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Deborah posted the what follows below the fold in the Kingwood Area Democrats group. She is a member of the age group that the right wing has convinced that the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare) is bad for them. Deborah has been fighting an uphill battle by writing op-eds in the local papers and speaking to whomever she could to enlighten them on Obamacare. She went to a financial planning seminar a few days ago and she recounts the following, below the fold.

The financial planner told a group of older voting Conservatives that Obamacare was good for their financial well-being. Ironically, a commenter on the post in the same age bracket had the same experience with another group. Now that reality has set in, money managers are advising baby boomers appropriately.

On Monday the New York Times had an excellent article titled “In New Health Law, a Bridge to Medicare.” It details the benefits for those retiring before they qualify for Medicare and the benefits for Americans with pre-existing conditions that had to stay on their jobs lest they would be left without health care. The following paragraphs from the article are prescient.

THE sweeping federal health care law making its major public debut next month was meant for people like Juanita Stonebraker, 63, from Oakland, Md., who retired from her job in a hospital billing office a year and a half ago.

She was able to continue her health insurance coverage from the hospital for a time, but when she tried to find an individual policy on her own, none of the insurers she contacted would cover her because she was diabetic.

“I didn’t even get to tell them about the heart attack,” said Ms. Stonebraker, who has been without health insurance since July. She is a little over a year away from qualifying for Medicare, the federal insurance program for people 65 and older. She now worries a recent hospitalization will leave her several thousand dollars in debt.

Under the Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare, insurers must now offer coverage to people like Ms. Stonebraker, and they will not be able to set the premiums they charge on the basis of someone’s health. Starting Oct. 1, she and millions of other Americans are expected to be able to buy one of the plans available through newly created online state marketplaces, or exchanges, for coverage that begins in 2014. For those with low incomes, subsidies are available to help pay premiums.

Does anyone know anyone over 50 without some pre-existing condition that an insurance company would not have used to deny coverage entirely or red-lined some pre-existing ailment from coverage?

At this point it is unnecessary to attempt to have any type of argument with Obamacare naysayers. This is the time for the enlightened to help relatives, neighbors and friends to navigate their health insurance head winds. One should encourage them to discuss their medical situation and where applicable hold their hands to assist in getting the coverage they need. One should encourage them to get their information from healthcare.gov and not from political radicals maligning the law.

In a state like Texas where more than 25 percent of the population is uninsured, every fourth person you are in contact with is likely uninsured and a fall or accident away from a bankruptcy inducing medical bill. Many of the uninsured are unaware that Obamacare is the law of the land and are unaware of the benefits that will materially make their lives better.

Given that when Americans are provided with the individual benefits of Obamacare they love it, one should personalize the way it is explained with the specific benefits one's relative, neighbor, or friend's need in such a manner that the benefits are stressed and not the politics. This will ultimately prevent that carnal resistance that can cause someone to make decisions against their own interest to save face.

Many part time workers will face employers like Trader Joe’s who may find it more economical to send those employees to state health insurance exchanges. While many corporations will blame Obamacare, over the years corporations have been offloading health care costs. One should explain that as more and more employees go to the exchanges the exchanges become more economical. Moreover not being tethered to the employer’s health care plan allows one to make decisions based on work satisfaction and not the requirement for health care.

Dissuade those opting for paying the penalty instead of premiums by reminding them that the new policies cover screenings at no additional charge. After all, many of the uninsured have been without insurance for many years and in need of physicals and screenings.

As Obamacare becomes more and more real to Americans, they won’t necessarily claim to like it. However, they will not want to give it up for an alternative that does not exist. They won’t leave it for financial insecurity. Henceforth that is the biggest fear of the Republicans that oppose the bill. Americans will see Republicans as a liability to their well-being if they continue to disparage a law they come to see as beneficial.

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Comment Preferences

  •  One sickness away from bankruptcy: (81+ / 0-)

    My small exposure to consumer bankruptcies had two types of people: 1) I lost my job; 2) I or someone in my family got sick.  

    Nor am I particularly worried about businesses dropping insurance.  If the exchanges and mandate work, then employer provided health insurance isn't even needed anymore, for anyone.  

    HEY COGNITIVE INFILTRATORS! I googled "confirmation bias" and Daily Kos raided my house! And and and smashed my hard drives! Ask CNN, it's all truthy!

    by Inland on Sun Sep 15, 2013 at 03:13:05 PM PDT

  •  I'm on Medicare and Obamacare is already (47+ / 0-)

    helping me.  I can get mammograms, physicals, diagnostic testing that I couldn't afford before.  The co-pay for a simple lab test 2 years ago was $95.  I finally got them to leave me alone by telling them Medicare paid what Medicare thought it was worth.  I can now afford healthcare.  It's a BFD.

    I'm not looking for a love that will lift me up and carry me away. A love that will stroll alongside and make a few amusing comments will suffice.

    by I love OCD on Sun Sep 15, 2013 at 03:20:35 PM PDT

    •  Thanks for the testimonial. We need more of (16+ / 0-)

      those here. Concrete examples that Obamacare IS an important step forward.

      "The soil under the grass is dreaming of a young forest, and under the pavement the soil is dreaming of grass."--Wendell Berry

      by Wildthumb on Sun Sep 15, 2013 at 03:23:32 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  OCD can you please expand on that. I am 2 years (8+ / 0-)

      away from Medicare and have been always told that I needed a supplemental policy to fill in the gaps. I have gone on my state's (Illinois) exchange and am told I don't qualify for additional insurance through the exchange when I retire.

      Do I need this supplemental insurance or not. Thank you.

      UID 35,098 Nov. 4, 2004. Seems like yesterday.

      by flatford39 on Sun Sep 15, 2013 at 03:34:46 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  The exchanges are not set up for those over 65. (13+ / 0-)

        If you are 63 now, you will be able to purchase insurance on the exchange for the next two years.  After 65 when you get Medicare you will be able to purchase a supplemental policy to cover expenses not covered by Medicare - a secondary policy.  You will purchase it privately - not on the exchanges.  

        We are all in this together.

        by htowngenie on Sun Sep 15, 2013 at 03:52:20 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  I believe Medicare pays 80 per cent, and the (15+ / 0-)

        supplemental private policy, which is usually reasonably priced, picks up the rest with perhaps some co-payments.  If your income will be modest, best to get the supplementary.  I know two people who have AARP and are happy with its coverage, but all supplementary policies are worth a look, including the HMOs.

        Building a better America with activism, cooperation, ingenuity and snacks.

        by judyms9 on Sun Sep 15, 2013 at 03:53:33 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  I have no supplemental, can't afford it. (8+ / 0-)

        I HAVE to have the damn policy for drugs cuz that's how the Republicans helped Seniors soooo much.  My mother had supplemental coverage that was worthless- they still left her with co-pays we struggled to pay.  

        What I have now is annual physicals with no co-pay, diagnostic tests with no co-pay, services like mammograms that were not covered at all.  I don't go to doctors much because their solution is always pills, but when I need one I can go, a huge relief.  

