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Just another day in the midwest.   The state of Kansas has launched a new salvo aimed at the feds, saying that the federal government is of the mistaken belief we are not, in fact, a confederacy and that the feds have any say over issues.  A pox on those losers, says the state of Kansas, vowing to reject federal science standards.

http://www2.ljworld.com/...

Topeka — The Kansas Republican Party has adopted a resolution that demands state leaders reject Common Core school standards and prohibit adoption of new science standards.
In other words: you plan to force us to teach evolution and not teach that men hunted with dinosaurs Alley Oop style, and we're kind of ticked off about it.

It may not go quite that far, I'm sure there are a great number of people who oppose the adoption of scientific standards in the classroom simply because they fear witchcraft.   But, for the others the rejection of the idea of scientific standards seems like a strike back at a government that can't deal with the fact it lost the civil war and should have no say in the day to day workings of any state within the confederacy.

State GOP Chair Kelly Arnold said today there is "a groundswell of people" who are opposing Common Core standards for reading and math, which are going into effect in Kansas and 44 other states.

"We feel we lose control over what we are allowed to teach our children here in Kansas," Arnold said.

The resolution approved by the state GOP committee says the Common Core standards "obliterates" state control of language arts and math standards, and represents "an unconstitutional and illegal transfer of power to the federal government and unaccountable private interests." A number of tea-party affiliated groups have targeted Common Core.

Yes, damn those feds with all their meddling!  We should reject them at every turn.
In June, the State Board of Education approved the science standards that supporters said would give students a better understanding of science.

The standards were opposed by some because they treat evolution of species as a fact and offer no discussion of religious-based theories such as creationism or intelligent design.

GOP officials also approved resolutions opposing the expansion of Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act, elimination of the income tax, and support of Gov. Sam Brownback's efforts to cut state income tax rates.
Stupid feds thinking they can kick religious indoctrination out of school?   Didn't they learn anything from the past?   Being a Kansan, I'm sure every other Kansan remembers the time the state whipped the feds on that stupid Brown V Board of Education.

Shows them for telling us what to do.

Wait.  I received all my diplomas in the state of Kansas.

Please consider some of my commentary above potentially in doubt, there are unfortunately no standards in what we teach here.   Don't worry, I'm sure it will lead to our youth finding good high paying jobs in the outside world.

Originally posted to tmservo433 on Wed Sep 18, 2013 at 03:21 PM PDT.

Also republished by Kansas & Missouri Kossacks and Community Spotlight.

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Comment Preferences

  •  Tip Jar (139+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    bear83, grollen, slowbutsure, TDDVandy, Glen The Plumber, 88kathy, hnichols, sfbob, whaddaya, Thinking Fella, Yosef 52, Joan McCarter, pitbullgirl65, terabytes, ZedMont, sceptical observer, Lennykat, greycat, gfv6800, tuesdayschilde, kj in missouri, Empower Ink, kmfmstar, itzadryheat, Mister Met, jasan, bbctooman, Philpm, native, spunhard, fb, parse this, ichibon, Lujane, mookins, ModerateJosh, ybruti, I am a Patriot, ladybug53, sawgrass727, rja, JVolvo, Deep Texan, celdd, YucatanMan, BlueMississippi, shortgirl, worldlotus, kurt, ColoTim, roadbear, geebeebee, thomask, pvasileff, Debby, myboo, dotdash2u, kevinpdx, TracieLynn, Regina in a Sears Kit House, sny, begone, Chaddiwicker, Fonsia, Greenfinches, radarlady, Nebraskablue, skohayes, riverlover, Matt Z, Byron from Denver, murrayewv, missLotus, pyegar, DRo, sodalis, Buckeye54, Clive all hat no horse Rodeo, wintergreen8694, emmasnacker, Kimbeaux, Hillbilly Dem, srelar, Marihilda, splashy, GeorgeXVIII, concernedamerican, Leftcandid, Raggedy Ann, Robynhood too, Sailorben, flowerfarmer, rmonroe, anodnhajo, BYw, SaraBeth, TrueBlueMajority, OooSillyMe, maybeeso in michigan, IndieGuy, Sherri in TX, JBL55, Jake Williams, Josiah Bartlett, pixxer, Sychotic1, wasatch, Sylv, eztempo, jlms qkw, dinazina, Statusquomustgo, rantsposition, annominous, FlamingoGrrl, barbwires, eeff, zinger99, mslat27, Wino, stlsophos, millwood, SherwoodB, Isara, eru, jbob, ItsaMathJoke, rbird, Frank Cocozzelli, blue aardvark, AuroraDawn, Larsstephens, ChicDemago, califdem, MartyM, brentbent, HeyMikey, Youffraita, Damnit Janet

    Gandhi's Seven Sins: Wealth without work; Pleasure without conscience; Knowledge without character; Commerce without morality; Science without humanity; Worship without sacrifice; Politics without principle

    by Chris Reeves on Wed Sep 18, 2013 at 03:21:43 PM PDT

  •  Feds have nothing to do with Common Core; (51+ / 0-)

    it was Governors who came up with the standards.

