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It has been decades since I last visited Disneyland in Anaheim, so up front I'll admit that I might be living in a time warp.  But I spent some time reading a couple of articles detailing Disney's newest ticket price increases, as well as a couple of blogs wherein people detailed their experiences, and the costs they incurred, on recent vacations to the iconic amusement park.  I have never been to Orlando's Disneyworld, so I can neither compare nor comment upon how the two experiences differ.  But it now costs anyone older than 10 yrs $92 apiece just to walk through the entrance gate at Disneyland.  For those between the ages of 3 and 9, the ticket price is $86.  As if that is any meaningful difference.

That's after you pay $16 to park your car.

For the typical family of 4 (which isn't that typical anymore), You have already spent $400 as soon as you pass through the turnstiles, and it's going to be a long day.  At some point, everyone gets hungry and thirsty, gets a sweet tooth.  Little Billy and his sister want a mouse cap, or a pirate hat.

Before you know it, your bank account has taken close to a $500 hit.  Maybe, as I said, I'm just living in a time warp, but that sort of takes the amusement out of "Amusement Park" for me.  Let's say you're a single parent, which is pretty common these days...the cost of treating the kids to a day at the Magic Kingdom becomes  quite possibly even more onerous.

What's going on here?

I was trying to remember the last time I went to Disneyland...it was sometime in the 80's.  But a brief review of "the price of admission" is a good place to start.  A book of tickets didn't pass the $10 mark until 1980, and at that time they still issued a booklet of individual tickets, marked 'A' through 'E', depending upon the popularity of the rides.  For those of you born after 1980, that's where the expression "E-Ticket Ride" comes from.  They discontinued individual ride tickets in 1982, which allowed them to raise the price for a daily pass, and rid themselves of the operating expense of maintaining ticket booths inside the park (as well as the wages of the extra employees who manned them).

Still, in 1981 the admission fee was $10.75.  By the end of the decade it rose to pass over the $20 benchmark, and Eisner was at the helm of the company.  By the end of the 90's ticket prices doubled once more, surpassing $41 in 2000.  The most recent price hike to $92 is a 6% increase over 2012's ticket price...but since 2010 alone the admission fee has increased an incredible 28%.  

By the way...since 1985, middle class incomes have remained exactly stagnant.  Flat.  In just the past decade, they have actually fallen.  So it isn't a rise in general prosperity that explains the rather remarkable inflation rate that Disneyland tickets have experienced.  The past 12 years have seen two recessions in this country, and an actual decrease in average incomes, while the price to spend a day with the kids at Disneyland has gone up 2.5 fold.

Back in the 60's, when I was a kid growing up in Southern California, there probably wasn't a more middle class way to spend a family day than loading into the Chevy Impala and driving to Anaheim to spend a day at Disneyland.  It was a very democratic experience.  I have to wonder how true that is today, although I haven't been there in years.

There are about 10 million residents of LA County.  Orange County has another 3 million or so.  Disneyland doesn't need everyone of them to be able to afford a ticket, obviously...and they probably, for purposes of attracting the clientele most desired, prefer that most of those 13 million cannot afford it.  But it isn't just Southern Californians that visit Disneyland.  People from Northern California, from out of state...indeed, from all over the world visit the park regularly.

The ticket prices are being determined not on the basis of what most can afford, but on the basis of what a sufficient number to keep the park full are willing to pay.  I guess that shouldn't be surprising.  It is basic capitalism, and the law of supply and demand.  In 1960, Disneyland was a regional attraction.  Today it is an international attraction.  And the ticket prices reflect the global auction process of "admission goes to the highest bidder."  

Still...it's just one more example, albeit a small one, of how the America I grew up in is no longer within the reach of so many people of average means.  The affluent, both domestic and international, have priced it increasingly out of reach.  There is no democracy in capitalism...only return on investment.  It wouldn't really bother that much if Disney didn't try so hard to infiltrate itself into the heart, soul and mind of every child...instilling in them a burning desire to visit their park.   The fact that that message gets disseminated so democratically and pervasively, while the affordability of the experience continues to recede farther and farther out of the reach of so many who receive their message, is a little troubling.  A little cynical.  

I respect the LA Lakers more.  They make no bones about it.  If you don't have the Benjamins to attend a game....there's always the radio.  Seats at the Forum are for the well connected, the glitteratti, the conspicuous consumers and corporations who can take advantage of our tax laws to write them off as "business expenses."

I wouldn't be surprised if corporations aren't currently able to buy yearly passes that they can provide to clients as needed, and write that expense off as a business expense.  Just like corporate box seats at any major sports venue.

I never liked Mickey Mouse that much anyway, but the Matterhorn was always fun.  I'd be curious to hear from those of you who have visited Disneyland much more frequently than I have over the past 40 years.  How has it changed?  Is it still, relative to other ways to spend a family outing, a fair deal?

Originally posted to Keith930 on Tue Jun 04, 2013 at 11:44 AM PDT.

Also republished by Community Spotlight.

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$92 to get into the Magic Kingdom?

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Comment Preferences

  •  When I was in High School, it was five hours (16+ / 0-)

    busting my ass at minimum wage.

    Ok, maybe 6 after taxes.  They routinely had lower prices for Southern California Residents, with deals around 20 bucks.

    Today, it would be 11.5 hours at CA's minimum wage.  

    "I would argue that its perfectly fine to blame the victim in part when they should know their actions will expose themselves for greater dangers" Game Guru

    by JesseCW on Tue Jun 04, 2013 at 11:54:52 AM PDT

  •  I don't care what it cost my parents (7+ / 0-)

    to witness the shooting of a deranged hippopotamus.

    My brother didn't either and paid so that his kids could have the same experience.

    •  they're still shooting that hippo? (10+ / 0-)

      Just goes to show, you can't keep a good hippopotamus down.

      You know you're in Oregon when you only see people using an umbrella to protect themselves from the sun.

      by Keith930 on Tue Jun 04, 2013 at 12:18:32 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  One of my fellow school board members (12+ / 0-)

      worked the Jungle ride and can still recite the script today, many decades later. We were very impressed.

      Fry, don't be a hero! It's not covered by our health plan!

      by elfling on Tue Jun 04, 2013 at 01:27:39 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Walt Kelly worked for Walt Disney. (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        ichibon, Sharoney, rl en france

        Pogo in the swamp was probably an improvement.

      •  It was a pretty fun ride...and the reason was (11+ / 0-)

        the live employees who provided the narrative.  It was very entertaining.  First time I ever saw the Enchanted Tiki Room...I was simply enthralled.  Disney's magic was tapping into our sense of wonder and joy, not our adrenal system.

        I remember when Magic Mountain first opened up in the far reaches of the San Fernando Valley.  It was all adrenaline, and no magic.  And it always catered to a clientele that was a more rough around the edges.  Think shaved heads and neck tattoos.  Disney used to be almost militant about enforcing a dress code and degree of propriety amongst its visitors.  They didn't want anyone to be off put or left with a bad taste in their mouth by their experience at the park.   If you stepped out of line, you could and would be booted from the grounds.

        I don't know how militant they are about that these days, but the ticket pricing acts as an effective economic filter for removing some, if not many, of those people.

        Magic Mountain, and most of the other attractions in SoCal, can ride Disney's coattails in terms of admission price...but Magic Mountain, especially, from the day it opened had a bad rep as a magnet for hoodlums.  It was all thrill at a low price, in comparisan.

        You know you're in Oregon when you only see people using an umbrella to protect themselves from the sun.

        by Keith930 on Tue Jun 04, 2013 at 02:37:24 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Ah, the Tiki Room! (13+ / 0-)

          It is my favorite.

          I grew up in LA in the 1960s through 80s (then left for college). I grew up at Disneyland. My cousin worked at Disney and her daughter now works at Disney. We would visit my Aunt and go in the morning, have an afternoon break, then return at night for the fireworks because you had in-and-out admission with a glow-in-the-dark handstamp back in those days.

          Summer daycamp always went to Disneyland at least once. And our family drove down from LA to Anaheim every few years to go to the Magic Kingdom.

          I was never a Disney fanatic, but it was an important part of my growing up - it was a part of the fabric of my experience, and still plenty magical.

          I remember when Magic Mountain opened and it didn't interest me all that much. I went to Knotts Berry Farm a few times, but it wasn't all that interesting either. Universal Studios was meh (of course this was when the big thrilling ride was the "parting of the Red Sea" and seeing Downtown Mayberry and Land of the Giants props and the video backdrop for McHale's Navy). Disney really was magic and the best of them all in a town with a lot of entertainment options.

          I used to believe that the submarines REALLY went underwater!

          It was my first introduction to Monsanto - the "inner world" ride that was fun to do as a teen so you could laugh cynically through it.

          I once tried to count the number of times I'd been to Disneyland but finally gave up. It would have to be 15 at the very least and probably more.

          Of course, I don't go now. I cannot imagine how anyone could afford it. I've gone with my parents and my kids when they were younger (twice) and could afford it because my Disney Cousin is a member of Club 88 and we got guest passes.

          But you know, it is all so "themed out" now that a lot of the charm for me is gone. I know it was always somewhat about promoting their products, but a lot of it was just pure imagination: the Pirates ride wasn't a movie at first, the Haunted Mansion wasn't a movie at first. The Jungle Boat ride is iconic. Now it is all so "branded" with the latest movies and characters that it has lost some of its own sense of self, really.

          My favorite place is Tom Sawyer's Island. I used to love the Swiss Family Robinson treehouse, but alas that has been repurposed. As has the submarine ride. :-(

          I guess the era when a little black light and a jerky car ride were exciting has come and gone.