        I'm pretty sure hospital care will be much less expensive a few years into the ACA.  I know I wouldn't have had 3 MRI's 2 CT's, endless x-rays (after I fell) with the new Medicare rules in place.  I was in ICU for 5 days, then suddenly sent home with no follow-up care plan.  And no one spent enough time with me to get that I had no idea where I was, what happened, what the damage was.  I found out after 3 months I'd crushed a 2" section of my collar bone and would need PT.  fortunately I thought it was cracked and went back to playing the organ 3 days after I got home.  I probably would be impaired otherwise.  They wanted another $40,000 dollars from me.  Right!  I can't afford a mammogram, where do I get that kind of money?  

        I'm not looking for a love that will lift me up and carry me away. A love that will stroll alongside and make a few amusing comments will suffice.

        by I love OCD on Sun Sep 15, 2013 at 04:30:54 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Medicare Part D (4+ / 0-)

          is the Achilles heel  of Republican deficit argument.  Bush and the Republican establishment created one of many unfunded mandates in Medicate Part D.  Because of Republican insistence, the US government has to pay retail for drugs, so a program that could have had a minimal cost instead increased the deficit a trillion dollars over 10 years. Now they against a program that all objective observers agree is going to reduce the deficit and potentially make government health care solvent.  Which is the problems. The entirety of the conservative strategy is to make as much of the government insolvent as possible.

          •  When Bush made that huge gift to Big Pharma (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            flatford39

            what killed me was that not only was there no volume negotiations allowed, which meant that the government had to pay top price, they also made sure that getting drugs more cheaply from other countries was illegal. The rational was that such drugs couldn't possibly be counted on to be of good quality.

            I wonder what that backwards, third-world nation, Canada, thought about that rationale!

            Freedom has two enemies: Those who want to control everyone around them...and those who feel no need to control themselves.

            by Sirenus on Mon Sep 16, 2013 at 07:39:11 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

    •  The argument I hear from the doctors though is (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      on the cusp, qofdisks

      that insurance companies are responding to this by making procedures that used to be covered not covered so doctors are frustrated when the expense for tests that used to be routine are now not allowed.

      "Pulling together is the aim of despotism and tyranny. Free men pull in all kinds of directions.” --Lord Vetinari

      by voracious on Sun Sep 15, 2013 at 03:36:32 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  remember that doctors and you and the ACA might (13+ / 0-)

        all have different goals.

        My docs are into making money and moving on to the next patient ASAP

        The ACA is into not paying for useless tests that only generate income for Drs.

        You want good medical care at an affordable price.

        “Conservation… is a positive exercise of skill and insight, not merely a negative exercise of abstinence and caution…” Aldo Leopold

        by ban nock on Sun Sep 15, 2013 at 03:53:25 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  You personally know these doctors? (10+ / 0-)

        I'd like to know what kind of doctors they are and what kind of tests they are.  

        Having an 86 year mother, 88 year father, and 91 year old mother in law, I've experienced first hand doctors who take advantage of Medicare and order unnecessary tests.  If the Medicare is coming down on them, good for Medicare.  Somebody needs to be watching.  

        Is that what you are referring to here?  Because ACA hasn't started yet, the medical advisory board hasn't even been formed yet.  

        Please clarify.

        We are all in this together.

        by htowngenie on Sun Sep 15, 2013 at 03:56:41 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Just last week my 92 yr. old Aunt was told (4+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          htowngenie, Philpm, on the cusp, Matt Z

          by her very young MD cardiologist that she needs a stint somewhere, where it is only 52% closed. She sits in a wheelchair all day long. Otherwise she is very healthy, no reason to put her through that....its greedy doctors.

          "Compassion is the keen awareness of the interdependence of all things." Thomas Merton

          by createpeace on Sun Sep 15, 2013 at 04:01:15 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Every individual case is different and it's (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            on the cusp

            between the patient and the doctor to decide.  

            We are all in this together.

            by htowngenie on Sun Sep 15, 2013 at 04:12:10 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

          •  Your Aunt (0+ / 0-)

            Seen above, was a comment from a nurse in an ICU wondering why a 90+ year person was being "saved" from death from 3 different fatal diseases.
            Something along the line of "when the lord calls, how loud are you going to shout no?
            I know that at that age (or hell even if FSM forbid at 70) I'm done with good health and can just move on, it will be good.  Palliative care would be welcome...  

        •  I have to say, your second to the last paragraph (0+ / 0-)

          hit a big nail right on the head.

          On Facebook, I'm seeing all sorts of things being blamed on "Obamacare." I keep having to point out that most provisions of the ACA aren't going into effect until January.....so exactly how is it causing, right now, all these massive premium hikes and doctors getting out of medicine and hospitals going out of business, etc, etc.?

          Oh, the trolls are busy.....

          Freedom has two enemies: Those who want to control everyone around them...and those who feel no need to control themselves.

          by Sirenus on Mon Sep 16, 2013 at 07:43:46 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

    •  Could you explain how that works (6+ / 0-)

      and what the ACA has to do with Medicare in your case?

      I've had Medicare for  12 years and have supplemental insurance to cover the 20% Medicare does not pay.  The two have always paid for yearly mammograms and every imaginable test.  

      So I'm assuming from your comment that you have no supplemental but have been able (at least in one case) to get all your health providers to write off the 20%?  I don't know of anything in the ACA that provides for such a benefit but I'd like to take advantage of it I you can point the way.  

      My situation aside, I think once Obamacare is fully implemented it will be embraced and cherished as is Medicare and SS.  But admittedly it's a hard sell when organizations Like Heritage are all out all over the country trying to destroy it with deception and outright lies.

      Recently I saw Jim Demented at a meeting shown on C-span joking he was sorry so many people had to stand against the walls.  "We got a room for 500 even though we knew more would come so everyone could get an idea how going to the doctor would be like under Obamacare"  Ha Ha

      "Anyone who thinks Obama is like Nixon is a moron. More than that, a F###ING moron". Kos, 5-24-13

      by Lying eyes on Sun Sep 15, 2013 at 03:55:48 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  I wasn't able to get mammograms paid for (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Radiowalla, qofdisks

        under Medicare, they wanted cash.  Wish I knew how you got them.

        I'm not looking for a love that will lift me up and carry me away. A love that will stroll alongside and make a few amusing comments will suffice.

        by I love OCD on Sun Sep 15, 2013 at 04:34:54 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Wow.............. (4+ / 0-)

          That's awful. Just not right.  Medicare has always paid (80% of the amount they set) for mammograms.  I never did anything different from any of my medical needs.  Make an appointment, show your card, simple as that.  Anyway, whatever the circumstances I'm glad you're getting them now.  Two years after I turned 65, my routine mammogram turned up breast cancer but because I had them every year it was caught in an early stage and an outpaitient lumpectomy and 7 weeks of radiation took care of it. It's ten years later and I still get one every year.

          btw, call Medicare if you have doubts or questions about anything.  It's amazing how you can usually get them on the phone with little wait time and they're usually very helpful.  1-800-633-4227

          "Anyone who thinks Obama is like Nixon is a moron. More than that, a F###ING moron". Kos, 5-24-13

          by Lying eyes on Sun Sep 15, 2013 at 05:03:16 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

    •  Ditto here. Annual physicals under (4+ / 0-)

      Medicare are now no-charge.  The monthly premiums for my Medicare Advantage plan were reduced after PPACA kicked in.