    ...Son, those Elephants always look out for themselves. If you happen to get a crumb or two from their policies, it's a complete coincidence. -Malharden's Dad

    by slowbutsure on Wed Sep 18, 2013 at 03:29:19 PM PDT

  •  What? (21+ / 0-)

    You mean that Kansas Republicans think the purpose of education is something other than educating children?

    29, white male, TX-07 (current), TN-09 (born), TN-08 (where parents live now)

    by TDDVandy on Wed Sep 18, 2013 at 03:34:12 PM PDT

    •  well apparently Forbes thinks so too in its Op-Ed (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      wintergreen8694

      I saw on the dkos front page a minute ago:

      And when some individual person–a parent, a teacher, a customer–”gives” something to someone else, it is not an act of charity, but a trade for value received in return.
      Time to go back to bed and see if it's a different day when I get up again the way this one is headed.

      We are all pupils in the eyes of God.

      by nuclear winter solstice on Thu Sep 19, 2013 at 04:39:16 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  A specter is haunting America (0+ / 0-)

        Marx tried to warn Europe about 'everything has a price' and the 1% anarchists, but they didn't listen.

        There are a hundred reasons corporate America demonizes the Communist Manifesto.  It's America's mirror.

        BTB - Marx cribbed from Jefferson.

        Joy shared is doubled. Pain shared is halved. Spider Robinson

        by nolagrl on Fri Sep 20, 2013 at 08:45:34 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  Brownback is waiting in the wings to enter stage (11+ / 0-)

    right as the GOP savior.

  •  I'm getting pretty fed up with these little ankle (33+ / 0-)

    biters.  Whenever a state "declares" that any federal law does not apply to them, it should immediately be cut off from any and all federal funding for any purpose, and every federal military installation should be moved out of state, and federal contracts should be terminated at the earliest possible time.

    Yes, I'm aware this would harm innocent people who have nothing to do with legislation.  They can complain to the governor.

    Fighting for peace is like screwing for virginity -- George Carlin

    by ZedMont on Wed Sep 18, 2013 at 04:29:44 PM PDT

    •  Ankle biters, huh huh. (5+ / 0-)

      Save a child's life. Please sign and share. www.signon.org/sign/sarasota-sheriffs-office Save a child's life. Please sign and share.

      by kmfmstar on Wed Sep 18, 2013 at 06:42:46 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Put this on a ballot. I want to commit voter fraud (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      PaloAltoPixie, ZedMont, tacet

      and vote for it seventeen million and three times.

    •  The "Kansas Quarantine" (3+ / 0-)
      Yes, I'm aware this would harm innocent people who have nothing to do with legislation.  They can complain to the governor.
      They'd be better off moving to a more civilized state - that way, we can convert Kansas to a quarantine site for Tea-Klanners, secessionists, birthers and other right-wing nutjobs...

      "Federal law limits me to 3 shells when duck hunting, but no law limiting assault magazines. We have more protections for ducks than people." - Rep. Mike Thompson (CA-5)

      by radabush on Wed Sep 18, 2013 at 11:07:49 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  I wonder if Koch Industries has any (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      ZedMont

      federal contracts, it is time to make an example of them.  Also it would be nice if the DOJ would explore the use of RICO, on the activities of the brothers Koch.

      One does not simply walk into Mordor! One invites a gas driller in, and one’s land becomes Mordor. Chris From Balloon Juice

      by Mr Stagger Lee on Thu Sep 19, 2013 at 05:31:26 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Fed contracts? Better to ask how many (0+ / 0-)

        lobbyists the Brothers Koch have, and how many congress people they have living in their pockets.

        Our political system is so corrupted that the fat cats were able to stack our SCOTUS. They they used that to legalize political bribery by redefining that bribery as freedom of speech and access to our democratic system (Citizens United decision).

        That's the kicker, prior to engaging in these hideous activities, the fat cats get those activities legalized. They've been doing that for decades.

    •  What about WA and CO MJ laws? (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      hmi
      Whenever a state "declares" that any federal law does not apply to them, it should immediately be cut off from any and all federal funding for any purpose, and every federal military installation should be moved out of state, and federal contracts should be terminated at the earliest possible time.
    •  Matters of principle (0+ / 0-)

      "Whenever a state "declares" that any federal law does not apply to them, it should immediately be cut off from any and all federal funding for any purpose..."

      Fugitive Slave Law?
      How about if Hawaii successfully passes legislation to ban GMO crops that the FDA has approved?

    •  Isn't this just tied to federal funding, anyway? (0+ / 0-)

      If they turn down federal funding I thought all the federal rules about education go away, too.

      "Nothing happens unless first a dream. " ~ Carl Sandburg

      by davewill on Thu Sep 19, 2013 at 11:04:44 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  so (0+ / 0-)

      cali should  lose all fed money due to medical marijuana etc?
      hint : cali would turn back into a barren desert overnight.

      A man is born as many men but dies as a single one.--Martin Heidegger

      by cdreid on Fri Sep 20, 2013 at 01:57:50 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Its alright Kansas, you'll always have OZ (5+ / 0-)

    and look behind the curtain, there's ole Hunchback, er Brownback pulling the strings.

