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(Boston, MA - 4/3/13) Republican senatorial candiate Gabriel Gomez talks with the Herald editorial board, Wednesday, April 03, 2013. Staff photo by Angela Rowlings.
Threat?  Warning?  However way you take it, Gabriel Gomez (R. MA) is vowing that despite the outcome on Tuesday, this won't be the last we'll see of him:

http://politicalticker.blogs.cnn.com/...

Massachusetts U.S. Senate candidate Gabriel Gomez says he's not discouraged by polls that show him trailing his rival. And the Republican businessman and former Navy SEAL said Sunday an Election Day loss wouldn’t mean an end to his political career.

“I'm confident I'm going to win. But as a famous general once said in World War II, I shall return. And I know that a lot of people are very excited about our candidacy,” Gomez said on “Fox News Sunday.” Voters in Massachusetts will select a new U.S. senator Tuesday to serve out the term started by John Kerry, who left the Senate earlier this year to become secretary of state. If Gomez loses, he could run again for the seat in 2014.

The Republican is pitted against longtime Democratic Rep. Edward Markey in the special election. The contest has been marked by negative campaigning from both sides: Markey has accused Gomez of being a pawn for national Republicans, while Gomez says Markey’s long tenure in Washington makes him a poor advocate for Bay Staters.

“Congressman Markey has probably done the most misleading, egregious campaign, trying to paint somebody that I'm not, and he's trying to scare people,” Gomez said Sunday. “I think he's scared and he doesn't want to talk about his record. And in the end, people are going to come to the polls, because they're more enthusiastic voting for me as opposed to voting against somebody else.”

Surveys in Massachusetts have consistently put Markey in the lead, though the margins have varied. On Saturday, Vice President Joe Biden campaigned for the 20-term lawmaker in South Boston, becoming the latest high-profile Democrat to hit the state. President Barack Obama and the first lady have both stumped for Markey in the past several weeks. - CNN, 6/23/13

It's true, Gomez could always return next year for round two when Markey would have to run again for a full term.  Then again, Scott Brown (R. MA) could always come back for another shot, hence why he may have sat this one out.  Of course he's also open to coming to New Hampshire to try and take on Senator Jeanne Shaheen (D. NH).  So who knows.  But one thing is for sure, Gomez is the farthest thing from a Scott Brown quality candidate for the GOP.  Politico lists six reasons why:

http://www.politico.com/...

1. It’s not 2010

Brown three years ago tapped into leeriness of President Barack Obama and his controversial health care law; even voters in a state nicknamed “Taxachusetts” scoffed at what was being disparaged at the time as an ultra-left agenda. Send him to Washington, Brown promised, and he’d break the Democrats’ filibuster-proof majority.

Gomez has run aggressively against Washington, linking Markey to everything unpopular about the federal government.

But Obama carried the state in November by 23 percentage points over former Gov. Mitt Romney. The president’s image has been sullied some by the Internal Revenue Service scandal and the National Security Agency sweeping up phone records, but neither resonates the way the health care overhaul did. This time around, Markey is running on Obamacare and calling Gomez a threat to the law.

2. The no-surprises factor

In 2010, nobody in the Democratic Party apparatus believed Brown could actually win — until it was too late to stop his momentum. This time, the national party machine made an early decision to go all in.

The Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee and Senate Majority PAC spent hundreds of thousands of dollars on ads attacking Gomez. And every major liberal interest group also chipped in: environmentalists, unions and women’s groups.

A stream of surrogates visited the state, including the president, first lady Michelle Obama, Vice President Joe Biden and former President Bill Clinton.

3. Big outside GOP money never came

While Democrats were pulling out all the stops, the major GOP groups were standing on the sidelines, seemingly afraid of losing. Donors are fatigued after last fall’s shellacking, and the big groups didn’t want to invest in a likely loser.

“The campaign never got it together,” said a consultant to a GOP super PAC. “And outside groups watch for basic measurements to engage and none of them were met — candidate performance, fundraising, message. … [T]he days of throwing money at every Republican candidate and campaign are over.”