      Not a big deal, but helpful, especially for low-income seniors.

      I can't help it. I love the state of Texas. It's a harmless perversion. - Molly Ivins

      by rsmpdx on Sun Sep 15, 2013 at 05:21:21 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  right wing will fail (13+ / 0-)

    in this miserable attempt to terminate aca.  in the process they will make new enemies.

    "The real wealth of a nation consists of the contributions of its people and nature." -- Riane Eisler

    by noofsh on Sun Sep 15, 2013 at 03:28:46 PM PDT

  •  I wish Obamacare would happen for me... (9+ / 0-)

    I work part time, don't qualify for benefits at my job as a result. But my state's not expanding Medicaid to cover working poor people (without children), and not running state exchanges, so I still will be without health coverage after January 1st.

    Sigh.

    "Fast, Cheap, and Good... pick two." - director Jim Jarmusch

    by AnnCetera on Sun Sep 15, 2013 at 03:30:22 PM PDT

    •  If your state isn't running an exchange then (20+ / 0-)

      you'll have a chance to participate in the federal exchange just like Texans. I think Rick Perry's decision to not have a state exchange will backfire on the Republicans.

      "I agree with you, I want to do it, now make me do it!" ~ FDR

      by JC Dufresne on Sun Sep 15, 2013 at 03:48:35 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Okay... (7+ / 0-)

        But will I be able to afford it? In June and July my entire paychecks went to cover COBRA and out of pocket maximums for health insurance. This is insane!

        "Fast, Cheap, and Good... pick two." - director Jim Jarmusch

        by AnnCetera on Sun Sep 15, 2013 at 03:50:26 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  to find out how much the govt will cover you could (7+ / 0-)

          use a calculator online. My state plan is down right now but they are very similar for all states. What you want to find out is your subsidy, in other words how much the govt is going to help out on your plan.

          “Conservation… is a positive exercise of skill and insight, not merely a negative exercise of abstinence and caution…” Aldo Leopold

          by ban nock on Sun Sep 15, 2013 at 03:58:24 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  The answer is "not enough". (4+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Lujane, Willa Rogers, AnnCetera, qofdisks

            For the working poor the subsidies are very often not enough to make health insurance affordable on the Exchanges.

            Which is why there is a large expansion of Medicaid, which will provide health care for all of those working poor who, even with the subsidies, can't afford health insurance on the exchanges.

            Unless you live in a state that doesn't expand medicare.  Then you're still required by law, under threat of fines, which are administred at the federal level, to have health insurance, even if you CAN'T afford it on the exchanges.

            And that's the problem.  

            "It puts the lotion on its skin, or it gets the GOP again." - The Democratic Party (quip courtesy of Nada Lemming and lotlizard)

            by Rick Aucoin on Sun Sep 15, 2013 at 04:08:19 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  Not true. (8+ / 0-)

              If you live in a state that did not accept expanded Medicaid and you fall into that group who earn between 100-138% of poverty line, you will be EXEMPT from purchasing insurance or paying a fine.  

              We are all in this together.

              by htowngenie on Sun Sep 15, 2013 at 04:38:30 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  It's those below... (2+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                on the cusp, AnnCetera

                ...100 percent of the FPL who are s.o.l. The way PPACA is written, there's no provision for them in the state that don't expand Medicaid.

                (If a new solution has been found to this, I'm all ears. As of a month ago, this was what I knew to be true. Maybe there's been a rule change since then?)

                •  Actually, it's a coverage gap for those who fall (2+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  AnnCetera, True North

                  between 100-138% for FPL, which was exactly the point of expanding Medicaid: to help the working poor.

                  Most people who live in states who haven't expanded Medicaid haven't figured it out yet, but I suspect there will be hell to pay when they do.

                  "Let us not look back to the past with anger, nor towards the future with fear, but look around with awareness." James Thurber

                  by annan on Sun Sep 15, 2013 at 06:37:11 PM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

              •  However if you live in a state that did not (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                Rick Aucoin

                accept expanded Medicaid and you fall into the group that is below 100% of the poverty line (but can't get Medicaid because you don't have kids) then you will NOT BE EXEMPT from purchasing insurance or paying a fine.  Most likely they will just try to take the fine out of your food stamps or something.

                You have watched Faux News, now lose 2d10 SAN.

                by Throw The Bums Out on Sun Sep 15, 2013 at 08:24:50 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

            •  Hmmm... I'm confused about this. I thought that (0+ / 0-)

              fines/fees/penalties for the individual mandate are not going to be imposed, even if health insurance is not actually purchased.  Wasn't that one of the sticking points that had to be negotiated before many of our chicken-livered "moderate" Dems would finally get on board?

              Anyone else know the status of that?

              •  If you're too broke for insurance... (5+ / 0-)

                ...and don't qualify for subsidies, you aren't fined. But you also aren't insured, in those instances.

                •  Thank you. But, now I'm even more confused. If (2+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  annan, AnnCetera

                  you're too broke for insurance, why wouldn't you be able to qualify for subsidies?  

                  Or, is it a case of earning enough income on paper, but actual monthly expenses  or debt-to-income ratios leaving  too little money remaining to actually purchase the insurance?

                  •  I'm not sure. (2+ / 0-)
                    Recommended by:
                    AnnCetera, awcomeon

                    It's one of those loopholes for which we need to get a definitive answer/reason before trying to explain it to our families and friends.

                  •  It's a coverage gap that Medicaid expansion (2+ / 0-)
                    Recommended by:
                    AnnCetera, awcomeon

                    was designed to cover: the working poor who earn between 100-138% of FPL.

                    For a single person without children Medicaid is currently not available and ACA subsidies don't kick in until you earn about $15,000.

                    This coverage gap is going to be a real problem.

                    "Let us not look back to the past with anger, nor towards the future with fear, but look around with awareness." James Thurber

                    by annan on Sun Sep 15, 2013 at 06:39:48 PM PDT

                    [ Parent ]

                    •  Ohhhh....that explains it much more clearly. I am (1+ / 0-)
                      Recommended by:
                      annan

                      so angry at the despicable, hateful actions of the GOP wingers and their enablers (on both sides of the aisle) who deliberately hurt needy men, women, and children by denying them the knowledge, and access to programs that are designed to alleviate a little of their suffering.  

                      Refusing to implement the Medicaid expansion feature is simply designed to insure political failure of the ACA, regardless of how many families are devastated by those refusals to act.