  •  in 1981, Disneyland Daily passes cost (33+ / 0-)

    3 times the minimum wage at the time ($3.35)

    Today, it is 12.5 times the minimum wage.  I think that puts it in the proper perspective.

    You know you're in Oregon when you only see people using an umbrella to protect themselves from the sun.

    by Keith930 on Tue Jun 04, 2013 at 11:58:18 AM PDT

  •  Two points (19+ / 0-)

    1.  The parks are bigger, with far more in the way of "over the top" (i.e., expensive) attractions than even 15 years ago.  

    2.  More importantly, yes, it is the law of supply and demand.  I've been to Disney World Orlando a number of times, and know a lot of people who have as well, especially recently, and the one thing everyone agrees on is that it is immensely more crowded these days than it was, say, 15 years ago.  The wait times are often ridiculous.  Disney has been trying to update its fastpass system to alleviate that, with middling success.  (On big holidays or other especially busy days, the Magic Kingdom in Orlando sometimes has to shut the gates because it reaches capacity by mid-morning).  Those long wait times for rides are not only bad for the customer experience, they are bad for profits -- people in line for rides are people who are not at food outlets or gift shops buying things.  So, yes, demand is up, and frankly, I'm sure any entity as big as Disney has done tons of research to see what is the "sweet spot" as far as pricing.  

    •  Disneyland is the same size it's been since (10+ / 0-)

      its inception.

      The rides are, for the most part, very much the same as they were in the 1980's.  The "Pirates" theme makeover of Tom Sawyers Island and the update on the submarine ride hardly justify increasing the price at something like three times the rate of inflation.

      "I would argue that its perfectly fine to blame the victim in part when they should know their actions will expose themselves for greater dangers" Game Guru

      by JesseCW on Tue Jun 04, 2013 at 12:06:17 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  I'm more familiar with Disney World (7+ / 0-)

        And while the footprint on parks may be the same, the number and quality of attractions has increased.  

        But as I said, far more important is the number of people who go.  When demand gets high in relation to supply, that, in and of itself, justifies a higher price.  Disney doesn't have to say, well, we're entitled to charge more because we added x, y, or z.

        If Disney raises its prices too high, and enough people stop going, the price will come down.  If enough people keep going, then Disney did the right thing by raising its prices.  

        •  If your argument is simply that charging (5+ / 0-)

          what the market will bear is the nature of unrestrained capitalism(duh), then why waste time with the rest?

          "I would argue that its perfectly fine to blame the victim in part when they should know their actions will expose themselves for greater dangers" Game Guru

          by JesseCW on Tue Jun 04, 2013 at 12:17:05 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Because the two are related (10+ / 0-)

            For example, Disney just finished increasing both the size, and the attractions, in the Fantasyland part of the Magic Kingdom in Orlando.  I haven't seen the cost of that, but I'm sure it wasn't insignificant.  

            Disney spends money to do that kind of thing so that it will attract people to its parks.  And the more people it can attract to its parks -- i.e., the more demand -- the more it can charge.  

            In Orlando, the Magic Kingdom is the "crown jewel" (and most crowded part) of Disney World, and Fantasyland is the "crown jewel" of the Magic Kingdom.  I'm certain it's no accident that Disney waited until after that revamping of Fantasyland to up its prices.  

            •  Yup, I get the leanings of the post: (6+ / 0-)

              It's sad when things that are part of your childhood aren't part of your children's childhood. I oftentimes think at how ostenisbly easy it was for my parents to provide for three children on what was most of the time one salary. My wife and I can't seem to live that easily and it's just us and we both work like dogs.

              All of that being said, who cares whether middle class children today are able to go to Disney World? It's a crappy corporation that hasn't done anything remotely creative in decades, and they're better off not getting the opportunity, although they may not understand that until they're older. Take them to the acquarium or the zoo or a national park.

      •  Disneyland is (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        wintergreen8694, BusyinCA

        but it has a sister park now, California Adventure.

        Oh, and the parking lot is now essentially the first and last ride of the day.

        Fry, don't be a hero! It's not covered by our health plan!

        by elfling on Tue Jun 04, 2013 at 01:29:10 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Yes, at the same admission price. (0+ / 0-)

          It's not as if you're getting another park for price of a ticket, which has risen about 2.5 times faster than real wages.

          "I would argue that its perfectly fine to blame the victim in part when they should know their actions will expose themselves for greater dangers" Game Guru

          by JesseCW on Tue Jun 04, 2013 at 03:13:18 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

      •  The original parking lot has been converted to (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Keith930, badscience, VClib

        California Adventure, another complete park that also is priced into the admission. I strongly believe that Disneyland is over priced; however, I also have such fond memories of taking my children to the park and going there myself as a teenager that it's hard to be critical of this iconic part of Southern California.

        "Intelligence is quickness in seeing things as they are..." George Santayana

        by KJG52 on Tue Jun 04, 2013 at 05:18:35 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  It's changed a lot since its inception, (2+ / 0-)

        if not since the 80s.

        I grew up at Disneyland, and there are a lot of new rides that didn't used to be there in the 60s. Perhaps in terms of acreage it hasn't changed, but not true in terms of "attractions."

        I think its biggest growth seemed to happen in the late 70s/early 80s.

        It's a Small World. Pirates of the Caribbean. Haunted Mansion. Country Bear Jamboree. That runaway mining train I forget the name of. Space Mountain. Those were all "new" to me at some point in my growing up, and like I said, I have been there a lot.

        There has also been a lot of repurposing as well. Sad to me, but that is my own nostalgia.

        •  I was especially sad to see the sky bucket tramway (5+ / 0-)

          go.

          With the right company, that relatively private and leisurely "ride" could truly make Disneyland the "Happiest Place on Earth."

          No wonder they decided to get rid of it.

          You know you're in Oregon when you only see people using an umbrella to protect themselves from the sun.

          by Keith930 on Tue Jun 04, 2013 at 06:23:48 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Lots of amusement parks have, sadly. (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Keith930, VictorLaszlo

            Those things are a liability nightmare, and they tend to shut down every time there's even a moderate wind blowing.

            There are a couple parks still operating them, though.  Cedar Point has one right down the center of it's midway.  It's short, but quite a fun ride.  Busch Gardens Williamsburg also has one, and the view simply cannot be beat - they are landscaped better then any Disney park.

            There may be others I don't know of, but they are a very rare breed nowadays.

          •  I missed the boats. They still had them the (5+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            ichibon, badscience, mythatsme, Debby, BusyinCA

            time I got to go as little kid. Gone by the early 90's.

            The Fort on Tom Sawyers Island is gone too.  That place was fun.  I got chased around that island for an hour or two by a pair of little blonde twins until I found my stepdad and asked for help.

            "These girls won't stop chasing me!!"

            "They will if you stop running"

            "But they're trying to kiss me!!"

            "Is that bad?"

            Last time I ever got to kiss twins in cave.

            "I would argue that its perfectly fine to blame the victim in part when they should know their actions will expose themselves for greater dangers" Game Guru

            by JesseCW on Tue Jun 04, 2013 at 07:09:03 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  What boats? Are you talking about the (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              JesseCW

              Davy Crockett canoes?  Are those gone?  I'm guessing the Mark Twain Riverboat is gone, too, it the whole island has ditched it's Americana theme in favor of Pirates.  The pontoon (barrel) bridge?  Nyet?

              You know you're in Oregon when you only see people using an umbrella to protect themselves from the sun.

              by Keith930 on Tue Jun 04, 2013 at 08:24:00 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

        •  Yes, but not much since the 1980's. (0+ / 0-)

          Country Bear Jamboree got taken down not too long age IIRC.

          A few makeovers.  I think after Space Mountain they kind of dropped the "New spectacular rides will draw crowds and command higher prices" approach.

          "I would argue that its perfectly fine to blame the victim in part when they should know their actions will expose themselves for greater dangers" Game Guru

          by JesseCW on Tue Jun 04, 2013 at 07:05:18 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

      •  The fact that it's the same size (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        ladybug53

        is exactly what explains raising the price.

        The target population has increased.  There is only one Disneyland.  Therefore, Disney needs to limit admission to a smaller proportion of the population every day that passes, in order to not overwhelm the park and destroy the experience.

        They could issue tickets by lottery.  That might be more "fair, " but would leave cash on the table.

        So, raise the price until the number of takers is right at the capacity of the park.  If the park starts to get overcrowded, raise it again.  If things thin out a bit, lower the price a little.

        That's how monopolies work, and to the degree that Magic Mountain, Knott's Berry Farm, and Sea World are not really competitors of the Kingdom, Disneyland is a monopoly.

    •  Go in August :) (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      coquiero, catwho, BusyinCA

      I promise you, the crowds will be (relatively) thin, and you won't have to wait in line much at all.

      That is, if you don't collapse from heat stroke. Walking around Disney in the Florida August heat and humidity can be....challenging.  :)

      Black Holes Suck.

      by Pi Li on Tue Jun 04, 2013 at 12:32:19 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Here in New Orleans, (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Pi Li, wintergreen8694, VClib

        Mardi Gras week is often a big time to go.  Many schools are closed for the week -- it's sort of our "spring break," although it happens in February or early March.  

        For people who are tired of the Mardi Gras thing, many of them either go skiing (with older groups) or to Disney  (with younger kids).  The joke is that, during Mardi Gras, you'll see more New Orleanians at Disney World than you will on Canal Street.  