The Americans for Progressive Action super PAC (a slightly deceptive name) finally launched a $700,000 TV ad buy to boost Gomez in mid-June. And the National Republican Senatorial Committee sent $400,000 in mid-May to the state party, while the Republican National Committee transferred $126,000 at the end of May.

4. Gomez’s fix with Republicans

Several Bay State conservatives who supported Gomez’s opponents in the primary said they were much less motivated to work for Gomez because of a letter he sent in January asking Gov. Deval Patrick to appoint him to the vacant Senate seat. Gomez wrote that he voted for Obama in 2008 and even said he would support him on immigration and gun control.

Even as Gomez alienated some base voters, a fundraising solicitation from Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell and a campaign contribution from Newt Gingrich gave Democrats fodder to tell voters that he would be just another party-line vote.

5. The Stephen Lynch vote

Gomez badly needed to win over working-class, socially conservative Democrats who voted heavily for Rep. Stephen Lynch in the Democratic primary.

But a stream of negative stories, presumably based on opposition research peddled by Democrats, helped keep these voters in the Democratic fold. The most damaging were about Gomez’s background in private equity and a $281,000 tax deduction the GOP candidate took for promising not to alter his historic home.

“A big piece of Stephen Lynch’s support base was organized labor,” said Massachusetts Democratic Party Chairman John Walsh. “The labor folks are saying it was a contest between a friend and a brother and they stuck with a brother.”

6. Gomez was outmaneuvered on women’s issues

Brown ran ads last year calling himself “pro-choice.” Gomez says he personally opposes abortion but would not try to curtail abortion rights — and that’s been a difficult tightrope for the political novice to walk.

At the first debate, he suggested both that he could vote to confirm a Supreme Court justice who would roll back Roe v. Wade and that he would support a 24-hour waiting period before a woman could have an abortion. His campaign said immediately after the debate that he would vote against this if it came up in the Senate.

Democrats identify as a turning point in the race the moment Gomez declined to take a position on the Blunt Amendment — which would have allowed employers to restrict coverage for contraception — saying he had not read the text. - Politico, 6/23/13

FYI, the latest poll has Congressman Ed Markey (D. MA) leading Gomez by 8 points:

http://www.masslive.com/...

The poll, conducted by the Western New England University Polling Institute, found Markey leading Gomez, 49 percent to 41 percent among likely voters, with 9 percent undecided. Markey was boosted by a strong showing among Democrats and among women.

The poll also found what political observers have noted all along – that voters are simply not engaged in this race in the way they were with the 2012 U.S. Senate race between Republican Scott Brown and Democrat Elizabeth Warren.

“I think the campaigns have a much more difficult task in front of them than they would in a normal election cycle getting people out to vote,” said Tim Vercellotti, director of the Polling Institute at Western New England University and a professor of political science.

The election will be held on Tuesday.

Markey entered the race with an advantage because registered Democrats outnumber Republicans in Massachusetts three to one. The poll found that Gomez is getting some support from Democrats – 12 percent, compared to just 7 percent of Republicans who support Markey. Gomez is also leading by 15 points among independent likely voters.

However, in order for a Republican to win in Massachusetts, he must have a far greater lead among independents to offset the state’s large population of Democrats, Vercellotti said. In the last Western New England University poll before the 2012 Senate election, Brown had a 33-point lead among independent voters – but he still trailed statewide. “It all depends on turnout on Tuesday, but the data here don’t reflect the kind of lead (Gomez) would need to make this a real horse race,” Vercellotti said.

So-called “women’s issues” have played a role in this election, with Markey and his supporters frequently drawing distinctions between the candidates on issues like abortion. Markey is pro-choice. Gomez is personally pro-life. Though Gomez says he does not want to change abortion laws, critics have attacked him for not having an abortion-related litmus test for Supreme Court justices.

Numerous polls have found Markey with a growing lead among women. The Republican/MassLive.com poll found Markey leading by 24 points among women. Gomez leads by 12 points among men.

