles and Orange County, where he will meet with “business leaders in the high tech, biotechnology, financial, insurance and film industries,” according to a statement from his office released Thursday.

As Markos pointed out, businesses in Silicon Valley and other California tech hot spots are there for a reason. They're not going to be eager to pick up and move to Perry's vision of a low wage, low education state. Perry's not trying to woo them by promising anything except lower taxes, but if these companies are in California, they're already plenty familiar with the tax issue, and still made their choice.

Perry is trying hard to make Texas into a business-friendly state mainly by slashing taxes and dumping as many worker protections as possible, thus turning the state into a slightly more convenient Mexico. (Sorry, Mexico. I mean no insult.) Low-wage industries love that approach; more specialized industries and, frankly, more decent ones don't care so much. As far as I can tell, then, Perry's not-entirely-serious pitch to California businesses is "hey, you could maybe move all your crap jobs to Texas, right?" The industries he's targeting (all right, insurance, I'll give you that one) don't have all that many crap jobs, though. They're based where they are for a reason.

Maybe California should try poaching some jobs from Texas in retaliation. Texas still has its own vibrant tech base, though Rick Perry can claim responsibility for exactly none of it—maybe the California pitch could be "Come move to California. We don't have Rick Perry."

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Comment Preferences

      •  No less: bad at arithmetic (12+ / 0-)

        Previously, Texas has been able to poach a couple dozen of 100 or so California businesses leaving the state.

        Meanwhile,  in the same period of time, there were 137,000 (if memory serves) new businesses start ups in the state of California.

      •  Perry's message to Silicon Valley: (8+ / 0-)

        Let's put teh stupid back in high tech!

      •  That is an old game now. Anti "critical thinking" (8+ / 0-)

        was rampant in the late 1970s and 1980s with school boards being faced with near mobs of preachers and their flock demanding a stop. Long ago, when I lived down south a while, I heard fundamentalist preacher in a series of preachers and their flock make quite a speech out of the platform quote from your link:

        have the purpose of challenging the student’s fixed beliefs and undermining parental authority
        Yer damn right! Can't have those innocent kids coming home from school questioning the stuff they get in Sunday school can we? Asking embarrassing questions of their parents? Gotta get back, and a near quote here, to those three Rs: "read'n, ritin 'n rithmatik" that are neglected.

        I had fliers stuck on my windshield in parking lots with demands to focus on those three "Rs" spelled about as I quote above and to stop commie "critical thinking" undermining our Christian nation. Sometimes, if I'd been gone long, my car also accumulated the bright pink "fluoridation is a commie plot" handbill too. Some were agin chlorination too. That was in a state ranked somewhere in the bottom five in almost every good criterion and high in the bad—also with pretensions of attracting "high tech" companies with low tax, low wages and the rest of that suite. Almost forty years later their rankings are pretty much the same.

        The only foes that threaten America are the enemies at home, and those are ignorance, superstition, and incompetence. [Elbert Hubbard]

        by pelagicray on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 02:13:24 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Sheesh, try teaching moral 'reasoning' or values (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          helpImdrowning, dewtx, pelagicray

          clarification, analysis and philosophy of ethics without getting fire and brimstone rained your way. Referencing anthropology, mythology, comparative literature, cross species physiology and differentiation by locality and time periods, or bringing up cross-cultural studies can all bring out the crazies in force.  

          Suggesting human physiology, has changed from even a mere 10,000 years ago, and is still adapting (in some positive ways), and will keep changing over time is tantamount to summoning the Devil, since the fundies all presume we're spoiled by Original Sin and humanity can only get worse, not better, or else Jesus won't need to Rapture them and Return. This means talking about blood types and when they appeared in history is anathema.  Keep in mind the AB+ blood type apparently didn't even exist until perhaps 900 C.E. (er A.D. for Bible Belters)...yep, think of that, a new human blood type appearing after the times of Jesus and his redeeming blood, after the Apostles, after the rise of the Papacy, but before the bloody Crusades.

          Try talking about cellular evolution and the evolutionary jump made when mitochondria were taken inside a larger cell, adaptively, and they became symbiotically linked for energy production, and that the DNA of mitochondria are traceable only on the maternal side...which means DNA replication is different for....yeah, see, it all just gets so baffling once led outside those pages of Genesis.

          When life gives you wingnuts, make wingnut butter!

          by antirove on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 04:11:24 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  It is a pattern in the fundamental religious world (0+ / 0-)

            of all religions where counter-factual myths must dominate in order for the continued existence of the religion or sect. The segments outside the fundamentalist groups try various coping methods with some success and manage to be less obviously ridiculous. What we, as secular citizens and the less fundamentalist religious people, are facing is an aggressive push back by segments insisting they not be confronted by facts even in the "public square" of normal life.

            In this country we are seeing a great deal of that from fundamentalist Christians who see public education teaching anything but the "three Rs" as a threat because it really is difficult for a sane mind to juggle ancient beliefs with modern science. Though evolution is the most frequent target the entire scientific body of evidence is the ultimate target. Geology without plate tectonics is just quaint. Astronomy without that aspect of looking back in time over light years is just plotting positions, categorizing and naming of the past. Physics, beyond simple mechanics and such depends on things these groups find threatening.

            As with the TP/GOP, this element of society is deeply set against the reason and knowledge clawed by dedicated researchers over the past few hundred years. They would apparently all like to see a reversion to 1860 when "races knew their place" and the world was nice and static without seafloors spreading and continents moving.

            These moves are part and parcel with not just opting out of the entire modern world but of trying to impose their primitive views upon it and us all. It goes to this relatively new and aggressive claim of religious liberty trumping the rights of all other citizens as with state licensed pharmacists refusing to fill legal birth control prescriptions and that whole argument in health care now.

