Skip to main content

[This is the second post in the series Why Everything You Know about Your “Self” Is Wrong. The series explores how our understanding of selfhood affects our sense of individuality, our interpersonal relationships, and our politics.]

In the first post in this series, we disentangled the notion of selfhood from the body, the mind, and the witness. Another common mistake is to identify a current identity as our "real" self. With age, most people realize that they are not the face they present to the world, not even the superposition of the various identities they’ve assumed over the course of their lifetime.

By my late thirties, I had accumulated enough personal history to see that I had presented several quite different Bobs to the world. Principal among my serial identities were student, teacher, and educator. Alongside these occupational personas were the familial ones of son, husband, and father. As Shakespeare famously noted:

All the world’s a stage,
And all the men and women merely players:
They have their exits and their entrances;
And one man in his time plays many parts …
Like many an Eastern sage, Shakespeare saw that we assume a series of parts while at the same time watching over ourselves as if we're a member of the audience. That is, we both live our lives and, at the same time, witness our selves doing so. We don’t stop there: we even witness ourselves witnessing.

We know that our current persona will eventually give way to another. In contrast, the self ages little, perhaps because it partakes of the detached agelessness of the witness.

Distinct identities are strung together on the thread of memory, all of them provisional and perishable. No less fascinating than the birth, life, and death of our bodies are the births, lives, and deaths of these makeshift, transient identities. Reincarnation of the body is arguable; metamorphosis of identity is not.

The witness’s detachment facilitates the letting go of elements of identity in response to changing circumstances. As we age, the feeling that life is a battle is gradually replaced with the sense that it’s a game played with a shifting set of allies and opponents who, upon closer examination, are unmasked as collaborators. Without opposition, we might never notice the partiality and blind spots inherent in our unique vantage point.

The more flexible, forgiving attitude that results when we see our self as a home for transient identities turns out to be the perspective we need to maintain our dignity in adversity and accord it to others in theirs. Former antagonists—which may include colleagues, spouses, and parents—come to be seen as essential participants in our development, and we in theirs.

To keep an identity in working order, we continually emend and burnish it, principally by telling and retelling our story to ourselves and anyone who’ll listen. Occasionally, our narrative is revised in a top to bottom reformulation that in science would be called a paradigm shift. Though most incremental changes are too small and gradual to be noticed over months or even years, they add up, and suddenly, often in conjunction with a change in job, health, or relationship, we may come to see ourselves quite differently, revise our grand narrative, and present a new face to the world. Whole professions—therapy, coaching, counseling—have grown up to help people weather such identity crises.

It is tempting to think of the self as simply a home for the identities we adopt over our lifetime, but on reflection, this, too, falls short. Our self is also the source of the identities that sally forth as our proxies. That is, we experience the self as more than a retirement home for former identities; it’s also the laboratory in which they're minted, tested, and from which they step onto the stage. One can think of the self as a crucible for identity formation.

Before examining this process, we consider two more candidates for the mantle of selfhood: the soul and pure consciousness.

Am I My Soul?

If selfhood, as currently understood, has a shortcoming, it's its mortality. We grudgingly accept physical aging, but who has not balked at the idea of the apparent extinction of his or her self upon physical death? Alas, our precious but nebulous self—whatever it may be—appears to expire with the demise of our body.

To mitigate this bleak prospect, many religions postulate the existence of an immortal soul, and go on to identify self with soul. After we’ve clarified the concept of selfhood, we’ll discover that, even without hypothesizing an immortal soul, death loses some of its finality and its sting.

Am I Consciousness?

A last redoubt for the self as we’ve known it is to identify it as pure, empty consciousness. But what exactly is consciousness? Arguments run on about whether animals have it, and if so how much, without ever clarifying what consciousness is. Moreover, identifying one’s self as pure consciousness is just another identification, namely that of systematically dis-identifying with everything else.

Even if you don’t find pure, empty consciousness a bit spare or monotonous, there’s another problem with equating it with selfhood. Whatever it may be, stripped-down consciousness is deficient in agency, and agency—that is, not just being, but doing—is inextricably connected to selfhood because mentation does not occur apart from its potential to actualize behavior. To think is to rehearse action without triggering it. Thought involves the excitation of motor neurons, but below the threshold at which the actions those neurons enervate would be emitted. In computer parlance, thought is virtual behavior.

In the next post, I’ll bring in the postmodern perspective, which will complete the deconstruction of naive selfhood, and set the stage for a self that’s congruent with the findings of both traditional introspection and contemporary neuroscience.

Part 1 of Everything You Know about Your “Self” Is Wrong can be found here.

