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Looking northeast at southeast side of Gracie Mansion on a cloudy afternoon.
Gracie Mansion, official residence of the Mayor of New York
Most Democrats do not have a vote in this year's City-wide election in New York. But despite not having a vote, if you're a Democrat you do have a stake.

The Mayor of New York is one of the most high profile positions in America, arguably more important than the Governor of New York. This is one of the most important cities in the world, and certainly the most important in America. Furthermore, it is the home of the global media, with most of the media's people living here and therefore interested in what happens here. The Mayor of New York has always been a very high profile position, but even moreso in today's global media environment. Whomever speaks for New York, and the things that person chooses to talk about, will have an audience that is quite possibly only rivaled by the presidency in the size of its megaphone.

Democrats have a chance to take back this important seat of authority this year. For 20 years the Mayoral megaphone has been controlled by a couple of autocrats, one of whom is a self-absorbed billionaire. Mayor Giuliani's 'tough on crime' and 'terrorism' focus has been as bad for Democratic messaging as Mayor Bloomberg's focus on making life better for rich people and gun control. Prior to him, Mayors Dinkins and Koch were very much local issues mayors, and were centrists in the mold of acceptable Democrats beaten into submission in the Reagan Era.

Electing a new Democratic Mayor in New York will be an excellent sign of the increasing health of the Democratic Party nationally. Furthermore, electing a left-of-center Mayor would do even more to amplify the message of the progressive wing of the Democratic Party. That person will have a soapbox to move issues. Democrats would do well to take this race as seriously as any that would effect national policy. While the Mayor of New York can't make national policy, that person can lead many other cities' mayors and can command the attention of the national media to focus on issues important to Democrats everywhere.

Originally posted to Triple-B in the Building on Wed Aug 14, 2013 at 06:48 AM PDT.

Also republished by New York City.

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Comment Preferences

  •  While Democrats are united on social issues, (169+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    dsb, Remediator, kathny, Chi, Adam B, vcmvo2, TomP, greenbastard, CS11, Texas Lefty, beltane, maxomai, DRo, Dr Erich Bloodaxe RN, blueoregon, I Lurked For Years, wintergreen8694, Egalitare, Stude Dude, asterkitty, milkbone, PinHole, DBunn, theKgirls, HeyMikey, MKinTN, Jason Hackman, JamieG from Md, Raggedy Ann, commonmass, Crashing Vor, Youffraita, Denise Oliver Velez, ban nock, jbob, mattc129, MartyM, pixxer, MBNYC, stegro, kevinpdx, david mizner, Terri, Portlaw, TheLizardKing, filkertom, bink, a2nite, emobile, willrob, Jarrayy, Involuntary Exile, Ed in Montana, psnyder, Betty Pinson, rexxnyc, freeport beach PA, mconvente, The Lone Apple, Pandora, GeorgeXVIII, Ian Reifowitz, pfiore8, boatjones, Bonsai66, bluesheep, radv005, NMRed, ArthurPoet, Loge, Statusquomustgo, leeleedee, Actbriniel, nyceve, Assaf, rbird, Independant Man, BachFan, Greasy Grant, noemie maxwell, Aunt Pat, merrywidow, petral, shaharazade, Late Again, SheilaKinBrooklyn, Pragmatus, bobswern, rubyr, Siri, Stephen Wolf, fenway49, MRA NY, NearlyNormal, Nulwee, fou, koNko, JML9999, basquebob, roses, leonard145b, daveygodigaditch, shanikka, Living in Gin, HCKAD, LNK, Sylv, RichM, rapala, Greg Dworkin, Trix, Eric Nelson, happymisanthropy, DEMonrat ankle biter, Lily O Lady, Korkenzieher, Bill in Portland Maine, Shotput8, jnhobbs, GAS, Torta, cpresley, edsbrooklyn, Jeff Y, fixxit, 714day, madame damnable, karmsy, Empower Ink, LilithGardener, terabytes, DefendOurConstitution, Ckntfld, legendmn, janosnation, OtherDoug, YucatanMan, jgnyc, Sixty Something, native, PrahaPartizan, AgavePup, schemp, Kevskos, Scioto, ARS, carpunder, devis1, slowbutsure, sc kitty, CA Nana, orestes1963, Sun Tzu, mikeconwell, wasatch, mightymouse, Plox, Jim Domenico, Dodgerdog1, pundit, Liberty Equality Fraternity and Trees, cjo30080, EdSF, HamdenRice, OMwordTHRUdaFOG, not4morewars, OIL GUY, Janet 707, Pat K California

    there is a sharp division over economic ones. Bill de Blasio is only one of two candidates talking about income inequality and a plan to do something about it. Making him Mayor will give him a perch from which to push back against the current economic order.

    I encurage you to support him no matter if you live in New York or not.

    Bill de Blasio

    •  I'm not so sure that Democrats *are* united... (4+ / 0-)

      ...on social issues. Big tents and all that.

      ‎"Masculinity is not something given to you, but something you gain. And you gain it by winning small battles with honor." - Norman Mailer
      My Blog
      My wife's woodblock prints

      by maxomai on Wed Aug 14, 2013 at 07:11:54 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  I'm on board for de Blasio. (10+ / 0-)

      of course my tea partyin' Siciliano co-worker here (who actually proudly stated that he had an Ethiopian great-great-great-great grandmom during the inaug in 2009...he just HAD to have a piece of the victory as he was miserable taking down all of his bush memorabilia from his office walls...the reagan stuff is still up there)....is supporting Catsimitidis.

      Ayn sucks. Please know I am not rude. I cannot rec anything from this browser. When I rec or post diaries I am a guest at some exotic locale's computer.

      by Floyd Blue on Wed Aug 14, 2013 at 07:26:46 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  NYC should have its own minimum wage (6+ / 0-)

      based on the national minimum wage and adjusted for the cost of living in NYC.  In this way, we have a common standard of living for a min wage worker putting in 40 hrs week.

      For example, a person making $15,000/yr in Tulsa would need to make $35,466/yr to have the same standard of living in Manhatten.   See http://money.cnn.com/...

      So if the min wage in Tulsa is 7.25/hr, the min wage in Manhatten should be $17.11/hr not $7.25 as it is today.

      Why should a min wage worker in Manhatten have a lower standard of living, than a min wage worker in Tulsa?

      The most important way to protect the environment is not to have more than one child.

      by nextstep on Wed Aug 14, 2013 at 08:37:12 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  You have it backwards. (1+ / 1-)
        Recommended by:
        johnniec
        Hidden by:
        Yohannon

        The cost of living is higher in NYC because of the higher wages.

        It is also higher because we pay more it taxes (which mean better services).

        Manhattan is a fantastic place to live and a Corvette is a fantastic car to drive. We don't hand out free Corvettes. Why do people think they are entitled to live in Manhattan?

        If the cost of living in a place is too high for you, don't go to that place!

        •  So... (11+ / 0-)

          For all the working class neighborhoods where people are struggling to pay rent because Manhattan real estate is so sought after, no neighborhood is immune, they should just pack it up and move?

          Tell that to someone in my office who makes  35k a year, lives near Columbia U and is having to go to court so he and other tenants are not being driven out by a landlord who refuses to fix the basics in the apartment  or buying people out so he can rent newly renovated apartments at three times the rent.  He and his family have been living in that building for three generations.

          Cost of living has gone up, all around them,  they did not move there for convenience.  They have been living in an area that was not previously considered a real estate boon.

          All the suffering of this world arises from a wrong attitude.The world is neither good or bad. It is only the relation to our ego that makes it seem the one or the other - Lama Anagorika Govinda

          by kishik on Wed Aug 14, 2013 at 09:53:29 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  There is no such thing... (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            DarkOmnius, bex

            ...as Hereditary Nobility in the USA. Or at least, there shouldn't be.

            Just because your Grandad rented an apartment does not meant that you get to rent it. There are new immigrants, people from out-of-town, and people from other neighborhoods who might like a turn!

            I cannot afford 5-star restaurants, so I don't eat at them.

            I cannot afford the rent at Trump Tower, so I don't live there.

            There are many fine towns in upstate New York where once can live on a lower income.

            I believe we have an obligation to help people who can't afford food and shelter. Nobody should starve or freeze.

            But that doesn't mean we should serve them porterhouse steak and put them up in Manhattan apartments!

            •  I don't think anyone... (9+ / 0-)

              Is asking for more than they want as fair and decent housing.

              So you're fine with unlawful tactics to force people who legally reside in apartments and do pay their rent because it is rent controlled.  And to force them out for those who can " afford to eat porterhouse steaks"

              Got it.

              Move the poor who actually do have work in the city, and have them pay out of their noses in commuting costs.

              Got it.

              Employed working class or working poor need not apply.

              Got it.

              All the suffering of this world arises from a wrong attitude.The world is neither good or bad. It is only the relation to our ego that makes it seem the one or the other - Lama Anagorika Govinda

              by kishik on Wed Aug 14, 2013 at 10:24:38 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  Rent control is WHY rent is too damn high (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                ManhattanMan

                As the neighborhood is gentrified, it becomes more desirable... rent should increase as a result. Those who can afford it can stay, those who cannot will need to eventually move someplace else.

                By not allowing the rent to increase, you create a perverse situation where there is no incentive to up-keep the property... leading to poor housing. And the more laws there are against slum lords, the more likely slum lords are to take over. Honest businessmen want no part of that mess, leaving it to the wolves.

                Rent control should be abolished and replaced with housing vouchers. That would have fewer side effects.

                •  Yes.... (1+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  sc kitty

                  Section 8 housing.... Great program!

                  Got it.