            I've no particular objections to these groups going off into isolated communities—as long as they obey the laws of the land. I've enjoyed retreats to the past in monasteries, Catholic and Zen, or little vacations into the 19th century in Amish country. I have no wish to force them to conform with anything but the basics of law and can be tolerant of their retreat from the world. When any such group wants to impose those views outside I, and I think we should all, push back very hard. For example, pharmacy is a state regulated profession for public safety. The license is dependent upon a pharmacist performing the functions without intrusion of personal belief and refusal to do so should end that career path with license revocation.

            The only foes that threaten America are the enemies at home, and those are ignorance, superstition, and incompetence. [Elbert Hubbard]

            by pelagicray on Sun Feb 10, 2013 at 05:45:42 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

      •  why would a creative smart parent (4+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Possiamo, dewtx, Eyesbright, Julie Gulden

        want to live in a place where the kids are taught that the earth is flat, climate change is a hoax, and jesus rode on a dinosaur?

        It's no contest.  Totally we need to poach the silicon prarie companies.

        Hay hombres que luchan un dia, y son buenos Hay otros que luchan un año, y son mejores Hay quienes luchan muchos años, y son muy buenos. Pero hay los que luchan toda la vida. Esos son los imprescendibles.

        by Mindful Nature on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 03:57:42 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

    •  I assume you're talking about this DKos diary: (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Eyesbright, Julie Gulden

      Scariest Horror Movie - not the Exorcist, it's the PBS documentary on the Texas Board of Education.

      The Texas Board of Education, while better since the former young-earth creationist head of the Texas Board of Education (who is a principal subject in this amazing documentary) was defeated for reelection, and Texas public education, always chronically underfunded by the Texas legislature and which recently lost an important court case regarding the constitutional equity of its education funding, is still nothing to write home about, especially compared to California's attitude toward education. That's why many California companies will have some reluctance to move their companies to Texas--the abysmally poor state of public education in Texas.

      Men must learn now with pity to dispense; For policy sits above conscience. — William Shakespeare, 'Timon of Athens', Act III, Scene II

      by dewtx on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 02:51:03 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  They teach creationism there! (6+ / 0-)

      That'll pull in the biotech industry that is currently located around our universities that actually teach real science and graduate people who can do more than simply recite "gawd dun it".

      I don't get mad. I get stabby!" - Fat Tony D'Amico

      by sizzzzlerz on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 03:27:52 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Did he mention the money they will have to pay (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      dewtx

      him under the tabel? What about that while unskilled workers are cheap skilled workers are.... mostly in other states. Did he mention the bad reputation of Texas education and how little they are putting into it. There are several court battles going on by wealthy school districts not liking all their money going to poor districts. Did he mention Texas is trying to not use Obamacare so workers here will not have the choices other states will. I could go on and on but I don't think California has to worry too much.

      Our money system is not what we have been led to believe. The creation of money has been "privatized," or taken over by private money lenders. Thomas Jefferson called them “bold and bankrupt adventurers just pretending to have money.” webofdebt

      by arealniceguy on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 08:39:05 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Save money on taxes, (24+ / 0-)

    then spend the savings bringing in workers who have the education to do the job. Yeah, that makes sense. Guess he just wanted some Dungeness crab and a Disneyland trip and needed an excuse to stick Texas taxpayers with the tab.

    There's only one rule that I know of, babies -- goddammit, you've got to be kind. -- Kurt Vonnegut

    by Cali Scribe on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 01:36:44 PM PST

    •  Spend more trying to convince them Texas is great (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Dirtandiron, Eyesbright

      And a wonderful place to live.

      Yeah, right. I can see all kinds of different people feeling right at home in Texas. Not.

      Women create the entire labor force. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Sympathy is the strongest instinct in human nature. - Charles Darwin

      by splashy on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 03:46:55 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Watching the dance of insanity continue, I often (11+ / 0-)

    think about how horrified people like Rick Perry (and the rest of the Konservative Krew) would feel to see themselves on video, hologram, whatever have you, in 20 years.  Then i remember that they have no shame.  

    Someone once asked me why do you always insist on taking the hard road? and I replied why do you assume I see two roads?

    by funluvn1 on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 01:37:17 PM PST

  •  He just wants to go on vacation to the west (22+ / 0-)

    coast at tax payer expense.

    “Parties do not lead revolutions. They follow them. And then only when forced to.” Joe Bageant

    by tgypsy on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 01:37:48 PM PST

    •  Well, (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      JeffW, rbird, Aunt Pat, tgypsy

      sure

      Someone once asked me why do you always insist on taking the hard road? and I replied why do you assume I see two roads?

      by funluvn1 on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 01:38:45 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  At least it's not Hawaii (8+ / 0-)

      And at least he's not merely a county sheriff!

      Jon Husted is a dick.

      by anastasia p on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 01:42:37 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  the first sane comment (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      tgypsy

      Perry is a bad conservative.  He used his presidential campaign as a book tour, at great expense to the Texas taxpayer.  

      OTOH if the true fiscal conservative Bill White, a true fiscal conservative, had been elected governor, I would expect the same kind of trips from him.  Though there are reasons for businesses to exist in California, there are equally good reasons why some business should consider moving to Texas.  Not only for social reasons, like the fact that  the Texas Police forces tend to be less corrupt than California PD, or that Texas does not have nearly the problem of allowing the murder of young black people that California has, but for real business reasons as well.

      For instance, I have no idea why Tesla motors does not have more of a presence in Texas.  I see Lotuses around here all the time, and you can't throw a stone without hitting a mercedes.  THere is money around here.  It would be easy enough to build charging stations along the major thoroughfares.  And we already have public charging stations around the state provided by retailers.

      •  I have spent some time visiting Houston, (5+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Possiamo, EWembley, FiredUpInCA, tgypsy, SeekCa

        Dallas, San Antonio, and Austin and have no personal issue with the state of Texas, and have in fact enjoyed my visits.  That being said, I have lived in California most of my life and all I can say to you is; mountains, beaches, and weather, weather, and weather.