                      I absolutely despise the GOP evil and cruelty.

                      Thank you so much for responding.

            •  8% exemption (0+ / 0-)

              Any taxpayer who cannot find essential minimum insurance for less than 8% of income, taking the subsidies into account, is exempt from any penalty.

              Use whatever income figure you have in mind and just do the math. Did you come up with a number for the premiums that looks like something an insurance company would charge?

        •  My wife and I are on my COBRA and I used the (11+ / 0-)

          online calculator. According to that, we'll save about $500/mo. That will help us immensely.

          •  No Income and 55+? (0+ / 0-)

            You will get auto enrolled in Medicaid.  No subsidized insurance gambling for you.  You get a collateral loan which you just pay back from your assets at death.  Such a deal!  Thanks Obama!

            Why Digby & Krugman are wrong.

            Collateral Loan

            [I]f an Exchange determines you are eligible for Medicaid, you have no other choice. Code for Exchanges specifies, “an applicant is not eligible for advance payment of the premium tax credit (a subsidized plan) or cost-sharing reductions to the extent that he or she is eligible for other minimum essential coverage, including coverage under Medicaid and CHIP.” Therefore, you will be tossed into Medicaid unless there are specific rules as to why you would not be eligible. If you are enrolled in a private plan through an Exchange and have been receiving a tax credit, and your income decreases making you eligible for Medicaid, in you go. If you are allowed to opt out because you don’t want Medicaid, you will have to pay a penalty for being uninsured unless you can afford to purchase insurance in the open
            market. ...
            Such a deal for the 55+-65 crowd!
            •  you don't have to pay back medicaid (0+ / 0-)

              my kids are on it.

              It was part of the expanded CHIP.

              “Conservation… is a positive exercise of skill and insight, not merely a negative exercise of abstinence and caution…” Aldo Leopold

              by ban nock on Sun Sep 15, 2013 at 06:33:03 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  Wrong. (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                AnnCetera

                At 55+ program turns into just a collateral loan.  Younger?  You are a targeted demographic (voter).  To happyville you go.  55+?  You will not be able to give your kids the house.  Read the links.

                •  It's ok for you to delude yourself with R wing (1+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  True North

                  scare misinformation but you shouldn't drag others down that worm hole with you.

                  “Conservation… is a positive exercise of skill and insight, not merely a negative exercise of abstinence and caution…” Aldo Leopold

                  by ban nock on Sun Sep 15, 2013 at 08:07:40 PM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

                  •  Ban, What proof do you need? (0+ / 0-)

                    Here is New Jersey...

                    • Medicaid benefits received on or after age 55 are subject to estate recovery. This is specifically stated and acknowledged on the authorization page of the PA-1G Medicaid Application Form.
                    • DMAHS has an immediate right to recover from the estate unless there is a surviving spouse or child(ren) who is under age 21 or who is blind or permanently and totally disabled. Should any of these exceptions to DMAHS’ right to recover from an estate no longer apply (e.g., death of surviving spouse, attainment of age 21 by surviving child, or death or termination of disability of blind or permanently and totally disabled child), DMAHS has a right to recover from any remaining estate assets at that time.
                    • Estate recovery in New Jersey includes payments for ALL services, not merely services for institutionalized clients. There is no limitation on the type of service for which DMAHS can recover its payments from estates including managed care (HMO) capitation fees. However, effective January 1, 2010, Medicare cost-sharing benefits paid under the Medicare Savings Programs such as “Buy-in”, Specified Low-Income Medicare Beneficiaries (“SLMB”) or Qualified Individuals (“QI-1”) are not subject to estate recovery.
                    DSHS pdf.
                    WHOSE ESTATES ARE SUBJECT TO RECOVERY?

                    Recoveries may only be made from the estates of deceased recipients who were 55 or older when they received Medicaid benefits or who, regardless of age, were permanently institutionalized. However, states may exempt recipients if their only Medicaid benefit is payment of Medicare cost sharing (i.e., Medicare Part B premiums).

                    If a state has elected to impose TEFRA liens12 on recipients’ homes, then it must also recover from the estates of those recipients. States may impose liens on property of Medicaid recipients of any age if they are permanent residents of a nursing home or other medical institution, and if they are expected to pay a share of the cost of institutional care.

                    Just use the google and you will find every state has coverage of this Federal requirement.  I know you are an enthusiast for free Medicaid, but the program shifts to a loan after 55!
                    •  links to a modern source that address the specific (0+ / 0-)

                      issue of medicaid to 55+ under the ACA.

                      Your first source is extremely doubtful, it reads like some of the stuff I read here. Web sites from partisan sources whether L or R always cause me to be sceptical.

                      The R feeds on scare even more than the L.

                      “Conservation… is a positive exercise of skill and insight, not merely a negative exercise of abstinence and caution…” Aldo Leopold

                      by ban nock on Mon Sep 16, 2013 at 04:33:51 AM PDT

                      [ Parent ]

                      •  Nothing has changed under ACA. (0+ / 0-)

                        Don't take my word just call the O'care question hotline or ask online about it.  You are projecting free lifetime Medicaid into O 'care.  After 55+ it's going to eat everything you have.

                        That is why we need single payer non profit healthcare like in Canada where there is no medical bankruptcy.

                      •  Found link for Colorado. (0+ / 0-)

                        Colorado Medicaid Estate Recovery alive and well.  Will post it when I can...

                        •  Colorado Obamacare/Medicaid Estate Recovery (0+ / 0-)

                          Link to Colorado O'care Estate Recovery

                          Estate Recoveries

                          The Estate Recovery project is a federally mandated program that requires the State to recover the cost of benefits paid on behalf of a Medicaid client from their estate. Estate recovery is handled primarily 2 ways. First, liens can be placed on property owned by the Medicaid client if it has been determined that this individual is unlikely to return home from a nursing facility. Second, upon the death of certain Medicaid clients, Medicaid files a claim against the estate of this client for the Medicaid benefits paid on his/her behalf.

                          For more information:
                          Estate Recoveries

                          Or contact: Mark Seevers Mark.Seevers@state.co.us
                           

                          Mark will no doubt be able to answer all your questions!  Please report back to us!
                    •  Interesting and sad.... (0+ / 0-)

                      however, looking at the link you provided above, DSHS.pdf these rules appear to predate the ACA, said link is dated 2005.  I should not be stunned that we would do that to people over 55 who have been on Medicaid but I am.  :-/

                      Looks like a problem which if it's not been addressed needs to be.

                      As an aside, I'm trying to extrapolate the reasoning behind these Medicaid estate rules, it seems logical to assume that someone poor enough to need Medicaid at the age of 55 isn't going to have much of an estate to worry about it.

                      Getting blood from turnips comes to mind.

                      •  Obamacare Enthusiastically Incorporated Clawback. (0+ / 0-)

                        It is a feature of the program.

                        •  Evidence .... (0+ / 0-)

                          of this beyond very creative rhetoric?