The poll was conducted June 16-20. The sample of 653 registered voters has a margin of error of plus or minus 3.8 percentage points. The sample of 566 likely voters has a margin of error of plus or minus 4.1 percentage points. - The Republican, 6/22/13

Despite the polling numbers, Markey and Gomez have been hitting the campaign trail hard making sure voters come out to the polls on Tuesday:

http://boston.cbslocal.com/...

Gomez planned to greet voters in western Massachusetts, including Springfield, Chicopee and Agawam, before attending a rally in Boston’s North End with former Boston Bruins coach and player Mike Milbury. Markey was stumping in Lynn, Lowell, Waltham, Framingham and Worcester, including stops with Democratic Gov. Michael Dukakis and Vicki Kennedy, the widow of Sen. Edward Kennedy.

Gomez and Markey are vying in Tuesday’s election to fill the Senate seat left vacant by the resignation of John Kerry to become secretary of state.

Both campaigns are putting added emphasis on their efforts to ensure their voters get to the polls.

The ramped up get-out-the-vote drives come amid warnings from the state’s top election official that turnout could be very light given distractions like the start of summer vacation and the Bruins’ pursuit of hockey’s Stanley Cup.

The national parties are also keeping an eye on the Massachusetts contest as Republicans try to chip away at the Democrats’ hold on the Senate and Democrats seek to shore up their control of the chamber.

On Saturday, Markey campaigned with Vice President Joe Biden at a rally on the University of Massachusetts-Dartmouth campus. Biden was the latest in a string of Democratic heavy-hitters who have campaigned for Markey in recent weeks, including President Barack Obama and former President Bill Clinton. - CBS Boston, 6/23/13

Markey has been making the case that he is the candidate who will preserve the American Dream:

http://cognoscenti.wbur.org/...

On the issue of the budget, Social Security and other safety net programs are placed at the top of the Republicans’ chopping block. But people have contributed to Social Security throughout their entire lives. Social Security is not an entitlement. It is an earned benefit. In the Senate, I will fight to defend Social Security from cavalier cuts.

I know how important social safety-net programs are. My mother was the president of her high school class. But after her mother died, she had to sacrifice her dreams of going to college to take care of her younger siblings. Before the New Deal, that was America’s social safety net: One of the girls will have to stay home. Now, Republicans want to cut those safety nets that allow Americans to keep pursuing their dreams.

I believe budgets are about priorities. Before we make any more devastating cuts on the backs of working class families, on the sick, on the elderly, let’s talk about the entitlements that Republicans have championed. Let’s talk about the entitlements for Big Oil. Those companies get $40 billion in tax breaks, even as they tip us upside down at the gas pump every week. Let’s talk about the entitlements for new nuclear weapons programs. They want $100 billion for new nuclear weapons that we don’t need and we can’t afford. Let’s talk about the entitlements that big corporations get for overseas tax evasion. Let’s cut those entitlements before we let Republicans balance the budget on the backs of the poor, the sick and the elderly.

At the core, this election comes down to a choice of priorities. Will we finally get real gun control on the books? I will fight for a ban on assault weapons and high capacity magazine clips. Will we finally move past the debate over women’s access to reproductive health care and focus on advancing women’s health? I will defend a woman’s right to choose. Will we make sure seniors can enjoy a secure retirement? I will protect Social Security for this generation and the next.

That’s what I stand for. And I know just how lucky I am to be on the ballot to take that message to the U.S. Senate.

My father grew up on the first floor of a triple-decker on Philips Street in South Lawrence. My grandparents were immigrants from Ireland and they raised their five children there. A few years ago, I went back to that same triple-decker to see who lived there now. I rang the doorbell; the door opened and it was a Dominican-American family with their children. The accents were different, but the aspirations were clearly the same. They want for their children what the Markeys wanted for theirs.