  •  science illiteracy (23+ / 0-)
    no discussion of religious-based theories such as creationism or intelligent design
    well, that would be a very brief discussion since neither creationism nor intelligent design are actually theories.  In fact, nothing "religious-based" can be a theory.  To be a theory it first has to be testable, and nothing based on "magic" is testable. Second after having been tested, it must be found to be "true" so often that it is accepted as a fact, before it can be a theory.
    The very language these idiots use reveals their ignorance of and/or utter contempt for science.
    •  Exactly. (4+ / 0-)

      I would not care if Kansas rejected Federal monies or guidelines or curriculum, etc. as long as they didn't insist on replacing those things with BULLSHIT.

      My God, it's full of stars!

      by nuthangerfarm on Wed Sep 18, 2013 at 08:11:42 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  But that isn't true. Einstein's (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      greblos

      theories of relativity were not  testable for a long time but were accepted as theories. Plate tectonics is certainly considered to be valid but how the hell you could test it I don't know.

      The test of a theory is in its explanatory and predictive power. Evidence helps with its acceptance. Counter evidence can alter or destroy it or show holes that need to be filled in.

      You have reinforced the right's idea that a pile on of "truths" means evidence which "proves" some theory. It doesn't.

      I'm asking you to believe. Not in my ability to bring about real change in Washington ... *I'm asking you to believe in yours.* Barack Obama

      by samddobermann on Thu Sep 19, 2013 at 11:29:13 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Right. The Scientific Method is (0+ / 0-)

        Hypothesis:  I have an idea

        Experiment:  I have figured out a way to test my idea.  If I get the expected result, my idea has predictive value and is more likely to be true

        Review:  Other people trained to interpret your idea and experimental results test your logic, assumptions and experimental process against their own understanding.  Some will try to repeat your experiment.  If they get the same results, it is more likely your idea is true.

        Scientists are NEVER sure of ANYTHING.   They only have a grab bag of ideas that let you predict outcomes in the real physical world.   A fairly strong theory is one where no countering evidence significant enough to exceed the error of the measuring tools exists.   A weak theory is one which has passed all tests so far, but testing and peer review isn't yet very extensive.

        The true sign that you are in religion rather than science is that you're actually certain.  Well that, and the lack of any actual testing, evidence, etc that proves your idea has any merit or predictive capability.  "The Giant Sky Fairy created the world in 6 days" isn't much of a theory.   It makes a decent assumption from which you can draw other conclusions if you agree with it, and that's where most religious and philosophical arguments go.    The difference between science and philosophy is that you don't have to agree on the premise and argue from there.

        In science, you agree that the experimental result does or does not support the hypothesis.  If the testing is flawed, you improve it and try again.  If further testing shows your theory doesn't hold up, you change the theory.   There isn't any equivalent of that in philosophy.  You can make different rhetorical arguments, you can reject logic in favor of subjective experience, you can cleverly argue in ways that confuse your opposition.   But you don't actually ever change your axioms...the points on which you argue.

        There is no way to prove or disprove any creation myth.  An omnipotent being can place the fossil record, generate the heavenly bodies by fiat, all moving as if there was something like a Big Bang x Billion years ago, even though the being waved their hands 6000 years ago.   Omnipotent beings make poor fodder for scientific theories though.  They have no predictive value.

        If you think the universe exploded x billion years ago and is expanding, you can predict whether or not an asteroid will hit the earth in your lifetime.  If you think a Sky Fairy can at any time just create new things or alter trajectories...well....that meteor can come at any time, presumably when some angel blows a horn or some such, if Revelations is one of your core axioms.

  •  "unaccountable private interests" ?!?! (12+ / 0-)

    What the hell do they think a corporation is?!  C'mon hicks, you know, those formless, immortal, multi-billionaire psychopaths you think can do no wrong and want to put in charge of everything.

    Domestic politics is the continuation of civil war by other means.

    by Visceral on Wed Sep 18, 2013 at 08:15:15 PM PDT

  •  Geez (10+ / 0-)

    What part of the supremacy clause do these yahoos not get? if its not Missouri trying to arrest fed officers, or Utah trying to exempt itself from the Antiquities act, its Kansas pulling this stunt. Fed law trumps state laws, you dingbats!

  •  I say good for Kansas. (2+ / 0-)

    We do not live in a monolithic super-power, mistakenly called "America" where everyone agrees to the same set of rules. We live in the United States. That's plural, not singular.

    You don't like Kansas rules? Move to Nebraska -- nobody's stopping you. You don't like Nebraska? Try Florida, or New Mexico. Nobody's gonna ask you for a passport.

    I think the federal government has too much power as it is, over the various regions within the nation. California wants to legalize pot? Ain't nobody's business but their own. Texas wants to arm school teachers with AK47's? Go for it baby.

    If you want to marry a transgender person, you probably shouldn't be living in Kansas anyway. Unless you want to try and convert the whole state to your way of thinking. Good luck with that.

