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I read The World Inside in 1971 when I was 14 years old, the very heart of the most impressionable years in an adolescent's life.  The music you love at 14 is music that can stay with you all your life, your crushes and romances at 14 imprint you for your whole life, and if you are a reader, the books you read then can stay with you all your life.

I was a voracious reader then as now, and the early seventies were when I discovered science fiction writing.  I had started with Asimov short stories as a lot of teens do, and progressed to SF short story anthologies.  Some of my favorite short stories then and now are speculative fiction speculating about a future where everything has gone wrong.  But this time, instead of a short story, it sustained itself for the length of an entire novel.  The World Inside was one of the first full novels I read in the SF category, and it was definitely the first full length dystopia, weaving together several touchstone issues of the 60s:  concerns about "the population explosion", what would happen if the "free love" counterculture continued to thrive, what would happen if mind altering drugs were legal and available to everyone, and whether city sprawl would overwhelm and eliminate all the rural space between the cities.

The novel is set in the year 2381.  75 billion people are living on Earth in enormous self-contained skyscrapers 1000 stories tall called urban monads, or urbmons.  Each urbmon holds about 800,000 people, with 25 cities of 40 floors each.  People on higher floors have higher social status, more money, and more power.  Fifty of these superskyscrapers get grouped together in large metropolitan areas covering hundreds of miles like BosWash (stretching from Boston to Washington), Chipitts (stretching from Chicago to Pittsburgh), Berpar (from Berlin to Paris), and Shankong (from Shanghai to Hong Kong).

Instead of people being concerned about population growth, fertility is sacred and women are expected to have as many babies as possible.  Contraception is obscene, jealousy has been abolished, there are no locked doors, and everyone has sexual access to everyone else. Usually the men go "nightwalking" from woman to woman, but women are also allowed to seek out anyone they desire, or seek sexual partners during the day.  Everyone is required to have sex with anyone who asks. I quickly became desensitized to the frequent sex scenes, even though I had not read sex scenes before, because in context they were not very exciting. When sex is everywhere, sexiness is nowhere.

If you question the way things are, display inappropriate emotions like jealousy, challenge government decisions about how they move populations around, or otherwise do not fit in, they might label you as "flippo" and you could get sent down "the chute" where all the organic waste material is reprocessed and recycled into foodstuffs and energy.

I had been immersed in the "everything will be beautiful and we will all get along" world of Star Trek reruns, but I was also fascinated by people imagining alternate worlds where the Nazis won WWII, or for some other reason life on earth had gone terribly, horribly wrong.  The World Inside was my first exposure to a full length novel that, from my point of view, depicted something even worse than terrible:  a world where things were terrible AND almost no one openly acknowledged things were terrible AND people who were unusually bright or creative or otherwise perceptive (as I imagined myself to be) were the only ones who noticed that things were terrible.  And they were punished for it.  Sometimes killed for it.  They were punished and/or killed for wanting more from life than the prescribed and strictly enforced social norms of people around them.

This blew my mind.

But paradoxically it also romanticized the idea of not fitting in, and made me even more proud to be an outlier and an outcast.  Those were the years when I was beginning to strengthen my "question authority" muscles.  I saw myself in the characters in The World Inside who went flippo and paid for not fitting in at the cost of losing their identities or losing their lives.

So as I read this book I knew I could never be someone who just accepted a life that was prescribed for me by powers that be, especially when their goal is to control as many people as possible without concern for individual emotions and needs.  I hoped that in such a world I would have the personal courage to follow my individual dreams, feel my genuine emotions, and live authentically, even if it meant being branded as flippo.  Even if the consequences of being branded as flippo included death, I would not be silenced!

Some people live their whole lives and ever get anywhere near making a decision to stand alone when necessary in the name of personal identity.

Reading The World Inside helped me make that decision at the age of 14.

Originally posted to Readers and Book Lovers on Fri May 10, 2013 at 05:00 AM PDT.

Also republished by Star Trek fans and Community Spotlight.

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Comment Preferences

  •  I made the choice to stand for myself (3+ / 0-)

    when I was five.  If my parents couldn't break me, nobody else is going to.

    I hated that book.  I loathe dystopian fiction.

