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On Friday, Israeli soldiers and undercover personnel arrested five people, including two children, and took them off to an unknown destination. This is similar to the practice of extraordinary rendition done by the Bush administration, where they would whisk people off to unknown jails in violation of their Constitutional rights.

This is the sort of thing that happens on an ongoing basis as the Israeli government continues to pursue its policy of perpetual warfare against the Palestinian people and engage in the practice of collective punishment. And the problem is that the corporate media won't report on it even though billions of taxpayer dollars go to Israel, a nation that does not practice fundamental human rights towards its people.

Here in this country, we are protected by the right to know the nature of the charges against you, the right not to be arrested without probable cause, and the right to a fair trial. The fact of the matter is that we have basic philosophical differences with the Israel government. We protect the rights of our people; they don't. We allow all people to be represented in government; millions of Palestinians are disenfranchised.

What is happening right now in Palestine is very similar to what would have happened if the British had won the Revolutionary War and then continued right on with their policy of taxation without representation. We would have fought for as long as it would have taken to throw off British rule. Washington would have kept right on fighting for independence if it came down to it, even if it meant retreating west of the Appalachian Mountains to continue the struggle. And the Tibetans are in the same sort of position, engaged in a perpetual struggle to throw off Chinese rule that does not respect their right to self-determination.

The time for occupation and conquest is nearing its end. Back in the times of Julius Caesar, he had to kill 1 million Gauls and send another million into slavery before the third million finally surrendered. This is the sort of thing that one would have to do in order to complete a war of conquest. Back in the time of the Romans, nobody would have thought anything about it. Now, that sort of thing is becoming less and less acceptable. Human life is much more valued today than it was when the Romans were occupying the world.

The US has no business getting allied with nations with which it has basic philosophical differences except under extraordinary circumstances. The $3 billion or so that it sends to Israel every year could be much better spent on roads, bridges, and schools instead of propping up a dictator who whips up paranoia at every opportunity and brings right-wing extremists into government with him in order to cling onto power. There is no clear and present danger to the US that we need to continuously prop up the Israeli dictators with billions of taxpayer dollars in a time when we are considering sequestering trillions of dollars in order to get rid of our massive budget deficit.

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Comment Preferences

  •  if "...we have basic philosophical differences (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    debedb

    with the Israel government." then we have them with any country that does not have a Bill of Rights. I think that includes every country you discuss.

    Here in this country, we are protected by the right to know the nature of the charges against you, the right not to be arrested without probable cause, and the right to a fair trial. The fact of the matter is that we have basic philosophical differences with the Israel government.
    •  good point because if we have issues with (3+ / 0-)

      extreme rendition, we have issues with any nation that practices it, such as China, Russia and ourselves.  Perhaps we should begin with ourselves and take a good hard look at what bin Laden managed to do to us as a nation on 9/11 and what we have allowed ourselves to become.

      That being said, there is no question that Israel's actions have had a negative effect on the children, extreme rendition to the side for the minute.  I believe the latest estimates I have seen said that up to 60% of Palestinian children in Gaza suffer from malnutrition as a direct result of the blockade

  •  Israeli dictators? (0+ / 0-)

    really?

  •  No, rendition is sending them to another country. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    doc2

    I really doubt Israel did that.  They're doing something much less unusual.

    You know, I sometimes think if I could see, I'd be kicking a lot of ass. -Stevie Wonder at the Glastonbury Festival, 2010

    by Rich in PA on Sat Feb 23, 2013 at 04:29:36 AM PST

    •  It appears that no one here even understands (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Rich in PA

      what rendition is (and that includes "extreme rendition", whatever that is).

    •  Not at all. Kiodnapping of any kind is (0+ / 0-)

      rendition, sending them to someplace other than the kidnapping state's home territory is "extraordinary" rendition.  These may not be the original meanings, but are what has evolved thanks to the U.S. incessant use and defence of these tactics.

      That, in its essence, is fascism--ownership of government by an individual, by a group, or by any other controlling private power. -- Franklin D. Roosevelt --

      by enhydra lutris on Sat Feb 23, 2013 at 10:09:54 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  How one defines people.... (0+ / 0-)

    Let us remember, that Isreal has no constitution.  There are no codified guaruntees of anything in Israel, including the right to worship as one pleases (this would include women not being able to pray at Jewish places being arrested and jailed using state treasure and resources) live where you want, free expression, to come and go as you please...and so on.