    •  You have no basis for this comment. (22+ / 0-)

      You forgot about the word "United." Believe it or not, there really is a federal government that supersedes states, and the only people whining about it are reactionary states that are net receivers of the largesse of the American taxpayer.
      What about states operating an army? What about issuing their own money? Closing their borders? Creating a theocracy? What about allowing slavery? The only thing you left out of this absurd comment is "teh Founding Fathers said...."

      "You can die for Freedom, you just can't exercise it"

      by shmuelman on Wed Sep 18, 2013 at 09:21:09 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Yeah right. Reductio ad absurdum, (0+ / 0-)

        with a dash of insult thrown in for good measure. Way to go guy.

        •  It didn't need "reductio".. (0+ / 0-)

          Your comment was absurd from the get-go.

          "THERE IS NO JUSTICE. THERE IS JUST US." spoken by Death in Terry Pratchett's Discworld books.

          by Sailorben on Thu Sep 19, 2013 at 06:13:01 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  Only it's not. (5+ / 0-)

          Shmuelman points out correctly that there are limits to what states can do, and they are defined by the constitution and the bill of rights.  He's providing you the most extreme examples, because you don't seem to understand the role of the federal government.  There have been conservative states-rights politicians just this past year calling for the resumption of segregation in their states.

          It's absurd, all right, but that doesn't mean it's not true.

          So you say "Good for Kansas" for forcing one particular religious view to be taught in schools to the detriment of all other beliefs and for lying about science to the students, at a time when US students already have a hard time competing in the world.

          That's pretty silly.  And unconstitutional.

    •  Rec given for (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      elfling

      raising an interesting counter point.

    •  The key problem with this is (4+ / 0-)

      That individuals have largely no choice as to where in the greater US they are born.   It is not as though a fetus can say "get me out of Kansas" or a child in school has the ability to propel their family out of state.

      As such, those individuals who will become voting members of society later deserve an education that leaves them informed.  

      If we just write off areas by saying 'who goes there' we create a permanent divide amongst our population rather than working to better all of our citizens.

      Gandhi's Seven Sins: Wealth without work; Pleasure without conscience; Knowledge without character; Commerce without morality; Science without humanity; Worship without sacrifice; Politics without principle

      by Chris Reeves on Thu Sep 19, 2013 at 06:45:13 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Umm- From our Constitution, Article Six (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Ahianne
      This Constitution, and the Laws of the United States which shall be made in Pursuance thereof; and all Treaties made, or which shall be made, under the Authority of the United States, shall be the supreme Law of the Land; and the Judges in every State shall be bound thereby, any Thing in the Constitution or Laws of any State to the Contrary notwithstanding.
      Ya have read it, haven't ya?
  •  it's a damn shame (6+ / 0-)

    i heard calculus is being phased out of some high schools altogether.

    we have multiple problems. the religious right being a big one.

    stupid lazy americans are another.

    -You want to change the system, run for office.

    by Deep Texan on Wed Sep 18, 2013 at 08:47:08 PM PDT

    •  Some places in the USA are stupider (0+ / 0-)

      than others. By far. We should not equate the entire Union with its lowest common denominator. Nor should we try to force by law, an enlightened view on people who do not wish to accept it.

      •  because freedom (0+ / 0-)

        Idiocracy.

        -You want to change the system, run for office.

        by Deep Texan on Wed Sep 18, 2013 at 09:12:54 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  No, plurality. (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          gffish

          Religion, or the absence of it, is an individual choice. It's not up to you or any intelligensia to tell a community what to teach, or what not to teach their kids. Belief in this or that version of reality is something that evolves organically, over time. It is not something that can, or should be enforced by law.

          •  which leads us back to freedom (4+ / 0-)

            to be dumb. to defraud each other while the government has to prove our guilt.

            to maim and kill each other.

            freedom to poison the environment.

            i for one think that enough of us can agree that some of these things can be regulated including what schools are teaching our kids.

            the other side agrees.  they just disagree on the content.

            we'll see who wins in the long run.

            -You want to change the system, run for office.

            by Deep Texan on Wed Sep 18, 2013 at 09:31:29 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  It's not OUR kids, (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              PaloAltoPixie, Kimbeaux

              it's their kids. I agree though, that public schools should not be indoctrinating children into any religion. Catholics have been doing it for centuries, but that doesn't make it right.

              •  doesn't matter (5+ / 0-)

                same way we can enforce seat belt laws, we can regulate the stupid out of americans.

                for the safety of the planet. in a perfect world that was rational, the battle of the ideas and facts would suffice.

                we have limited freedom for a reason.

                -You want to change the system, run for office.

                by Deep Texan on Wed Sep 18, 2013 at 09:49:49 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

                •  We shall have to agree to disagree. (0+ / 0-)

                  I don't think that stupidity can be regulated out of people, at least not when it comes to religious belief. You think it can. Maybe you're right.