        "Too often we enjoy the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought." - John F. Kennedy -7.8., -6.6

        by helpImdrowning on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 04:25:59 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  LOL! He's so wrapped up in the task at hand (14+ / 0-)

    that his tongue is sticking out.  That'll surely help. Maybe he can commission Dubya to do a portrait of it.

    Inspiration is hard to come by. You have to take it where you find it. --- Bob Dylan.

    by figbash on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 01:39:52 PM PST

  •  He's not too good at math: (18+ / 0-)
    Rick Perry has made corporate recruitment a hallmark of his administration making frequent trips to lure prospective businesses while at the same time preaching austerity for the masses and cutting services to the population. Texas gave up more than $250 million in tax revenues to Amazon alone, in exchange for 2,500 jobs (amounts to about $100,000 per job. (for workers are paid $20,000 to $30,000 a year))

    Be the change you want to see in the world. -Gandhi

    by DRo on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 01:40:39 PM PST

  •  "Come to California, coyotes are safer here" (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    rbird, billstewart, Aunt Pat, poemworld
    The firearms manufacturer that makes the Ruger handgun is capitalizing on the recent news reports that Texas Governor Rick Perry shot and killed a coyote with a Ruger .380 while on an early morning jog with his daughter’s Labrador.  Ruger has released a special Ruger .380 commemorating this occasion.

    On the box it comes in it says “For Sale to Texans Only.”  It says “Coyote Special” on one side of the barrel and “A True Texan” on the other side of the barrel.  The top of the barrel has a Texas star and a Coyote howling to a full moon.

    Warning - some snark above‽ (-9.50; -7.03)‽ "We're like a strip club with a million bouncers and no strippers." (HBO's Real Time, January 18, 2013)

    by annieli on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 01:40:50 PM PST

  •  Not making sense (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    PSzymeczek
    Perry is trying hard to make Texas into a business-friendly state mainly by slashing taxes and dumping as many worker protections as possible... Low-wage industries love that approach; more specialized industries and, frankly, more decent ones don't care so much.
    I don't get it.

    1. Wouldn't the "more specialized" industries like to pay less in taxes so that they could use the extra money for, you know, R&D and those other things money is good for for "more specialized" industries.

    2. Cannot the companies belonging to these "more specialized" industries treat their workers as nice as they like even without the government holding a gun to their head to make them do it? Heck, with the lower taxes, they could pay their workers even more, and with the lower cost of living in TX, it's a win-win.

    •  Hasn't Been the History. Wages are a Write Off (8+ / 0-)

      so there's incentive from higher taxes to pay better.

      Peak earning and wealth years for the middle class was the late 60's when individual and business taxes were much higher.

      We are called to speak for the weak, for the voiceless, for victims of our nation and for those it calls enemy.... --ML King "Beyond Vietnam"

      by Gooserock on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 01:49:35 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Could be these specialized industries (7+ / 0-)

      can't attract the specialized employee skill sets in the Texas labor market. And with the problems with the education system in this state, it may not get better any time soon. The low taxes do you no good if you can't find the right personnel for the job. Only saying....

      Can I get a Grey Goose on the rocks over here?!

      by G Contractor on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 02:05:29 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  In many cases... (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        RedPrairie, DRo

        ...yes, they can.  

        Dallas and Austin both have healthy and vibrant hi tech sectors, and plenty of good engineers can be found in either city.

        That said, most of us originally moved here from out of state, which does say something about the Texas educational system, doesn't it?

        Political Compass: -6.75, -3.08

        by TexasTom on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 03:47:50 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  I too relocated here several years ago. (0+ / 0-)

          And not of my own free will. I keep hoping we transplants will soon cause a lighter shade of red in this state. However, that only seems to be happening in the Dallas, Houston, Austin and San Antonio metros.  

          Can I get a Grey Goose on the rocks over here?!

          by G Contractor on Sun Feb 10, 2013 at 09:06:40 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  The problem is... (0+ / 0-)

            ...that Texas is a big state.  And that means that large as Dallas, Houston, Austin, and San Antonio are, those areas alone aren't sufficient to swing this state blue...or even purple.  And that is really the difference between us and most blue states -- I'm originally from Washington state, and in that state, Seattle and Tacoma are sufficient to counteract the extremely conservative eastern side of the state.

            Political Compass: -6.75, -3.08

            by TexasTom on Sun Feb 10, 2013 at 11:49:37 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

    •  Why then (9+ / 0-)

      is Mississippi not the Silcon Valley of the U.S.?   Decent companies tend to trend away from 3rd world shitholes like Mississippi and the Texas of Perry's dreams.  

    •  The people that work in those industries (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Eyesbright

      Are more likely to really feel out of place in Texas, with its intolerance and arrogance.

      A large percentage are very diverse, so why would they want to move to a place where they would be treated badly by the populace and police because of how they looked?

      Women create the entire labor force. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Sympathy is the strongest instinct in human nature. - Charles Darwin

      by splashy on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 03:52:02 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Aren't they just going to laugh at him? (13+ / 0-)

    He's trolling California to impress Texas voters.  Jesus Christ.

    I think he's doing it just to get press so he can be the savior of the lost cause of the GOP.

    Republicans: Taking the country back ... to the 19th century

    by yet another liberal on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 01:41:06 PM PST

  •  I would think they'd be discouraged (22+ / 0-)

    by the way Texas is dismantling education, trying to force religious beliefs into the curriculum and objecting to things like the teaching of independent and creative thinking (because — gasp! — you might not have an uncritical belief in every word of the Bible!) That anti-science, anti-intellectual approach would not seem conducive to a Silicon Valley type business.