                  All the suffering of this world arises from a wrong attitude.The world is neither good or bad. It is only the relation to our ego that makes it seem the one or the other - Lama Anagorika Govinda

                  by kishik on Wed Aug 14, 2013 at 12:05:58 PM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

                •  Prove it (3+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  PrahaPartizan, devis1, sc kitty

                  If rent control is the problem, why there are scores of new buildings in my neighborhood that are less than half occupied?  It's because developers want to earn a certain rent and would rather leave the spaces vacant than bring down the market rate.  We have had an increedible housing boom over the past ten years, yet rents continue to escalate.  Greater supply should bring down rents, but somehow that has not happened.  Please explain.

                  •  Same Applies to Commercial Space (3+ / 0-)
                    Recommended by:
                    devis1, sc kitty, orestes1963

                    It's incredible watching commercial landlords force going concerns out of business so that they can raise their rents and watch the property go unoccupied for, sometimes, years.  And, I'm talking about prime commercial real estate in the heart of major upper middle class neighborhoods too.  The landlords do this even though other properties are unoccupied at the same time.  Clearly the market isn't working the way it is supposed to in a true free market condition.  It resembles more a quasi-monopolistic market controlled by enterprises working behind several layers of protection.  For all anyone knows all of the real estate firms in NYC could by controlle by a handful of firms with multiple layers of corporate ownership providing plausible deniability for monopoly practices.

                    "Love the Truth, defend the Truth, speak the Truth, and hear the Truth" - Jan Hus, d.1415 CE

                    by PrahaPartizan on Wed Aug 14, 2013 at 01:56:11 PM PDT

                    [ Parent ]

                    •  I have long advocated a vacancy tax for NYC (1+ / 0-)
                      Recommended by:
                      kishik

                      That's the only way we can ensure the market operates properly.  Apartment warehousing has been a problem for as long as I have lived in the city (25 years).  

                      You are correct about commercial properties.  I admit I had really focused on this aspect of the problem.

                    •  The market is working. (0+ / 0-)

                      Two things people often miss about commercial vacancies:

                      1) The "going concern" that was "forced out of business" may have been months behind on rent. Unless you are their accountant, you don't know.

                      2) If I own a building with multiple storefronts, I may want to put in a large store instead of small ones. To do this, I must wait until each lease is up.

                  •  Even greater demand? (1+ / 0-)
                    Recommended by:
                    ManhattanMan

                    I think his point that lots of new people are moving to the area and that it is a desirable place to live explains why rent doesn't decrease just because more units are built.  I don't live somewhere with rent control and have always been interested in it.  Nice to see an honest progressive debate over it.  So far, I'm in agreement with ManhattanMan, but I would add that there will surely be consequences to forcing all people below a certain income out of such a large area.  There should be a point at which those people demand more money to bother making the trip in to town to work or just decide to work elsewhere (one of those nice upstate towns?).  What would the bankers do if there were no more garbage men or firemen willing or able to work in Manhattan?  

                    •  Gentrification... (1+ / 0-)
                      Recommended by:
                      orestes1963

                      economic eviction.

                      forced exodus of the poor and working class.  Move them to places so space can be made for those that can afford to live in Manhattan.  

                      Destroy neighborhoods that have been long established - usually immigrant neighborhoods.  People have no rights to remain in neighborhoods where generations lived because they have no monetary wealth to "afford" to live in Manhattan.

                      Got it.

                      All the suffering of this world arises from a wrong attitude.The world is neither good or bad. It is only the relation to our ego that makes it seem the one or the other - Lama Anagorika Govinda

                      by kishik on Wed Aug 14, 2013 at 02:54:06 PM PDT

                      [ Parent ]

                      •  So I can't live... (0+ / 0-)

                        ...in a Harlem brownstone or an Alphabet City walk-up unless I have the right grandparents?

                        Why not just issue Titles of Nobility to rent-controlled tenants? "Ye shalt have this lande forever, ye and all ye heirs and descendants..."

                    •  Demand would be the answer (0+ / 0-)

                      if the supply were dried up.  It is not.  There has been massive development in Long Island City, for example, much of which remains unoccupied.  I also live in one of the gentrifying neighborhoods where new housing stock continues to enter the market.  Many of these units lie vacant.  The developers received hefty tax subsidies to build these units, which lowers their costs.  They are keeping rents artificially high out of self-interest.  For a while, the Bloomberg admin was renting out some of these units for homeless families.  They paid "market rates" (ie, what the developer wanted for the units) of over $3000/month for many of these units in buildings that could not attract buyers or tenants at those rates.  These were typically buildings in areas that had not yet gentrified before the bust.

              •  Don't be insulting. (0+ / 0-)
                "So you're fine with unlawful tactics..."
                I said no such thing.

                We should change the law so that a guy moving to New York City from the midwest has the same shot at a nice apartment as the guy who was born in NYC.

            •  The problem with your move upstate (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              kishik

              reasoning is that there are not necessarily enough jobs upstate, especially for lower skilled workers.  (I have not looked at the figures recently.)   There often are also housing restrictions that can cause problems for poorer people.  

              Fundamentally, I disagree with the notion that poorer people should be reduced to a nomadic existence.  It is immoral to me to reduce all opportunities to "those who can afford it."  I appreciate that there are different socio-economic strata, but that does not mean that those on the low end should have no rights to a decent place of residence solely because of their status.  IMO, a vibrant city must include people of all socio-economic standings.  I have been an urban dweller my entire life, so I have experienced the value that people from all walks of life bring to a vibrant urban experience.  For me, the over-gentrification of Manhattan (and increasingly parts of Brooklyn) have deadened the urban experience.  

              •  thank you... (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                orestes1963

                although I am really wondering why there is a discussion on the notion that poor people should be relocated out of the city for the convenience of those who can "afford" better to live in Manhattan.

                All the suffering of this world arises from a wrong attitude.The world is neither good or bad. It is only the relation to our ego that makes it seem the one or the other - Lama Anagorika Govinda

                by kishik on Wed Aug 14, 2013 at 04:33:42 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

        •  Sound like you don't believe in having an (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Tool, ManhattanMan

          effective minimum wage in New York City.

          A higher minimum wage is not handing out a benefit, it just says that employers must pay at least $x/hr for employees working.

          The most important way to protect the environment is not to have more than one child.

          by nextstep on Wed Aug 14, 2013 at 11:12:22 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  A higher minimum wage would mean the (0+ / 0-)

          cost of living for everyone would increase somewhat, but those earning minimum wage see their net standard of living rise.  While the wealthy would make less profit from their labor.

          The most important way to protect the environment is not to have more than one child.

          by nextstep on Wed Aug 14, 2013 at 11:16:36 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  A higher minimum wage would just (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            quince

            bring people in that earning category fractionally (talking tiny here) closer to closing the outrageous income gap.

            People making the kind of money that you need these days to live in the city could afford the impact of a higher minimum wage.

        •  That HR is really out of line! (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          orestes1963

          I may not completely agree with the comment, but there's nothing about it that merits a hide rating.

          ManhattanMan, I'm replying to you since I don't see Yohannon commenting here.

        •  Ah the school of Marie Antoinette (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          TheOtherMaven, kishik

          it always resonates.

    •  But he come from the Clinton wing of the party, (0+ / 0-)

      I don't trust his progressive talk. Reminds me of Barack Obama- run as a progressive and when you are in office, govern as a DLCer. I would never vote Republican. My friends are now saying they will not vote. I knew Weiner was  progressive only on healthcare.

  •  Recced for this: (21+ / 0-)
    Mayor Giuliani's 'tough on crime' and 'terrorism' focus has been as bad for Democratic messaging as Mayor Bloomberg's focus on making life better for rich people and gun control.

    Republicans cause more damage than guns ever will. Share Our Wealth

    by KVoimakas on Wed Aug 14, 2013 at 06:59:14 AM PDT

  •  How does this happen in NYC? (6+ / 0-)
    For 20 years the Mayoral megaphone has been controlled by a couple of autocrats, one of whom is a self-absorbed billionaire.
    How does a great liberal city like New York elect, then re-elect people like Giuliani and Bloomberg as their mayor?

    "I'm a progressive man and I like progressive people" Peter Tosh

    by Texas Lefty on Wed Aug 14, 2013 at 07:04:20 AM PDT

    •  Maybe you shouldn't start from (10+ / 0-)

      the false assumption that NYC is "a great liberal city."

      Dogs from the street can have all the desirable qualities that one could want from pet dogs. Most adopted stray dogs are usually humble and exceptionally faithful to their owners as if they are grateful for this kindness. -- H.M. Bhumibol Adulyadej

      by corvo on Wed Aug 14, 2013 at 07:07:52 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  How is that a false assumption? n/t (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        ManhattanMan

        "I'm a progressive man and I like progressive people" Peter Tosh

        by Texas Lefty on Wed Aug 14, 2013 at 07:22:49 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Gerritsen Beach (7+ / 0-)

          Staten Island, large swaths of Orthdox Brooklyn, parts of Queens.

          •  Don't most major cities have conservative areas? (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            phenry

            Do you know what percentage of NYC these people represent?

            "I'm a progressive man and I like progressive people" Peter Tosh

            by Texas Lefty on Wed Aug 14, 2013 at 07:43:35 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  I don't think it's Conservative/The Left but (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              mconvente, Loge

              more the very rich and the very poor. Our most liberal affluent small city out here also has the greatest divide rich/poor. If you say the right things on social issues you win if you are rich.

              “Conservation… is a positive exercise of skill and insight, not merely a negative exercise of abstinence and caution…” Aldo Leopold

              by ban nock on Wed Aug 14, 2013 at 07:48:12 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  But isn't that like most major cities? (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                ban nock

                A divide between the rich and the poor, the haves and the have nots?

                "I'm a progressive man and I like progressive people" Peter Tosh

                by Texas Lefty on Wed Aug 14, 2013 at 07:53:40 AM PDT

                [ Parent ]

              •  Sadly (2+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                ban nock, Kevskos

                Only rich people are able to run for political office in that affluent small city to which you refer. Especially the city council, because there is no real salary.