I think that’s the responsibility of anyone who goes to the United States Senate: to ensure that every child on every porch, in every city and town across Massachusetts and our country is able to achieve the American Dream. - 90.9 WBUR, 6/21/13

Markey also picked up another big press endorsement:

http://www.wickedlocal.com/...

In his 37 years in Congress, Markey has proven to be a consummate legislator. While many members of Congress introduce bills and offer amendments, Markey has the prowess to get his passed. He led the way in opening up the Internet to competition and has continued to ensure it remains a place for freedom via his Internet Freedom Preservation Act.

Markey has been a vocal and persistent watchdog of the nuclear industry, and outspoken on all of Plymouth’s Pilgrim nuclear power plant’s shortcomings – though it’s far removed from his district. He’s authored and passed legislation to protect children online, and has consistently been an advocate, working with Republican leaders, for privacy for all.

With everything from his positions on personal privacy for medical and cell phone records, to his consistent votes against the reauthorization of The Patriot Act, Markey has advocated for the people. In the age of hyper technology where corporations and, as we’ve recently discovered, our own government routinely spy on us, Markey’s wonkish focus is vital to ensuring Constitutional rights are preserved as we sort out Spygate. Given his record as a vocal advocate for Massachusetts and consumers of every state, Markey is the better choice. - Somerville Journal, 6/23/13

The Special Election is Tuesday, June 25th.  If you would like to sign up and volunteer you can can do so here:

https://docs.google.com/...

Or here:

http://www.edmarkey.com/

Originally posted to pdc on Sun Jun 23, 2013 at 04:17 PM PDT.

Also republished by Massachusetts Kosmopolitans, Pushing back at the Grand Bargain, Repeal or Amend the Second Amendment (RASA), Shut Down the NRA, Youth Kos 2.0, In Support of Labor and Unions, Climate Hawks, and The Democratic Wing of the Democratic Party.

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Comment Preferences

  •  Tuesday will be a full day (15+ / 0-)

    what with digesting the Supreme Court decisions of the day before, with parsing Obama's climate change proposals, and especially with saying "Scram" to Gomez.

    It's the Supreme Court, stupid!

    by Radiowalla on Sun Jun 23, 2013 at 04:27:00 PM PDT

  •  Go Ed Go! (9+ / 0-)

    I like this:

    [T]he days of throwing money at every Republican candidate and campaign are over.

    If I ran this circus, things would be DIFFERENT!

    by CwV on Sun Jun 23, 2013 at 04:34:06 PM PDT

  •  This post deserves to be on the rec (13+ / 0-)

    list.

    Can't thank you enough for your continued hard work in keeping us all appraised of how this crucially important race is going.

    Lets help GOTV in what ever way we can.

    Tip'd, Rec'd and shared.

    "Compassion is not weakness, and concern for the unfortunate is not socialism." Hubert H. Humphrey

    by Onomastic on Sun Jun 23, 2013 at 04:39:30 PM PDT

  •  I can't wait to vote tuesday!.. (12+ / 0-)

    Scott Brown just seemed like an unqualified benefactor of the Koch Bros. Gomez just seems a bit more slimy to me!

    Arrogance is ignorance matured.

    by jennyp on Sun Jun 23, 2013 at 04:53:13 PM PDT

  •  Um, actually, Tues will be the last we see of him (6+ / 0-)

    Gabriel Gomez's ego is becoming that of Scott Brown and he just shot himself in the foot by saying to John McCain that he should be term limited while having McCain support him.

    Unless Gomez challenges Stephen Lynch, he's a goner.

  •  Extreme disinterest in this race is wild card (10+ / 0-)

    Making polls of "likely" voters, I feel, less accurate. Those two 20  pt lead polls for Markey this past week did him no favors.

    You know what? I got an email from my local (town/neighborhood but it's officially part of Boston) Markey office saying "it's not over yet! Please come do calls.

    and this

    "many (or most, can't remember) poeple did NOT show up for their scheduled phone bank calling"!!