                  •  Freedom vs. education (15+ / 0-)

                    I want my children taught that they are free to believe in whatever religion their little hearts desire.  And I want them to have at least a basic understanding of how the world functions based on tested, accepted scientific theories.  Sunday school class is the place for the first, and science class is the place for the second.  I don't expect a preacher to get up and try to explain Newtonian principles.  Likewise, I don't want a science teacher starting a class with, "And on the first day He created..."  

                    This isn't legislating the stupid out of people.  They can believe what science has to say or not, I really don't care.  But having their particular religion's story of creation taught as just as possible as evolution gives children a skewed understanding of science, and that hurts America, all of us, in the end.  It's a global stage and teaching "intelligent design" makes our kids no more ready to compete with Europe and Asia than "Flying Spaghetti Monsterism."

              •  No, it isn't. (3+ / 0-)

                Who is this "they" you are speaking of?  The people who want to do this are the GOP of Kansas.  This is not in any way a "community" decision.  A quick search tells me there are nearly 8000 muslims living in Kansas.  A small bit of research should turn up any number of Catholics, Buddhists, agnostics, atheists and other non-fundamentalist Christian people there.

                Is it your belief that when any political party voices a goal it should be considered a request by the community?  

                Perhaps you are one of those people who holds the mistaken belief that our country runs solely on majority rule?  If so, you'd better go brush up on the constitution and the bill of rights.  Our country has taken great pains to protect the minority of the population from simple "majority rules", and religion is one of the areas where this really counts.

      •  We cannot turn our backs on the health and (9+ / 0-)

        well-being of our fellow citizens by allowing a vocal group of WATBs to hijack and endanger the future of a whole state.  Teaching science and math to national standards will equip future generations of Kansans to be employable when they graduate and not be consigned to dead end jobs at the few businesses that haven't been able to relocate out of Kansas the way the aircraft industry is (one of the few high-tech industries Kansas had).  Kansas probably already is a net drain on the national budget in part because of the large territory and low tax base.  This country shouldn't let Kansas get to be an even bigger drain, especially by dooming a generation or more on the Tea Bagger altar.  The Koch brothers hail from Kansas, IIRC.

      •  A dangerous view (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Cpqemp, wintergreen8694

        The enlightened view should be forced on those who do not wish to accept it. Unenlightened viewpoints, especially of a religious nature, that are used as the basis for policy decisions are how we ended up with the Taliban controlling Afghanistan. Non-scientific viewpoints, and specifically those based on religion - those used to justify governmental policy are inherently dangerous to civilization itself.

        We have civilization today because at one point in time the unenlightened amongst us were chastised, stigmatized, and marginalized.

    •  Phased out in high school (0+ / 0-)

      implemented in grade school.  

      The stuff they're teaching my 7th grader now is stuff I learned in high school.  

      The Common Core is a joke.  It was a test designed by a private for profit company to make money and it all but guarantees failure.  Which is fine and good with the privatizers.  They will no doubt gleefully hold up the test scores as proof positive that public schools have failed us and need to be privatized ASAP.  

      This is your world These are your people You can live for yourself today Or help build tomorrow for everyone -8.75, -8.00

      by DisNoir36 on Thu Sep 19, 2013 at 05:26:49 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Not necessarily bad that HS Calculus is phased out (0+ / 0-)

      Depends on what it's replaced with.

      In math more than any other subject (other than foreign languages), a student's success depends on his prior preparation. People who think of themselves as "no good at math" are largely people who fell behind at some point in their school career, and once you fall behind you're screwed unless somebody helps you.  A better mastery of Algebra II and analytic geometry would serve many students better as college freshmen taking a serious calculus course.

      I remember I entered MIT without having taken calculus, which wasn't offered at my high school (not unusual in the 70s).  Other kids had had a year of calculus in HS. fter about six weeks it made no difference, I was just as well prepared for MIT's first semester calculus course as the kids who'd taken AP calculus.

      All that said, some basic mechanical calculus skills are highly helpful for high school students taking physics.  Not the full calculus course, but some basic operations like differentiating and integrating polynomials, which can be taught by rote.

      I've lost my faith in nihilism

      by grumpynerd on Thu Sep 19, 2013 at 02:04:00 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  OK, Kansas... (5+ / 0-)

    The next time a tornado comes and wreaks havoc, don't come running to the evil gubmint for help.  Take personal responsibility instead.  We aren't the boss of you.

  •  Common Core is a corporatist scheme to turn kids (4+ / 0-)

    into mind numbed obedient drones. Standards are good.  The rest of what CC$$ does is pure evil.

    As far as the evolution goes?  That's just pure facepalm land.

    "Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity." --M. L. King "You can't fix stupid" --Ron White -6.00, -5.18

    by zenbassoon on Wed Sep 18, 2013 at 09:24:39 PM PDT

    •  in regards to CC, etc. (3+ / 0-)

      I think the idea of core concepts/etc can be debated legitimately.   The key point here, though, is that Kansas is not remotely arguing this from a legitimate viewpoint, they are arguing from a viewpoint that the state has no requirement to heed to any guidelines listed by the federal government.   That's the absurd land stuff.