    Jon Husted is a dick.

    by anastasia p on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 01:41:59 PM PST

  •  An excellent example (14+ / 0-)

    Microsoft was founded in New Mexico. They moved when they couldn't find educated employees.

    Now there are over 40,000 Microsoft jobs in the Puget Sound area, which could have been in New Mexico if there had been good schools in NM.

    •  Bad example (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      dewtx

      MITS, their first customer, was in Albuquerque.  That's why they started here.  MITS was bought out a couple years later and the brand disappeared. MS had like thirteen employees when they decided to move to the Seattle area.  They moved primarily because of Seattle Computer Products, who became one of the central MS customers and partners.  I don't think the employee base or the schools in New Mexico had anything to do with it.

      Tell me what to write. tellmewhattowrite.com 'To know what is right and to do it are two different things.' - Chushingura, a tale of The Forty-Seven Ronin

      by rbird on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 02:29:01 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Yeah, the fact that they both (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        dewtx

        grew up in Seattle and their families were here and it's a lovely place to live had absolutely nothing to do with it.

        •  That, too (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          dewtx, Eyesbright

          A little extra bonus to the decision.  Most of the histories I've read stress MITS and SCP, but near to family and the old home town, that had to have played a role.

          Here's a great vignette of their days in Albuquerque.

          GATES: Next door was a vacuum-cleaner place, then a massage parlor. To get to our offices, you had to walk past the vacuum-cleaner guy. We stayed in this motel down the road called the Sand and Sage. We're talking real sage, not some hypothetical thing. Every morning all the cars in the parking lot had all this sagebrush and tumbleweed that blew underneath them.
          http://money.cnn.com/...

          ABQ only had a population of around 250,000 back then.  We've grown a bit since.

          Tell me what to write. tellmewhattowrite.com 'To know what is right and to do it are two different things.' - Chushingura, a tale of The Forty-Seven Ronin

          by rbird on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 03:00:30 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

      •  Nice confirmation... (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        antirove, dewtx
        By the end of 1978, a wave of impressive personal computers, including Apple Computer's landmark Apple II, had left MITS in the dust. There was no longer any reason for Microsoft--now a dozen employees strong--to hang around Albuquerque. On January 1, 1979, Gates and Allen transplanted the business to the lush and soggy Seattle suburb of Bellevue, where it took root. Within a year the head count had swelled to more than 35 people...
        http://money.cnn.com/...

        Like I said, MITS hit the skids.  That was the real reason they left Albuquerque.

        Tell me what to write. tellmewhattowrite.com 'To know what is right and to do it are two different things.' - Chushingura, a tale of The Forty-Seven Ronin

        by rbird on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 02:48:37 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  # 1 Reason Why Rick Perry is in California (9+ / 0-)

    He has a vacation home in San Diego. Quality of life, y'know.

  •  Perry and the GOP (20+ / 0-)

    cut over $5 billion from education last year. Texas has one of the fastest-growing student populations in the country. As a TX public school employee, I cannot stress enough what a stupid move this is. Lawmakers refused to even touch the state's enormous Rainy Day Fund, which makes it clear that this was what they really wanted to do all along: slash the public workforce, so that they could hand out more tax breaks and business "incentives" to their cronies. I'm hoping voters wake up to this nonsense.

    And the state, under the GOP, has fallen down on its commitment to public funding of universities. When I went to UT 20 years ago, my tuition/fees, in today's dollars, was $1000 per semester. Today, it's over $6000 per semester - truly moving out of the reach of those with modest means.

    So, anyway, if California businesses want to move to a state where education is swirling the toilet (though the worst effects might not have shown up yet), where their kids can be taught voodoo Young Earth creationism instead of science, and where public universities are going to have a significant cost, then yeah, by all means, they are welcome.

    Austin is also becoming a victim of its own success - it is no longer WAY cheaper to buy a house here as compared to CA. We have all the problems of traffic and overcrowding that the CA companies wanted to escape from.

  •  Number one reason Perry Comes to California (6+ / 0-)

    He has a vacation home in San Diego. For real!

  •  Ricky , buddy , pal o mine (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    JeffW, DRo

    you pay a little for the relocation of my business ,
    say just one million U.S.
    and quicker than you can say Bobs your uncle
    I'll be there .

    "Drop the name-calling." Meteor Blades 2/4/11

    by indycam on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 01:51:14 PM PST

    •  . (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Womantrust, blukat, antirove, Eyesbright

      Texas spends at least $19.1 billion per year on incentive programs, according to the most recent data available. That is roughly:

      $759
      per capita

      51¢
      per dollar of state budget

      That's over half the state budget, folks.  Just think of what could be done with that money were it directed to people and programs that really need it.

      Be the change you want to see in the world. -Gandhi

      by DRo on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 01:54:04 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  See: (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Aunt Pat

    Lines Blur as Texas Gives Industries a Bonanza
    An examination into corporate incentives that has become standard operating procedure for state and local governments across the country, the New York Times takes a special look at Texas, and presents some startling numbers of of tax breaks and subsidies fostered by Rick Perry and his gang to corporations at the cost of limiting basic services to Texans. That article is worth a total read as it names names and connections.

    Be the change you want to see in the world. -Gandhi

    by DRo on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 01:51:38 PM PST

  •  After he get laughed out of California... (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    PSzymeczek, Aunt Pat, DRo

    ...where does the dumbass go next?

    Try to poach jobs from Freeport, IL?

    Too late, Tex...

    Float like a manhole cover, sting like a sash weight! Clean Coal Is A Clinker!

    by JeffW on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 01:53:37 PM PST

    •  He and Dewhurst (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Aunt Pat

      have both been pitching in NY  gun enthusiasts  to "come on down"  (We have liberal gun laws and we're going to protect your rights).  Full page ads!