      •  In Florida, best time to go is (4+ / 0-)

        the first week of December.  It's post-Thanksgiving and pre-Christmas rush periods, value pricing on the rooms, everything's decorated for Christmas, and the Very Merry Christmas Party at the Magic Kingdom is very cool if you've got the extra scratch.

        Also, do not forget annual passes, if you live near either Disneyland or WDW and you want to visit them a lot.  Much, much more worth it -- let's see, what's an annual Parkhopper at WDW going for today...? Just under $650 for an adult.  Kick in some more, and you can also get the water parks.  And you get various discounts on food 'n' such.

        -----
        Tom Smith Online
        I want a leader who shoots for the moon. The last time we had one, we got to the moon.

        by filkertom on Tue Jun 04, 2013 at 01:11:36 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  It's a park, not a basic necessity. If it becomes (8+ / 0-)

    too expensive, attendance will drop.

    •  I wasn't suggesting it is a necessity (6+ / 0-)

      just an experience that used to be a lot more affordable to a much broader range of people.  

      You know you're in Oregon when you only see people using an umbrella to protect themselves from the sun.

      by Keith930 on Tue Jun 04, 2013 at 12:15:19 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  I just don't get the outrage. (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Victor Ward, RobespierreHoo
        •  You don't have any problem with a highly (4+ / 0-)

          classist society. You believe it to be the natural order of things.

          While I don't see any "outrage", it stands to reason that wouldn't be able to see the problem.

          This is how you want things to be.

          "I would argue that its perfectly fine to blame the victim in part when they should know their actions will expose themselves for greater dangers" Game Guru

          by JesseCW on Tue Jun 04, 2013 at 02:24:01 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  I've seen classless society. It was much worse. (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Victor Ward

            That said, these are amusement parks not food and shelter.

          •  Thanks Jesse...for saying what I would have. (11+ / 0-)

            You are faster on the draw than I am.

            This is in no way an "outrage" diary....more along the lines of a wistfull remembrance of when a trip to Disneyland didn't cost a modest family $500.  

            That is the monthly rent for some people.  If they're lucky.

            I understand the concern by FG and Coffeetalk that too many of the lumpen proletariat clog up the gears, swell lines, and make their experience less vibrant and enjoyable.  And if they can afford to pay whatever Disney charges for their family to have a pleasant experience, who can blame Disney for accommodating them?

            Give the people (or at least those who can afford it) what they want.

            But don't market your product indiscriminantly to every child out there, telling them that they absolutely must experience this or else their lives will be incomplete.  Target that marketing by zipcode.  You know which ones.

            You know you're in Oregon when you only see people using an umbrella to protect themselves from the sun.

            by Keith930 on Tue Jun 04, 2013 at 02:49:06 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  Btw, I've never been to a Disney park and have (0+ / 0-)

              no plans to go. Expensive and I don't particularly enjoy this stuff. So it's not really personal.

            •  As I understand, (0+ / 0-)

              the riff-raff, non Premium Individuals go to Magic Mountain — at least it had a reputation as a partying place back in my day. It's North of LA by a bit. Tickets are $39.99 in advance.

              "Societies strain harder and harder to sustain the decadent opulence of the ruling class, even as it destroys the foundations of productivity and wealth." — Chris Hedges

              by Crider on Tue Jun 04, 2013 at 06:25:37 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

            •  So, Disney is just your prime example? (0+ / 0-)

              I mean, "don't market indiscriminately to children" applies to far more than just Disney and amusement parks in general, yes?

              The absolute cheapest 1-day ticket I could find online for any major amusement park was Kings Island's $38 (online-purchase discount); even Holiday World (formerly known as Santa Claus Land) is $40 online.  If Magic Kingdom's $95 1-day ticket is the worst-case scenario, let me ask you this - where's the tipping point?

              What about major league sports advertising to kids when their single-game tickets are in that same high price range?  Should NBA teams even have "kids clubs" at their prices?

              I understand your frustration that "local folks" can't afford this stuff, but the truth of the matter is that these are luxury items.  

              The word "parent" is supposed to be a VERB, people...

              by wesmorgan1 on Wed Jun 05, 2013 at 11:03:11 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

          •  Riiiiiiiiiight. (0+ / 0-)

            "Classist society" because a business doesn't maintain its prices at a level that satisfies your class consciousness?  That's a bit much.

            Amusement parks are a luxury item.  Luxury items, almost by definition, carry higher price tags.  

            It's that simple.

            The word "parent" is supposed to be a VERB, people...

            by wesmorgan1 on Wed Jun 05, 2013 at 10:23:13 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

      •  Here's the problem (0+ / 0-)

        If it really was a lot more affordable to a lot more people, it would have logically been constantly jammed. Yet it's more crowded than ever these days. Some of it may be that people are traveling farther, but that trip is part of the affordability or lack thereof. Some of it may be the large increase in population. I'd be curious to see a comparison of Disney attendance vs. US and world population.

        Chechnya: Russia's North Carolina.

        by NE2 on Wed Jun 05, 2013 at 07:11:11 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  I'd be curious to see Disney's internal (0+ / 0-)

          market research that shows how many visitors now hail from overseas.  

          You know you're in Oregon when you only see people using an umbrella to protect themselves from the sun.

          by Keith930 on Wed Jun 05, 2013 at 08:22:26 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Last time I went (0+ / 0-)

            awhile ago.

            There were so many languages spoken I couldn't identify.

            But you could always tell the overseas folks from the overweight Americans.

            Politics is the entertainment branch of industry. Frank Zappa

            by Da Rock on Wed Jun 05, 2013 at 05:12:52 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

  •  1960 (9+ / 0-)

    I first went to Disneyland in 1960 and it cost $5.00 to get in. That is when we didn't sneak in and it was pretty easy to do back then. ;-). I live about 20 minutes away and haven't been in 25 years. Not a fan of Team Rat.

  •  Free Marketeers rule the Magic Kingdom. (13+ / 0-)

    Your point that society is tiering out more and more strikes me nearly everyday. Loss of societal touchstones is not a good thing. Not if you want to grow democracy.

    "George RR Martin is not your bitch" ~~ Neil Gaiman

    by tardis10 on Tue Jun 04, 2013 at 12:26:29 PM PDT

  •  Tomorrowland in Disney or Europe Today! (15+ / 0-)

    You can visit a Fantasy Tomorrowland developed by Disney and pay a premium, or see the Future in Europe Today, travel on 200 MPH bullet trains, enjoy continental cuisine.

    The cost is about the same!  The difference is reality or fantasy!

    "Stupidity got us into this mess, then why can't it get us out?" Will Rogers offering advice to the Republican Party.

    by NM Ray on Tue Jun 04, 2013 at 12:28:43 PM PDT

    •  Put in those terms I'd go to Europe. :-) (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Wife of Bath, ladybug53

      and when I have the money and the choice, that is usually what I do!

      But I never go on vacation; it is always somehow related to work. Frankly I have no idea how people afford vacations. If I can't sleep on someone's floor, I am probably not going.

    •  Hmmm, nice idea. (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      gramofsam1, Wife of Bath

      I recently took my daughter and her small group of friends out to lunch to celebrate them getting through freshman year. Talk turned to a spring break trip to Disney when they're seniors and I said I'd chaperone. Who knows where they'll be and what they'll like in three years, but I wonder if they wouldn't prefer London or Paris instead? Either way, I'll start saving my pennies.

      Get old and do lots of stuff in the process. Half of the fun is trying everything out. --Noddy

      by Debby on Wed Jun 05, 2013 at 08:02:53 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  At $92 to get in... (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        gramofsam1, Debby

        At $92/day to get in plus transportation and hotel costs, perhaps it would be reasonable to compare the cost with a trip to a European destination.  March is low season in London and Paris (cheaper than usual);  further south it may be a shoulder season with reasonable (not beach) weather.  Mexico City is reasonably safe these days and March is fairly warm.  

        "Politics should be the part-time profession of every citizen who would protect the rights and privileges of free people and who would preserve what is good and fruitful in our national heritage." -- Lucille Ball

        by Yamaneko2 on Wed Jun 05, 2013 at 02:17:26 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  I went to Chicago (0+ / 0-)

          one year for my spring break. We had rain, snow, and sleet, all in the same day! We actually went to England once in February for work. The weather was kind of delightful, especially compared to Midwest U.S. at the same time. It was mild and on the last day, we got the lightest dusting of snow for a send-off.

          Get old and do lots of stuff in the process. Half of the fun is trying everything out. --Noddy

          by Debby on Wed Jun 05, 2013 at 10:38:21 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  London vs Chicago temps (0+ / 0-)

            A normal summer day in London (74/57 F) would be comparable to Chicago in late September or late May.  The 46/36 F of deepest London winter would be comparable to late November or mid-March in Chicago.  

            I wonder if you got your heart broken by the lake breeze.  Some time in March, the sun shines as the temperature rises.  If there is no strong synoptic (large-scale) wind blowing toward the lake, the lake breeze takes over around rush hour.  Thick fog rolls in as temperatures plummet 20 degrees in as many minutes.  This little cold front can extend 40-60 miles inland.  

            "Politics should be the part-time profession of every citizen who would protect the rights and privileges of free people and who would preserve what is good and fruitful in our national heritage." -- Lucille Ball

            by Yamaneko2 on Thu Jun 06, 2013 at 01:30:06 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  My heart wasn't broken! (0+ / 0-)

              I love Chicago! I love it when it's feisty (like March weather) and when it's sweet (like wandering the streets looking at amazing architecture on a sunny fall afternoon). Chicago's the first real city I got to explore on my own as a young adult. I will always love those big shoulders!