      Gandhi's Seven Sins: Wealth without work; Pleasure without conscience; Knowledge without character; Commerce without morality; Science without humanity; Worship without sacrifice; Politics without principle

      by Chris Reeves on Thu Sep 19, 2013 at 12:01:24 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Kansas isn't. Your diary title (0+ / 0-)

        and whole thesis is misleading and hyperbolic. All you present is a party screed. Even if it were the party standard there is no evidence that any or all of it will even be proposed.

        The key point here, though, is that Kansas is not remotely arguing this from a legitimate viewpoint, they are arguing from a viewpoint that the state has no requirement to heed to any guidelines listed by the federal government.  
        This was part of a Republican party document — not of the State of Kansas. You have set up a whole pile on or absurd "punishments" and other awfull-izing from irate wheel spinners. The vitriol spewed out in this one misleading diary just mirrors the wrath poured out by the Tea Party.

        What if all that misplaced energy actually went into some productive work? Letters to Reps and Senators or LTEs on something that matters. And preferably not calling people idiots and telling them off.  

        I'm asking you to believe. Not in my ability to bring about real change in Washington ... *I'm asking you to believe in yours.* Barack Obama

        by samddobermann on Thu Sep 19, 2013 at 09:56:08 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Response to your comments (0+ / 0-)

          (1) in regards to this being hyperbolic, etc... you do grasp that quite a bit of this is written intentionally tongue in cheek and purposely over the top for humorous elements, I hope.

          (2) In regards to misplaced energy...

          As a Kansas Resident, I have to point out that the Kansas right wing republican party broadly controls the legislative agenda of this state.  This is why we've had broad cuts to schools, significant cuts to mental health programs, and we've adopted heinous abortion policies that open the door to everything from suing a biological mother for abortion (do to 'emotional damage') and so on.

          This is, of course, an internal document.   But here in Kansas, it also exists as a legislative agenda.   The reason why people such as myself write these blog posts isn't some raving hysterical lunacy, it is because the party agenda within the opposition of our state is, in fact, raving lunacy and deserves mockery.

          It's pretty well established here that I'm spending significant time advocating for the election of Paul Davis, who is running against Sam Brownback in the next election cycle.

          Part of the narrative that is structured has to be that we are a state with one party completely unhinged and reason needs to return to our statehouse.

          Internal documents and legislative agendas like this make a significant difference in the way people think about the parties.

          It's the same reason why last year, I took time to write about 'Spiritually Dark' Kansas, which got a lot of coverage.. it doesn't mean that was a legislative agenda, it was just a very dumb thing for a party to say.

          But yes, a lot of this is intentionally written in a wild - hopefully humorous, response.

          If it doesn't work for you, then it doesn't work for you :)

          Gandhi's Seven Sins: Wealth without work; Pleasure without conscience; Knowledge without character; Commerce without morality; Science without humanity; Worship without sacrifice; Politics without principle

          by Chris Reeves on Fri Sep 20, 2013 at 04:33:40 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

  •  NCLB? (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    wintergreen8694

    I suppose W's No Child Left Behind was not a federal intrusion, according to Kansas republicans.

  •  Common Core still sucks. (5+ / 0-)

    Common core accentuates the test-score driven rating of schools that is driving the teach-to-the-test mentality that has shitcanned music and art classes.

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/...

    A few paragraphs by the principal, a professional in New York State:

    By Carol Burris

    When I first read about the Common Core State Standards, I cheered.  I believe that our schools should teach all students (except for those who have severe learning disabilities), the skills, habits and knowledge that they need to be successful in post secondary education. That doesn’t mean that every teenager must be prepared to enter Harvard, but it does mean that every young adult, with few exceptions, should at least be prepared to enter their local community college. That is how we give students a real choice.

    I even co-authored a book, “Opening the Common Core,” on how to help schools meet that goal.  It is a book about rich curriculum and equitable teaching practices, not about testing and sanctions. We wrote it because we thought that the Common Core would be a student-centered reform based on principles of equity.

    I confess that I was naïve. I should have known in an age in which standardized tests direct teaching and learning, that the standards themselves would quickly become operationalized by tests. Testing, coupled with the evaluation of teachers by scores, is driving its implementation. The promise of the Common Core is dying and teaching and learning are being distorted.  The well that should sustain the Core has been poisoned.

    •  I could grant the standards could be horrible.. (0+ / 0-)

      But as opposed to the proclamation that teaching religion in school it has to look like genius.   I think the key part here isn't at all what they are opposing, it is the ground on which they use to oppose it (and everything else)

      Gandhi's Seven Sins: Wealth without work; Pleasure without conscience; Knowledge without character; Commerce without morality; Science without humanity; Worship without sacrifice; Politics without principle

      by Chris Reeves on Thu Sep 19, 2013 at 05:22:57 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  One Way to Teach Evolution (4+ / 0-)

    Is to tell the students that this way of looking at biology is what most employers are going to expect of people in the biological sciences, so the students should at the very least use this way of thinking for purposes of education and future employment, whether or not they personally believe.