      Be the change you want to see in the world. -Gandhi

      by DRo on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 01:58:03 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  My Error (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Aunt Pat, Jay C, JeffW

        It was his

        Texas attorney general Greg Abbott (R) has extended an open invitation to any New Yorkers who feel threatened by the new gun violence protection measure. Abbott launched an Internet ad campaign targeting New Yorkers shortly after Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D-NY) signed the law.

        The provocative web ads, paid for with Abbott campaign funds, will appear as a pop-up on screens on a variety of media web sites, including that of The New York Times, for those accessing the sites in Manhattan and Albany.

        “Is Gov. Cuomo looking to take your guns? Sick of the media outing law abiding gun owns? Are you a lawful NY gun owner seeking lower taxes?” reads one of two pop-up ads.
        A second reads: “Wanted: Law abiding New York gun owns looking for lower taxes and greater opportunity.”

        http://thinkprogress.org/...

        Be the change you want to see in the world. -Gandhi

        by DRo on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 02:22:21 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  Perry is a pirate. He doesn't create crap... (6+ / 0-)

    He merely raids other states. And now you've got governors Brownback and Jindall not only following Perry's lead but trying to do it better or, more appropriately, worse. All of this fucking ego and oneupmanship is really beginning to piss me off. They don't do shit to contribute to job creation. Now that I think about it, Perry, Brownback, Jindall, and those like them...now there are the genuine takers in this country.  

    Can I get a Grey Goose on the rocks over here?!

    by G Contractor on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 01:54:06 PM PST

    •   Brownback and Jindall not only following Perry's (0+ / 0-)

      lead but trying to do it better, this kind of thinking is the heart and soul of the race to the bottom which contributes greatly to the decline in wages and benefits for the working class.  Problem is that China, Viet Nam and many others are the next lower rungs on that ladder to the bottom.

      •  Indeed, Michiganmitch (0+ / 0-)

        Ya gotta wonder where it will end. Perry raids CA, Brownback raids TX, Jindall raids KS and on, and on, and on. Sounds like a circular firing squad, doesn't it. I guess we'll soon overtake those two countries you mention and have the dubious distinction as the lowest rung.

        Can I get a Grey Goose on the rocks over here?!

        by G Contractor on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 02:31:12 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  One of these days (4+ / 0-)

    Blue states are going to get properly hacked off about this sort of behavior.

    The unstated secret for states like Texas is that to expand industries that require educated workers, they have to poach those workers from other states, because one result of Texas's low-tax, low-spending philosophy is a poorly-educated populace.

    (Also, a lot of the "job creator" reputation is earned from peak oil.)

    28, white male, TX-26 (current), TN-09 (born), TN-08 (where parents live now)

    by TDDVandy on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 01:58:33 PM PST

  •  Wait a few years then come (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Aunt Pat, doraphasia

    Right now, spending on education is down, Perry has vowed to keep it down and he  is doing everything he can to keep folks from getting health insurance. Wait 5 to 10 years when the rest of the State catches up with Austin and turns blue.

    Caveat -- if you are a gun or ammunition retailer or an alchemist who can turn stupid into gold, get to Texas as soon as possible.

    "Mr. President, I'm not saying we wouldn't get our hair mussed." General Buck Turgidson

    by muledriver on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 02:16:16 PM PST

  •  He has it all wrong (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Aunt Pat, Womantrust, DRo

    If Gov. Goodhair had any sense he would be stealing school textbook publishers. If your state cuts education then obviously it opens up a market for dumbed-down books such as "Of Pandas and People," etc., and also cleaned-up simplified patriotic versions of other books.  So does Gov. Genius go for the dumb stupid companies?  No. He goes for companies staffed by MIT graduates.  I mean, the guy has the business instincts of a boot.

  •  Ah, you Californians are so smug. (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    kovie, doraphasia, Jay C

    Texas has a lot to offer tech companies, and it has a lot of tech companies.

    Places like Dallas, Houston and Austin spring to mind, and San Antonio appears ready to boom.

    Lots of investors in Dallas and Houston with money to spend, and good universities like U of Texas, Texas A&M, Texas Tech, Rice, SMU, and Baylor.

    Already, more people leave California for other states than vice versa.  Population growth in California has been less than 1% annually for most of the last decade -- and that includes both births and immigration.

    Not that I don't sympathize.  Where I live, Illinois, is in worse shape than California, but without the beaches (well-- the beaches on Lake Michigan in Chicago are pretty special in their own way), wine country, or moderate climate.

    LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

    by dinotrac on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 02:23:44 PM PST

    •  I agree that Texas is hardly just about (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      doraphasia, TexasTom, dinotrac, brn2bwild

      rednecks and racists, having been to it twice and enjoyed both times, but I find state poaching to be unethical and economically destructive, generally resulting not only in economic pain for the poached state, but the replacement of higher-paying jobs with better benefits and conditions with lower-paying jobs with worse benefits and conditions. E.g. Boeing moving jobs from the Seattle region, LA and Wichita to South Carolina, where it can hire underpaid non-union workers to produce planes of likely lesser quality. If you look at traditional regional economies, they generally built theirs from the ground up, and not through poaching. E.g. Silicon Valley, Wall St., Hollywood.

      Perhaps CA should poach TX's cattle industry?

      "Liberty without virtue would be no blessing to us" - Benjamin Rush, 1777

      by kovie on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 02:50:42 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Can you call it poaching if the "home" state is (0+ / 0-)

        chasing it away?

        Yeah, if Texas bribes them away with billions in incentives, that's a problem.

        Not sure Texas is even set up to do that, though.  They don't even have a state income tax.

        Businesses are well within their rights to pick up stakes and move elsewhere if it makes economic sense.  States that forget that fact deserve what they get.

        When people try to interest me in a job elsewhere, I never list California as one of the places to which I'd relocate.  No logic in moving from one messed-up state to another.

        LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

        by dinotrac on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 03:06:51 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Depends on what you mean by "chasing it away" (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          brn2bwild

          If by that you mean insisting that workers receive fair wages, decent benefits and proper working conditions, and that environmental impact is minimal, then such companies should be chased away--far, as in off the planet.

          But if you mean that a state refuses to spend properly to educate its citizens so that they are attractive workers, then I would agree. But the flip side to that is that these companies have to be willing to pay enough taxes to fund such education. Otherwise, they're freeloaders and should move.

          "Liberty without virtue would be no blessing to us" - Benjamin Rush, 1777

          by kovie on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 03:53:15 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  And that's one way to look at things, but... (0+ / 0-)

            last I looked, wasn't California's university system one of the areas getting hit hard by cutbacks in the state?

            LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

            by dinotrac on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 04:29:35 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  Yes, because its corporations and well-off people (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              brn2bwild

              didn't want to pay their fair share in taxes, forcing such cutbacks.

              "Liberty without virtue would be no blessing to us" - Benjamin Rush, 1777

              by kovie on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 04:59:15 PM PST

              [ Parent ]

              •  I thought those high-tech industries relied (0+ / 0-)

                on well-educated people to make money.

                Seems like they'd be cutting their own throats if they support gutting of the university system.

                LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

                by dinotrac on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 07:54:41 PM PST

                [ Parent ]

                •  They support the system (0+ / 0-)

                  Provided that someone else pay for it. See, that's one of the fatal flaws with a truly "free" market--everyone wants everything to be free.

                  "Liberty without virtue would be no blessing to us" - Benjamin Rush, 1777

                  by kovie on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 08:23:36 PM PST

                  [ Parent ]

      •  I was born in Texas, went to college & med school (0+ / 0-)

        there. I moved away upon graduation from med school, when I also went on active duty in the Army. In the past 33 years I have seen Texas become more low income and less educated than when I lived there. It was a blue state when I lived there and now is solid red. My oldest son lives in Austin, which is considered a progressive city, and even he is afraid to put an Obama sticker on his car. It has the lowest rate of health insurance in the nation. My friends from high school, who I keep up with on Facebook, panic when their adult employed children need medical care because they don't have insurance and don't know where to go for care. My friends do not realize they get the government they deserve. They do not realize they could fix this by voting out their corrupt Republican government. I would never move back there to live. My mother lives there too and reports hearing blatant racism that makes me sick. She cannot tell people she supports Obama because she is afraid they will physically attack her. I live in Hawaii now. The cost of living is high, but it's a blue state, the people are friendly, and its diversity is beautiful. Added bonus: no snow and strict gun laws.

        "For we, the people, understand that our country cannot succeed when a shrinking few do very well and a growing many barely make it." - President Barack Obama, Second Inaugural Address, January 21, 2013.

        by surfermom on Sun Feb 10, 2013 at 01:11:01 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

    •  Baylor is not in the same league as Cal & Stanford (0+ / 0-)

      Not even close. You need a nucleus and the right environment to build industries like Silicon Valley, biotech, entertainment etc... That combination doesn't exist in Texas and if it did - Perry wouldn't have to come here to beg.

      "The two pioneering forces of modern sensibility are Jewish moral seriousness and homosexual aestheticism and irony." Susan Sontag

      by Shane Hensinger on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 04:04:00 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Texas and Texas A&M are. (0+ / 0-)

        Texas Tech's not bad, either.

        Last I looked, people were moving away from California, especially the educated professional workers you'd like to have in high tech industries.

        LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

        by dinotrac on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 04:31:54 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  No, you're wrong (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          brn2bwild, FiredUpInCA

          Apple, Facebook, Universal, Genentech, Amgen, Google etc... didn't arise in CA accidentally. The confluence of environment, society, education etc... is not something which can be replicated elsewhere, especially in Texas.

          BTW - CA's population is growing.

          "The two pioneering forces of modern sensibility are Jewish moral seriousness and homosexual aestheticism and irony." Susan Sontag

          by Shane Hensinger on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 04:36:33 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  No, I'm right. You need to read the words. (0+ / 0-)
            Last I looked, people were moving away from California, especially the educated professional workers you'd like to have in high tech industries.
            People are also being born in California and people are immigrating in from other countries, especially Mexico.

            California's population has been growing by less than 1% annually because more people are leaving California for other states than are coming to California from other states.

            More babies, more poor immigrants coming in, more educated professionals moving out.

            LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

            by dinotrac on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 07:53:18 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

  •  Just because Perry is stupid, doesn't mean (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    doraphasia

    you need to go after Texas.  

    I see alot of myths here about Texas, such as the education system is bad, its economy is based on oil only, etc.

    None of this is really true when you dig down deep, and there are plenty of high tech companies that have moved from or expanded to Texas.

    Salaries are a bit lower here, but you can buy a house here for less than $200k.

    •  The problem with (7+ / 0-)

      Moving to Texas is then you have to live with the Texans. A coworker of mine took a job in Dallas because his wife thought San Diego was too cold. We keep in email touch and he is constantly complaining about his ultra conservative coworkers, his ultra conservative neighbors, the poor governing of the state. The problem is, when a company brings well educated, well traveled people who have actually been outside of the state of TX, they quickly realize how narrow minded the people are and how poorly run the state is.

      I've lived in TX as well. I liked the state but was ambivalent about the people. I'm older and more politically outspoken now and would probably not be able to tolerate the people today.

      •  Ever been to Austin? nt (0+ / 0-)

        nt

        •  Yes (6+ / 0-)

          I've been to Austin, used to live about 1.5 hours from it. It's one city in a large state full of Texans. I was once told Austin is where Texans go to see the Liberals.

          So I guess you think all the high tech companies could move to Austin so we have decent neighbors. The legislature generously gerrymands us one blue district in a sea of red and we still have Texans running the state and representing us in congress. No thanks, I'll stay in CA where we have independents drawing districts and we vote to raise our taxes to fund education.