    They thought...I BET...I needn't bother he's 20 pts ahead.

    shit. I'm worried about this one because I know a ton of normally engaged people who are not at all tuned in and though i talk to them I get vibe they will not BOTHER to vote. Eveyrone is busy trying to start their summer now it's here at last.

    I'm really worried. Note that I predicted Coakley's loss five weeks in advance (they wouldn't listen). Am not Predicting loss but am concerned about my concern because of that...

    PLEASE KEEP MAKING CALLS, PLEASE TELL YOUR FREINDS IN MA TO VOTE AND WHY (it will be the lowest turnout most likely in history and that favors Republicans)

    This guy is NOT ready for prime time. Let Markey be our Senator.

    •  It was last night-phone bankers didn't show (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      elwior, jennyp, Onomastic, psnyder

      for Markey.

    •  This time I don't agree (0+ / 0-)
      (it will be the lowest turnout most likely in history and that favors Republicans)
      A pure base election in Massachusetts favors Democrats.

      The interesting thing about all the polling is that each pollster has an entirely different likely voter model, but in ALL of them there's been virtually no difference between the results among all registered voters and the results when their likely voter model is applied. That suggests both sides are equally (un)enthusiastic.

      In January 2010 things were very different. We had an extremely energized GOP, electrified at the thought Brown could actually win and deprive the Democrats of their 60th Senate vote. And we had low Democratic turnout. Here we'll probably get low turnout, but we'll be OK.

      Our crack team of Newton volunteers did double duty yesterday to cover the phonebank shortages. The campaign was looking for 100-125 callers statewide. We had 10 or 12 going in Newton alone. When they were asked to stay because others hadn't showed, they stayed. Until 9. Most of them got to the office by 9 AM.

      But the campaign HQ, for whatever reason, specializes in apocalyptic emails.

      "I am not for a return to that definition of Liberty under which for many years a free people were being gradually regimented into the service of the privileged few." Franklin D. Roosevelt, 1934

      by fenway49 on Mon Jun 24, 2013 at 05:56:32 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  That's fine. I'm going by the lack of interest (0+ / 0-)

        in the people I call and am in contact with. Theoretically that is reasonably anecdotal, and I do hope you are correct. We have the additional side effect that my saying that does not depress turnout at all like saying "it's Markey's to lose".

        I'd have not posted if I didn't get an email from JP for Markey that people didn't show. It was concerning confirmation that people think this is in the bag a bit too much. At least some people.

        It wasn't an apocalyptal email from the campaing statewide, have seen those.

        Maybe people in Newton are more responsible than in some other places? Staying after Im there, ie late, is much easier than showing up, at least for me, anyway.

        BUt again I hope you are right.

        •  I don't expect (0+ / 0-)

          enthusiasm to be anywhere near what it was in November. But I think people tuning out is hitting both sides about equally, which wasn't the case in 2010.

          Point about Newton was just that we covered a lot of the shifts from callers who didn't show.

          We'll find out tomorrow night!

          "I am not for a return to that definition of Liberty under which for many years a free people were being gradually regimented into the service of the privileged few." Franklin D. Roosevelt, 1934

          by fenway49 on Mon Jun 24, 2013 at 09:28:22 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

  •  'That which doesn't kill me makes me dumber!' (5+ / 0-)

    'Give me idiocy or give me death!'

  •  masslive, like a lot of other folks, is misleading (6+ / 0-)

    when they say:

    Markey entered the race with an advantage because registered Democrats outnumber Republicans in Massachusetts three to one
    That's true, but it is what I call an incomplete statistic.

    The actual breakdown is something like this:

    Republicons 12%
    Democrats 36%
    Independents 50%
    Other 2%

    A bunch of those "independents" are actually blue collar Republicons who are embarrassed by the Republicon label for various cultural reasons.  Others are conservadems who distressingly vote for the occasional R at the top of the state ticket or the national ticket.  It is, as far as I am concerned, a conservative leaning group of "independents" or, rather, "unaffiliated" voters who will not choose a party affiliation.

    So it does not matter how far ahead Markey is with Democrats.