    •  exactly. and then in comparative religion class (0+ / 0-)

      they can learn about how many other creation stories there are and have been that we know of. Keep 'em separated. They can go to Sunday school on Sundays and Wednesday nights.
          I was totally surprised when my surgeon recently was very concerned to make sure that I wasn't pregnant before he did a D&C on me and in a loud voice announced "My God won't let me disturb it if it's in there already" and yet a few months later, when it became clear that my whole womb was malfunctioning, even though I wasn't in menopause he cheerfully removed it for me.
           So here's a guy who can successfully manage both the spiritual and scientific sides of the same issue. This is how it should be presented to the youth who may want to walk that ethical line. I mention this here because that kind of an outburst of faith just doesn't usually happen around here, in the north where we've been called "the frozen chosen." Turns out his diplomas etc. are from Alabama.

      We are all pupils in the eyes of God.

      by nuclear winter solstice on Thu Sep 19, 2013 at 05:04:29 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Tell that to (0+ / 0-)

      .. the HR department at the Creation Museum.

      I've lost my faith in nihilism

      by grumpynerd on Thu Sep 19, 2013 at 02:06:54 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  but this is what church is for (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Kimbeaux, wasatch
    The standards were opposed by some because they treat evolution of species as a fact and offer no discussion of religious-based theories such as creationism or intelligent design
    do their churches suck that bad that they have to use the public school system?

    (It's the question I plan on asking if and when my local school district ever decides to mess around with science standards.)

    Dawkins is to atheism as Rand is to personal responsibility- mperiousRex.

    by terrypinder on Thu Sep 19, 2013 at 05:10:44 AM PDT

  •  and while we're at it? (0+ / 0-)

    Dawkins is to atheism as Rand is to personal responsibility- mperiousRex.

    by terrypinder on Thu Sep 19, 2013 at 05:26:33 AM PDT

  •  Can't wait for GOP to vote against gravity... (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Hillbilly Dem, tmservo433
    •  It's just a theory nt :) (0+ / 0-)

      Gandhi's Seven Sins: Wealth without work; Pleasure without conscience; Knowledge without character; Commerce without morality; Science without humanity; Worship without sacrifice; Politics without principle

      by Chris Reeves on Thu Sep 19, 2013 at 05:36:06 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  The world is moving on and the kids of Kansas (0+ / 0-)

    will be left behind in the new world of science-based everything

  •  Won the civil war, lost the Reconstruction. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    zinger99

    Kansas, of all states, wants slavery back. Lawrence should form its own state, like West Virginia did.

  •  Let Kansas do what it wants (0+ / 0-)

    If they don't want to follow Federal LAWS,
    then they don't get Federal MONEY.

    Take a guess at how long that lasts.

    The Governor will be begging for Federal money two
    seconds after the next batch of tornados rips the state
    into little pieces.

    On Giving Advice: Smart People Don't Need It and Stupid People Don't Listen

    by Brian76239 on Thu Sep 19, 2013 at 07:32:50 AM PDT

  •  Kansas was not a Confederate state. (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    tmservo433, Ahianne, barbwires, davewill

    The diary is well written, and makes its point. Tipped and recommended! So glad I don't live there!

    But it seems to imply that Kansas was part of the Confederacy. It wasn't even a state at that time. If I remember my hisory, it was years of violent battles over whether to allow slavery to expand into Kansas territory("Bleeding Kansas") that helped start the Civil War.

    •  Oh no I'm aware of that (0+ / 0-)

      I mean that's basic.  I a wasn't trying to imply that they were then, I'm stating they act as though that side won the war now. ;)

      Gandhi's Seven Sins: Wealth without work; Pleasure without conscience; Knowledge without character; Commerce without morality; Science without humanity; Worship without sacrifice; Politics without principle

      by Chris Reeves on Thu Sep 19, 2013 at 07:55:26 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  I painful living & working with the stoopid daily (0+ / 0-)

    it just plain hurts...

    In traffic this morning one of the minions was cussing and
    screaming at me about Obama and the liberal media, making mad gestures at me with multiple fingers and motions...
    I flipped him off and smiled pretty... which made him madder...
    gotta start watching myself, he was vein popping, red faced mad.  

    As he drove off into the sunrise, I saw the bumper sticker on
    the back of his car saying "I don't believe the Liberal Media lies"

    heh... another disillusioned Rush listener....

    "It is horrifying that we have to fight our own government to save the environment." *Ansel Adams* ."Even if you are on the right track, you'll get run over if you just sit there."*Will Rogers*

    by Statusquomustgo on Thu Sep 19, 2013 at 07:58:31 AM PDT

  •  wrong issue to fight this on (0+ / 0-)

    This is NOT "Brown v. Board." The Federal government does not, in fact, have plenary Constitutional authority over the content of teaching in every classroom in the US. Brown was decided on other grounds, the reach of the equal protection clause.

    If I'm remembering correctly, it was Pres. Bush and the "No Child Left Behind" Law that started the push for Federally-imposed standards. I consider NCLBL to be generally bad law, bad constitutional theory, and bad educational theory. If, say, Vermont wanted to buck it, I'd applaud.