      •  He can't do much about the coworkers... (0+ / 0-)

        ...but he maybe can do something about some of those other things.  I live in Dallas, and my neighborhood is actually politically pretty moderate judging by the yard signs that appeared prior to the last election.  And that's in the northern suburbs, which generally are very Republican.  

        Not everyone around here is right wing or a redneck, but it does take time to seek out and find a comfortable circle of friends and acquaintances.

        Political Compass: -6.75, -3.08

        by TexasTom on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 03:53:05 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  Lowering taxes won't bring businesses.... (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    dewtx, brn2bwild

    Businesses have to weigh liabilities of any location beyond that of simple taxation levels.

    Ready access to educated employees is only the tip of the ice burg that Texas faces in there deluded quest to take jobs from California, rather then create new jobs.

    Texas's legal infrastructure is designed to serve the interests of dirty industry not high technology, This is partly why they do have a number of chip fabrication facilities located in their State.

    Texas is known for under funding public works, being a hostile place to live for anyone who is an "intellectual" or worse an "intellectual women", other then a few places likely lacks the infrastructure of many of these high tech businesses(electricity, fiber).

    Many privately provided services cost more, such as health insurance, property insurance, etc. Business cost of living is somewhat different from individual cost of living.

    This also neglects costs of moving operations, and I am not just talking the cost of the physical moving processes, Their is a cost in the form of trained employees who wouldn't move with the company. cost of setting up new supply chains, cost of replacing suppliers that can't be worked into the new supply chain, potentially increased costs in the supply chain itself from a physically longer supply chain.

    Generally speaking, very few if any companies would take this up based on the brain drain from moving to a place like Texas, let alone the rest of the nightmare in everything else.

    Image if Microsoft moved to Texas, that is 40,000 employees, at best only half would move with the company, so that is 20,000 employees they would have to replace, Perry's pittance tax break is going to even come close to scratching that absurdly high cost.

    Made worse by the fact that most of the employees would have to be imported from out of State.

  •  Jerry's counter ad (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Womantrust, dewtx, RedPrairie

    should detail how CA. has water... Perry has no plan for a TX. response to the drought.  Ca. has firefighters to fight fires unlike the under staffed force due to Perry's layoffs.  

  •  We citizens of Texas passed a TX Constitutional... (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    DRo, doraphasia, antirove, brn2bwild

    Amendment in 2007 establishing an agency to fund research into cures for and prevention of cancer, the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas (CPRIT), with $3-billion of our tax money. Now our Gov. Oops is turning that Institute into a slush fund to make his rich business friends even richer. In fact, in this Houston Chronicle article, "Perry calls creating wealth an intent of cancer agency", little Ricky wants this research institute now to become a means to "create wealth" (and you can guess for whom) instead of a means to create knowledge toward preventing and curing cancer.

    Fortunately this change of mission by Gov. Oops regarding CPRIT is already blowing up in his face and even generating resistance within the Texas Republican party and the Republican-led Texas legislature. It's still early in this slow-motion catastrophe, but anyone interested in challenging Perry for Governor in 2014 or President in 2016 would do well to keep an eye on this developing scandal and how deeply Gov. Oops becomes mired in it, while also watching him try to deflect attention from it and wiggle his way out of it. Already some Perry appointees to this Institute have resigned because of significant irregularities in how grants on the "commercialization" side of the institute were reviewed (or actually not reviewed) and made. The Dallas Morning News is maintaining a very good blog about the problems at CPRIT here: CPIRT | Investigates Blog. I cannot stand our Gov. Oops, and only hope that this scandal will contribute to ending his political career.

    Men must learn now with pity to dispense; For policy sits above conscience. — William Shakespeare, 'Timon of Athens', Act III, Scene II

    by dewtx on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 02:33:13 PM PST

    •  It just may (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      dewtx, brn2bwild
      contribute to ending his political career.
      It's getting nastier the more that comes out.

      Be the change you want to see in the world. -Gandhi

      by DRo on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 03:13:57 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Rick Perry... (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      dewtx, brn2bwild

      ...is a really bad governor who has successfully ridden the Republican wave in this state to stay in power.  He appeals to the nutcases who vote in the Republican primaries, and then the larger base of voters hold their noses and cast their votes for him because they're still not willing to support a Democrat even when the Republican sucks as badly as he does.

      I suspect that if we ever went to the sort of open primaries that California and Washington states have, Perry would be out in the next election.

      Political Compass: -6.75, -3.08

      by TexasTom on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 03:55:24 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  he's just on vacation (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    doraphasia

    the phony jobs tour is just to justify the airfare.

  •  with apologies to Kossack Texans, there is NO (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    DRo, dewtx, brn2bwild

    way in hell I am going to move to a state that miserably hot with Perry, Cruz and Cornyn. NO way in hell. I won't even go to a conference anymore in Texas (granted I have never been to Austin and I would give it a try if I ever have a conference scheduled there).

  •  Perry is all about three things (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    dewtx, FiredUpInCA, RedPrairie

    FreeDumb, posing...and one other thing I forgot.

    "Liberty without virtue would be no blessing to us" - Benjamin Rush, 1777

    by kovie on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 02:42:58 PM PST

  •  is our children learning? (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    dewtx

    What Gov. Perry should push is the Texas commitment to quality education...

    http://video.pbs.org/...

  •  one thing they just love in silicon valley (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Overseas, brn2bwild

    is the kind of stone cold stupid that only Rick Perry can bring to the table. this is the land of more PhDs than you can shake a stick at, people with brilliant achievements in fields that Rick Perry never heard of, never will, and never will understand if he was painted a paint-by-numbers picture. and when he opens his mouth, confirming everything these uber-brains ever thought about Rick-Perry-types, the first thing they will say to themselves is "how do I surround myself with people like him 24-7"

    /snark

  •  Why does TX need to take jobs from CA? (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    antirove, brn2bwild, FiredUpInCA

    If the business climate in Texas is so wonderful, the jobs should just create themselves in Texas, and Governor Brown would be begging leading edge high tech Texas industries to move to California instead.