                          It doesn't make sense, even in your own quoted material below:  "However, it is clear that the much-vaunted savings have not become a reality."  So no real monetary incentive there.

                          Furthermore the links you provided clearly cite state level initiatives, not federal.

                          Therefore I'm not buying that it's been 'enthusiastically' incorporated in any way.

                          It does sound like it could be a problem though, which needs to be addressed.

                          •  Call your Navigator! (0+ / 0-)

                            Use the web question format to find the answer.  Clawback has been seen as a problem from day one.  Remember it was Democrats who passed it in '93 on a partisan vote with Al Gore breaking the tie.  It's a neoliberal standard which of course is part of O'care by design.  Good luck trying to change it!

                          •  States respond to FEDERAL MANDATE. (0+ / 0-)

                            Passed by Democrats in 1993...  It has long been a barbaric requirement placed on steroids in O'care.

                          •  It's not.... (0+ / 0-)

                            logical though.  If it's not going to provide a benefit to the gov't (i.e. savings/funds) why would they 'enthusiastically' embrace it now? Additionally if it's of no benefit to the program, people or the feds then it shouldn't be 'that' hard of a problem to correct.

                            Anyhoo, I don't know you and therefore can't tell what your motives are BUT I really do think it's good that you bring this to light.  Problems cannot be fixed if we aren't aware of them.  ;-)

                            ACA is going to be implemented.  Good things will come of it and problems will crop up and have to be addressed. The anti-everything-Obama crowd will point to those problems with loud 'I told you so's'.  They'll get fixed and the cycle will repeat until most of the bugs are ironed out. That's just life!

                          •  This is where (0+ / 0-)

                            All the laid off and no longer employable 55+-65 year olds are going to end up.  It amounts to a huge wealth extraction regime.  Remember the means test for Medicaid eligibility has been waived.  Now, if you have savings, a house but no income you will be placed in Medicaid.  You can't buy a pos insurance plan with a subsidy.  Your income makes you not eligible.  (i.e. not enough).
                            I suggest you expand your horizons a little.  Start reading Naked Capitalism and Correntewire.
                            Naked Capitalism

                            Correntewire

                            Warning these are not enthusiast sites.  You may learn some unpleasant facts.

                            Disclosure:  I am enrolled in Medicare, 67 yoa, and also pay for supplemental coverage through my union TH plan.  I have good health care now.  But all of us are under attack.

                            Read this:

                            Throwing the over 55′s into Medicaid and taking their property to pay for it is very reminiscent of the workhouse and relief rules the Irish had to contend with [in the potato famine]. If you had a quarter acre of land, you were not too poor to support yourself. In order to get any kind of relief at all, you had to give that up. Then you were eligible for the workhouse where you might get some food in exchange for losing every other possession you had. In the Medicaid opt-out states, you won’t even get relief. You’ll just get access to the emergency room and bill collectors. Back in the 1840s, most people looked upon this as wretched and bad but the ones who were not suffering put up with it. Opting out of Medicaid is like the landlords pulling down the roofs of starving tenants. It happened and people were both homeless and starving but no one stopped the billhooks.
                          •  Well Dicken's would be proud.... (0+ / 0-)

                            of your vivid explanation however it still has nothing to do with the ACA.  You're trying to conflate the ACA with problems which may or may not really exist in addition to imputing the worst possible outcomes.

                            I also note your admission that you're on medicare, congrats, you got yours eh?  

                            In the meantime I guess you'd have the 55 and overs go without because of a potential worst case possible scenario then? A possible, potential, worst case scenario that you also say would be near impossible to fix!

                            Really, you bring up wealth extraction in the context of the ACA too?  How about the fact that a hip replacement surgery in the U.S. costs upwards of $100K and in Belgium at a top notch hospital with better outcomes then many U.S. hospitals it's under $15K?  Now that's wealth extraction right here in the good ole US of A.  Or the same name brand medicine my cousin gets in Canada costs 2/3rds the amount of what I would pay.  Isn't that the real wealth extraction?  What about that 56 year old that got laid off and then diagnosed with cancer and has to file bankruptcy.  That's not wealth extraction?

                            I'm not saying the ACA is perfect, far from it, but thanks to the a-la-cart profit taking at every level of our health care system that's where the real wealth extraction takes place.  You are the one who should expand his/her horizons.

                          •  Medicare for All! (0+ / 0-)

                            100% for single payer here.  I'm only 20 minutes from Canada here in Bellingham WA so I know how it works.   ACA is imo just a joke doing nothing to lower costs outside of cutting benefits.  The rentiers still get their 30% off the top.
                            Read all the Correntewire links I posted and we will talk some more.

                          •  Well I am with you... (0+ / 0-)

                            on that!  Medicare for all...BUT...if you read my post, the last comment at the bottom as of this moment, persons like my friend and our conservative legislators is why we don't have it.

                            ACA is a HUGE compromise for the private sector because too many people in this country are worried some 'undeserving' person may get health care for free that the shouldn't (a.k.a. the socialism boogey man).  The conservatives in power have no reason to fight that meme.

                            Now my turn for disclosure.  I'm the poster child for everything that's wrong in our healthcare system.  I'm self employed, just turning 50 and have been struggling in what I call the 'private insurance shark tank' for many years, as did my mother and father before me.  All these years people like me and my family have been asking for help.  We've been raked over the coals and every effort to make changes was thwarted, every call for change or reform tossed aside and the problems got worse and worse.

                            I was born with a heart murmur.  I don't need meds for it but talk to an insurance company and you'd think I was on death's door step.  My insurance rates have been going up relentlessly since long before Pres. Obama and the ACA.  My father, after being diagnosed with HBP couldn't find insurance.  BCBS said they would take him but not cover his HBP or any heart problems for two years and then he would be covered.  For two years he paid and then after the two year mark they jacked up his rates so high he couldn't afford the policy.  They pushed him out with pricing and he was back to square one.

                            Like I said, the ACA is monstrosity mostly due to the concessions made to the profiteers but that doesn't mean we can't make things better.  I know of people who have already benefitted, such as my friend who was able to keep her child on state Medicaid even though she is now over 18 years old, her daughter has a learning disability and probably will not be able to have a good job with benefits. So for her and her daughter this has been literally a life saver.  

                            So we're stuck with this huge concession to the private health care industry and we're going to have to make it work as best we can.  Which means highlighting potential problems as you have done, but we can't use problems like that to put a complete stop to the ACA.  It's an ugly baby but it's better then what we had before and hopefully it'll turn into something like medicare for all!

                          •  Canada saves $600 billion/year. (0+ / 0-)

                            Everyone covered, no copays or deductibles, no medical bankruptcy.  Costs average around 6k per participant/year.  Let's go straight to single payer!
                            If I could just make one change right now I would reduce eligibility for medicare to 50.  I have been lucky to work in one industry to retirement while many of my friends have passed on due to the health hazards in the work.  Asbestos, fumes, accidents, all have taken their toll.  The medicaid situation for the 55+-65 is simply barbaric.  I don't see O'care evolving to anything without a strong movement straight to single payer.  Where I sit, so far from God and so close to the USA.  Just 20 minutes North there is happyville!