    Strength and dignity are her clothing, she rejoices at the days to come; She opens her mouth with wisdom, and the law of kindness is on her tongue.

    by loggersbrat on Fri May 10, 2013 at 06:38:06 AM PDT

    •  loggersbrat, I don't care for dystopian fiction (11+ / 0-)

      either, but the little I've read certainly haunts me.

      Take A Handmaid's Tale--that totally freaked me out, because I can imagine all too well the idea of it's happening here.  In fact, I think that process has already begun.  Certainly I feel as if I'm living in the Republic of Gilead, with women's hard-won rights being taken away one by one by legislators.

      Starhawk's The Fifth Sacred Thing also made me wildly uncomfortable.  I can see that happening too.

      So far I've refused to read The Hunger Games or anything like it.  Brave New World and the dystopias I've mentioned are already kicking uncomfortably around in my head, and they're quite enough for the moment.

      "Religion is what keeps the poor from murdering the rich."--Napoleon

      by Diana in NoVa on Fri May 10, 2013 at 07:06:27 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  The Handmaid's Tale (6+ / 0-)

        is one of those classic dystopias that is even more chilling because so many elements of it are coming true around us.

        Brave New World and The World Inside seem so outlandish that they could never happen.

        For what it's worth, I read all three of the Hunger Games books and understand their appeal to teens and young women but they are not nearly realistic enough to be truly frightening.  The dystopian society in hunger games is just the reason for setting up the games and explaining Katniss' participation in the games.  In my opinion, the violent adventure of the games themselves are more the focus of the first book rather than the society that spawned them.

        Politics is like driving. To go backward put it in R. To go forward put it in D.
        Drop by The Grieving Room on Monday nights for support in dealing with grief.

        by TrueBlueMajority on Fri May 10, 2013 at 10:14:16 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  I read 2 of the 3 Hunger Games books. (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          RiveroftheWest

          The last two. We were on vacation when my daughter finished #2, and I figured I'd take a look at what was going on inside her head.

          Frankly, I was not impressed. I thought the author was manipulating her readers in some fairly obvious ways, and I got the feeling she was being extra-violent and extra-grim mainly to show that a woman could be just as violent and grim as a man. But it was the manipulation that really irritated me--it seemed the author did not trust her own characters and story, so she felt the need to resort to gimmicks.

          "The true strength of our nation comes not from the might of our arms or the scale of our wealth, but from the enduring power of our ideals." - Barack Obama

          by HeyMikey on Fri May 10, 2013 at 08:31:41 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  I've read the first 2 books several times each, (3+ / 0-)

            but the third only once. "Mockingjay" is a bit of a mess. Since I'm writing (among other things) dystopian fiction myself, I want to do better than that.

            Find out about my next big thing by reading my blog. Link is here: http://bettysrants.wordpress.com/2013/01/05/my-next-big-thing/

            by Kimball Cross on Sat May 11, 2013 at 03:43:08 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  Mockingjay is a good concept (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              RiveroftheWest

              but the book is obviously not as well thought out as the first two.

              it's like the Triple Crown--plenty of horses win the first two legs.   it's the third that makes greatness or mediocrity.

              Politics is like driving. To go backward put it in R. To go forward put it in D.
              Drop by The Grieving Room on Monday nights for support in dealing with grief.

              by TrueBlueMajority on Sat May 11, 2013 at 05:53:25 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

            •  OK, some suggestions. (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              RiveroftheWest, citylights

              I wish you the best in your writing career!

              I humbly offer my reactions to the last 2 Hunger Games books, for whatever they're worth.

              1. Seems like EVERY friggin' chapter would end with some new crisis blowing up, to manipulate the reader into going ahead with the next chapter. This is what cheap TV series do. That's what I was referring to when I said the author didn't trust her characters and story to keep the reader interested. It's like the author saw me as a target to be manipulated into submission, rather than as a peer who might enjoy or find meaning in what she enjoys or finds meaning in.