    The independent vote is what matters in MA, and that's why people should stop calling us a solid blue state.

    We are not.

    If we were, MA would not have voted for Reagan twice, would never have elected Rmoney governor, and would not have sent Scott Brown to the Senate.

    Politics is like driving. To go backward put it in R. To go forward put it in D.
    Drop by The Grieving Room on Monday nights for support in dealing with grief.

    by TrueBlueMajority on Sun Jun 23, 2013 at 05:44:54 PM PDT

    •  True and not true (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      brae70

      Sure, there are 50% unenrolleds. Some of them are conservative. Many of them - and I've met them on the doors around here - are not. Some can't pick a side because they're just not political and rarely vote. In most elections registered partisans - though only half the electorate - are a far higher percentage of actual voters. With a 3-1 edge in registration, Dems need only about a third of unenrolleds unless a LARGE number of registered Dems are voting for the Republican. Which doesn't happen except Scott Brown in 2010.

      Also, polling here often shows a big lead for the GOP candidate among "independents" but that's a much smaller subset than the 50% unenrolleds. When the polling specifies "independent" by actual registration status, you see a pretty even balance. Take this poll: 225 unenrolled respondents, but only 1/3 of that (75 or so) self-identify as "independent." That smaller group is much more to the right of the larger pool of unenrolleds.

      As for the history: Reagan barely edged Carter in 1980, and that only because John Anderson got 15%, highest in the nation. Reagan was in the low 40s. MA was particularly down on Carter because of bad blood from Ted Kennedy's run and not being liberal enough. Had Anderson not run, Reagan would have lost the state.

      In 1984 Reagan took 51.22% percent in MA (Mondale 48.43%). This was Reagan's lowest percentage in any of the 49 states he won and over seven points behind his national percentage. Michigan went for him by 20 points, Illinois by almost 15.

      Romney was a combination of factors. First, he had oodles of money. Dems had a tough primary that left O'Brien only 8 weeks to run, GOP ignored their primary and hounded Swift out of the race so Romney could run. Jill Stein took 3.5% away from the Dems on the left. 2002 also was the year of Romney's 2002 Olympics and a big GOP year due to terrorism fear-mongering. And, with 90% Dems in the legislature, many unenrolleds vote GOP for Gov as a "check" provided the Republican is moderate.

      Still, Romney was trailing in the polls until he lied about all his positions (as virtually all MA GOP candidates do) to seem moderate. Voters stupidly got mad at the Democrat because she was "too aggressive" in calling him out on it. Those voters learned. He didn't run in 2006 because he would have lost in a landslide.

      Scott Brown in 2010, enough has been said.

      An impossible state for a Republican? No. But we've elected one Republican Senator - Scott Brown in a special that broke exactly his way - since 1972, when the liberal Ed Brooke beat a more conservative Democrat. Every single US House seat has Democratic since 1996, every statewide office is held by a Democrat, and the Democrats have over 80% in each house of the state legislature.

      "I am not for a return to that definition of Liberty under which for many years a free people were being gradually regimented into the service of the privileged few." Franklin D. Roosevelt, 1934

      by fenway49 on Mon Jun 24, 2013 at 06:22:47 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  you are exactly right (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        fenway49

        that the only polls that count are the ones that separate the declared "independents" (who are mostly Rs who don't want the label, and faux-libertarian hate radio fans) from the mere unenrolled.  I was unenrolled for a long time just so I could take either ballot in the primary and cast strategic votes.  I voted for Jon Huntsman in 2012, for example.

        most of the rest of the stuff in your post is helpful to educate people who do not live here.  I know exactly how Brown and Romney got elected.  I know how Weld got elected.  I know there used to be a lot of moderate Republicans around these parts.  I know that even in the state of the Kennedy compound, there are Kennedy haters, even among Democrats.