                "Political ends as sad remains will die." - YES 'And You and I' ; -8.88, -9.54

                by US Blues on Wed Aug 14, 2013 at 08:31:20 AM PDT

                [ Parent ]

              •  Actually (4+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                petral, ban nock, orestes1963, Kevskos

                The divide is between those who hate and fear Puerto Ricans and black people and those who don't.  A large segment of the rich side with those who hate/fear a black/brown city.  

                This goes all the way back to the Civil War draft riots, continues through the public works of Robert Moses, and echoes down through the administrations of Koch and Giuliani. During the Civil War, New York was a copperhead city.  

                With the exception of Dinkins, the hate/fear side has prevailed, at least when it comes to being mayor.

                Here's hoping New York has turned the corner on this one.  And here's to hoping Chicago eventually does too.

                This aggression will not stand, man.

                by kaleidescope on Wed Aug 14, 2013 at 08:53:07 AM PDT

                [ Parent ]

              •  Not to sound provincial (0+ / 0-)

                but NYC is an international city.  Its dynamics are, IMO, different from all other US cities.  For example, more languages are spoken in the borough of Queens than anywhere else in the entire US.  It is the urban nerve center of the country.  I think that lady in the harbor may also have something to do with it.  

        •  Don't you think that if the Big Apple (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          shaharazade, happymisanthropy

          were a "great liberal city" that it might actually vote like one?

          Dogs from the street can have all the desirable qualities that one could want from pet dogs. Most adopted stray dogs are usually humble and exceptionally faithful to their owners as if they are grateful for this kindness. -- H.M. Bhumibol Adulyadej

          by corvo on Wed Aug 14, 2013 at 08:12:32 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  People don't bother to vote. Big problem! n/t (0+ / 0-)
            •  Well, not voting (0+ / 0-)

              is a form of voting too, when you think of it.  And it's not exactly sensible to assume that all nonvoters skew Democratic; most have little use for politics or at least for either of the two parties.

              Dogs from the street can have all the desirable qualities that one could want from pet dogs. Most adopted stray dogs are usually humble and exceptionally faithful to their owners as if they are grateful for this kindness. -- H.M. Bhumibol Adulyadej

              by corvo on Wed Aug 14, 2013 at 10:19:55 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

          •  Voting doesn't really reflect true values (0+ / 0-)

            American elections generally skew conservative because too many liberals and those supporting more liberal policies are less likely to vote than conservatives and those supporting conservative policies.  That's not just New York City, that's pretty much everywhere.  

            "I'm a progressive man and I like progressive people" Peter Tosh

            by Texas Lefty on Wed Aug 14, 2013 at 10:14:15 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  And why do you assume that nonvoters (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              Kevskos

              are eager to support "liberals"?  Their nonvoting indicates that they don't.  After all, these days Democrats -- the supposed "liberals" -- don't do a terribly good job of supporting "liberal policies," dontcha know.

              Dogs from the street can have all the desirable qualities that one could want from pet dogs. Most adopted stray dogs are usually humble and exceptionally faithful to their owners as if they are grateful for this kindness. -- H.M. Bhumibol Adulyadej

              by corvo on Wed Aug 14, 2013 at 10:21:47 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

            •  That doesn't make sense to me (0+ / 0-)

              Can you expand on that?  On what do you base that conclusion?  

          •  NYC tends to be extremely liberal on social issues (0+ / 0-)

            and fairly conservative on economic ones.

            •  Well, fairly conservative (0+ / 0-)

              on those social issues that impinge on the citizenry's sense of safety and order too.  Giuliani was actually quite popular for "cleaning up" the city, after all, even though his methods were questionable.

              Otherwise your distinction is quite valuable.

              Dogs from the street can have all the desirable qualities that one could want from pet dogs. Most adopted stray dogs are usually humble and exceptionally faithful to their owners as if they are grateful for this kindness. -- H.M. Bhumibol Adulyadej

              by corvo on Wed Aug 14, 2013 at 10:23:22 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

      •  It IS incredibly diverse, & not just neighborhood (9+ / 0-)

        to neighborhood, but certainly in Queens, WITHIN many neighborhoods.  I find it far more diverse than even downtown DC, or Northeast DC around the embassy areas.

        Where I live in Jamaica, the census calls it (I believe they still do) a black neighborhood, but it is loaded with folks of West Indian descent of all hues and cultures, and many East Indian/South Asian folks, and Latino folks.  To give you an idea, the people in my building protested againt a new dorm built by St. John's, because they were worried what the noise and aggregation of young people (mostly white were anticipated, tho I see all types of folks walking around with the red sweatshirts) would do to the neighborhood!

        Ayn sucks. Please know I am not rude. I cannot rec anything from this browser. When I rec or post diaries I am a guest at some exotic locale's computer.

        by Floyd Blue on Wed Aug 14, 2013 at 07:38:24 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  Giuliani I understood completely. (21+ / 0-)

      I mean things had really gotten out of hand with crime and Giuliani had a reputation for being a hard ass on the Mob when he was U.S. Attorney. He was easily re-elected with a lot of Democratic votes, including a lot of Minority votes. My father voted for him on the re-elect.

      Mark Green, who faced Bloomberg in 2001, got my vote. But  he is one of the most abrasive human beings in the world. He just isn't good at making people like him.

      Now, Freddie Ferrer was my guy in 2005, but he ran a shoddy campaign versus Bloombergs billions.

      2009, I just don't get and can't explain.

      •  A lot and I mean a lot of blame (9+ / 0-)

        has to go to the democratic party.  It is so severely entrenched that there is an overwhelming old boys network.  Kind of like living in a deep red region. That level of entrenchment destroys government. It caused a lot of democrats not to like the party.  Issues always seemed political rather than based on  policy.  Candidates seemed write off the party machine assembly line.  Gerrymandering is pretty awful in the the city too.  People don't realize these things don;t lead to "your" candidate getting elected.  They lead to the party candidate getting elected.  Hopefully De Blasio is different. Hopefully he is more accountable to voters than to party.  Or at least not as bad in the past.  

      •  I thought he actually was softening a bit too... (0+ / 0-)

        when he revealed he had prostate cancer.  He seemed more human....for a few days.  I was suckered in a little by that sympathy stuff....and I believe many folks here were too.

        Ayn sucks. Please know I am not rude. I cannot rec anything from this browser. When I rec or post diaries I am a guest at some exotic locale's computer.

        by Floyd Blue on Wed Aug 14, 2013 at 07:40:18 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  crime went down under Dinkins (4+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        milkbone, Loge, Woody, orestes1963

        and it went up under Lindsay and Beame and Koch

        But Giuliani actually called the Dinkins administration the 'dark old days'

      •  whats to get? (6+ / 0-)

        Bloomberg is socially liberal, green, and fiscally conservative. In a socially liberal, and at its core, fiscally conservative city. And nyc was happy with the state of the city.

        Note..i am not a Bloomberg supporter or non supporter.

        "My Mom is my hero, my angel and I revere her to no end.." Christin, July 6, 2013

        by Christin on Wed Aug 14, 2013 at 08:18:29 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  Me... (0+ / 0-)

        I was resident of Long Island in 1989, so wasn't able to vote for that one.  1993, I went for Dinkins. 1997 for Ruth Messinger (that election, they couldn't find my name at their regular polling place and directed me to a nearby one a few blocks away and forced to vote by affidavit ballot.  A few weeks later I got a letter saying they couldn't verify something and that my vote didn't count ...hmm), 2001 was for Green (I actually volunteered on this one), 2005 I unenthusiastic-ally voted for Ferrer (who I regarded as at least partly responsible for the situation contributing to Green's defeat), 2009 I voted for Thompson and was surprised how he almost beat Bloomberg.  Later it was found out that Team Bloomberg knew from internal polls they were weak, buried that info, and projected an aura of inevitability.  OK, political campaigns do that.  However, there was no excuse for the media to be in Bloomberg's pocket and keep repeating the inevitable meme.  Did they deliberately sit on polls showing Bloomie's weakness as well?

        "Valerie, why am I getting all these emails calling me a classless boor?"

        by TLS66 on Wed Aug 14, 2013 at 10:16:15 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  IMO (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          chambord

          Green's defeat can be attributed to his willingness to delay the election on Giuliani's behalf due to 9/11.  Freddy Ferrer only hurt Green because he forcefully refused to consider any delay in the election.  He was right about that.  Green came off as a fool.  Also, Mark Green was always one of the most disliked politicians in the city.

          •  orestes1963 (0+ / 0-)

            Thanks for your comments, you brought up some very good  points.

          •  Bloomberg was also willing to delay the election (0+ / 0-)

            I actually admired Ferrer's saying "No way!" to Giuliani.  No, what I'm referring to is how Ferrer withdrew his support from Green in the final days of the campaign and tacitly encouraged his supporters to either stay home or vote for Bloomberg.  Apparently, during the runoff campaign, some overenthusiastic Green supporters (without the knowledge of either Green or the campaign) distributed a cartoon of Ferrer kissing Sharpton's, who was a Ferrer supporter, ass.  Ferrrer and Sharpton took offense. Can't blame them for that, but to think Green personally had a hand in it?  What could have been nipped in the bud by a meeting between Green, Ferrer, and Sharpton, snowballed and Green (whose white support had collapsed already due to Guiliani's endorsement) now started to lose some black and latino support as well, not to mention a few sanctimonious white liberals such as Harvey Weinstein.

            "Valerie, why am I getting all these emails calling me a classless boor?"

            by TLS66 on Thu Aug 15, 2013 at 07:38:09 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

      •  The crack epidemic (0+ / 0-)

        helped Giuliani's clean up the city campaign.

      •  When Giuliani was a US Attorney... (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        orestes1963

        he testified for the defense to uphold the detention or return of Haitians coming here for refuge.  Giuliani's stance was that they were not fleeing from persecution because this did not exist under Papa Doc.  meanwhile, Cubans were given free and readily access as long as they made it to some US shore OR passing boat.  Haitians were returned by the thousands, tortured, detained, killed.