                          •  I respect... (0+ / 0-)

                            your intentions completely but we gotta face reality.  We aren't in Canada** and culturally we're very different. There are too many people like my friends and neighbors here in GA who really are willing to cut their noses off to spite their faces or are just flat out ignorant (heck I personally know people on Medicaid who refuse to admit they are on Medicaid).  That's the real problem, our cultural hang ups..

                            So we have to deal with that reality.  Rolling back ACA will just leave us back with absolutely....nothing.... unless there's a big shift culturally soon and I don't see that happening.

                            (**btw I don't know that I'd call Canada happyville LOL!, they have problems too, nothing is perfect but at least they aren't as hung up worrying about if the guy next door is getting healthcare he somehow doesn't 'deserve'.)

            •  Do you have a real source for that? (0+ / 0-)

              splashoil, I clicked on the link and it went to a blog.

              Do you have a link to an authoritative source?

              •  Yes, You can just google.... (0+ / 0-)

                Medicaid Estate Recovery 55+.  I found the pdf online and provided it to Lambert.

                US DSHS pdf....

                The main features of the OBRA ‘93 Medicaid estate recovery mandate are described below.7

                Highlights of the 1993 Estate Recovery Mandate:

                States must pursue recovering costs for medical assistance consisting of:

                Nursing home or other long-term institutional services;
                Home- and community-based services;
                Hospital and prescription drug services provided while the recipient was receiving nursing facility or home- and community-based services; and
                At State option, any other items covered by the Medicaid State Plan.
                At a minimum, states must recover from assets that pass through probate (which is governed by state law). At a maximum, states may recover any assets of the deceased recipient.

                Much of the original enthusiasm for mandatory estate recovery was based on the results in Oregon, where estate recovery was implemented in the 1940s as part of a comprehensive program to help senior citizens keep enough money to meet their own needs and protect their assets from unscrupulous uses by others.8 An extraordinary jump in Medicaid savings was predicted if all states were to follow the Oregon model.9 A more recent study estimates that one state (Nebraska) could increase Medicaid savings fivefold if it adopted all of Oregon’s estate recovery practices.10 However, it is clear that the much-vaunted savings have not become a reality. In 2003, estate recoveries amounted to $330 million, or 0.13% of total Medicaid spending in all states, with individual state collections ranging from 0.0 - 0.64%.11

                This is a huge hit for 55+-65 folks who have lost their jobs and  will never be hired.

                New Jersey (typical, link at end):

                • Medicaid benefits received on or after age 55 are subject to estate recovery. This is specifically stated and acknowledged on the authorization page of the PA-1G Medicaid Application Form.
                • DMAHS has an immediate right to recover from the estate unless there is a surviving spouse or child(ren) who is under age 21 or who is blind or permanently and totally disabled. Should any of these exceptions to DMAHS’ right to recover from an estate no longer apply (e.g., death of surviving spouse, attainment of age 21 by surviving child, or death or termination of disability of blind or permanently and totally disabled child), DMAHS has a right to recover from any remaining estate assets at that time.
                • Estate recovery in New Jersey includes payments for ALL services, not merely services for institutionalized clients. There is no limitation on the type of service for which DMAHS can recover its payments from estates including managed care (HMO) capitation fees. However, effective January 1, 2010, Medicare cost-sharing benefits paid under the Medicare Savings Programs such as “Buy-in”, Specified Low-Income Medicare Beneficiaries (“SLMB”) or Qualified Individuals (“QI-1”) are not subject to estate recovery.
                This information is not covered well on enthusiast sites!
                •  My Thoughts... (0+ / 0-)
                  Lambert just lit my light bulb. It's rather dim, but now I understand the big push for the Medicaid expansion. It is about us, 50 and up! A managed care Medicaid is the perfect place for the maximum extraction and would keep folks out the profitable insurance pools. Add in the clawback and it's a two-fer.
                  This explains the plaintive articles put up on the enthusiast sites which ignore this issue and tell you Medicare for all will never happen. All about the rents baby! Got to keep the cages,
                  I mean buckets separate because they are all specialized.
                  Time to go pull more weeds.
                  Riverdaughter:
                  ’m referring to the millions of long term unemployed, many of whom are over 50, who are now forced to cobble together some kind of living as self-employed.  That affects just about everyone I know who was laid off since 2008.  To these people, the premiums are not just a nuisance.  They are extremely burdensome.  And if Lambert has been reading the tea leaves correctly, lumping these people into the Medicaid pot puts whatever estate they have left at risk.  So, to recap, Obamacare is putting an extra burden on these people who are now forced to a.) work for themselves, b.) pay all of the payroll tax by themselves and c.) pay for their own retirements.
                  Please don't take my word, look into it.  Ask O'care!
                  •  add'l comment.. (0+ / 0-)

                    I read through more of your posts and clearly the estate recovery does predates the ACA.

                    So I better understand your argument now, if more people over 55 have access to Medicaid then more people/families may be exposed to the estate recovery.

                    IF this hasn't been addressed by the ACA already it should, so it's good that you bring this to light!

                    Any implication, however, that the estate recovery tax is the fault of 'O'Care' is inaccurate.  

                    There are going to be problems like this that crop up and have to be worked through.  That's a normal part of implementing new systems of any kind.

                  •  I would take this question (0+ / 0-)

                    directly to CMS instead of navigators, blog posts, or trying to understand excerpts from laws.  With the latter there are always advisories, regulations, and references to other laws, especially one originally passed in the 90's, that are involved in completely understanding how it will work.

          •  I used to be on COBRA (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            AnnCetera, jck

            and I was paying around $450/month for just me. Just for the heck of it, I used the calculator to see what my payments would be if the exchanges had been around then; IIRC they came to around $100/month for the platinum plan.

            Which, as it happens, was also what I paid when I eventually ended up on CoverColorado.

        •  Here's the calculator, Ann (12+ / 0-)

          This will help you figure out if you'll be eligible for subsidies (it certainly sounds like it!)
          http://kff.org/...

          I plugged in some fake numbers- 2 adults in the family, $20,000 annual income, and no employer insurance available.
          Here are the numbers it gave back:

          If your state does not expand Medicaid
          If your state does not expand Medicaid, you will be eligible to purchase subsidized coverage through the exchanges.

          The information below is about subsidized exchange coverage. Note that depending on your state's eligibility requirements, you may still be eligible for coverage through Medicaid.

          Household income in 2014:129% of poverty level

          Unsubsidized annual health insurance premium in 2014:$6,036

          Maximum % of income you have to pay for the non-tobacco premium, if eligible for a subsidy:2% Amount you pay for the premium:$400 per year
          (which equals 2% of your household income and covers 7% of the overall premium) You could receive a government tax credit subsidy of up to:$5,636
          (which covers 93% of the overall premium)

          You can plug in your numbers and see if you'll be eligible. I live in Kansas, another stupid state, so our residents will also be dependent on the federal exchange. I don't know when that will be implemented though, I don't think they've set on up yet.