        Sadly, I am partly to blame for Reagan's 1980 win because I voted for Anderson.   I walked the North End with him when people barely knew who he was.  I was young and idealistic... but at least it only took me one election to learn my lesson.  My mom who was older and wiser and more politically savvy tried to warn me.  If MA had made the difference in the election I would have been really bummed out.

        Politics is like driving. To go backward put it in R. To go forward put it in D.
        Drop by The Grieving Room on Monday nights for support in dealing with grief.

        by TrueBlueMajority on Mon Jun 24, 2013 at 06:43:47 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  The only reason I wrote it! (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          TrueBlueMajority
          most of the rest of the stuff in your post is helpful to educate people who do not live here.
          Your credentials I do not question! As I saw it you were trying to clear up one kind of out-of-state misconception about Massachusetts, I was trying to clear up another potential misconception: that Republicans have anything close to an even chance here in most statewide elections. It takes a fair amount of convergence to elect a GOP Governor, and a near-perfect storm to elect a GOP Senator.

          "I am not for a return to that definition of Liberty under which for many years a free people were being gradually regimented into the service of the privileged few." Franklin D. Roosevelt, 1934

          by fenway49 on Mon Jun 24, 2013 at 07:39:03 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  God yes (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          TrueBlueMajority
          I know that even in the state of the Kennedy compound, there are Kennedy haters, even among Democrats.
          We have plenty of "Reagan Dems." I knew the "People's Seat" thing was a masterstroke the second I heard it. I have to say, a lot of liberal activists I know in Newton, Cambridge, Lexington, etc., don't understand how anyone could feel that way. But, even though I myself think the world of Ted Kennedy, I know many people who don't.

          The 1969-1992 period was not kind at all to the Kennedy family legacy here. My uncle believes that, even nationally, the blue collar association of Democrats with yachts and snobs and "limousine liberals" is squarely connected to the Kennedys and the tarnishment of the Camelot image as seamy tales were told and the next generation had its troubles.

          "I am not for a return to that definition of Liberty under which for many years a free people were being gradually regimented into the service of the privileged few." Franklin D. Roosevelt, 1934

          by fenway49 on Mon Jun 24, 2013 at 07:44:30 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Ted Kennedy, however, was able to bridge (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            fenway49, TrueBlueMajority

            the gap between the two groups, recieving huge margins in the old industrial cities such as Lawerence and Fall River.

            Elizabeth Warren seems to be doing the same thing.
            I recieved a postcard from the AFL-CIO which started "Help Ed Markey work with Elizabeth Warren..." or something like that.

            "We must all hang together or most assuredly we shall all hang seperately." - Benjamin Franklin

            by brae70 on Mon Jun 24, 2013 at 08:17:05 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  Yes, but (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              brae70, TrueBlueMajority

              the blue-collar suburbanites turned hard against him, and in particular the Southie diaspora. I've heard plenty of grumbling.

              It's hard to get a sense of Ted Kennedy's personal standing from election results. He was so well-financed and well-connected the GOP didn't often try very hard to beat him.

              1982 was a good year for Democrats, especially in Massachusetts, where Dukakis knocked off Ed King and got 60% in the general. In 1988 we had the Governor running for President. In 1994 Romney gave him a run for a while, but Ted pulled it out with plenty of room to spare. In 2000 the GOP nominated the extreme Jack E. Robinson. 2006 was another big Dem year where the GOP nominated some guy who'd never run before.

              "I am not for a return to that definition of Liberty under which for many years a free people were being gradually regimented into the service of the privileged few." Franklin D. Roosevelt, 1934

              by fenway49 on Mon Jun 24, 2013 at 08:30:05 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  Jack E. Robinson is a joke (0+ / 0-)

                where they find these fools I have no idea

                when will Republicons learn that black folk will not just vote for any black candidate they find just because of the color of his skin?  they've had ample opportunity to learn that lesson.

                Politics is like driving. To go backward put it in R. To go forward put it in D.
                Drop by The Grieving Room on Monday nights for support in dealing with grief.

                by TrueBlueMajority on Mon Jun 24, 2013 at 09:20:53 AM PDT

                [ Parent ]

                •  Maybe they thought that a certain number (1+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  TrueBlueMajority

                  of voters would think he was the famous baseball player.