        Yah - and then he flip flopped when running for mayor saying he was the mayor for immigrants.

        right.

        All the suffering of this world arises from a wrong attitude.The world is neither good or bad. It is only the relation to our ego that makes it seem the one or the other - Lama Anagorika Govinda

        by kishik on Wed Aug 14, 2013 at 04:28:52 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  brooklynbadboy (0+ / 0-)

        Thanks for starting this thread.  It is the best one I have read in  a long time, and I read every night.

    •  Because they are not RWNJ's on social issues (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Texas Lefty, happymisanthropy

      So it all comes down to economics.

      I'm no philosopher, I am no poet, I'm just trying to help you out - Gomez (from the song Hamoa Beach)

      by jhecht on Wed Aug 14, 2013 at 07:37:36 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Is it economics or security? (0+ / 0-)

        Have Giuliani or Bloomberg dealt with any major economic issues as mayor? I'm curious as I obviously don't follow all the issues in NYC.  

        "I'm a progressive man and I like progressive people" Peter Tosh

        by Texas Lefty on Wed Aug 14, 2013 at 07:47:34 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  September 11th and the Wall Street meltdown (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          a2nite, Portlaw
          •  NYC in a great wave of trickle down prosperity (0+ / 0-)

            Bush tax cuts benefited NYC as much as anywhere else in the country (i.e. Silicon Valley and Seattle)

            TARP money is sloshing around the real estate market too

            So any mayor would have looked good, balanced budgets, etc.

            And tourism and movies and tv are soaring too

            But Bloomberg is roughshod pro-developer and has tried lots of projects to re-invigorate different neighborhoods

            And his education policies are bulls*^t

            I admit I let my spleen govern my vote in 2001 (I really couldn't stand Mark Green)

    •  Apathy (6+ / 0-)

      and crappy candidates. And remember Archie Bunker lived in Queens. The older generation in the city votes with regularity, and with missionary zeal. The younger more progressive generations are more transitory, harder to register and get to the polls. NYC Dems are geniuses at failing to attract talent (or rather squelching potential threats to the status quo). And at the end of the day, the Real Estate industry really runs the city, and whoever runs the city is eventually made to dance the tune the Realtors call. This is why Bloomberg was their dream candidate. They'll never have it so good again. For the same reason there's no doubt that DiBlasio's candidacy is radical by comparison, a direct throwback to the Lindsay era in terms of the role of government.

      •  That makes alot of sense (0+ / 0-)

        Apathy and shitty candidates

        "I'm a progressive man and I like progressive people" Peter Tosh

        by Texas Lefty on Wed Aug 14, 2013 at 07:55:54 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  A lot of younger voters (4+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Christin, petral, mrblifil, orestes1963

        are registered at their parents' house in other states, are registered but won't commit to a party, don't vote and are proud of it.

        Developers love deBlasio. He turned a blind eye for as long as he could to illegal development in his city council district and managed to secure a spot rezoning for Toll Brothers along the Gowanus Canal.  He claimed that living next to raw sewage was safe.  Soon after the canal was designated a superfund site and deBlasio did everything he could to prevent that designation despite his constituents' overwhelming support for the designation.  

        •  Do you know of a catalog of DeBlasio's compromises (0+ / 0-)

          I live in Quinn's district - so I'm well aware of hers...

          I did live next to the Gowanus a looong time ago, things are certainly getting spiffy there now

          •  What do you mean by compromises? (3+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Aunt Pat, petral, orestes1963

            You can google deblasio, superfund, gowanus, Toll brothers.
            IoudA serNd a
            For giggles, google Hanna Senesh deBlasio.  I had forgotten about how he was about to sell city owned property for a buck to a private school without notifying the community.

            He also ignored numerous complaints about an illegal roof top addition at 333 Carroll St. aka the Carroll Gardens Hell Building designed by notorious architect Robert Scarano.  Besides that illegality, the site was unsafe and sheet metal that was unsecured was flying off and hit a window bedroom window where newborn twins were sleeping. It was only after being shown pictures of the sheet metal and a serious injury to a worker on another Scarano site in the South Slope that Bill began to pay attention. When he did, he wanted us to organize a rally got the New 12 cameras.

    •  How does this happen? (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      petral, fisher1028, LNK, MRA NY

      This map is a big part of the answer.

      Where People Dont Vote

    •  Crime. (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Woody, VClib

      People got absolutely fed up w/ crime, which led to tough-on-crime mayors.  As the memories of that era fades, it's inevitable that NYC mayors will shift to the left.  That is, until or unless crime ticks back up.

    •  Why? Because NYC Democrats... (0+ / 0-)

      ...are often incompetent and corrupt.

      Scandal after scandal after scandal. Drugs. Prostitutes. Stealing. Payoffs and kickbacks.

      What we need is for Jimmy Carter to move to NYC. He is what we need as mayor...

    •  Bloomberg was a lifelong Democrat (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Peace Missile, mightymouse

      who switched to Republican so he could side step the Democratic primary in 2001.

      The winner of the Democratic primary, Mark Green, screwed up badly and Bloomberg was easy to vote for in the weeks after 9/11.

      He has many faults, but I'll admit that in his first term he did some important things right to stabiize the city's finances/services and keep property values from just collapsing (beyond the initial shocking 30% drop), which they would have done if people and businesses fled the city.

      "They did not succeed in taking away our voice" - Angelique Kidjo - Opening the Lightning In a Bottle concert at Radio City Music Hall in New York City - 2003

      by LilithGardener on Wed Aug 14, 2013 at 12:42:43 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Bloomberg faced weak or disorganized Dems (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      orestes1963

      And he's a Dem who used the Republican primary to avoid a messy primary fight in 2001.  That, plus a lot of his actions in his first term kept me from ever voting for him, but I will give him credit for leading on environmental issues, putting NYC at the forefront of dealing with the effects of climate change.  His leadership on those issues has been as effective as his leadership on fighting gun violence has not.  He's a technocrat and can rally fellow technocrats.

    •  Well (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      fisher1028

      Giuliani was elected because they placed an initiative on the ballot for Staten Island to secede from the city.  SI is the archly conservative borough of NYC (it also remained loyal to the crown during the revolutionary war).  There was a greater than 90% turnout on SI, which gave Giuliani the sliver he needed to win.  There was also anti-Dinkins sentiment in the Jewish  community, some of whom blamed Dinkins for the Crown Heights/Rosenbaum murder.

      In his second election, he ran against an old school liberal, Ruth Messinger (a former social worker).  Giuliani was rabid in stifling dissent from all quarters.  For example, Dinkins was a big supporter of the USTA, so Giuliani went after the USTA.  Messinger came off ineffectually during the campain, but still came close to defeating Giuliani.

      Bloomberg came to office right after 9/11.  He portrayed himself as above the political fray (the smart, sensible businessman that the republicans had pushed as the ideal politician for years) and used his considerable wealth to curry favor around the city.  Indeed, Bloomberg was able to stay in office because he essentially silenced most critics through donations, which he spread liberally.  During the last election, Christine Quinn, the highest ranking Dem in the city at the time withheld her endorsement of the Dem candidate (Bill Thompson) until the eleventh hour, signaling that even she supported another Bloomberg term.  

      In short, I would argue the Giuliani and Bloomberg mayoralties was founded on fear-mongering and vicious attacks (Giuliani) and pay-offs of the legal sort (Bloomberg).

  •  completely agree (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Denise Oliver Velez

    thanks for the diary

    Growth for the sake of growth is the ideology of the cancer cell. --Edward Abbey

    by greenbastard on Wed Aug 14, 2013 at 07:06:28 AM PDT

  •  I always do care (9+ / 0-)

    I may be in exile in Maryland but I always care about New York and a lot of my family is still there right in Manhattan.

    De Blasio sounds good at the moment. I don't know anything really about Quinn at all.

    I would love to see Dems back in control of NYC, we end up with an odd assortment of mayors. I hope we just have a decent one that actually wants the job and not the microphone!

    Although a soldier by profession, I have never felt any sort of fondness for war, and I have never advocated it, except as a means of peace. ~ Ulysses S Grant

    by vcmvo2 on Wed Aug 14, 2013 at 07:07:31 AM PDT

  •  I don't know from media, but I do know from (4+ / 0-)

    economic activity.  New York City houses many of the major power and monetary players in the country, as well as many of the wealthiest Americans.

  •  NYC Mayor's attitude to anti-Wall St. protests (9+ / 0-)

    would seem to have a big impact on the ability of protestors to publicize the misdeeds of, and put reform pressure on, the financial elite.

  •  You've convinced me. Excellent diary, thanks (4+ / 0-)

    "Truth catches up with you in here. It's the truth that's gonna make you hurt." - Piper Chapman

    by blueoregon on Wed Aug 14, 2013 at 07:16:24 AM PDT

  •  Population of... (17+ / 0-)

    New Jersey: 8.9 million
    NYC: 8.3 million
    Virginia (my home state): 8.2 million

    (Note these are the biggest elections in November 2013)

    We absolutely have a stake in the NYC Mayor's race. This one and all future ones.

    When you are right you cannot be too radical; when you are wrong, you cannot be too conservative. --Martin Luther King Jr.

    by Egalitare on Wed Aug 14, 2013 at 07:22:01 AM PDT

  •  Glad I'll have a chance to vote in this (8+ / 0-)

    I voted for whoever ran against Bloomberg the first time (Green?), just before I hightailed it to the west coast, where I lived under two Democratic mayors (and governors), the second of whom lived just blocks from me and was also big on bike lanes, but who actually used one to commute to work.

    I look forward to having a mayor who isn't an authoritarian prick who likes to dictate things to what he clearly views as his ungrateful subjects.