          Your beliefs don't make you a better person. Your behavior does.

          by skohayes on Sun Sep 15, 2013 at 04:11:17 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Thank you! (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            skohayes, Odysseus

            Although I think I'll still be hosed until 2015. I worked full time and had coverage until mid May, when I moved. Since then, I've only been working part-time. So income for 2013 will be too high. Grr!

            "Fast, Cheap, and Good... pick two." - director Jim Jarmusch

            by AnnCetera on Sun Sep 15, 2013 at 07:28:42 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

        •  Just out of curiosity (6+ / 0-)

          I took a look at the plans offered in California. In my retired situation (low income) the bronze plans and one of the silver plans were listed at $1 per month. It seems the subsidy amount was greater than the plan premium, so the $1 minimum payment was to give me some 'skin in the game.'

          I could not afford cobra premiums to continue my Kaiser coverage when I retired, so I signed up at the VA. The closest facility is in Long Beach, so getting to appointments takes me half an hour vs. ten minutes for the closest Kaiser facility.

          I strongly suspect you will be pleasantly surprised by how affordable coverage is compared to what you pay for COBRA.

          "The problems of incompetent, corrupt, corporatist government are incompetence, corruption and corporatism, not government." Jerome a Paris

          by Orinoco on Sun Sep 15, 2013 at 05:31:30 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  Try the Kaiser calculator (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          AnnCetera, True North

          It should give you an idea of what your subsidy would be: http://kff.org/...

          I have no idea what your situation is, so I just stuck in 15k income and 30 years old. Result:

          If your state has expanded Medicaid, you get Medicaid. Otherwise, your premium after the credit is $300/year (2% of income).

        •  And remember, depending on your income, you (0+ / 0-)

          will probably get tax credits.  That can cut the cost down a lot.

          Freedom has two enemies: Those who want to control everyone around them...and those who feel no need to control themselves.

          by Sirenus on Mon Sep 16, 2013 at 07:46:27 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  I suspect (0+ / 0-)

          that buying on the exchange will be less than COBRA.  After I was laid off 3 years ago I went to the Fed Pre-Existing Insurance Plan which was significantly less than my COBRA.  For the heck of it I checked my state exchange calculator to see how the exchange compared.  It was comparable.  I am now on Medicare though so I won't be using the exchange.

    •  As I understand it (7+ / 0-)

      the federal government will be running an exchange for states that have decided not to have an exchange.

  •   For those already 65 (10+ / 0-)

       There are benefits and news and most already know about these benefits.  
        It is weird that  GOP folks on Medicare won't bother to admit that they are get  benefits from ACA.   Hate runs pretty deep for the GOP who blog.   They repeat what the GOP pundits write about ACA...it is striking how much they are in denial.  

  •  Maryland also has a health insurance program (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Radiowalla, Lujane, awcomeon

    For folks that can't get commercial health insurance for whatever reason the for-profits can dream up.  It's called MHIP and is worth looking into if you don't have or can't get commercial health insurance.  Google Maryland Health Insurance Program  and go from there.

  •  Several thousand in debt? (12+ / 0-)

    The woman worries about being "several thousand in debt" if she is hospitalized and doesn't have insurance.  What is meant by several thousand?  

    I had abdominal surgery in mid August, with a 5 day hospitalization.  As surgeries go, it was fairly uncomplicated, although I don't believe I'm healing correctly, but that is another issue that might bring up additional expenses.

    The total cost will be about $55,000.  Of course, the insurance will get a big "discount" on many of the charges.  I already know that I owe about $1500 to the clinic, after the insurance paid, because the clinic is already dunning me, less than 3 weeks after the surgery.  I know that the hospital part is about $11000+, but I don't know how much of that will be left for me after the insurance pays.  

    Fortunately, I have COBRA insurance, so we have to pay $1100/month, which is 102% of the cost of the insurance under my husband's now-not-existant job.  Thank you, government, for COBRA.  

    Last year I had three "day surgeries" which cost $15000, $18000, and $22000 total each.  These were for the same surgery, and I believe that the clinic has figured out ways to increase their charges so that they still get enough after the insurance "discount."  

    So, anybody without insurance or a Republican who doesn't understand the necessity for insurance improvement/reform is NAIVE if they think that someone will have several thousands of dollars of debt. Besides, who can work if they have lots of health problems?

  •  I have many family menbers in Texas, (6+ / 0-)

    most without health insurance.  I wonder if the administration would consider a program like "adopt a state", meaning a state that has accepted the ACA for its citizens can adopt a state that doesn't and get that states subsidies or a percentage to get people insured.
    Just thinking out loud.  

    •  Let those states keep paying for ER care until (0+ / 0-)

      the citizens finally notice that the nose that the state cut off to spite their face needs to be reattached for a cost of six digits.  Perhaps they will change their minds--and maybe even have a look at their educational system.

      Building a better America with activism, cooperation, ingenuity and snacks.

      by judyms9 on Sun Sep 15, 2013 at 04:00:22 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Texas will have an exchange regardless of (12+ / 0-)

      Rick Perry and the GOP.  Texans will go to www.healthcare.gov, the federal exchange for their insurance.  

      What Texas will be missing out on is expanded Medicaid - that group of people who fall between 100% and 138% of the Federal Poverty Line.  They won't qualify on the exchanges and Texas won't offer Medicaid to them.  I am sure legislation will be introduced to cover them after the fact, but it's little consolation to them now.  But remember, they have no medical insurance today either.

      This was designed to force states to accept expanded Medicaid and most have, even GOP states like Arizona and South Dakota have taken the expanded Medicaid.  

      Texas will sooner or later, they've already asked for expanded Medicaid to cover mental health issues.  They'll cave on the other soon.

      We are all in this together.

      by htowngenie on Sun Sep 15, 2013 at 04:07:23 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  My sister in Houston, who owns (25+ / 0-)

    a small business, is gearing up for the first health care coverage she has been able to afford for years.  Her take on how her friends and colleagues, many of them self-employed or in small businesses:

    People are excited.  A lot are currently without insurance, or paying a lot.
    Her small business associates in TX excited about having the opportunity for coverage under PPACA.

    I can't help it. I love the state of Texas. It's a harmless perversion. - Molly Ivins

    by rsmpdx on Sun Sep 15, 2013 at 03:59:03 PM PDT

  •  Just a quick read through of this diary and (17+ / 0-)

    posts that accompany it make me think that if DKos wanted to do a real service to readers, it might give thought to an informational section on ACA.

    Hey, if Republicans are going to do everything within their power to obstruct ObamaCare,  why shouldn't DailyKos do what it does best, get the facts out there.