              2. As I noted above, the grimness and violence seemed so over-to-top, forced.

              3. The technology didn't add up. OK, I know, it was fiction. But still--they have all this fabulous tech for the game arenas, but their aircraft haven't advanced to the point of a 1916 Sopwith Camel? But they have hovercraft, which are obviously significantly more sophisticated? Give me a friggin' break. That was an obvious gimmick so that the hero could shoot the hovercraft with a bow and arrow. Again, it felt like the author was manipulating me; it's not good to treat your reader as an adversary.

              "The true strength of our nation comes not from the might of our arms or the scale of our wealth, but from the enduring power of our ideals." - Barack Obama

              by HeyMikey on Sat May 11, 2013 at 08:30:45 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  It was supposed to be some kind of weird sci-fi (3+ / 0-)

                arrow, though shot from a traditional bow. Only problem is, the future society has automatic weapons, which could have riddled Katniss with bullets in the time she needed to nock an arrow and draw her bow.

                The attack on the Capitol (sic) made no sense because the author has spent 2 and 1/2 books telling us the Capitol government produced nothing but the Hunger Games and oppressive laws. One week of siege would be enough to sweat them out. The attack on the Capitol happened so that certain characters could die to set up the final confrontation between Katniss and President Coin.

                You're quite right.

                Find out about my next big thing by reading my blog. Link is here: http://bettysrants.wordpress.com/2013/01/05/my-next-big-thing/

                by Kimball Cross on Mon May 13, 2013 at 09:52:17 AM PDT

                [ Parent ]

              •  you R correct--she wasn't writing to you as a peer (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                RiveroftheWest

                Hunger Games was young adult literature.

                books written for that age group are often constructed like that.

                supposedly young adult readers follow action rather than character at that age.

                not everyone is JK Rowling, able to write at a level both children and adults can enjoy

                Politics is like driving. To go backward put it in R. To go forward put it in D.
                Drop by The Grieving Room on Monday nights for support in dealing with grief.

                by TrueBlueMajority on Mon May 13, 2013 at 11:55:30 AM PDT

                [ Parent ]

          •  the first book is the anchor (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            RiveroftheWest

            reading them out of order does not work

            i think the first book is the best, and I thought the last book was sort of lame, but I'm not the intended demographic!

            Politics is like driving. To go backward put it in R. To go forward put it in D.
            Drop by The Grieving Room on Monday nights for support in dealing with grief.

            by TrueBlueMajority on Sat May 11, 2013 at 05:51:26 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

    •  everyone to his or her own taste (6+ / 0-)

      at least we agree on standing against the dominant culture when necessary.  this was the first fiction I read that highlighted that concept

      Politics is like driving. To go backward put it in R. To go forward put it in D.
      Drop by The Grieving Room on Monday nights for support in dealing with grief.

      by TrueBlueMajority on Fri May 10, 2013 at 10:06:36 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  TrueBlue, thanks for this excellent, thoughtful (14+ / 0-)

    diary.  It's always highly interesting to me to find out what resonates with one person but not another.

    But paradoxically it also romanticized the idea of not fitting in, and made me even more proud to be an outlier and an outcast. Those were the years when I was beginning to strengthen my "question authority" muscles.  I saw myself in the characters in The World Inside who went flippo and paid for not fitting in at the cost of losing their identities or losing their lives.
    Speaking as one who has always been a lone wolf (until I found community quite late in life), I can identify strongly with this.  I found that as an "outlier," if I wasn't popular I was certainly resilient and adaptable--probably much more so than the popular people.  My lack of popularity drove me to books, which have been my salvation over the years.  My extensive reading certainly prepared me to deal with the vicissitudes of life.

    As for fitting in, there was one lesson from Somerset Maugham's Of Human Bondage that I never forgot:  As long as you look like everyone else, you can think what you like.

    "Religion is what keeps the poor from murdering the rich."--Napoleon

    by Diana in NoVa on Fri May 10, 2013 at 07:01:13 AM PDT

  •  TrueBlue, congratulations on your diary's being (8+ / 0-)

    promoted to "Community Spotlight"!  Well done!