    I'm strongly leaning DeBlasio right now. I like his parks policy. I'd like to see more emphasis on quality of life for NYC's non-elite, which includes not only affordable housing and better schools, but cleaner and better-maintained parks, which we don't have today. And more and better bikes paths in the outer boroughs. And, if it's not too much to ask (and it probably is), a way to cross either the Whitestone or Throgs Neck bridge on bike.

    "Liberty without virtue would be no blessing to us" - Benjamin Rush, 1777

    by kovie on Wed Aug 14, 2013 at 07:26:15 AM PDT

    •  To rain on the parade (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      fisher1028, OtherDoug

      Sorry but de Blasio apparently thinks that what NYC needs is wider streets, more parking spaces, and no more bike lanes or public plazas created by narrowing the asphalt.

      If you who want a mayor ...
      who will give priority to the majority of NYC households that do NOT have cars,
      who truly, with taxes and tolls, supports mass transit,
      who wants to do something about the hundreds of pedestrians killed wounded and crippled by drivers each year,
      who thinks bikes have a place in the network ...
      Well, you don't really have a candidate, certainly not de Blasio.

      Examples. "The City" can be reached from Brooklyn, Queens, and the Long Island suburbs by three bridges and tunnels with tolls, and by four free bridges. Adding tolls to the free bridges would create revenues in the hundreds of millions, to support expanded bus routes all across the five boros, more frequent subway trains and buses, and even help fund the next phase of the Second Avenue Subway. Oh, and reduce traffic where millions of people use the sidewalks and streets for walking. But when any variation of tolls or fees to discourage driving into the business district has come up, de Blasio is always against "congestion pricing".

      Uglier, in discussing one controversial bike lane, he repeats the lie that the community was not consulted. The Prospect Park West bike lane was proposed by neighborhood organizations. They worked for more than five years to get approval from all nearby Community Boards and support from the local city council members, which came only after many public hearings. That's his neighborhood. He knows the process was open and public. But he lies about it because that now-popular and much-used bike lane is still opposed by a handful of rich and powerful people (e.g. Sen Chuck Shumer and wife) living in a handful of buildings along the way.

      Those positions, against funding mass transit over driving and demonizing bike lanes, may win de Blasio votes in Brooklyn and Queens -- and on Long Island LOL -- but he hasn't won me over yet.

      •  PPW bike lane is dangerous. (0+ / 0-)

        The site lines are poor over the roofs of parked cars and the cyclists zoom past in either direction. I'm glad my little league parent days are over.  

        There is a picture of Chuck pedaling on the PPW bike lane.  I think it was in Gothamist.

        Having said that, I won't be voting for Bill.

        •  Hard evidence (0+ / 0-)

          As far as I know EVERY bike lane in the City has shown reduced rates of collisions, reduced numbers of deaths and wounds to walkers and bikers, and even to drivers and their passengers. Every single bike lane.

          If you have statistics that show PPW is the one exception, rush to tell Iris Weinshall and her friends; they'd surely pay well for such valuable information

      •  Congestion pricing is a regressive tax (0+ / 0-)

        Progressives should oppose all regressive taxation IMO.  

        •  How u think that? (0+ / 0-)

          People who own cars by definition tend to have more assets than people who cannot afford cars. People who own homes in the suburbs tend to have much more assets than people who rent apartments in the inner city. Exceptions in every case, but get real.

          Taking money from drivers and use it to run more buses and subway trains ... redistributes from the haves to the have-nots.

          Compare the average income of subway riders to the average income of drivers coming across the free bridges.

          •  Since you make the claim (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            kishik

            you should provide the stats on the incomes of those using public transportation v. those driving into the city.  

            As a general priciple, any use tax is regressive because it imposes a greater burden as you move down the economic scale.  A $5 toll for someone making $100,000/yr reflects ).00005% of their income.  For someone earning $50,000, it is 0.0001% of their salary, which is twice the pecentage.  That is regressive.  A toll based upon income would not be regressive.  

            Your claims are not convincing because you provide no data to support them and they are incomplete.  I can assure you that there are poor people living in the suburbs.  They are not all home owners.  Additionally, many poorer NYers live in areas of the city that are not readily accessible by public transportation or they work in areas that are not readily accessible.  Many working class families in the city own cars.  They do not have high asset values.

            Finally, taking money from drivers does not restribute funds from the haves to the have nots per se.  There are many high earners who use public transportation to go to work as well.

            I assume your analysis is based upon people commuting from the north shore of long island or the suburbs into the city.  I would like to remind you that there are many NYC residents from the outer boroughs who use cars to come into the city not for work, but for recreation.  Aside from the regressive nature of a toll on the east river bridges, I think it is bad public policy to divide this city even further among the haves and have nots by closing off the bridges (except at great expense) to the working clas and working poor.  If congestion pricing were implemented, those commuting from the suburbs would not change their habits.  Indeed, less traffic would encourage them to commute because there would be less congestion.  The people whose quality of life would change would be those least able to absorb the additional cost of enjoying Manhattan.

            •  Wrapping the poor around you (0+ / 0-)

              We've heard these claims before during the fight over congestion pricing. Somebody made them up and others like you repeat them.

              By definition, people who are too poor to own cars will be riding buses and subways, walking, or biking. People rich enuff to drive cars may or may not also or sometimes use public transportation. But poor people are far, far more likely to do so because they have no other choice.

              Well, if any use tax is regressive to you, why shed your blood fighting the congestion tax? Why aren't you crusading against parking meters that charge the poor the same as the rich? Or against subway and bus fares which are one price for all?

              Why don't you go after some biggies that favor the rich even more, like, don't you think tickets for speeding, driving under the influence, hit-and-run, etc. should be aligned with income, not the same rich or poor? Since driving means to much to you, why are license plates all the same price and not more costly for the rich? Those bridge tolls, too, why should they be the same for the poor as for the rich? Present your W-2 forms when you get your E-Z Pass?

              At airports, should landing fees be the same for every plane, since landings and take-offs use about the same amount of FAA resources and the like, instead of being based per passenger, which tilts the table in favor of private jets and against commercial carriers?

              Now get out of your car and take a look around you. The poor and the working poor from the outer boros do not commute into Midtown Manhattan in single occupant cars, nor do they carpool. They take the subways and the buses.

              You are "borrowing the poor" to make this fake argument that congestion pricing is regressive and would hurt the poor. The money from congestion pricing was going to improve the transportation services used by poor people in every neighborhood in all five boros of the city, thereby uniting the majority of NYC households who do not own a car. The majority.

              As for as people with money enuff to drive their cars thru, no, to speed thru NYC -- on almost every arterial street and many side streets the average driver is exceeding the speed limit.

              So you want to keep speeding thru the neighborhood where I live -- trailing noise pollution and exhaust fumes, putting my life and limb at danger of death and mutilation by your car if I step off the curb (and often enuff when your car jumps the curb and kills people on the sidewalks). Well, I don't think I like that.

              Get out of your damn car and take the subway into the heart of the city like the poor people and I. That's a very egalitarian thing to do.

              •  I resent (0+ / 0-)

                your characterization of my position.  I do not use the poor as a "wrap" for my positions.  I never mentioned those who are too poor to own a car.  If you can't win the argument on its merits, you do not fare any better impugning the integrity of your opposition.  And your inability to refute my point- that use taxes are regressive- proves my point.  Instead, you try to divert with false claims.  

                As for the poor, I am well aware that a significant population of the city relies upon public transportation.  I advocate increased and better p.t.  Apparently, you suffer from the bourgeois mindset that if you own a car, you must be rich.  Yes, because all commodities belong to the bourgeoisie.  Your thinking it myopic at best; offensive, at worst.  I also never claimed that the working class and working poor commute by car into Manhattan to go to work.  Another misreading on your part.  

                I am not "borrowing the poor" because I never relied upon the poor for my argument.  You seem to want to avoid the denotative fact that congestion pricing is regressive.  Notably, you made no rebuttal to my claim on this point.  

                Your diversions to other use taxes (traffic fines are not taxes, by the way, they are penalties.  Furthermore, if I were to concede they are taxes, they are not "use" taxes.  That should be obvious.) is pointless.  The fact that other use taxes exist does not alter the fact that congestion pricing is a regressive use tax.  Do you understand that basic point of logic?

                It also does not follow logically that because I decry congestion pricing as a regressive (therefore, unacceptable) tax that I must necessarilt support speeding(!) through your neighborhood or any of the other problems that come with traffic.  

                Finally, you make the false assumption that I own a car.  I do not.  I have relied upon public transportation my entire life (save a 6 month period).  i would posit (not assume, like you) that I have probably been using public transportation for longer that you have been on this earth.  I sincerely asked in an earlier post whether you were raised in a large city, I think you have answered my question.

        •  Cost of driving falls on poor (0+ / 0-)

          Sadly, much of the external costs of driving seems to fall on the poor. Surveys of asthma rates are terribly high in traffic-heavy neighborhoods, like East Harlem around the entrances to the Triboro Bridge.

          In NYC, pedestrians are killed and wounded in large numbers by drivers, and from the write-ups it seems that most of the victims are poor, old, children.

          The cost of building free parking, usually mandated by city codes -- so many parking places per habitable units in a building -- runs from $10,000 to $40,000 in the City. Part of these costs for free parking spaces are passed along to all tenants in the buildings, whether they use the parking spaces or not, thereby pushing up average rents for non-drivers.

          Consider free street parking. What a wonderful privilege for drivers to be allowed to store their property at the curbside for free. But if I wanted to park a mobile home at curbside so as not to be homeless, or to stash a moveable storage shed to hold my surplus stuff, the defenders of the dollar eagle and the rights of drivers would tow my mobile home away and my ass to jail. Cars, yes, free parking. Home, no, go to jail.