    So yes, the states have to yield to the Federal government, in areas where the Constitution gives the Feds authority. And I'd defend the expansion of that Federal area to include minimum wage laws, environmental regulations, and all sorts of other economic measures that the Founding Fathers never imagined.

    But I have quite a bit of sympathy with the push-back against the Feds trying to set standards for every schoolroom in the country. I may disagree with Kansas' choice on what to push against and why, but not on Constitutional grounds.

    •  Yes and No (0+ / 0-)

      First, I understand exactly what you are getting at with regards to standards.

      Second, there are key problems with the argument being voiced here.  They are:  This standard is NOT in any way a federal standard, it's a standard the states adopted amongst governors (so their case is reactionary and wrong), and more importantly, their case is not predicated on defining standards, it is instead designed around the idea of rejecting all standards.

      As others have noted there are places that have their own standards that are not part of this, but that is not at all what Kansas is attacking.

      The entire point of trying to get across the wit element here isn't to say I'm a huge fan of the standard (I'm not) but rather the state of Kansas is so willing to fault everything on the federal government and declare themselves in rebellion that they have no clue what they are rebelling against, and more importantly, all they really desire is to put religion back in schools.

      Even the most disastrous standard does not apply to this ground that they are proposing.

      :)

      Gandhi's Seven Sins: Wealth without work; Pleasure without conscience; Knowledge without character; Commerce without morality; Science without humanity; Worship without sacrifice; Politics without principle

      by Chris Reeves on Thu Sep 19, 2013 at 03:36:25 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  ks board of education (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    elfling, samddobermann

    A couple of years ago I worked a 6-month contract programmer job at the KS Board of Education.  Believe it or not, it is a very well-run place with dedicated people who work really hard and don't make a lot of money for the important work they do.  Professional in every sense of the word.  

    Now, every now and then some crazies get elected as a board member, but there are usually enough other votes to keep them at bay (and if for some reason the crazies have a majority it NEVER lasts beyond one election cycle).   I found no crazies inside the organization itself.  Just normal hard-working people.

    So, I have no doubt that even if the Common Core were not implemented that the old standards would be put back into place and they are pretty standard stuff.  As long as the crazies don't get to write the standards we'll be ok.  And even if they do we'll throw them out again and put things right again. Rural Kansas may have some hard-core stupid going on, but in the cities and suburbs we love and support our schools.

    •  Yes.. (0+ / 0-)

      I worked on several campaigns for board members, most have a head on their shoulders and do well; the issue here is really that the public is so eager to throw all of 'them there edjumacators' (spelling and diction corrected) out with any proposal they make if any of those proposals lead to evolution being taught as the primary standard.

      Gandhi's Seven Sins: Wealth without work; Pleasure without conscience; Knowledge without character; Commerce without morality; Science without humanity; Worship without sacrifice; Politics without principle

      by Chris Reeves on Thu Sep 19, 2013 at 03:37:38 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Thanks for this. It's good to hear (0+ / 0-)

      from  an insider. This diary is just hysterics about a repub party document, not an established government policy.

      But your excellent comment points up a critical issue. We, liberals, need to run for — school boards. All school boards are important, local and state wide.

      The left frothes at the smallest least meaningful provocations which is exactly what the right wing wants. We spin our wheels and sputter. They go for the offices.

      I'm asking you to believe. Not in my ability to bring about real change in Washington ... *I'm asking you to believe in yours.* Barack Obama

      by samddobermann on Thu Sep 19, 2013 at 11:25:29 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Fortunately, (0+ / 0-)

    We have them completely surrounded.

    I feel like I'm taking crazy pills!

    by itsjim on Thu Sep 19, 2013 at 12:57:23 PM PDT

  •  I want to go back to Oz (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    bleedingheartliberal218

    I moved to Kansas three years ago. I've lived in a lot of states, but this is the bottom of the barrel. The Koch brothers put their Republican puppets in power, who then divert the attention of the moronic faithful by talking about god, guns and gays. Once in office, they get to work transferring wealth from the bottom to top, while destroying opportunity and hope.

    I feel like Dorothy who after tapping her shoes three times, realizes she just traded the magic kingdom of Oz for a pig pen.

  •  Um... (0+ / 0-)

    Kansas never seceded as far as I can tell.  Ya'll were on the Union side during The Late Unpleasantness.  And for that matter we were too until that Lincoln fella tried to federalize our militia to retake Sumter.

    I'll believe corporations are people when one comes home from Afghanistan in a body bag.

    by mojo11 on Fri Sep 20, 2013 at 10:18:07 AM PDT

  •  No problem (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Damnit Janet

    Just defund every education program they have, deny them any disaster aid. close all military bases in the state and terminate any all government contracts with Kansas, defund monies for bridge repairs, road construction, farm subsidies, national weather reporting, etc.  Then we can watch them squiggle and squirm when they realize just how much of thier "independence" is dependent on federal money.

    No being has inherent power, only the illusion of power granted by others who similarly have none.

    by Mark701 on Fri Sep 20, 2013 at 01:11:12 PM PDT

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