Robert W. Fuller is an author and independent scholar from Berkeley, CA. His most recent book is The Rowan Tree: A Novel.

EMAIL TO A FRIEND X
Your Email has been sent.
You must add at least one tag to this diary before publishing it.

Add keywords that describe this diary. Separate multiple keywords with commas.
Tagging tips - Search For Tags - Browse For Tags

?

More Tagging tips:

A tag is a way to search for this diary. If someone is searching for "Barack Obama," is this a diary they'd be trying to find?

Use a person's full name, without any title. Senator Obama may become President Obama, and Michelle Obama might run for office.

If your diary covers an election or elected official, use election tags, which are generally the state abbreviation followed by the office. CA-01 is the first district House seat. CA-Sen covers both senate races. NY-GOV covers the New York governor's race.

Tags do not compound: that is, "education reform" is a completely different tag from "education". A tag like "reform" alone is probably not meaningful.

Consider if one or more of these tags fits your diary: Civil Rights, Community, Congress, Culture, Economy, Education, Elections, Energy, Environment, Health Care, International, Labor, Law, Media, Meta, National Security, Science, Transportation, or White House. If your diary is specific to a state, consider adding the state (California, Texas, etc). Keep in mind, though, that there are many wonderful and important diaries that don't fit in any of these tags. Don't worry if yours doesn't.

You can add a private note to this diary when hotlisting it:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary from your hotlist?
Are you sure you want to remove your recommendation? You can only recommend a diary once, so you will not be able to re-recommend it afterwards.
Rescue this diary, and add a note:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary from Rescue?
Choose where to republish this diary. The diary will be added to the queue for that group. Publish it from the queue to make it appear.

You must be a member of a group to use this feature.

Add a quick update to your diary without changing the diary itself:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary?
(The diary will be removed from the site and returned to your drafts for further editing.)
(The diary will be removed.)
Are you sure you want to save these changes to the published diary?

Comment Preferences

  •  I am thinking back to when I told a friend (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Robert Fuller, maggiejean

    that I looked forward to retirement so I could sit in my rocking chair and think.  It made me feel good to imagine it, but my friend literally screamed, "No!"

    I have no idea what frightened her so much about the idea of taking time to think.

    I also remember coming home from teaching night school and reflecting on the good and bad results of the lessons for the night and asking how I could make it work better the next night.  I would rock and consider and then begin rocking faster as I thought of some things to try and then I would catapult out of the chair and go write the ideas down or get things to put in my school bag.

    Thinking did turn into action in that case.  :)

    Best wishes!!

    Join us at Bookflurries-Bookchat on Wednesday nights 8:00 PM EST

    by cfk on Thu May 16, 2013 at 06:07:32 PM PDT

    •  thinking turns into action (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      cfk

      Not always, as you imply, but some kind of mental process -- that doesn't always rise to the level that it warrants being dubbed a "thought" -- seems to precede action. Of late, neuroscientists have even been able to detect thought processes in the form of brain waves that precede actions. They occur before we're even conscious of them so it's not that we consciously decide, it's more that we are decided by processes of which we're unaware. Free will ain't what we thought.

      Thanks for putting a picture -- you in your rocker, rocketing out to make a note -- to my words.

  •  I am trying to think of some dkos (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Robert Fuller

    people who are able to discuss this with you.

    I suppose you have already mentioned the series at the Street Prophets diaries.

    Others you might send a DKos message to and ask to read your diary and respond are:  (As you know, it is good to put the links of these first two in the message.) Some of these people may be at Street Prophets and already know.  I am just putting down a few names.

    commonmass

    teacherken

    dirkster42

    gmoke

    rimjob

    Magnifico

    algebrateacher

    palantir

    Around midnight, the Overnight News Digest diary comes up and it is OK to talk about your diary and link to it there.  

    Just a thought.  

    Join us at Bookflurries-Bookchat on Wednesday nights 8:00 PM EST

    by cfk on Thu May 16, 2013 at 07:44:55 PM PDT

    •  Thanks for the interlocutors (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      cfk

      As the next few posts in the series make clear, creation is actually co-creation. Elizabeth Warren is righter than she knows! We not only don't do anything without help from others, we do not even have "selves" apart from interaction with others. We co-create each others' selves. What I'm up to with this series is to ground empathic intuitions in introspection and neuroscience (they dovetail).

      Having said that, I am a bit shy about pushing my stuff directly on strangers. I'll look into Street Prophets. Some of my earlier diaries were posted there.

      I won't be able to check the Overnight Digest diary till early tomorrow morning, but thanks for the head's-up.

Subscribe or Donate to support Daily Kos.

Click here for the mobile view of the site