    Isreal, rather than like a TRUE democracy defines people by 'class' and by 'ethnicity or religion'.

    Those they prefer are deemed citizens.  Those they tolarate are deemed 'guests', and those they dont like are deemed 'infiltrators'.

    This is what they call "The Basic Law'...a secualrised version of thier ideological foundation of jurisprudence.

    This is what the the current Israeli regime fears most...that the world will give 'status' to those people that Israel deems 'infilteators', and that those people will be given the right to present thier case to the world.

    The true strength of of an oath is forged in adversity.

    by Nur Alia Chang on Sat Feb 23, 2013 at 05:35:13 AM PST

    •  Great Britain doesn't have a written ... (0+ / 0-)

      ... Constitution.  Nor does New Zealand.

      I haven't been here long enough to be considered a Kossack, does that mean that I'm just a sack?

      by Hey338Too on Sat Feb 23, 2013 at 08:28:45 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  the KEY here is.... (0+ / 0-)

        Although the UK and New Zealand dont have consitutions, what thier jurisprudence is based on is not 'religious' in nature

        That is the difference.

        The true strength of of an oath is forged in adversity.

        by Nur Alia Chang on Sat Feb 23, 2013 at 06:12:15 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  According to Wikipedia: (0+ / 0-)
          Israeli law is a mixed legal system reflecting the diverse history of the territory of the State of Israel throughout the last hundred years (which was at various times prior to independence under Ottoman, then British sovereignty), as well as the legal systems of its major religious communities. The Israeli legal system is based in common law, which also incorporates facets of civil law. Israel does not have a formal Constitution, despite the assertion in the Israeli Declaration of Independence that one would be written.[1] Statutes enacted by the Knesset, particularly the Basic Laws of Israel (Hebrew language: חוקי היסוד, ḥŭḳḳēi ha-yyǝsōd), provide a framework which is enriched by political precedent and jurisprudence. Foreign and historical influences on modern-day Israeli law are varied and include the Mecelle (Hebrew: מג'לה; the civil code of the Ottoman Empire) and German civil law, religious law (Jewish Halakha and Muslim Sharia; mostly pertaining in the area of family law), and British common law. The Israeli courts have been influenced in recent years by American Law and Canadian Law[2] and to a lesser extent by Continental Law (mostly from Germany).[3]

          I haven't been here long enough to be considered a Kossack, does that mean that I'm just a sack?

          by Hey338Too on Sat Feb 23, 2013 at 07:01:33 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

  •  Bottom line... (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    corvo

    The US gives billions of dollars to an "ally" described as a "democracy" when Israel is NEITHER.

    How long are we going to be blinded to this?... As long as people who write on behalf of and in sympathy to the plight of the Palestinians and who correctly point out the aggression of the Israeli government and military are "hide recommended" by others on this site and elsewhere in the US media.

  •  Uprated to offset bogus (and unexplained) (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    alain2112

    HRs.

    That, in its essence, is fascism--ownership of government by an individual, by a group, or by any other controlling private power. -- Franklin D. Roosevelt --

    by enhydra lutris on Sat Feb 23, 2013 at 10:11:53 AM PST

    •  How's this? (0+ / 0-)
      The $30 billion or so that it sends to Israel every year
      This figure is inflated by almost 10 times.

      Here's Al Jazeera's take on the "kidnapping":

      Protesting worshippers at the Al-Aqsa mosque compound in East Jerusalem, annexed by Israel, threw stones at riot police, who responded by firing stun grenades, Micky Rosenfeld, Israeli police spokesman, told AFP.

      He said five Palestinians were arrested in the Issawiyeh district of the city, including four minors.

      Nothing about rendition, nothing about kidnapping.  Maybe they would have mentioned something about those aspects of the story if they were based in reality.

      How about Press TV?  They talk about the demonstrations, but strangely nothing about rendition or kidnapping.  Actually nothing about the arrests at all.  Nothing about the rendition, kidnapping or arrest in the comments of either article.