              Get old and do lots of stuff in the process. Half of the fun is trying everything out. --Noddy

              by Debby on Thu Jun 06, 2013 at 09:56:09 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

  •  disney is a big, ugly corporation... (7+ / 0-)

    trying to turn happy, friendly characters into huge profits by whatever means they can including the exploitation of third world workers sweatshop labor.

    i wouldn't pay a dime to enter the disney corporation's enchanted kingdom and its commodification of "happiness."

    i'm part of the 99% - america's largest minority

    by joe shikspack on Tue Jun 04, 2013 at 12:42:03 PM PDT

    •  I think the commodification began after Walt's (3+ / 0-)

      passing, but maybe I'm just being nostalgic.   Michael Eisner probably earned more in two years as CEO than Walt ever did, but who knows.  You gotta sell a lot of souveneirs to the throngs to pay for that kind of salary package.

      You know you're in Oregon when you only see people using an umbrella to protect themselves from the sun.

      by Keith930 on Tue Jun 04, 2013 at 01:28:41 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  I always heard Walt was a creepy tyrant (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        joe shikspack, wintergreen8694, JBL55

        That he envisioned the Disney media empire as basically a giant vanity press, that "Disney World" was always meant to be literal, and that by comparison, a cynical outsider like Eisner would be more likely to give people what he thought they wanted rather than what Walt thought they should have.

        •  Chapter Two of "Fast Food Nation" ... (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Wife of Bath

          ... drove the stake through the barely breathing corpse of the fatherly image of Walt Disney some people (e.g. my daughter-in-law) had managed to hang onto over the years.

          No doubt many people haven't read it and don't want to read it.  But reading it can profoundly change one's views, of Disney and many other "benevolent" icons of childhood.

          Then there's the rest of the book ... but that's not this diary.

          "War is not the answer, for only love can conquer hate." ~ Al Cleveland & Marvin Gaye (1970)

          by JBL55 on Wed Jun 05, 2013 at 09:45:44 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

      •  Walt was evil, but Henry Ford style (6+ / 0-)

        He was anti-semitic, had pedophilic tendencies apparently, and was ruthlessly anti-gay, anti-minority, anti-twentieth-century. His -land projects were, in some ways, projections of his megalomania, as he sought to create a town that was right, in comparison with the real world that refused to obey.

        That marks him as being in the grand tradition of American tycoons. Henry Ford was more benign to his workers, but he, too, would impose microscopic control to create a town/world that was "right." Kellogg would do the same. So would Hershey. Utopianism met with benevolence and social conscience to allow private demons to ride forth in disguise.

        Thus, he would be quite nasty, quite evil, but always collecting unto himself. Commodifying is an opposite tendency -- one where no object, no person, no act, has any intrinsic value, and everything is simply a temporary occupier of space that should be filled by money. Eisner's Mouse was commodifying: Hong Kong and then PRC factories, union busting, Cinderella dresses made by girls who are chained to the sewing machines, and maximum profit for minimum art. That's the MBA Mouse.

        "...ere God made us He loved us; which love was never slacked, nor ever shall be." - Juliana of Norwich

        by The Geogre on Wed Jun 05, 2013 at 06:52:13 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  No, it was merciless. (0+ / 0-)

        The old Walt Disney Club shows relentlessly pushed Disneyland before it was built.  

        "Politics should be the part-time profession of every citizen who would protect the rights and privileges of free people and who would preserve what is good and fruitful in our national heritage." -- Lucille Ball

        by Yamaneko2 on Wed Jun 05, 2013 at 02:18:07 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  It's Just Part Of Your Vacay Budget.... (7+ / 0-)

    I want to see The Wizarding World Of Harry Potter in Orlando.  I don't care how much it cost, & I'm 67 years old.

    I'll pay it.  

    •  Evidently, you don't have to care. (17+ / 0-)

      A lot of people really do.

      In Southern California in particular, for 30-35 years Disneyland was something that middle class family could afford to do 2-3 times a year, and that even poor families that weren't utterly destitute could afford once or twice in a lifetime.

      It was like a bigger version of a county fair.

      The 'stuff we all do' is vanishing from America.  

      "I would argue that its perfectly fine to blame the victim in part when they should know their actions will expose themselves for greater dangers" Game Guru

      by JesseCW on Tue Jun 04, 2013 at 02:16:44 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  ^^^^that's what I'm talking about^^^^ (7+ / 0-)

        thanks again, Jesse.

        You know you're in Oregon when you only see people using an umbrella to protect themselves from the sun.

        by Keith930 on Tue Jun 04, 2013 at 02:54:17 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  It is crazy expensive. (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        catwho, FG

        But mourning for the middle class families could do 2-3 times a year is sort of ridiculous. It was still something lots of families couldn't do. I mean, I suppose in Southern California, sure, but my nearest Disney has always been a couple thousand miles away, so ...

        www.stacysmusings.wordpress.com

        by Magenta on Tue Jun 04, 2013 at 05:33:27 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Pretty much this (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          SoCalSal, wintergreen8694, ladybug53

          I got to go to Disney in Orlando once as a teenager because my middle school gifted program went.  That entailed an 8 hour bus ride and major hotel stay for us.

          The "local" theme park of Six Flags Over Georgia was a day trip for us.  We'd leave home at 8AM, get there when the gates were open at 10AM, hang around til the park kicked us out at 10PM, and be home by midnight.  

          Carowinds up at the SC/NC border was a 4 hour trip, so we'd drive up there one day and go to the museum, stay in a hotel, hit the park the next day, and drive back home after dinner.

          For the majority of Americans who are not within quick driving distance of a Disney park, it's a once in a lifetime treat for the family.  They'll spend a week there and it will be the big family vacation for a year - or three or four.  Since they do a big tour package including hotel, the price of admission drops significantly on a daily basis.  One of my coworkers did a Disney trip with their family and they got the price of $900 per person for the week, including a food package and the hotel and admission to all the parks.

          The Cake is a lie. In Pie there is Truth. ~ Fordmandalay

          by catwho on Tue Jun 04, 2013 at 05:47:59 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  I've been five times to Disney World. (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            SoCalSal, JBL55

            First, I was 5, and my dad did big vacation, in part because parents were separated, and he had the money. And he liked to do the "big" family vacations.

            Next I was in my teens, but my grandmother lived an hour and a half a way. Epcot was new, so we went there.

            Went for our honeymoon.

            My dad gave us gift of vacation when the kids were 5 and 1.

            And we went in December when they were 11 and 6.

            But it's an expensive trip. It's not something we're doing every year by any means. Still as destination vacation, as opposed to day trip, it's really not that bad.

            And the customer service is to die for. It really is.

            www.stacysmusings.wordpress.com

            by Magenta on Tue Jun 04, 2013 at 07:17:33 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  as a destination for a honeymoon (0+ / 0-)

              it beats Hoboken, New Jersey...

              You know you're in Oregon when you only see people using an umbrella to protect themselves from the sun.

              by Keith930 on Tue Jun 04, 2013 at 07:26:56 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  That's becoming a theme park too (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                catwho

                Like New York City.  Manhattan is a theme park for international rich folks, vaguely themed "New York".  Hoboken, once a working-class town famous for the highest population density in the US, became yuppified in the 1990s.  Read "Yuppies Invaded My Apartment at Dinnertime", a book about that era (made from letters to the local paper).  While it's not Manhattan, Hoboken has gone upscale, vaguely themed "New Joyzee".  But hey, Buddy's City Hall bakery, as seen on TV, does make nice pastry.

            •  My step-son & DIL honeymooned there, too. (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              Wife of Bath, catwho

              They figured it would be more relaxing to go to a place they already knew and loved than to somewhere they'd never been and kew little about.  The run-up to their wedding was very stressful and nobody could blame them ... not that it was anyone's business what they did for their honeymoon.

              The love affair with Disney suffered a small blow when they began to have children and experienced the Disney Marketing Machine.  Then I read selected portions of chapter two of Fast Food Nation to them.  

              Now the only time their boys see any Disney-related items is at other people's homes, and SS & DIL are (so far) resisting peer pressure to take the kids there.  

              They are more interested in going to one of the agricultural fairs still prevalent around Maine when they come up here.  Food, rides, huge Morgan and Belgian draft horses, not to mention the pig scrambles ... what more could little boys want?

              "War is not the answer, for only love can conquer hate." ~ Al Cleveland & Marvin Gaye (1970)

              by JBL55 on Wed Jun 05, 2013 at 10:01:23 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

      •  YES YES YES!! (4+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Keith930, Crider, wintergreen8694, Debby

        I've already mentioned that I "grew up" at Disneyland, and I cannot imagine that kids in SoCA can do now what I did in the 60s and 70s, which is decide to ditch high school, hop in your friend's car and go to Disneyland for the heck of it. Or go every summer as part of camp. Or drop in for an afternoon because you were in Anaheim and heck, why not?

        We had a drawer full of old tickets that we'd take and try to use up all those awful A, B and C rides. These days, though, I'd give anything to go on the old Mr. Toad's Wild Ride.

        •  Nowadays, a good time for the kids in So Cal (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          mightymouse, ladybug53

          if you're not of excess means is to give each $10 and let them loose in a Dollar Store.

          "Societies strain harder and harder to sustain the decadent opulence of the ruling class, even as it destroys the foundations of productivity and wealth." — Chris Hedges

          by Crider on Tue Jun 04, 2013 at 06:28:47 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

      •  Have you considered that the culture has changed? (0+ / 0-)

        National/state parks make great vacations, and they're something we could all "still do;" however, most folks don't consider them sufficiently "entertaining."