          Noise pollution. When a driver honks a horn, the blast of noise pollution hits everyone walking, sitting, or standing around. It does not hit the driver as heavily, however, because the driver is in a well-insulated cocoon. You make noise, I have to hear it. Yeah, right. If you hear or see someone on the streets shouting "Shut up!" at honking taxis and other motorists, that's probably me. I mean it. Shut up! If you want to honk your damn horn, go back to Jersey where you belong. (Not intended as a compliment.) And don't get me going about car alarms, completely ineffective, but able to pollute whole neighborhoods with their hateful blaring.

          Meanwhile, when bike lanes are installed for a mile or so, drivers whyne about the loss of 17 or so parking spaces. When part of the streets passing thru Times Square are blocked to traffic and hundreds of people at every minute use the space to walk, to sit, to take pictures, to drink a beverage .. drivers complain. And Bill de Blasio is asked about the pedestrian plazas and replies, "I don't drive into Times Square." Bill, for one minute can you imagine yourself in the place of the millions of subway and bus users who don't own cars but somehow make it to Times Square? Or who leave their cars at home to go into the heart of the City. No, apparently he can't. Most drivers can't.

          •  Although I agree with some of your points (0+ / 0-)

            they are not germane to whether congestion pricing is regressive.  There are effective ways to combat these issues.  Congestion pricing does not do so.  On your most salient point re pollution in high traffic areas, the studies apparently indicate that traffic will always rise to the level available.  Thus, more lanes creates more traffic rather than eases congestion.  If this is true (I have not read the studies), congestion pricing will not ease congestion around the Triboro in Manhattan because the traffic will continue to flow at the same levels.    

            Re street parking, do the traffic regs prohibit mobile homes from parking on the streets.  I was not aware of that.  I am aware that the regs do not permit you to inhabit a space beyond a certain length of time.  

            The buildings in which parking is mandated are new, high-density builds.  The cost is therefore spread out among many units.  I don't have a problem with this because at the least it removes more cars from the streets when not being used.

            May I ask this question:  were you raised in a large city?  Your response would not affect the argument.  I ask out of curiosity because you are quite committed to your position.  As a lifelong urban resident who has owned only one car (for app. 6 months almost 30 years ago) and relied upon public transportation for all of my needs, I understand that traffic is just a natural component of urban life.    

            •  Growing old in NYC (0+ / 0-)

              I moved to NYC in 1966 and have lived here ever since -- half-owning a car with my bf for a little more than 6 months (until the insurance bill arrived and I realized that what we had budgeted to pay was only half what it was costing LOL).

              Anyway, almost half a century. And yes, I have paid a lot of attention to urban issues like architecture and transportation. For example, visiting London I've seen congestion pricing clearing the streets, making the buses move faster and crossing the streets safer for pedestrians).

              I'm also very interested in issues of race and economic justice.

              •  Well, the Brits have never met a regressive tax (0+ / 0-)

                that they didn't embrace warmly.  I lived in London for two years under congestion pricing and did not notice any streets being cleared.  For what it's worth, my colleagues did not notice any difference in traffic.  I had many discussions with them about a host of regressive taxes, many of which are endorsed by people who are liberal.  

  •  The point you make about the importance of (12+ / 0-)

    the Mayor of New York is a good one, and a true one: the Mayor of New York City governs more people than the Presidents and Parliaments of many countries.

    I resent that. I demand snark, and overly so -- Markos Moulitsas.

    by commonmass on Wed Aug 14, 2013 at 07:34:31 AM PDT

  •  Glad to see this - and though I can't vote (16+ / 0-)

    in the city anymore, family and friends can, and we are all on board for de Blasio, and have been from the beginning.

    Join us on the Black Kos front porch to review news and views written from a black pov—everyone is welcome.

    by Denise Oliver Velez on Wed Aug 14, 2013 at 07:45:17 AM PDT

  •  A generic governor of Alaska, let's say for eg.... (3+ / 0-)

    ....is responsible for the governance of less people than live in my neighborhood in Queens (going by the old postal designation that split Queens basically into only 3 or so areas: LIC, Flushing, and Jamaica)!

    Ayn sucks. Please know I am not rude. I cannot rec anything from this browser. When I rec or post diaries I am a guest at some exotic locale's computer.

    by Floyd Blue on Wed Aug 14, 2013 at 07:48:52 AM PDT

    •  That's certainly true, but (0+ / 0-)

      there is quite a bit of diversity in that small population, and very large distances to travel.

      "They did not succeed in taking away our voice" - Angelique Kidjo - Opening the Lightning In a Bottle concert at Radio City Music Hall in New York City - 2003

      by LilithGardener on Wed Aug 14, 2013 at 01:51:40 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  But there is more diversity in Queens. (0+ / 0-)

        However, the distance thing is still there.....

        Meanwhile the EX-guv i have in mind sucked at diversity issues.

        Ayn sucks. Please know I am not rude. I cannot rec anything from this browser. When I rec or post diaries I am a guest at some exotic locale's computer.

        by Floyd Blue on Thu Aug 15, 2013 at 04:34:55 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  Thanks BBB (3+ / 0-)

    nosotros no somos estúpidos

    by a2nite on Wed Aug 14, 2013 at 08:02:36 AM PDT

  •  De Blasio also tried to organize nationally agains (5+ / 0-)

    Citizens United.  Having his voice in the mainstream media mecca of NYC would be a great help in that regard as well.  

    If you're not talking about what billionaire hedgefund bankster Peter G. Peterson is up to you're having the wrong conversations.

    by Jacoby Jonze on Wed Aug 14, 2013 at 08:15:33 AM PDT

  •  You're 100% right about (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    shaharazade, Woody

    the race's importance. However, I don't buy many of the explanations upthread about why you haven't had a progressive mayor during, well, most of my lifetime (during which time cities like Houston and Salt Lake City have). Sure, NYC is diverse, and parts of Queens, SI, etc., have Republicans. And the kids move a lot. And then there's the wealth. . .

    Fine, but you consistently vote overwhelmingly Democratic in national elections. We're talking massive, lopsided landslide here. So it's the slippage between national and mayoral results that's key.

    Hope you fall on your burger and fries.

    by cardinal on Wed Aug 14, 2013 at 08:18:50 AM PDT

    •  nyc mayors..the gop ones (6+ / 0-)

      Are socially liberal. If they were not, they would lose. That simple. And MB was a d, then an r, then an I. People seemed to like that.

      "My Mom is my hero, my angel and I revere her to no end.." Christin, July 6, 2013

      by Christin on Wed Aug 14, 2013 at 08:22:08 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  The same is true, but in reverse... (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      cardinal

      ...in places like Kentucky (Dem governor but nearly 100% R representation in Washington). There I've heard it half-jokingly explained as "we like to keep our Dem pols closer to home where we can keep an eye on 'em.

      Not the case here, I don't think. Bloomberg was beatable for his third term, but Dems didn't have a strong, charismatic candidate to knock him off, no disrespect to Bill Thompson, who seems to be a nice enough guy.

      •  I disagree (0+ / 0-)

        the problem for Thompson is that the Dem party abandoned him.  The endorsements were tepid, if they arrived at all (see, e.g., Quinn) and the press touted the inevitability of a Bloomberg win throughout the duration of the campaign.  True, Thompson is not the most charismatic politician, but I place his loss on the shoulders of the Dem party.  Bloomberg used his money to quell any dissent.  

  •  electing a mature, balanced individual (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    shaharazade, ActivistGuy, Woody

    that will fight "city hall" would be great.

    someone who will fight militarization of police, privatization of the city's schools and prisons and remove armed guards from schools. someone who will make Wall Street cough up cash to maintain the city's infrastructure and find productive ways to aid people living on the edge.

    a savvy honest no-nonsense person... secular. sane. service-minded.

    and not tied to brand politics, but to citizens.

    you are right... NYC mayor or any local/regional elections are incredibly important.

    “You never change things by fighting the existing reality. To change something, build a new model that makes the existing model obsolete.” Buckminster Fuller

    by pfiore8 on Wed Aug 14, 2013 at 08:26:56 AM PDT

  •  although wary these last years, de Blasio (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    shaharazade

    articulates the challenges in a way that are almost music to my ears:

    Nearly 400,000 millionaires call New York home, while almost half of our neighbors live at or near the poverty line. Our middle class isn’t just shrinking; it’s in danger of disappearing altogether.
    yeah, I'm wary and not sold totally on St. Liz Warren...  however, i never lose faith that someone brave and tough will step up and begin to help us change this game. maybe he's the guy... i like his family. they look real.

    “You never change things by fighting the existing reality. To change something, build a new model that makes the existing model obsolete.” Buckminster Fuller

    by pfiore8 on Wed Aug 14, 2013 at 08:33:05 AM PDT

    •  The brave and tough people (3+ / 0-)

      have to be ourselves.  If we give off even a sercond's scent of weakness, of irresolution, of lack of understanding of our class self-interests, then the entire power structure recoups us immediately, pols and corporadoes only fight each other over carving us up.  We need to make it clear we've DONE our compromising, we've DONE our backing down, now it's the Overclass's turn.

      Clap On, Clap Off, The Clapper!

      by ActivistGuy on Wed Aug 14, 2013 at 09:18:38 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  as i've said many times (0+ / 0-)

        the heavy lifting will be left to us grunts on the ground.

        and while we may be done compromising, we haven't exactly turned that into exerting ourselves in positions like mayors and on town councils, there's not much we can do about police or prisons or schools.

        i'm just saying we could use a fresh breath of leadership... and if this guy is can exhibit leadership, then those of us tired of all the blah blah blah might take heart and plough into local politics ... but we need to be careful and stay out of people's private lives... yes, liberals I'm talking to you... and let's stay focused on the problems we have in common and how to express, describe, and spit ball ideas and ways of mitigating and solving those problems.

        i'd say it is time to steer clear of cultural issues for just the short term. they are killing the bigger species threatening issues.