    And Rescue Rangers, thank you for rescuing this excellent diary--much appreciated. :)

    "Religion is what keeps the poor from murdering the rich."--Napoleon

    by Diana in NoVa on Fri May 10, 2013 at 07:08:35 AM PDT

  •  Thanks TrueBlue (6+ / 0-)

    I am not a big reader of SF and haven't spent the time to figure out what I should read; so it is always good for me to hear about a work that has profoundly touched someone. I am going to get this from the library after work since it looks like rain all weekend and the house painting plans I had will be on hold.

    What I find most interesting in your diary is this sense of how reading can offer us a good avenue for introspection and--perhaps more importantly--develop in us what you call "personal identity."

    I like to think reading has helped me develop as a human being and made me face those larger questions we don't get asked on a typical day.

    Thanks again for the great diary.

  •  Thanks, TrueBlueMajority, for sharing your teenage (13+ / 0-)

    epiphany. It's amazing how big an impact a book can have on shaping our views as teenagers. I'm not famililiar with The World Inside, but I had a similar response to Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale. It was my first dystopian novel and I had a hard time shaking it off; my mind kept poking at it for weeks afterwards, like your tongue seeks out a hole in your tooth.

    Have you gone back and re-read The World Inside as an adult? Did you feel the same about the book, if you did?

    I've had some real life experiences that make it impossible for me to contemplate re-reading Atwood's Tale alone, and I'm not sure I'd want to revisit that world even with a book club group. Actually, though, I think reading it as a young teenager helped strenghten my sense of self, which I think is a good thing. And over the years it will pop into my mind when real life gives fiction a run for the money.

    I feel that's one of the amazing gifts we are given as readers. We're placed in so many different worlds where we can stretch our imaginations, our sense of place and time and empathy, as well as continuing to add layers of knowledge from which we can draw as the need arises. Our journey through books can give us an escape when we most need one. Books can also reinforce the message that we're not alone, and in a very real sense, innoculate us against hate and despair. Books can remind us that what does not kill us makes us stronger. Maybe someday I'll go back and re-read The Handmaid's Tale, but for now I'll settle for being glad I read it when I did. Sorry - I'll climb down off my soapbox here; but I'm going to give you part of the blame, er, credit. Thanks for your thought provoking diary. :)

    "In politics stupidity is not a handicap." Napoleon Bonaparte

    by citylights on Fri May 10, 2013 at 07:23:44 AM PDT

    •  Great comments, P Carey and citylights! (5+ / 0-)

      Comments like these add immeasurably to the enjoyment of discussing the diary.  Good to see you.  :)

      "Religion is what keeps the poor from murdering the rich."--Napoleon

      by Diana in NoVa on Fri May 10, 2013 at 07:40:59 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  yes actually I did re-read it as an adult (5+ / 0-)

      I think I've read it four or five times altogether, most recently in the summer of 2012.  The last time I read it very quickly through, in one day, since it is so familiar to me.

      when i read it as an adult one of the things that gets me is wondering why MORE people don't go flippo!  How can thousands and hundreds of thousands of people accept a life that is so limited, so prescribed by stultifying cultural boundaries, and still retain any sense of personal freedom?  Do people just become accustomed to the idea of freedom being impossible?  Or do they get so twisted inside that they think they ARE free?  Because drugs are free and sex is free and all these substitutes for true emotional freedom are free?

      since the novel is only about a handful of people, the other thing I assume is that these malcontents described in the book are only a representative sample of malcontents, and that there must be a lot more, but this book is only about a few of them.

      i believe that a great novelist does not know everything about the world s/he has created.  Missing pieces are filled in by the minds of the readers, and the sign of a truly great work is when each individual reader has an individual experience because each individual mind reacts and responds and fills in those missing pieces.

      I'm with you about The Handmaid's Tale.  I did read it twice, but not at all since 2000 as the forced birthers have grown in political power.  Too close for comfort.

      Politics is like driving. To go backward put it in R. To go forward put it in D.
      Drop by The Grieving Room on Monday nights for support in dealing with grief.

      by TrueBlueMajority on Fri May 10, 2013 at 11:40:30 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  On Babies and Bathwater (8+ / 0-)

    I am the last person to defend dystopian literature as a whole--I haven't read that much. And, I admit, it scares the hell out of me. But in light of loggersbrat comment (which I have much sympathy for) and Diana's take, I want to point out a few additional works that transcend any general label typically associated with that genre.