        That's actually the key point here - thanks to our culture and the immediacy of our media, we constantly raise the bar on our definition of "entertainment."  Movies aren't considered great unless they have millions of dollars' worth of special effects, rides must continue to invent new ways to increase our adrenaline rush (backwards!  upside down!  suspended!  standing!), sporting events must now be accompanied by Jumbotrons, fireworks (even indoors), lasers...you get the picture.

        Well, you can't deliver that level of "entertainment" without a hefty (and growing) price tag.  Even the less nationally known amusement parks continue to raise their prices; Kings Island is $38, Holiday World is $40, Dollywood is $56...

        Given the audience's expectations, I think your level of ire is unwarranted.

        The word "parent" is supposed to be a VERB, people...

        by wesmorgan1 on Wed Jun 05, 2013 at 11:53:09 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  You may have missed the point (0+ / 0-)

          in that the level of people's expectations and desires for bigger/faster/more is CREATED by the marketers, advertised to our kids as the only things will make them happy.  Sure, it's up to us to disabuse them of this notion, but we're certainly swimming against a hard, strong tide.

          If it weren't difficult, it wouldn't be an achievement.

          by Wife of Bath on Wed Jun 05, 2013 at 03:31:31 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  I didn't miss it... (0+ / 0-)

            ...I merely suggest that blaming Disney (or amusement parks in general) is rather ludicrous when we're talking about the purpose and effects of ALL advertising/marketing.

            If you really want to get down to brass tacks, it's up to PARENTS to raise kids who don't fall for the hype.  That's true in almost all cases in which advertising/marketing is concerned, from alcohol to sugar-laden cereals to fast food and, yes, amusement parks.

            The word "parent" is supposed to be a VERB, people...

            by wesmorgan1 on Thu Jun 06, 2013 at 06:17:11 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

    •  Oh, you should absolutely go! (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Thornrose

      I took my high school junior daughter right before Christmas in 2011.  If they update it (it's geared toward the books/movies through Goblet of Fire currently) we'll go back.
      We stayed on site which meant we could enter the park an hour early, so the wait to go through Hogwarts wasn't so bad.

      Lost my muchness, have I?

      by aepm on Wed Jun 05, 2013 at 10:19:45 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  When I was a kid in a large family in OC, (10+ / 0-)

    a summer trip to Disneyland was generally our one and only vacation event that cost money. Then, in high school and for some years after, I knew so many friends & family working there that it was easy to get signed in just to wander and use leftover tickets. (Also, friendly ride operators who doubled as our H.S. teachers would palm tickets and send us off with a cigarette packful of E-tickets ... those were the days!) It was not uncommon for us to go to Disneyland after seeing a movie, just to avoid going home while the night was young. These days, you'd have to buy an annual pass to experience it that way. I haven't been there in some years -- I think it was around $65-$75 at that point & I had a visiting young relative to entertain.

    I love the place for sentimental reasons (and because I never worked there myself, which knocks the bloom off that right quick from what I've seen). I'd still spend whatever it took to take the right age of kids there as a treat, but as a regular outing? No more. I find that sad, but I recognize that's not the demo they're looking for. "Regulars" buy a minimum amount of food and absolutely nothing in the way of hats or other souvenirs.

    My hunch is that the price increases have been subsidizing the troubled launch/redo/stagnation of the disastrous California Adventure park, which was a huge expenditure for limited return. Also, they seem to be spending a lot more on shows that change with the seasons & years, to keep it fresh -- something they never much bothered with in the first several decades. That used to be limited to occasional revamps of the summer nighttime parade & the audioanimatronic shows, but now there's a lot more live entertainment that's frequently updated. Less expensive for them than a major new ride (oh, sorry, attraction), but more expensive than past practice when they were always the big dog and didn't really have to compete with places like Universal. (Knott's Berry Farm, we still scoff in your general direction.)

    •  Knott's was kind of awesome when I was 10-12 (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Villanova Rhodes, jabney

      my mom lived 3 miles away, and a pass cost 35 bucks.

      Beat the hell out of having to stay in the house with the door locked while she was at work during the summer ;)

      "I would argue that its perfectly fine to blame the victim in part when they should know their actions will expose themselves for greater dangers" Game Guru

      by JesseCW on Tue Jun 04, 2013 at 02:21:48 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Also from SoCal, (7+ / 0-)

    and remember when it was an hour and a half drive, and we had plenty of A and B tickets when we got home.  And because Orange Country was mostly orange groves, the sight of the Matterhorn peeking over the trees was a big deal.

    Last time I went was about 1997, when we won 4 tickets in a raffle.  Otherwise could not afford to go.

    If you build a more expensive mousetrap, you will attract richer rats.

    I am not religious, and did NOT say I enjoyed sects.

    by trumpeter on Tue Jun 04, 2013 at 02:53:26 PM PDT

  •  The day trip has always been very expensive. (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Magenta, catwho

    If you stay for a week, the per-day cost is quite reasonable.  I'm all for jacking up the price as a way to thin out the crowds, so long as we're not defining theme parks as a public utility.

    I recommend Knoebel's, the largest amusement park in America where there's no admission and you pay by the ride.  The summer climate is a whole lot better than Central Florida, too.  And you can get real food at a good price--I recommend the meat loaf.

    You know, I sometimes think if I could see, I'd be kicking a lot of ass. -Stevie Wonder at the Glastonbury Festival, 2010

    by Rich in PA on Tue Jun 04, 2013 at 03:09:48 PM PDT

    •  as an adult...I can think of no circle of hell (6+ / 0-)

      that Dante ever described, that would be worse than shepherding a couple of kids around Disneyland for a week straight.

      Id rather get a cut rate vasectomy in my 20's in a back alley of Mumbai than deal with that.

      Disneyland was fun at a certain age...but I can only appreciate the fact that my parents took me once a year.  The crowds, the waits, the summer heat, the lousy and expensive food...they were more than patient.

      But...I didn't grow up with children.  I've never considered a trip to Disneyworld, or Disneyland, or a Disney cruise as anything even remotely within the possibilities of what to do with a week vacation.  

      I would be a news story if I had to take a couple of sullen kids upon a Disney Cruise:

      Passenger falls overboard in middle of Caribbean on Disney Cruise ship...Feared lost.  Searchers have scoured the area by plane for more than 24 hours, but no trace of body has been seen.  Passengers described the missing passenger as friendly, but not quite in the spirit of the "family environment" that Disney likes to nurture among its passengers.  He was described as having grown increasingly seclusive and unhappy as the cruise progressed, and was last seen drinking heavily the night before he apparently slipped overboard.

      You know you're in Oregon when you only see people using an umbrella to protect themselves from the sun.

      by Keith930 on Tue Jun 04, 2013 at 03:50:13 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  I haven't minded it. (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        catwho, SoCalSal

        It's not one park, it's four so you get some variety.  And when you do a week you don't feel quite so much under the gun to spend 15 hours a day there.

        You know, I sometimes think if I could see, I'd be kicking a lot of ass. -Stevie Wonder at the Glastonbury Festival, 2010

        by Rich in PA on Tue Jun 04, 2013 at 05:08:18 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  I've heard about Knoebel's on the Travel Channel (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      jabney

      when they had those specials about great roller coasters.  It sounds like a great place.

    •  Good point. (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      catwho

      We decided we wanted to add a day to Disney one evening because Universal was not cutting it. We already had a 5-day pass, it $5 each. It's the one-day that is expensive. And if you live in the area and want to go, the season passes are very reasonable. Of course, I know the reality is that you never go as much as you think you will.

      www.stacysmusings.wordpress.com

      by Magenta on Tue Jun 04, 2013 at 05:37:36 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  It's what the market will bear (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Magenta, catwho

    Six Flags charges $65 for a day pass, although less expensive options are available for paying ahead of time, etc.  Disneyland and Disney World are leagues ahead of Six Flags in terms of the "whole experience."  (Granted, one can question whether your kids really notice the kind of detail you get at Disneyland when they're probably mostly interested in the 45 seconds spent on whatever ride).

    A SoCal native, I also remember the days (mid-60s through the 70s) when it was relatively more affordable.  But, truth be told, it was still a relatively expensive outing that was a very special treat for anyone in the lower middle class (which is about where we were - on good days).  Compared with the expensive clothing and electronic gadgets that people manage to buy today, I don't see Disneyland prices so far out of whack.

    •  They notice. (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Darmok, Debby, ladybug53

      At least mine. They really don't like rides. They loved Disney World. It was the whole experience. And at 7 and 11, they loved the food and the fireworks and some of the rides, but the rides are nothing to them. We sent my son to Cedar Point last year, and I got six calls begging me to drive the three or so hours so he didn't have to stay there.

      But Disney, other than Tower of Terror, he thought was definitely the happiest place on earth.

      www.stacysmusings.wordpress.com

      by Magenta on Tue Jun 04, 2013 at 05:40:39 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  I used to have an Annual pass (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    catwho, SoCalSal

    As I recall, it cost $89. There were some blocked out days, mostly around Christmas, Thanksgiving and summer weekends.

    Now, an annual pass for Southern Cal residents costs $279 and almost the whole year is blocked out. Every weekend, all summer and the two weeks around every holiday, leaving you with an unusable pass.

    I wonder if the park is crowded these days?

  •  This is kind of incomprehensible to me (8+ / 0-)

    I don't like crowds and I would probably be more inclined to pay to get out of going (although I have to admit that when I did visit Disneyland as teenager in the 1970s I enjoyed it more than I thought I would).