      In looking through the archives of the site referenced in this article.  Every arrest of a Palestinian is called a kidnapping - yet there is no corroboration of that term, nor of rendition, on any news site (yes I searched Press, Al-Jazeera and RT) which reports the same event.

      Is that enough information for you to remove your uprate?  Probably not, right?

      I haven't been here long enough to be considered a Kossack, does that mean that I'm just a sack?

      by Hey338Too on Sat Feb 23, 2013 at 11:27:14 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Israeli police spokesman, - not remotely (0+ / 0-)

        credible.
        "Arrests" in territory to which they have no legitimate claim are kidnappings.  See
         the United Nations Security Council Resolution 242 .

        That, in its essence, is fascism--ownership of government by an individual, by a group, or by any other controlling private power. -- Franklin D. Roosevelt --

        by enhydra lutris on Sat Feb 23, 2013 at 12:35:59 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Done. Prove it. Here's UNSC Res. 242: (0+ / 0-)
          Resolution 242 (1967)
          of 22 November 1967

          The Security Council,

          Expressing its continuing concern with the grave situation in the Middle East,

          Emphasizing the inadmissibility of the acquisition of territory by war and the need to work for a just and lasting peace in which every State in the area can live in security,

          Emphasizing further that all Member States in their acceptance of the Charter of the United Nations have undertaken a commitment to act in accordance with Article 2 of the Charter,

          1. Affirms that the fulfilment of Charter principles requires the establishment of a just and lasting peace in the Middle East which should include the application of both the following principles:

          (i) Withdrawal of Israel armed forces from territories occupied in the recent conflict;

          (ii) Termination of all claims or states of belligerency and respect for and acknowledgment of the sovereignty, territorial integrity and political independence of every State in the area and their right to live in peace within secure and recognized boundaries free from threats or acts of force;

          2. Affirms further the necessity

          (a)    For guaranteeing freedom of navigation through international waterways in the area;

          (b)    For achieving a just settlement of the refugee problem;

          (c)    For guaranteeing the territorial inviolability and political independence of every State in the area, through measures including the establishment of demilitarized zones;

          3. Requests the Secretary-General to designate a Special Representative to proceed to the Middle East to establish and maintain contacts with the States concerned in order to promote agreement and assist efforts to achieve a peaceful and accepted settlement in accordance with the provisions and principles in this resolution;

          4. Requests the Secretary-General to report to the Security Council on the progress of the efforts of the Special Representative as soon as possible.

          I haven't been here long enough to be considered a Kossack, does that mean that I'm just a sack?

          by Hey338Too on Sat Feb 23, 2013 at 04:12:04 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

  •  Critical Reading (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Nospinicus

    I'd like to know more about the "children" Israel is holding in custody.  Are the "children" 17 year old men who are plotting a Sandy Hook incident against a predominantly Jewish Israeli elementary school?  Or are they 5 year old kindergarteners who were in the wrong place at the wrong time?  (I suspect it is the former, not the later.)  The identity and activities of the "children" are relevant to this story.  

    Since those details were left out, this story reads like propaganda, not facts. Sorry.

    •  Well: (0+ / 0-)

      It's too bad that Israel doesn't produce evidence to that effect. The burden of proof is on the accuser to produce facts.

    •  Here's an article on the topic: (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Eternal Hope

      The kids in this article are 14-17.

      Between 500 and 700 Palestinian children are arrested by Israeli soldiers each year, mostly accused of throwing stones. Since 2008, Defence for Children International (DCI) has collected sworn testimonies from 426 minors detained in Israel's military justice system.

      Their statements show a pattern of night-time arrests, hands bound with plastic ties, blindfolding, physical and verbal abuse, and threats. About 9% of all those giving affidavits say they were kept in solitary confinement, although there has been a marked increase to 22% in the past six months.

      Few parents are told where their children have been taken. Minors are rarely questioned in the presence of a parent, and rarely see a lawyer before or during initial interrogation. Most are detained inside Israel, making family visits very difficult.

      http://www.guardian.co.uk/...

      Here's one about a 13-year-old:
      http://www.time.com/...

      Here's on about a 7-year-old:
      http://www.haaretz.com/...

      The best way to prevent abortions is to arm fetuses.

      by Flyswatterbanjo on Sat Feb 23, 2013 at 02:39:17 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

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