    Off the top of my head, I would list the following as books that are fantastic reads and worthy of anyone's time.

    Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by Philip K. Dick (the film adaptation--Blade Runner--is one of my favorite movies of all time): Dick was a master and a writer of precision, laser-targeted fiction.  

    The Giver by Lois Lowry. I can't recall how many times I have read this book as I have helped my nephews, neices, cousins, children of friends deal with it as assigned reading in school. Not one person I know has failed to be taken by that book (and I have to admit it isn't my favorite by a long shot). It is written for young adults, and it has an effect on them: "But, wait...what? What happens?" Ah, the power of emotions.

    The Guardians by John Christopher. Another for younger readers and another well-written look at city versus country life, values, morals, etc.

    Love Among the Ruins: A Romance of the Near Future by Evelyn Waugh. How can you not love a book whose main character is named "Miles Plastic?"

    Nineteen Eighty-Four by George Orwell: He gave us Big Brother and the cult of personality. Haunting, but worth the pain for the lessons learned.

    Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury: For book lovers this is a must.

    Enjoy the weekend!

  •  Dystopian (10+ / 0-)

    Loved Silverberg's the World Inside and liked his novel Shadrach in the Furnace even more as a teenager back in the 70's.    I re-read them both 2-3 years ago and was not so impressed.  

    One theme from the World Inside:  This enormous society is running on some sort of auto-pilot, with society forces so great they simply crush any person left outside the, by our standards, strange, mores.

    Other Sci Fi works from the the 1960's and 1970's looking at how society might deal with overpopulation:

    Stand on Zanzibar by John Brunner.  

    Make Room, Make room Harry Harrison (later made into the movie Soylent Green)

    To Live Forever Jack Vance

  •  There are parts of the Bronx (6+ / 0-)

    that look like that urbmon picture.

    As I'm sure Silverberg well knew, being a New Yorker.

    The thing about quotes on the internet is you cannot confirm their validity. ~Abraham Lincoln

    by raboof on Fri May 10, 2013 at 10:33:57 AM PDT

  •  I read this book when I was a teenager (3+ / 0-)

    It's mostly about everyone having sex with everyone else, and what else has to fall into place around that for that to happen.

    Wild... Probably as good a read today.

    •  well, i can imagine (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      kazoo of the north

      that would be what you would remember most, but that is not in fact what the book is about :-D

      Politics is like driving. To go backward put it in R. To go forward put it in D.
      Drop by The Grieving Room on Monday nights for support in dealing with grief.

      by TrueBlueMajority on Fri May 10, 2013 at 05:00:51 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  yeah, it was a dystopian vision (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        TrueBlueMajority, RiveroftheWest

        .... I know.

        But it was FULL of sex, or the negative spaces around sex, and fertility and identity through all that.

        This was a long time ago. I read it because I read a lot of other Silverberg SF books, and I don't think any of them had a tenth as much sex.

        I wouldn't call it porn, either. But it was a wild & trippy thought experiment.

        I would call Robert Silverberg an important writer in his genre and time.

        •  it was full of sex, yes (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          RiveroftheWest

          but it wasn't ABOUT sex any more than it was ABOUT tall buildings.

          it was considered on the edge of porn because of the casual way he talked about men having sex with men and sisters having sex with brothers.

          but as you noted that was all in the service of the dystopia. at a time when some people advocated that unlimited sex might be a good thing, Silverberg showed how it could be, in its own way, a limiting thing.

          thanks for your comments!

          Politics is like driving. To go backward put it in R. To go forward put it in D.
          Drop by The Grieving Room on Monday nights for support in dealing with grief.

          by TrueBlueMajority on Sat May 11, 2013 at 05:50:16 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

  •  Dystopias are maybe too easy (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Black Max, TrueBlueMajority

    I liked Jack Vance's stories of people just doing their damn job, no apocalypse, no dystopia (or no more than now).

    I'll take dystopia over apocalypse though: those are REALLY cheating in my book. But I'd prefer an interesting, working society, wherein an interesting story is set.