        “You never change things by fighting the existing reality. To change something, build a new model that makes the existing model obsolete.” Buckminster Fuller

        by pfiore8 on Wed Aug 14, 2013 at 10:20:32 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  What's that about? (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      petral, happymisanthropy, orestes1963
      yeah, I'm wary and not sold totally on St. Liz Warren...
      There are serious limits to what she can change by herself in a system with 99 other Senators and an out-of-control filibuster, a nihilist House, and a President too enamored of Pete Peterson economics for our good.

      But, as a MA resident, I worked hard for her election and hoped to see a loud voice speaking out on issues I believe important, and a Senator who wouldn't sign on to every crappy deal Obama or Harry Reid pitched. So far she's met, or exceeded, those expectations. What's not to like? The woman's in her 60s and was making plenty of cash teaching law. It's not like she needed to do this for herself.

      "I am not for a return to that definition of Liberty under which for many years a free people were being gradually regimented into the service of the privileged few." Franklin D. Roosevelt, 1934

      by fenway49 on Wed Aug 14, 2013 at 09:22:58 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  well... (0+ / 0-)

        i totally dislike her foreign policy stance... a page right out of BushCo. not a good sign.

        while I like the causes (regulating banks, student loans), I am not sure if this isn't like Harry Reid trotting out the nuclear option on filibusters... I mean, there's a pattern of rah rah rah and then nada.

        and what really made me uneasy was her gushing about that fighter, John McCain. really?

        sorry. but I am jaded.

        “You never change things by fighting the existing reality. To change something, build a new model that makes the existing model obsolete.” Buckminster Fuller

        by pfiore8 on Wed Aug 14, 2013 at 10:10:53 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  You are jaded (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          orestes1963

          Not seeing "a page right out of BushCo" on foreign policy at all.

          Your other two points, in my view, contradict each other. I do NOT think Warren is anything like Harry Reid, making noise to placate the base and then caving. I think, if she could, she really would change things. But, as I said, one Senator can't pass legislation alone, so sometimes rah rah rah is all you have. I think her greatest value is (1) getting that bum Scott Brown out of there; (2) making noise on these issues and getting some media coverage of a more leftward position; (3) with any luck, being popular enough that voters in other states elect Senators of similar stripe. We need a lot more like her.

          But if you are going to pass legislation, you need a coalition. In today's climate you probably need a coalition with some Republicans. It's pretty damn hard to pass anything decent with the Republicans, but it's worth a shot if there is some common ground. Kissing McCain's ass a bit in a meaningless way doesn't bother me. I don't expect Liz Warren to fold on core principles just because she said a nice word or two about the guy.

          "I am not for a return to that definition of Liberty under which for many years a free people were being gradually regimented into the service of the privileged few." Franklin D. Roosevelt, 1934

          by fenway49 on Wed Aug 14, 2013 at 12:13:44 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  McCain eats it up (0+ / 0-)

            Sen McCain is an attention hog who loves compliments.

            So, please, feed him compliments. Trade him compliments by the railcar load for a vote, or even just a hush-up, here and there.

            If politicians were prevented from giving out insincere compliments, nothing would ever get done. (Sort of like now, LOL.)

    •  If you've got problems with Warren (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      fisher1028

      you don't know much about DeBlasio for sure.  DeBaslio has not yet demonstrated the level of commitment Warren has.  And I would venture he is much less intelligent and wise than she.  I would be okay with a DeBlasio mayoralty, but he is not a messiah.  The major problems in NYC, IMO, are stop and frisk and the cost of housing.  On the former, DeBlasio supports stop and frisk with changes to stop racial profiling (a position of more value in word than implementation, I would argue).  On housing, DeBlasio has been a friend to the developer cartel that has run roughshod over this city for the past 15 years at least.  

  •  help me with this... (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    merrywidow

    "Most Democrats do not have a vote in this year's City-wide election in New York"

    Huh? Why?

    Or did you mean "Most Democrats will not vote in this year's City-wide election in New York"??

  •  U forgot to mention, NYC is the seat of the UN. (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    petral, LilithGardener

    How typically American of you ;)

    •  NYC also economically connected to many countries (0+ / 0-)

      who send many visitors there, besides the foreign diplomats who visit the UN.

      Democratic Party governance of NYC can send messages to, and facilitate other interactions with, not only American but also foreign financial elites and professionals.

    •  On the East Side you can walk past the national (0+ / 0-)

      territories (diplomatically) of, for instance, Togo, Cuba, Malta, India and China.  The area from 34th to 53rd from 1st to Lex is packed with embassies.

      •  Not exactly embassies (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        petral

        Nitpicking, but those are Missions to the United Nations, usually with Consulates attached to handle trade, business, visas, etc. I think each country gets one Embassy, and it's always in D.C. It gets a number of Consulates bargained between the US and the other country. And for NYC, the bonus is, each country gets a Mission to the U.N.

        But point taken. This city is the capital of the world.

    •  And that's one security issue that many people (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Eric Nelson

      will never be able to comprehend. The only thing even close is the Olympics, but that's not even that close, IMO.

      When the UN General Assembly meets the city must accommodate security for hundreds of heads of state, or their top officials, all at the same time.

      Hundreds of Presidential Suites with their security details.

      "They did not succeed in taking away our voice" - Angelique Kidjo - Opening the Lightning In a Bottle concert at Radio City Music Hall in New York City - 2003

      by LilithGardener on Wed Aug 14, 2013 at 01:55:15 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Gracie's shutters are gorgeous. n/t (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    LilithGardener

    Difficult, difficult, lemon difficult.

    by Loge on Wed Aug 14, 2013 at 08:53:30 AM PDT

  •  "I'm still in there." (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Trix

    -- A Weiner

    Warren/3-D Print of Warren in 2016!

    by dov12348 on Wed Aug 14, 2013 at 09:10:53 AM PDT

  •  I'm so excited that de Blasio's leading! (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    brooklynbadboy, Eric Nelson

    And he's leading by a significant margin!

    Great post BBB.

    Rec'd.

  •  You raise an interesting point. (0+ / 0-)

    I may care who the next mayor of NYC is, but since I don't live there and we're not talking about a legislative body (e.g. who represents NYC in Congress), I don't feel like it's my place to get involved (which, let's face it, I wouldn't do anyway) or express an opinion with any claim on being taken seriously.

    You know, I sometimes think if I could see, I'd be kicking a lot of ass. -Stevie Wonder at the Glastonbury Festival, 2010

    by Rich in PA on Wed Aug 14, 2013 at 09:54:57 AM PDT

  •  "elections are about the future, not the past" (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Eric Nelson, LilithGardener

    I paraphrase Bill Clinton and I'm thinking that Bill de Blasio will be responsive to THE PEOPLE...if we organize and stay active.

    Thank you for this diary and the thread!

  •  As a non New Yorker (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Woody

    The first thing that comes to mind is, of course, Wiener jokes. Good luck guys.

  •  Truth be told (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Woody, orestes1963

    I was going to go for Bill Thompson.  I liked the way he gutsily still ran for mayor in 2009 even after Bloomberg's "Mugabe Moment", even though he (like Quinn) could have ran for a third term as Comptroller.  What's more, he almost beat Bloomberg. However, I'll have a second look at De Blasio.  I'm ABQ.  A gay mayor would be great ... but not her!

    "Valerie, why am I getting all these emails calling me a classless boor?"

    by TLS66 on Wed Aug 14, 2013 at 10:23:45 AM PDT

  •  If there had been no 911 and no Giuliani as (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    orestes1963

    "America's Mayor" pushing for Bloomberg, he would never have been elected.

    "Southern nights have you ever felt a southern night?" Allen Toussaint ~~Remember the Gulf of Mexico~~

    by rubyr on Wed Aug 14, 2013 at 10:38:06 AM PDT

  •  Concede the point, but.... (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    brooklynbadboy, Woody

    Out here in what the East Coast-centric national media annoyingly calls "The Heartland", practically everything that happens in New York is deemed to be of national importance. Every one of your blizzards leads the network news casts, even when that same front buried my hometown the previous day and was irrelevant then. Ditto times ten the speculation about your sports teams. It's impossible, even this year, to avoid hearing about the 4th place Yankees. And absolutely no one in my time zone cares about the Jets quarterback controversy.

    Did I mention the Yankees are in 4th place?

    We know that it isn't all irrelevant. We know that events like Hurricane Sandy or a plane crash in the Hudson and the like are actually legitimate national news. But most of what the Important People in Midtown Manhattan think the rest of the country should be interested in really isn't of interest to the rest of the country. So it's pretty easy for us to get jaded about a mayoral race in New York, even if it's actually important in the overall scheme of things. It all begins to feel like "Oh....New York again....whatever" even when in this instance, it matters, as you so eloquently point out.

    The Bush Family: 0 for 4 in Wisconsin

    by Korkenzieher on Wed Aug 14, 2013 at 11:06:57 AM PDT

  •  Other cities follow NYC's lead... (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    LilithGardener, OtherDoug

    I live in the SF Bay Area, but I can assure you that what happens in NY has a very strong influence on policy, even way out here. I'm even talking about local leaders in SF/Oakland advocating for stop and frisk. It's important.

  •  Question for New Yorkers: (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Eric Nelson

    What is a Public Advocate? I see people referring to DeBlasio with the title. Is that an official position? I sure like the sound of it.

    •  No one is sure what the public advocate (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      SixSixSix

      Is supposed to do.  The position was specifically created for Mark Green.  It sounds a lot better than it is.

    •  Yep. Its a city-wide elected office. (4+ / 0-)

      Doesn't come with a lot of power, which is concentrated in the hands of the Mayor. However, the PA does appoint members of various regulator bodies, has subpoena power to look into things, and sort of functions as a person to complain to about the City. And New Yorkers looooooooooove to complain.

      The PA can also introduce legislation in the City Council but can't vote.