    Maybe there is a reason "high tech, biotechnology, financial, insurance and film industries" have been born, grow, and continue to flourish in California.

    Maybe there is a reason that companies like Google and SpaceX started in California and not Texas.

  •  Why would educated tech people (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    surfermom

    Ever want to move to Texas?

    Seriously, I can't imagine them feeling at all comfortable there, with it's right wing religious groups, it's wanting to make girls/women give birth regardless of how it could hurt or kill them, and it's basic arrogance toward anything not originating in Texas.

    It's a bigoted state, full of people who hate gays, women, people of color, foreign languages, and foods that aren't fried and contain lots of plant foods.

    Or, at least that's the impression people get of Texas, so what else are they going to go on?

    It does have NASA, the first openly gay mayor of a big city (Houston), and of course Austin. But, other than that, it's not that appealing to many who like diversity and tolerance of others.

    Maybe when/if it turns blue in 10 years or so...

    Women create the entire labor force. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Sympathy is the strongest instinct in human nature. - Charles Darwin

    by splashy on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 03:44:18 PM PST

    •  Wow... (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      brn2bwild

      ...is it possible to load any more generalizations and stereotypes into a single comment than you have?

      Because, of course, Dallas, El Paso, Tyler, Amarillo, and Harlingen are all exactly alike.  Just as you find the exact same types of people in Fresno, San Francisco, LA, and Bakersfield.  Or Seattle and Spokane.  Or...well, pick any combination of places in virtually any state.

      You call Texas a bigoted state, and there certainly are many bigoted people here.  But far from all.  And from reading your message, I'd say you're pretty bigoted yourself.

      Political Compass: -6.75, -3.08

      by TexasTom on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 03:59:22 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Did you miss this part: (0+ / 0-)

        "Or, at least that's the impression people get of Texas, so what else are they going to go on?"

        This is the problem, it's what others think of the state. I was stating what I have read and heard about it from more tech oriented people.

        I came from Florida, and have to say that I was pleasantly surprised when we visited NASA, and saw some of the people around Houston. Then, we went to some other places and it wasn't that way, it was more like the stereotype.

        In fact, I worked at a dairy in NE Texas, and realized that my light skin, blue eyes and light hair was a real ticket to being accepted by the powers that be.

        Oh, and there were lots of racists in Florida too. So, it's not like I'm just picking on Texas.

        BTW, I live in Arkansas, another state where blue eyes and lightness goes a long way.

        Women create the entire labor force. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Sympathy is the strongest instinct in human nature. - Charles Darwin

        by splashy on Fri Feb 15, 2013 at 03:05:03 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  company moves can be hard on families (0+ / 0-)

    When I was growing up, the company my dad worked for transferred him twice, each time a state away. I graduated high school 500 miles from where I'd attended 1st Grade. My parents are now retired, and live far away from family and people they grew up with as a result of those transfers.
    If workers want to move, great. But a company deciding to up and leave affects a lot more people than the executives running the place.

  •  I thought Gov Brown was being nice. (0+ / 0-)

    He could have said that Gov Perry was less than a fart.

    "The case, my friend, is that the world has been over-run with fable and creeds of human invention, with sectaries of whole nations against all other nations, and sectaries of those sectaries in each of them against the other." - Thomas Paine

    by carbonman1950 on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 04:03:04 PM PST

  •  shouldn't he beg stanford U and other U. to move (0+ / 0-)

    to Texas? If the only think business people care about was taxes, there would be no businesses started in NY,MA, CA, ...

  •  I live in the Hill Country, the air is so clear (0+ / 0-)

    the stars at night are awe-inspiring.  Except when a gulf system lands on us, like today.  The refinery smell was strong.  My eyes feel like someone poured acid sand in them, my head hurts, my nose is running nonstop, my breathing is labored.

    Yo!  California dudes!  Talk to me first!

    I'm not looking for a love that will lift me up and carry me away. A love that will stroll alongside and make a few amusing comments will suffice.

    by I love OCD on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 06:42:51 PM PST

  •  Signing his name is hard work. (0+ / 0-)

    Note the tongue sticking out....

    You can't take the sky from me!

    by wrights on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 07:03:39 PM PST

  •  The right's just going to have to learn... (0+ / 0-)

    There's more to job creation then just tax cuts. If your education system sucks, in many cases, these businesses can't use you. Texas fits that bill better then most states.

  •  And the third reason for moving to Texas is ... (0+ / 0-)

    I can't remember. Oops  

  •  Move my startup to Texas? NFW! (0+ / 0-)

    I'm an advisor to a handful of startups, and running two others as cofounder.

    Yesterday I attended a demo & pitch event with 300-500 tech entrepreneurs in Silicon Valley.  On Friday there was an event with THOUSANDS.  Cost is free to perhaps $75.

    On Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday of this week there will be similar events between San Jose, San Francisco and Berkeley (a triangle with points about 45 miles apart). This goes on every week of the year.

    At all of these events there will be investors, venture capitalists, angels, founders, geeks, MBAs, PhDs, college dropouts, attorneys, patent attorneys, software, hardware, medical, life science, etc. people from around the world of all gender, colors, backgrounds.

    With all this amazing talent and energy who in their right mind would want to go to Texas?

    Those who go to Texas will be companies with low skilled labor, heavy physical products that benefit from a national distribution from a central location, and execs who pay themselves lots of money with no stock options for employees.

  •  Tex-Mex visit (0+ / 0-)

    Rick Perry is actually in California to vist Mitt Romney's place and be awed by the car elevator.

    I now understand what Tex-Mex is. Texas jobs with Mexican pay (as in the country of Mexico).

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