    For comparison I can (and do every year) buy an annual family pass to Florida State Parks.  It costs slightly more than one day admission to Disneyland and I can visit as many state parks as I want all year and bring a car load of people with me.

    My wife and I visited Charleston recently and spent a few hours at their aquarium.  It is new and quite nice but I was taken aback at the $25 entrance fee.  It's very nice but you can see the whole thing at a leisurely pace in about an hour.  

    "To see both sides of a quarrel, is to judge without hate or alarm" - Richard Thompson

    by matching mole on Tue Jun 04, 2013 at 04:44:17 PM PDT

    •  I should also add (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Keith930, BusyinCA, happymisanthropy

      that I have yet to really set foot in Orlando since moving to Florida (driven through once).  A few people have expressed utter astonishment at the fact that I haven't visited a single theme park.

      "To see both sides of a quarrel, is to judge without hate or alarm" - Richard Thompson

      by matching mole on Tue Jun 04, 2013 at 04:48:13 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  I hate Orlando (7+ / 0-)

        more than any place on earth where I have been.

        By the way, ALL aquariums are expensive because their upkeep is astronomical, as I learned when researching a story about the new aquarium here in Cleveland. It's why upgrading their aquatic area is far down on the priority list for our zoo.

        Jon Husted is a dick.

        by anastasia p on Tue Jun 04, 2013 at 06:34:58 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  Technically (0+ / 0-)

        Visiting Disney World isn't setting foot in Orlando. The city limits go only to just south of Universal.

        Downtown Orlando's not a bad place to walk around when it's cooler out. But if you're taking a trip for a specific destination there's not much there.

        Chechnya: Russia's North Carolina.

        by NE2 on Wed Jun 05, 2013 at 07:21:59 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  Spouse and I went to Orlando Seaworld (0+ / 0-)

        We totally loved it. Buy tickets on ebay if you can, we got a 4 day pass for 2 for $200, steal of a deal, a hurricane wiped out someone elses vacation.

        As for Disney Orlando, they can have it. Wasn't that impressed with MouseWorld, and MouseLand was really run down (we went for the last last time in 2007). Besides the price (another ebay deal) the rides kept breaking down or were out of order. Lots of things looked neglected and not updated since 1980, I hope that has changed for the better. The lines are the worst unless you get a reserved pass, but those are limited too. You really have to work the logistics of a visit unless you hire a disabled person or can visit all week. If you do go, I recommend you spring for one of the hotels on the Disney grounds. They have great dinner shows and cut down on commute time each day.

        Frontierland had a great dinner theater show, Hoop-De-Do Revue or something. Well worth it. Best for adults. Not in World or Land sections.

        Disney Anaheim is/was still better. Everyone should go at least once, but I have never thought of it as a mall for bored teens.

        Some of my kids still visit Magic Mountain, it is closer than CA Adventure and might still be le$$. I can't begin to imagine affording a week with kids at any Disney park.

  •  Security and Safety and Lawsuits are major drivers (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    catwho, Keith930, BusyinCA

    of increased costs .... 50 years ago there weren't the gang, theft, battery issues and the need for screening so many people, and keeping an eye on them to prevent them from harming each other, or falling down and hurting themselves and suing for megabucks.

    Likewise there wasn't a huge tier of financial and administrative executives with bloated salaries and options to pay for, and the company hadn't borrowed from everybody to finance everything.  

    Finally, the cost of accountants to arrange all those tax dodges -- er, loopholes has grown incredibly these last few years .....

  •  I have been several times (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Keith930, catwho

    over the last few years, and what I don't understand is why they don't do their pricing to coincide with demand. Some days, Tuesdays when it rains for example, could go for $45, while the 4th of July or Christmas Day, their two busiest days, could go for $200. That way they make the same amount of money but the lines are reasonable. With the way computers are today they could probably also do it in real time, the closer the park gets to full the higher the price. Also much of it is driven by tourists anyway, there's not a lot of locals left...

  •  WDW Orlando: (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Keith930, Eyesbright, catwho

    single park single day ticket to Magic Kingdom 10+ $95 3-9 $89
    Single day to any of the other parks: 10+ $90 3-9 $84

    Florida residents get a decent discount on multi-day tickets.

    4 days being $199

    The same ticket for non-Florida residents: $279

    When I was a kid we used to go every year. But I was too young to care about how much it cost back then. This was in the 70's though, and maybe early 80's.

    "Madness! Total and complete madness! This never would've happened if the humans hadn't started fighting one another!" Londo Mollari

    by FloridaSNMOM on Tue Jun 04, 2013 at 05:58:54 PM PDT

  •  One of the main changes I have noticed (4+ / 0-)

    is that Disney bought up all the cheap motels near the park and now they have put up a whole complex of hotels and restaurants surrounding it. So not only do they collect your ticket price but they want your dollars spent on food and lodging nearby, too. And that drives up the overall cost for visitors even more.

    •  most of those commercial properties (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Eyesbright, VClib

      probably date back to the late 50's/very early 60's....I'll bet they were snapped up on the cheap.  I can remember the area surrounding Disneyland.  It was full of places that looked like the main drag in a major stop along old Route 66...

      You know you're in Oregon when you only see people using an umbrella to protect themselves from the sun.

      by Keith930 on Tue Jun 04, 2013 at 06:36:14 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  in the 60s Disneyland was a regional attraction? (7+ / 0-)

    au contraire

    With the Wonderful World of Disney (and whatever title permutations it went through starting in 1955)  coming into our living rooms every Sunday night and the Mickey Mouse Club - both giving those of us growing up outside of CA glimpse of Disneyland - it was THE destination.

    Any child announcing to his or her friends, that they were going to Disneyland was given instant celebrity status.  And the rest of us were not only envious but then pestered our parents.

    We finally went in the spring of 1972, staying at theJolly Roger Inn (which is still there)

    We went to both Disney World and Disneyland in 2007 and 2008 respectively.

    Democracy left the park when "speed pass" was introduce, which allows those who can pay more to avoid the lines (so there is more added cost) ... then of course is the recent tale of the ultra rich posing a family members of the disabled so that they can jump the lines and not pay for a speed pass - or the tiny wait there  --- of course they do pay the disabled person for the day.

    For being the "Happiest Place on Earth" there is a lot of crying... crying from the kids when they have to go and crying from the parents when they get the bill.

    I thought about us having a family reunion at Disney World some time in the future, but if they are going to raise their prices this much I don't see how many family members are going to be able to afford it.

    Bumper sticker seen on I-95; "Stop Socialism" my response: "Don't like socialism? GET OFF the Interstate highway!"

    by Clytemnestra on Tue Jun 04, 2013 at 06:12:00 PM PDT

    •  it's never THE destination when it's almost (6+ / 0-)

      in your back yard.  Whenever we had out of state relatives visiting back in the 70's, they wanted to go to Hollywood.  

      Why?, I would ask.  Are you looking for a hooker?  

      Disneyland was fun, but it was just an amusement park.  It wasn't "the vacation of a lifetime."

      I had much more fun on any given day at the beach, to be perfectly honest.  It was more leisurely, more relaxed, there was no jostling, the water was a perfect temp most of the time, you could bring your own food and music...and it was within walking distance of home.

      You know you're in Oregon when you only see people using an umbrella to protect themselves from the sun.

      by Keith930 on Tue Jun 04, 2013 at 06:44:49 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  well it was THE destination (well one of them) as (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        wintergreen8694

        a kid growing up in CO in the 60s and 70s.
        The other THE destinations in SOCAL were Knottsberry Farm, Marine Land, and Sea World.

        But they didn't count as much to the kids at school, your cousins, etc. as Disneyland . . . wearing your ears to school (with your name stitched on it) was another in your face "I got to go" move

        Bumper sticker seen on I-95; "Stop Socialism" my response: "Don't like socialism? GET OFF the Interstate highway!"

        by Clytemnestra on Tue Jun 04, 2013 at 07:08:31 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  fastpass is not extra cost (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Debby, BusyinCA

      You simply put your ticket in the thing and get a pass to return later in the day and cut the line. You get one pass at a time (per person).

      Universal does have the pay extra to jump lines though.

      Chechnya: Russia's North Carolina.

      by NE2 on Wed Jun 05, 2013 at 07:25:13 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Fast pass = one or two rides per day. (0+ / 0-)

        OK, maybe three. My experience with it was to get fast pass at 9am for ride time of 1:30. Spend 10 minutes on ride then get another fast pass for a ride at 5:00. Lots of time in between to buy souvenirs, eat, walk, sightsee. Not a place to avoid crowds fer sure.

        •  or wait in line (0+ / 0-)

          for the other rides. If all you want to do is the very popular rides, sure, you'll have to wait a while. But go see the other stuff. Unless it's a holiday there should be rides with relatively little wait.

          Chechnya: Russia's North Carolina.

          by NE2 on Wed Jun 05, 2013 at 08:47:23 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

      •  I thought it cost... if it doesn't why doesn't (0+ / 0-)

        everyone use

        Maybe it's the time of year we go (benefit of living in MA our school vacations are not timed the same as everyone elses) but fast pass gets us on every ride in the park we want to go on.

        Even August in Disneyland in 2008 we hit almost everything we wanted to go on.

        http://disneyland.disney.go.com/...
        https://disneyworld.disney.go.com/...