                  "We must all hang together or most assuredly we shall all hang seperately." - Benjamin Franklin

                  by brae70 on Mon Jun 24, 2013 at 09:41:42 AM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

                  •  you can get a lot past the low-information voters (1+ / 0-)
                    Recommended by:
                    brae70

                    maybe they weren't dumb enough to think he actually WAS the famous baseball player... but i'm sure some people thought he was related to the baseball player, who was a black Republican back in the Dixiecrat days

                    Politics is like driving. To go backward put it in R. To go forward put it in D.
                    Drop by The Grieving Room on Monday nights for support in dealing with grief.

                    by TrueBlueMajority on Mon Jun 24, 2013 at 09:49:03 AM PDT

                    [ Parent ]

                    •  Yes, Robinson the ballplayer supported Nixon in 60 (1+ / 0-)
                      Recommended by:
                      TrueBlueMajority

                      but went over to Humphrey in 68 when he saw what was going on.

                      Then there was a low-level hack who was blessed by his parents by being named John Kennedy. He parlayed that name into a couple of terms as state treasurer.

                      "We must all hang together or most assuredly we shall all hang seperately." - Benjamin Franklin

                      by brae70 on Mon Jun 24, 2013 at 10:37:31 AM PDT

                      [ Parent ]

                      •  IIRC (1+ / 0-)
                        Recommended by:
                        TrueBlueMajority

                        Robinson, in his autobio, said he dropped Nixon even before the '60 vote because he refused to call Coretta King and JFK did. He gave the GOP quite the tongue-lashing in the book over not being out in front on civil rights. And the "Southern Strategy" would seal that conversion.

                        "I am not for a return to that definition of Liberty under which for many years a free people were being gradually regimented into the service of the privileged few." Franklin D. Roosevelt, 1934

                        by fenway49 on Mon Jun 24, 2013 at 02:27:27 PM PDT

                        [ Parent ]

  •  I do hope Democrats show up to vote even if is (6+ / 0-)

    June and summer is well underway.  I hope turnout is not a problem.

    However, I do think after the Brown win a few years ago , Democrats in MA will show up and vote to prevent something like that from happening again.

    I have a good feeling, but GOTV is still absolutely essential and leaving it all on the field.  I should offer to make some calls , if I did not have a house full of guests and I live in PA.  But I should still make some tomorrow while my guests are out. I will try to see if they need some help and check out the websites to see if they have online phone banking like OFA had.

    Follow PA Keystone Liberals on Twitter: @KeystoneLibs

    by wishingwell on Sun Jun 23, 2013 at 06:03:01 PM PDT

  •  Gomez is always welcome (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    psnyder, Rosalie907, a2nite

    If he wants to get creamed next election, fine with me!

    Obama 2012...going to win it with our support!!!

    by mattinjersey on Sun Jun 23, 2013 at 06:08:34 PM PDT

  •  Threat? Warning? (0+ / 0-)

    No: prediction...that he will lose.

    The GOP can't win on ideas. They can only win by lying, cheating, and stealing. So they do.

    by psnyder on Sun Jun 23, 2013 at 07:05:45 PM PDT

  •  I'll be back (0+ / 0-)

    Is this a threat and if so I hope the people of Mass give Gomez a sift one in the behind and let him know that they can't threaten them.

    Never be afraid to voice your opinion and fight for it . Corporations aren't people, they're Republicans (Rev Al Sharpton 10/7/2011)

    by Rosalie907 on Sun Jun 23, 2013 at 07:27:14 PM PDT

  •  Gomez is a Wall Street hack who will not say how (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    a2nite

    wrapped up he is with that crap, but we all know it in MA.

  •  Tipped & rec'ed (0+ / 0-)

    nosotros no somos estúpidos

    by a2nite on Mon Jun 24, 2013 at 07:32:30 AM PDT

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