    In the time it took Adam Lanza to reload, eleven children escaped. What if...

    by Sixty Something on Sun Sep 15, 2013 at 04:08:50 PM PDT

  •  This is very inspiring. I wish I could participate (9+ / 0-)

    Mostly, what drove us out of the US, to my wife's country of origin, was the unaffordability of her health care. Here, most of it is covered by the Seguridad Social or if you go to a private doctor, it's vastly less expensive.

    I'm health as an ox, so all the insurance I paid for years was pure profit.

    This Rover crossed over.. Willie Nelson, written by Dorothy Fields

    by Karl Rover on Sun Sep 15, 2013 at 04:16:47 PM PDT

  •  I emailed Rep Mike Coffman to not defund the ACA (12+ / 0-)

    Literally just before jumping to DK. I reminded him that his party has No alternative.  I am sure he will ignore me but I got my $0.02 worth in.

    •  Sent an angry but literate email to Sen. Dan Coats (3+ / 0-)

      yesterday. I am on his email list and got a newsletter yesterday with him crowing about how hard he's working to defund Obamacare.

      I gave him an earful about how important the ACA was to me as an older self-employed Hoosier. Told him I expected him to actually represent constituents like me.

      Doing my part ... ;-)

      "Let us not look back to the past with anger, nor towards the future with fear, but look around with awareness." James Thurber

      by annan on Sun Sep 15, 2013 at 06:53:57 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Any chance we can get some celebrities to do (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    worldlotus, Aunt Pat

    some outreach on MTV or other youth oriented TV?

    -1.63/ -1.49 "Speaking truth to power" (with snark of course)! Follow on Twitter @dopper0189

    by dopper0189 on Sun Sep 15, 2013 at 04:41:01 PM PDT

  •  Caution - All regs not effecive til Jan.1 (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    tmservo433, AnnCetera

    While its good toencourage everyone to look into coverage through the ACA, please remember that all the great changes passed in the law ARE NOT EFFECTIVE YET AND COULD BE DELAYED.

    Obama has already delayed implementation of some important rules that will leave many uninsured for at least one more year. He did so for reasons that aren't clear and don't make sense. He can make more foolish decisions before Jan 1.

    Most concerning of new regs not yet in effect are rules prohibiting insurers from charging higher rates to people with pre existing health conditions.

    Go ahead and pursue ACA enrollment at prices currently offered but make sure to call and email the WH to tell Obama "hands off" those regulations. Let them become effective Jan 1 2014.  I pray he does the right thing and stops underminingACA. We're watching.

    "The international world is wondering what happened to America's great heart and soul." Helen Thomas

    by Betty Pinson on Sun Sep 15, 2013 at 04:50:29 PM PDT

    •  Delays (0+ / 0-)

      Obama has already delayed implementation of some important rules that will leave many uninsured for at least one more year. He did so for reasons that aren't clear and don't make sense.

      Betty, he delayed implementation for very clear reasons:  The people to whom he granted a delay didn't want it. And, he wants their Democratic votes in 2014.  
      Those benefiting, of course, included most of the unions in the US.  They have a better deal now than they will have under ACA.  And they certainly don't care about those not in their membership.
      Now, he may back out of this, or the 75% subsidy he provided to Congress and their staffs, or implementation of its Medicare cuts, or... (since he does not have the legal authority to delay it in the first place).  But it is unlikely until after the 2014 election since, as I'm certain you are aware, BO is first and foremost a politician.

  •  It is important (5+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    rsmpdx, on the cusp, micsimov, annan, AnnCetera

    To act as an information agent.   There are a lot of voters in our great country who are simply low-information or one-sided information voters.   But if they are provided with knowledge that benefits them and their family, they are for the most part, grateful for it - and you get to know you did something good.

    So, spread the word.   In states that already have exchanges up and going, get people involved.   In states that don't, put some pressure on.  Now is the right time to build interest.

    Gandhi's Seven Sins: Wealth without work; Pleasure without conscience; Knowledge without character; Commerce without morality; Science without humanity; Worship without sacrifice; Politics without principle

    by Chris Reeves on Sun Sep 15, 2013 at 05:00:44 PM PDT

  •  Facts about Obamacare are facts. They'll win out. (5+ / 0-)

    We know what has been happening to health care coverage and costs over the years - decreasing quality of coverage if you have it at all, higher costs (premiums, co-pays, deductibles), a thicket of claims processes, etc. And people without any coverage at all, dependent on emergency rooms or traveling clinics for routine care, not to mention the extraordinary health issues most of us have or will face in the future.

    Financial advisers, at least those to people who aren't living off of dividend checks and trust fund distributions, understand what safety net coverage means. So do a lot of doctors and other medical professionals. Sure, there will be doctors who build "concierge practices" and refuse to take "Medicare patients", but like so many things about change, these folks will soon be a reactionary generational anomaly.

    And there is promise down the road of availability of preventive care and more emphasis on family practitioners. In short, major reforms in both health insurance and health care itself. It was slow in coming, and it could be better still, but we're on the way.

    One thing we can be sure of is that this President will not bargain away his signature achievement. Despite all the flack the anti's can - and will! - mount, it is very likely that the successes of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act will sustain it in a short period of time.

    2014 IS COMING. Build up the Senate. Win back the House : 17 seats. Plus!

    by TRPChicago on Sun Sep 15, 2013 at 06:37:01 PM PDT

  •  My Mother-in-law (0+ / 0-)

    Is coming to live with us.  She's 73 and she's from another country where she has universal healthcare although it's not always so great.  We've been buying her visitor insurance.  She's not eligible for Medicare since she never worked in the U.S.  I had thought she'd be able to get an individual policy under ACA.  But apparently not.  Does anybody have any suggestions for how we can get health insurance for her?  We're not looking for a free pass and are happy to pay premiums or whatever.  Will appreciate any ideas.

    "Ruling the country is like cooking a small fish." -- Lao Tzu

    by DanielMN on Sun Sep 15, 2013 at 09:30:15 PM PDT

  •  Though I dwell... (0+ / 0-)

    in the remote barbarian state of Georgia I'm trying to do my part!

    These southern conservatives are very hard nuts to crack though.

    I spoke with a friend just last night about insurance.  I don't know if the ACA can help her as she can get insurance through her husband's work but even that has gotten very expensive for them.

    I told her to check out the federal exchange as it may be of help.  She said she would.  

    What I found perplexing was her major complaint about the ACA was "I don't want to pay for people who go to the Dr. all the time".  She has fybromalgia, herniated disc, cancer survivor, accident prone and has worn just about every kind of splint known to mankind, sees a podiatrist fairly regularly to boot.  If it's not ingrown toenails she's there for her latest twisted ankle. This person has gone to the Dr. more times in 6 months then I have in my entire 50 years on this earth.

    Yet she worries about paying for people who go to the Dr. too much?

    I pride myself on understanding what makes people tick, but honestly, when speaking with these southern conservative Christians I feel like I've met someone from Mars.  A person from a mindset and culture so different from mine I simply ....cannot.... comprehend from where such ideas come?  

    It's absolutely mind boggling.

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