         (I didn't handle the tickets when we were there, my husband did- thank you for setting me straight)

        Bumper sticker seen on I-95; "Stop Socialism" my response: "Don't like socialism? GET OFF the Interstate highway!"

        by Clytemnestra on Wed Jun 05, 2013 at 10:24:11 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  if you mean why are there normal lines too (0+ / 0-)

          it's because of limits on fastpasses. You can only get one at a time, and even if you can get one you might prefer waiting half an hour over coming back in 10 hours. If there were no limits they'd probably have to charge for them to offset demand.

          Me? I have memories of family vacations to Disney World in the time before fastpasses, when I'd wait in 2-hour lines uphill both ways in the snow for Splash Mountain, and not even consider Space Mountain unless the park just opened.

          I haven't been there much recently (I only go at all because I get in free occasionally as one of me mum's employee benefits) but the fastpasses are pretty useful buggers.

          Chechnya: Russia's North Carolina.

          by NE2 on Wed Jun 05, 2013 at 01:06:21 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

  •  Corporate America (6+ / 0-)

    doesn't need the middle class anymore.  The world is their oyster and the world's wealthy are their clients. The rest of us are truly becoming the serf class. Expendable, cannon fodder, labor slaves.

    Everyone! Arms akimbo!

    by tobendaro on Tue Jun 04, 2013 at 06:32:18 PM PDT

  •  I go back to the very early days of Disneyland (6+ / 0-)

    First went in 1955, went many times after that until 1958 or 59 when we moved away from Southern California.

    Cost was an issue, but not a major one. Ticket books included park admission and could cost anywhere from $2.50 to $5.50 or so. It was higher than other amusement parks, but not crushingly so.

    You could also pay cash per ride -- 10 cents to 50 cents each. It was (much) cheaper to buy a ticket book.

    I remember the food and drink were relatively expensive so I didn't have much to eat or drink at Disneyland.

    Once I took a bag of pennies I'd saved to use at the Penny Arcade on Main Street. Somehow, I managed to lose the bag before I'd seen much of anything though. Went over to the Mr. Toad's Wild Ride and rode it until all my tickets were gone.

    $92/$86 in 2013 compared to a $5.00/$2.50 ticket book in 1956 is pretty outrageous, and it's hard to imagine an ordinary kid going to Disneyland frequently these days -- like a lot of kids once could. It's now more like a once in a lifetime experience, if that.

    Early day Disneyland: http://www.yesterland.com/

    Some examples of ticket books: http://www.keeline.com/...

    Blogging as Ché Pasa since 2007.

    by felix19 on Tue Jun 04, 2013 at 06:35:43 PM PDT

  •  My first visit was in 1965 to the Anaheim Park (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    BusyinCA

    Growing up in Hawaii and seeing it pitched in the 'Mickey Mouse Club Show', it was a hoot to actually go on the rides although by that time I was a teen.  The lines were not bad then at all and the park was a lot smaller so you could get around.  Low tech on all the rides and attractions.  Lots of pretty young things at the dance pavilion with live bands.  There were a lot of bands that played there at one time or another over the years including the pre-Eagles (as Linda Ronstadt's backup band) and Carpenters.

    Next visit was in 1969 when I was college freshman on a Navy summer training cruise in San Diego.  Rode up from SD on a Saturday morning in the back seat of a Porsche and spent the day there with a friend where we were lucky enough to find a couple of local girls to hang out with.  Rode the bus back to SD to rejoin the ship.

    In 1972 upon graduation from college, I joined a family road trip and went to Disney World shortly after it had opened.  Much bigger in scope and somehow not as entertaining.  I haven't been back since.

    In the early 80s working in Los Angeles, my company several times held employee Disney nights where several companies booked the park for private use by the employees.  That was great as there were virtually no lines so I rode Space Mountain and the Big Thunder Mountain several times in one evening.  That really was the best way to enjoy the rides although some of the attractions were dark.

    The last time I went to Disney, I was a guest at Club 33 which is a very exclusive club that features a restaurant in the New Orleans square section of the park.  The food is OK, the service is outstanding and the price about average for the type of restaurant it is.  However, it is expensive in the sense that you have to spend at least the entrance fee of the park.  In my case, my cousin who was the Club 33 member, had covered the cost and provided a Park Hopper pass which allows access to both the California Adventure and Disneyland.  We didn't go as we had a time issue but if you made the time, you could have quite an exhausting experience covering both parks.

    I will probably not go back there on my own but my cousin will be back again since the annual dues is in the low 5 figures and we may join him and his wife.  Needless to say, he is a Disney maniac.

  •  what is the big deal with Disneyland anyway? (0+ / 0-)

    why would anyone pay almost 100 bucks to go there?

    i do not understand the attraction.

    Politics is like driving. To go backward put it in R. To go forward put it in D.
    Drop by The Grieving Room on Monday nights for support in dealing with grief.

    by TrueBlueMajority on Tue Jun 04, 2013 at 08:29:50 PM PDT

    •  I feel the same way about a 12 dollar taco (4+ / 0-)

      but a one dollar taco is something altogether different.  I could eat a handfull of them.

      When a day at the park was reasonable, it was a fun day.  I wouldn't want to do it several times in a year, but that's me.  Growing up, once every couple years was enough to get my Disneyland fix.  

      Several here have mentioned yearly of multi day passes as if that makes it more affordable.

      That's like those steak houses along Route 66 that used to offer a 72 oz steak for free if you could eat it in one sitting.

      Untitled

      You know you're in Oregon when you only see people using an umbrella to protect themselves from the sun.

      by Keith930 on Tue Jun 04, 2013 at 08:49:57 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  What you said here - (9+ / 0-)
    It wouldn't really bother that much if Disney didn't try so hard to infiltrate itself into the heart, soul and mind of every child...instilling in them a burning desire to visit their park.  The fact that that message gets disseminated so democratically and pervasively, while the affordability of the experience continues to recede farther and farther out of the reach of so many who receive their message...
    is outstanding. Thank you.

    Whenever I hear Disneyland called "The Happiest Place on Earth", all I can think of is, '"You think the children working in Disney's offshore sweatshops are very happy?"

    “Any society that would give up a little liberty to gain a little security will deserve neither and lose both.”

    by Oaktown Girl on Tue Jun 04, 2013 at 09:04:59 PM PDT

  •  BTW, the Matterhorn speed has been derated ... (0+ / 0-)

    ... since I was a kid.

    And, of course, the Skyway ride is long gone.

    Disneyland.

    No fun.

    Go to Cedar Point!  :)

  •  I grew up with (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    BusyinCA, Wife of Bath

    the "Mickey Mouse Club" on my tee vee machine. I had a set of plastic mouse ears and a Mickey Mouse doll. I saw every classic Disney animated movie that came out.

    But I never wanted to go to Disneyland. Even at the tender age of seven something in me rebelled at the idea of getting excited over employees in cartoon character suits with enormous heads. And my family was far from wealthy, or even middle-class, so the cost of such a trip would have put enormous pressure on us four girls to enjoy everything about it, without exception, or else appear ungrateful.

    The other thing is that I never liked fancy rides, especially if I had to stand in line. When I went to Paragon Park at Nantasket Beach when I was in High School it was mainly for something to do as a group, a place where we could eat lots of stuff that was bad for us, try to win cheap prizes at the arcade, and take pictures as we tried to bash the shit out of each other at the dodgem cars. It was an excuse to get together, rather than the destination itself; if there was any aspect of such a place that made it at all attractive, it was the kitsch, which we proto-hippies appreciated even then.

    I guess to me, Disneyland always took itself far too seriously.  It was the opposite of kitsch. That it's now priced itself out of the range of even more families is telling.

    "The Happiest Place on Earth," indeed. Says who? Meh.

    "The truth will set you free...but first it'll piss you off." - Gloria Steinem

    by Sharoney on Tue Jun 04, 2013 at 11:06:55 PM PDT

  •  There’s a wonderful short story (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    OleHippieChick, Debby, JBL55, Wife of Bath

    However, I don’t remember the name of it or the author. I think it was written in the '90s.

    In the story, there’s a family planning to go to Disneyland for several days in the early 1960s. The father has a week’s vacation. There are two kids. It’s written from the point of view of the pubescent daughter.

    Part one of the story is about planning the Disneyland vacation. Then the Cuban Missile Crisis happens. The father decides, instead of Disneyland, he’s going to spend the money he has saved up on building a fallout shelter in the back yard. Instead of Disneyland, the family gets a hole in the ground.

    And the father announces that the one-week vacation is going to be spent testing out the fallout shelter, eating canned food and dried food, pooping in a bucket, with the door locked to the outside world for a whole week.

    Part two is the week spent in the fallout shelter, which is hell. And the girl who is the narrator gets her first period.

    I wish I could remember the name of the story. It might have been in some literary magazine like Story.

    "Stupid just can't keep its mouth shut." -- SweetAuntFanny's grandmother.

    by Dbug on Tue Jun 04, 2013 at 11:18:00 PM PDT

  •  If You Don't Have The Benjamins, There Is Always (0+ / 0-)

    Youtube

    Splash Mountain

    http://www.youtube.com/...

    "I think that gay marriage is something that should be between a man and a woman.” - Arnold Schwarzenegger 2003

    by kerplunk on Tue Jun 04, 2013 at 11:34:05 PM PDT

  •  Come on folks- Craigslist is your friend (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    BusyinCA

    Never ever pay full price for Disneyland, Legoland, or any of those lands, and not for skiing neither. I always buy my tickets from Craigslist. You just have to cultivate a sharp nose to sniff out the scammers.  You save a good 20-40%.

  •  Want to say 75$ a day (0+ / 0-)

    20 years ago when I went to Disney World. Never been to Land. I should ask my parents. They took my younger sister there in 2005.