  •  A personal reminiscence (9+ / 0-)

    I discovered SF in 1964 or so (What's the Golden Age of Science Fiction? 14.) and Silverberg's novels and stories became a mainstay for me. In the late 1970's one day I was at Peet's Coffee on Piedmont Avenue on Oakland and I recognized Silverbob, he was alone. I introduced myself, he was quite gracious, and we proceeded to have an hour-long discussion of his books (including TWI) and SF in general (boy do I miss Peet's!). From time to time I would encounter him at Peet's or see him walking on Piedmont and he never failed to acknowledge me and he usually had a few minutes for conversation. I met Poul Anderson on Piedmont as well and he was also convivial. Writers love to talk about writing with readers and if they don't something is wrong with them.

  •  Freebies, booklovers! (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    TrueBlueMajority, ozsea1

    Have three Friday slots free in May--the 17th, 24, and 31st!  Please respond here or kosmail me if you want to contribute a diary for "Books That Changed My Life."

    "Religion is what keeps the poor from murdering the rich."--Napoleon

    by Diana in NoVa on Fri May 10, 2013 at 12:09:52 PM PDT

  •  Wonderful diary, TrueBlue! (6+ / 0-)

    I remember being an avid reader at that age, too, and feeling strongly like I did not fit in.  At all, anywhere.  Perhaps all teenagers feel that way to an extent, or perhaps just sensitive kids who are coming into an understanding of their separateness from others.  It's scary, it's liberating, and it brings up so many questions.

    Teenagers are able to start thinking outside of themselves, too, and see the problems of the world.

    What sounds so interesting about this book is that the author took something that (especially in the 60s) was seen as a "good" thing.  Loosening up rigid sexual morality was, for sure.  But what if. . what if sexual openness became something that was coerced?  It's no longer "freedom" then, but something legislated by the more powerful.

    Also, I love that you came to an important decision about your own dreams and desires.  As you say, many people (myself included) struggle with that all their lives.

    Thanks again for such a thoughtful and thought-provoking diary.  I'm so glad I popped in here to read!!

    The earth is what we all have in common. ~ Wendell Berry

    by Knockbally on Fri May 10, 2013 at 12:47:17 PM PDT

  •  Love Silverberg. (3+ / 0-)

    Theodore Sturgeon, too.  

  •  Absolutely love that book (4+ / 0-)

    Silverberg is a real master of the genre and The World Inside is one of his best.

    My person top list of the best Science Fiction authors:

    1. Robert Heinlein
    2. Robert Silverberg
    3. Isaac Asimov

  •  I was 16 when I read The World Inside. (6+ / 0-)

    Wow, I haven't thought about that book for years.  For me, what stuck was when the main character was confronted with the society that lived outside the urbmons.  His horror at the ritual where the pregnant woman was struck (but never on the belly, and not hard enough to truly injure her) resonated since it was so opposite of what he had been living with all his life.

    Weird, what we remember about a book, isn't it? :)

    •  i've changed my mind about that part (3+ / 0-)

      that was the least interesting part of the book for me when I read it as a teen, but re-reading it as an adult that part is really fascinating to me now.  the guy who escapes and gets to see the world OUTside encounters a different level of dystopia--Silverberg did not sugar coat it by trying to make the outside farm world some idyllic hippie commune.

      Politics is like driving. To go backward put it in R. To go forward put it in D.
      Drop by The Grieving Room on Monday nights for support in dealing with grief.

      by TrueBlueMajority on Fri May 10, 2013 at 05:03:41 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Nice. I read it at about the same age (4+ / 0-)

    you did, and though I bet I haven't thought about it for 30 years, I see it right on the shelf where it belongs.

    Silverber's The Stochastic Man sits next to it. There was a time, pre-Lord Valentine IMO, where he was a very edgy and very thoughtful writer.

  •  Thank You - N/T (3+ / 0-)

    "Upward, not Northward" - Flatland, by EA Abbott

    by linkage on Fri May 10, 2013 at 04:17:25 PM PDT

  •  Some day (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    RiveroftheWest

    I was a huge Silverberg & Dick reader & I have a bunch of these titles in boxes downstairs. I wish I had the energy & time to break them out. Voracious when I was in my 20s. Family life has worn me out. Some day.

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