    •  Somewhat like being the vice president. (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      SixSixSix

      First in line if mayor dies, is incapacitated or has to leave office. The position used to be called City Council President. When they changed to position back in the '90's, they gave the Public Advocate the nebulous task of investigating citizen's complaints about city services. It's a pretty powerless job, actually.

    •  A real position. (0+ / 0-)

      The Public Advocate serves as a minor check on the power of the mayor and council.  I've always thought of it like the tribunes in the Roman Republic, but less so.  Tribune Lite.

    •  During a charter revision (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      SixSixSix

      designed to shift power out of the hands of the mayor, the public advocate position was created as a watchdog for the people over governmental activity.  It was designed to give the people a more direct voice in government.  Mark Green was the first public advocate.  Unlike Chief Justice Marshall who famously defined the role of the supreme court in the Marbury decision, Green did not define the position in any meaningful way (which is not to say he wasn't an advocate).  Accordingly, the position has devolved into a cushy, essentially ceremonial position.  

      The charter revisions also gave additional powers to the city council, making it a more equal branch in city government.  Christine Quinn has turned the speaker's position into a de facto second mayor.  She controls all legislation that reaches the floor and has used the city council discretionary fund as a reward/punishment system for councilmembers' behavior.  She has also aligned herself with Bloomberg, ensuring that his proposals sail through the city council.  She does not broker dissent from the ranks.      

  •  relabeling racial profiling as Stop & frisk may.. (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    brooklynbadboy, Woody, LilithGardener

    ..have escaped notice, with bloomberg's money and backers influence, but Christine Quinn doesn't have the money to get away with that kind of thing.  
    New York Magazine - Published Oct 30, 2011

    Christine Quinn is holding a press conference at ground zero praising LGBT ironworkers—and promising that as mayor she will appoint Ray Kelly police commissioner for life. When reporters ask Quinn if this is another blatant pander to the business community, she says something about the wisdom of her 86-year-old dad and dashes to the parade.

    We could help Bill De Blasio by making this a top issue.

    Facts are out now.  

     • The crime rate in New york started coming down in the 90's and reached it's low point late 90's before Bloomberg took office. A crime rate he has repeatedly attributed to racial profiling "stop & Frisk"

    • Firearms being the Bloomberg stated goal and top reason for the S&P program; only 1.0% of stop and frisk of non-whites produce firearms.  A lower rate than for white males @ 1.4%

    Source MSNBC: The Last word with Lawrence O'Donnell 8 12, 2013

    Good deal BBB

    P.S. I'm supporting Bill de Blasio

    •  Rethinking Gun Control - It's Time (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Eric Nelson

      Some facts and policy points I've put together to support a new direction. I'm sick and tired of people getting shot on the flimsiest, "I thought he was reaching for a gun." It turns out that a majority of crime guns originate from legal sales out of state.

      Rethinking Gun Contro:l Surprising findings from a comprehensive report on gun violence. By William Saletan, Slate, Posted Monday, June 24, 2013. The article is a digest of the key findings of the The National Research Council's comprehensive review of gun violence, which was requested by President Obama in January this year.

      As you will read in the report, to reduce gun crime we will need to stem the flow of handguns from legal sales into the criminal market and across state lines. Trace the Guns looks at how guns flow into criminal hands, and defines a useful gun trafficking parameter, "short time to crime," as a gun that starts as a legal sale from an FFL and is recovered from a crime investigation within 2 years.

      For some interesting facts about the flow of guns across state lines, click on any of the links to see which of these laws have passed in your state, or consider The Low-Tech Way Guns Get Traced by Melissa Block, NPR, May 20, 2013


      1. Allows Criminal Penalties for Buying a Gun for Someone who Can't

      9 states have passed this law, and they export 9.5 crime guns per 100,000 inhabitants, while the other states export 15.6 crime guns per 100,000 inhabitants.


      2. Allows Criminal Penalties for Buying a Gun with False Information

      27 states have passed this law, and they export 9.9 crime guns per 100,000 inhabitants, while the other states export 19.9 crime guns per 100,000 inhabitants.


      3. Allows Criminal Penalties for Selling a Gun without a Proper Background Check

      25 states have passed this law, and they export 12.0 crime guns per 100,000 inhabitants, while the other states export 18.3 crime guns per 100,000 inhabitants.


      4. Requires Background Checks for all Handgun Sales at Gun Shows

      16 states have passed this law, and they export 7.9 crime guns per 100,000 inhabitants, while the other states export 19.8 crime guns per 100,000 inhabitants.


      5. Requires Purchase Permit for All Handgun Sales

      13 states have passed this law, and they export 6.2 crime guns per 100,000 inhabitants, while the other states export 19.2 crime guns per 100,000 inhabitants.


      6. Grants Law Enforcement Discretion in Issuing Concealed Carry Permits

      24 states have passed this law, and they export 9.6 crime guns per 100,000 inhabitants, while the other states export 19.9 crime guns per 100,000 inhabitants.


      7. Prohibits Violent Misdemeanor Criminals from Possessing Guns

      14 states have passed this law, and they export 7.1 crime guns per 100,000 inhabitants, while the other states export 18.7 crime guns per 100,000 inhabitants.


      8. Requires Reporting Lost or Stolen Guns to Law Enforcement

      7 states have passed this law, and they export 6.2 crime guns per 100,000 inhabitants, while the other states export 16.1 crime guns per 100,000 inhabitants.


      9. Allows Local Communities to Enact Gun Laws

      8 states have passed this law, and they export 4.4 crime guns per 100,000 inhabitants, while the other states export 18.2 crime guns per 100,000 inhabitants.


      10. Allows Inspections of Gun Dealers

      22 states have passed this law, and they export 11.5 crime guns per 100,000 inhabitants, while the other states export 17.2 crime guns per 100,000 inhabitants.

      Please note that Trace the Guns reports an analysis of crime gun traces from 2009, and was published in 2010, so it reflects the relative success of gun policy post-Heller v. D.C. and well before Moore v. Madigan.

      "They did not succeed in taking away our voice" - Angelique Kidjo - Opening the Lightning In a Bottle concert at Radio City Music Hall in New York City - 2003

      by LilithGardener on Wed Aug 14, 2013 at 02:06:25 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Bill DeBlasio does not oppose stop & frisk nt (0+ / 0-)
      •  Bill de Blasio has called "stop & frisk".. (0+ / 0-)

        ..methods, racial profiling;The Nation

        Finally, de Blasio has been one of the fiercest critics of the NYPD’s stop-and-frisk policy, which has seen hundreds of thousands of young black and Latino men wrongly detained and subjected to searches.

        And of the candidates, he has been the most vocal and persistent supporter of a bill to prohibit racial profiling and impose greater police oversight. He has also pledged to replace Police Commissioner Ray Kelly, who stubbornly defends stop-and-frisk.

        Right Wing National Review Online
        De Blasio also drew a parallel between stand-your-ground laws and the local controversy over the New York Police Department’s stop-and-frisk tactic, which he cited as another policy that produces “racial profiling,” at least as currently practiced by the NYPD.

         - emphasis added

        So you've got the same opinion coming form the Nation and from the RWNJ even agrees.
        •  I'm disappointed (0+ / 0-)

          in the Nation.  I expect better from them.  They equivocate in their endorsement.  John Liu is the only candidate who opposes stop and frisk.  Bill DeBlasio favors "reforming" stop and frisk.  See his website:

          http://www.billdeblasio.com/...

          The Nation elides his support for a racial profiling bill with an end to stop and frisk.  I find his bill a bit perplexing.  If he supports an end to stop and frisk, the racial profiling bill is unnecessary.  I took a break from my Nation subcription about 20 months ago.  I will not be going back.  Bummer.

  •  This is how well Democrats have done. (0+ / 0-)

    A Democrat has not won for Mayor in New York City since 1989.  That was 19 years ago.

    Since 1981 (32 years ago) the candidate nominated by the Republican party has won the mayors race in 6 of the last 8 elections.

    This year poll shows every serious Democratic contender with a huge lead against all the serious Republican contenders.  So did every poll 12 years ago.  Btw.  Polling in New York City politics is notoriously lousy.

    The lady was enchanted and said they ought to see. So they charged her with subversion and made her watch TV -Spirogyra

    by Taget on Wed Aug 14, 2013 at 02:29:27 PM PDT

    •  Your math is off (0+ / 0-)

      1989 was 24 years ago.  Also, the republican candidate won 5 of 8 of the last elections, not six.  If you include Koch's first term, the number shifts to 5 out of 9 were republicans.

      •  Koch for his second term was cross-endorsed. (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        orestes1963

        My point is for the last 30 years the Republican ballot line has been more successful in electing Mayors than the Democratic one.

        And you're correct.  24 years.

        The lady was enchanted and said they ought to see. So they charged her with subversion and made her watch TV -Spirogyra

        by Taget on Wed Aug 14, 2013 at 04:30:04 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  Thanks BBB. Can I add one observation? (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    orestes1963

    There's this obviously bizarre situation that one of the most Democratic cities in American has failed to elect a Democratic mayor since David Dinkins. And before that, Koch was dual registered as Democrat and Republican, the most liberal mayors we've have had were Republcan -- John Lindsay and Fiorello LaGuardia.

    The problem is that the municipal Democratic Party of New York City sucks lemons.

    Because they have a lock, they think they don't have to do anything, and that political office is a matter of waiting in line, while being on the take.

    It's soooooo fucking sad.

    Just over 30 years ago, I briefly covered city politics for the then black New York newspaper, the Amsterdam News, and the Democratic Party was and continues to be like the Communist Party of the Soviet Union under Leonid Ilyich Brezhnev in terms of its stupidity, conformity, corruption, and hackdom.

    But I'm very happy about Bill Deblasio. He's the best of the bunch and the best option we've had in a long time.

    And oh yeah, David Dinkins was the most under rated mayor New York has ever had.

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