    One day wifey and I will go back there for an adult vacation.

  •  This: (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    BusyinCA
    I wouldn't be surprised if corporations aren't currently able to buy yearly passes that they can provide to clients as needed, and write that expense off as a business expense.  Just like corporate box seats at any major sports venue.
    This is happening on all fronts and is pushing the big change you're talking about, I think.

    Commercial Rent... for a little guy like me, the up front costs are absolutely prohibitive, but for a big corporate biz, that up front cost is just a tax deduction so it doesn't really matter how much it costs.

    Look at the way commercial development has gone down - the number of big corporate renters and participants in local markets. Up front costs don't mean a thing to them, which is why commercial rent and costs are so prohibitive for all but the smallest of moms & pops.

    Great piece here, BTW, Kieth... terrible how this is happening all over the country on so many different fronts...

    I used to get a general admission seat to the Pistons at the Pontiac Silverdome for $3 in the early 90s. The Palace killed that, shortly after. Wonder what General Admission tickets cost these days - granted it's not LA, but...

    Democracy - 1 person 1 vote. Free Markets - More dollars more power.

    by k9disc on Wed Jun 05, 2013 at 04:50:26 AM PDT

  •  If you live in-state, use annual pass (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    BusyinCA, ladybug53

    Even outside the state, taking a couple trips a year, this will save you.

    It's still way too much, but if you live within driving range then the annual pass is the only way to go. Sneak in your snacks. Don't take your kids through every single shop so they beg you for all the toys.

    Also, take your baby and get a baby swap pass for most rides. Without a doubt, the biggest ripoff at Disney is the fact that you pay $500 to get there, only to be able to ride three rides all day due to packed lines.

  •  Doesn't seem to be hurting attendance. n/t (0+ / 0-)

    Never argue with an idiot. They will drag you down to their level and beat you with experience.

    by thestructureguy on Wed Jun 05, 2013 at 07:29:29 AM PDT

  •  I had an interview in the area in '83. My hotel (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    JBL55, snazzzybird

    was across the street from the main gate. "Valley Girl" had come out in '82 and the kid behind the counter had the same accent. I'll never know whether he was just doing it for the tourists. In any case, I didn't have time to go to Disneyland, even if I'd been interested. OTOH, given what I've read here, I'm almost sorry I didn't. I was in Fullerton in '08 and didn't even go to "Downtown Disney," a shopping and dining extravaganza outside the park. Not even to get a Marvin the Martian figurine.

    I did try to get info on the hotel, because I'd done what one is never supposed to do: eat at the hotel's restaurant. Best lobster I think I've ever had. Alas, I could only describe the place by its pressed-tin ceiling with exposed fan belts, and was told that the area had been extensively renovated and the hotel might have been demolished. A bit like blowing up Earth because it blocks the view of Venus.

  •  I was in Orlando a few years ago and had a few (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Keith930, Wife of Bath

    hours to kill before my flight, so I thought I'd visit Disney World for a few hours. Then I found out that the admission price was $70 - after the discount offered by the hotel. Talk about sticker shock!

    For what a family would spend to have one weekend at a Disney park, they could spend a week at a national park.

    I never understood the allure of the place. I went to Disneyland a few times when I was a kid and thought it was fun but not that big a deal. To think that families scrimp and save for years to give their kids a weekend at a cartoon-themed amusement park just makes me sad. It's just another example of crass commercialism that people think they owe this type of experience to their kids, even if they can't afford it.

    But they do know how to market themselves well - their commercials are effective at creating demand - if I were a kid and saw their ads, I'd want to go.

  •  Disneyland was ALWAYS a corporate sales tool. (0+ / 0-)

    Remember that the original name of that Sunday show wasn't "The Wonderful World of Disney," but Disneyland. In exchange for providing funding for his new venture, ABC got a weekly show from Disney. The show was an hour-long infomercial where the CEO groomed his future customers to a high-pitched shrieking demand for the coming product -- cunningly disguised as Unca Walt magically creating The Happiest Kingdom On Earth for all the (white Gentile) boys and girls out there in the 1950s.

    ...And I was hooked as surely as any other Boomer kid.

    I still go about once every 10 years (have to, to maintain my California citizenship, it's in the rules) - mostly because I love the rides and the details of the internal world (that result when cartoon animators make a town). Best time to go is 1st week in November - before the holiday insanity and after the summer heat and crowds have dispersed.

    My favorite place to eat is Hungry Bear Restaurant in Critter Country. It's just overpriced burgers and fries (though they have fried green tomatoes) - but it's in the most natural part of the park (by the river, the boats pass, the train goes right by, lots of shady trees - and in spring you can see real live baby ducks swimming around with their migrating parents).

    Thank God, the Bob Fosse Kid is here! - Colin Mochrie

    by gardnerhill on Wed Jun 05, 2013 at 12:16:39 PM PDT

    •  you still go every 10 years? (0+ / 0-)

      Even though it is a White Supremist, anti semitic business venture?

      Did you see any minorities or Jews there last time you went?  Or are they turned away at the turnstiles?

      You know you're in Oregon when you only see people using an umbrella to protect themselves from the sun.

      by Keith930 on Wed Jun 05, 2013 at 12:33:22 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Admission to major league sports games is (0+ / 0-)

    out of sight, too.

    •  The game of the last twenty years (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Keith930

      has been to get taxpayers to finance a stadium or arena with enough luxury boxes to accommodate corporations and billionaires. Then ticket prices are set high enough to keep the working classes (and other rabble who pay taxes)  at home watching the games on TV.

      As long as the ten percenters keep buying tickets the games will continue - at the taxpayers expense.

      How long will it be before Disney openly courts taxpayer support for expansion and improvements to their parks?

      The evidence is overwhelming: Hilary hired that Ben Gahzee guy to kill Vince Foster.

      by ebrann on Wed Jun 05, 2013 at 02:36:45 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  I've been to Disney (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Keith930, CharlesInCharge

    Land and Disney World (Epcot) and would never go again, even at the point of a gun. Amusements parks are hot, crowded, smelly, horrible ways to take an incredibly slow, slow, slow walk.

    If you like long lines, crying kids, arguing spouses, bad food and heartburn with your bankruptcy, go to an amusement park.

    If you want to do your kids a real favor, take them to a shady park and help them identify trees, birds and flowers. Plant a garden with them. Make crafts at home. Go to a Dick Blick website and look through all the craft ideas. Can you imagine all the craft supplies you could buy for $500? You could probably give them a headstart in their own jewelry business.

    And you'd help replace the Disney myth, the one that destroys imaginations, with something that would actually stimulate thought and creativity and pride. Create something!!

    If it weren't difficult, it wouldn't be an achievement.

    by Wife of Bath on Wed Jun 05, 2013 at 03:11:17 PM PDT

  •  I've visited Disneyland every year since 1955 (0+ / 0-)

    and no matter the cost, I'll continue to go.  Disneyland is magical.  Yes, it's pricey, but it cannot be compared to any other amusement park.  Disneyland doesn't have RIDES, it has EXPERIENCES.  I turn into a 5 year old as soon as I walk through the gates.  And a ride on Star Tours is better than 6 months in therapy!  I visited Orlando once and found the Magic Kingdom to have less magic and more a sense of crowd control.  I enjoyed Epcot Center and the other venues, but nothing compares to a walk up Main Street, Disneyland in Anaheim!

  •  No longer the happiest place on earth (0+ / 0-)

    now it is the "most expensive place on earth".

    Glad my kids are grown up ... hmmm, but I do have grandchildren.

    Nope, my mom and dad didn't take my kids to Disney World. Besides I can't stand "It's a Small World" exhibit.

    I first went to Disney in the 70's ... I had long hair and a beard (still do). They tried to stop me from going into the park (nicely but suggesting that the park wasn't for me and my family) but I had already checked into one of their high $$ hotels and I was a Viet Vet .... I raised a ruckus and they decided it was ok. We got a lot of stares in the park but we had a ball. SCROOM..........

    Now, I prefer Universal ..... especially the English Pub.

    Want a fun time?? Go to happy hour at the U Pub and then go to the Dr Seuss ride right next door ..... don't understand why it is good when I'm sober.

    Politics is the entertainment branch of industry. Frank Zappa

    by Da Rock on Wed Jun 05, 2013 at 04:56:59 PM PDT

  •  I knew this would happen (0+ / 0-)

    As soon as Romney showed up there.

    “Those who can make you believe absurdities, can make you commit atrocities.” ... Voltaire

    by RUNDOWN on Wed Jun 05, 2013 at 05:11:12 PM PDT

  •  When our child was little we were able to visit (0+ / 0-)

    Disneyland twice, each time for one-day, due to visits to her grandparents who lived in LA. We live on the other side of the US.

    I was all against it, due to all I'd read about how employees are forced to smile, etc. etc. etc. Then our first trip. It was such a wonderful experience, especially for our child!

    However, we have never been able to afford to go to Disney World. We'd have to drive a long way to get there and stay at a motel. And then the price of admission and the expensive food. All too much for us. And now the prices have gone up even more?!

    Our child, now 24, has been able to go to Disney World several times -- because we sent her on school field trips. Her parents? We'll never be able to afford it.

  •  Between the Manning trial and the NSA-Verizon (0+ / 0-)

    datamining scandal, I did not get a chance yesterday to compliment you on a well-written piece and great discussion engendered therefrom.

    I live in SoCal but have never been to Disneyland. (I'm too much a Scotsman and guard my wallet too tightly, acc. to my wife, to enjoy it :) But I can still appreciate a good piece of writing when I read it.

    Thanks.

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