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CREDO Action is stepping up their efforts calling on Governor Jerry Brown (D. CA) to reject fracking in the state of California:
2013 was California's driest year in recorded history. But the devastating drought isn't stopping Governor Brown from signing off on a massive expansion of water-intensive fracking, which not only permanently contaminates vast quantities of water but also fuels climate-change-driven extreme drought.

Governor Brown's administration recently proposed regulations that, far from protecting California from toxic fracking, give it an official stamp of approval. The state is accepting public comments on the regulations for just under another week, which gives us a crucial opportunity to demonstrate the depth and intensity of public opposition to fracking by flooding the state with tens of thousands of public comments condemning this dangerous proposal -- and, hopefully, pressure Governor Brown to change course.

Tell Governor Brown: Scrap your dangerous fracking regulations and ban fracking now. Click here to submit a public comment:

http://act.credoaction.com/...

The most important flaw in Governor Brown's fracking regulations is that they allow fracking, as well as other dangerous oil-extraction techniques like acidizing, in which huge quantities of acid are injected underground. There are no regulations that can make fracking safe. However it's regulated, fracking contaminates water, produces toxic air pollution, creates dangerous wastewater, industrializes communities, and accelerates climate change by allowing the fossil fuel industry to burn and extract otherwise inaccessible oil and gas.

Governor Brown has called climate change "the world's greatest existential challenge," repeatedly stated his commitment to reducing carbon pollution from fossil fuels, and fought for renewable energy. But Governor Brown can't have it both ways: No real climate leader would frack California. Fossil fuel companies already have proven reserves of oil, gas and coal far greater than what we can burn without hurtling over the climate cliff, so there's just no excuse to extract even more oil with fracking.

Activists across the state are organizing to ban fracking in their cities and counties, to pressure their state legislators into standing up for a statewide ban on fracking, and to confront Governor Brown wherever he makes a public appearance. This public comment period gives us a chance to come together to speak out against fracking and call on Governor Brown to protect our state from this irredeemably toxic industry.

Tell Governor Brown: Scrap your dangerous fracking regulations and ban fracking now. Click here to submit a public comment:

http://act.credoaction.com/...

Thanks for fighting fracking.

Zack Malitz, Campaign Manager
CREDO Action from Working Assets

You can click here to ad your comment:

http://act.credoaction.com/...

Originally posted to pdc on Wed Jan 08, 2014 at 02:00 PM PST.

Also republished by Los Angeles Kossacks, California politics, Climate Change SOS, Climate Hawks, The Democratic Wing of the Democratic Party, and Silicon Valley Kos.

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Comment Preferences

  •  Tip Jar (11+ / 0-)

    Funny Stuff at http://www.funnyordie.com/oresmas

    by poopdogcomedy on Wed Jan 08, 2014 at 02:00:16 PM PST

  •  There are localities in my area (7+ / 0-)

    that report they only have a 60 day supply of water remaining.

    This is the north coast, not the desert.

    Fracking uses a lot of water and it damages the water used permanently, contaminating it so it is fit for no other use. By contrast, much of the water used for crops and drinking does come back to the California ecosystem.

    Water is way more valuable to us than natural gas.

    Fry, don't be a hero! It's not covered by our health plan!

    by elfling on Wed Jan 08, 2014 at 02:14:22 PM PST

  •  Brown can be bought... (0+ / 0-)

    ...just offer him more $$$ than the Petro-Cartel can afford.
    Good Luck.
    LOL.

    Nuclear Reactor = Dirty Bomb

    by olo on Wed Jan 08, 2014 at 03:02:07 PM PST

  •  Credo said: (0+ / 0-)
    The most important flaw in Governor Brown's fracking regulations is that they allow fracking, as well as other dangerous oil-extraction techniques like acidizing, in which huge quantities of acid are injected underground. There are no regulations that can make fracking safe. However it's regulated, fracking contaminates water, produces toxic air pollution, creates dangerous wastewater, industrializes communities, and accelerates climate change by allowing the fossil fuel industry to burn and extract otherwise inaccessible oil and gas.
    The statement "there are no regulations that can make fracking safe" isn't scientifically defensible.   Claiming that the proposed regulations "allow fracking" isn't being candid with the public since hydraulic fracturing has been conducted  on oil and gas wells in CA and throughout the nation for decades.

    While hydraulic fracturing operations are being conducted, no casing wellhead emissions a physically possible so it is erroneous to claim that carrying out a hydraulic fracturing operation causes air pollution.   While air emissions from oil/gas extraction operations are possible before hydraulic fracturing during well construction and after hydraulic fracturing has been completed with flowback/production operations, it is erroneous to say that the hydraulic fracturing of rock strata causes air pollution and toxic emissions.

    Since natural gas production allows switching from coal to gas for electricity generation, such switching is a key greenhouse gas air pollution control strategy, and Credo's comment denies any such benefit.

    While water demands for hydraulic fracturing are a crucial matter, there isn't any evidence the hydraulic fracturing operations inherently and intrinsically cause contamination of either groundwater or surface water.   As a result, there isn't any basis in water quality sciences for a ban on hydraulic fracturing or ban on the production of natural gas.

    •  california doesn't use coal, that's erroneous (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      old wobbly, LinSea

      the big push in CA against global warming is to shift away from gas towards renewables, which we have pretty incredible potential for, given our sun and wind.

      as for your claims that fracking doesn't affect water quality, give me a fucking break.

      •  California has plenty of history of using coal, (0+ / 0-)

        just not at coal fired power plants that are located in the state.   While Los Angeles light and power is getting out of coal by converting some of their coal plants to natural gas and selling others to the Salt River Project, that utility will be increasing not decreasing their overall natural gas combustion utilization to a greater degree than their renewable generation for future generation years.   This is the detail the Michael Brune didn't talk about when they had their news conference about the Los Angeles decision.

        You said:

        as for your claims that fracking doesn't affect water quality, give me a fucking break.
        There isn't any case for claims that a properly installed, completed and operated hydrocarbon well causes pollution of groundwater and surface waters.    There isn't any legitimate water quality science basis for a ban on hydraulic fracturing based on contamination issues.  
        •  Wow. 2 posts completely full of baloney. (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          wu ming

          The failure rate of the concrete casings is 5%. Drill a few thousand wells & there goes your water quality.
          The aggregate methane loss is 3.7%, the result is that natural gas via fracking is very harmful to the atmosphere.
          Add in profligate waste of water & the potential for earthquakes and it is pretty obvious that the oil companies are the only winners in this arrangement.
          If you are really ignorant of the facts, watch Gasland Parts I & II--I suspect your posts have a different genesis however.

          Warren is neither a Clintonesque triangulator nor an Obamaesque conciliator. She is a throwback to a more combative progressive tradition, and her candidacy is a test of whether that approach can still appeal to voters.-J. Toobin "New Yorker"

          by chuck utzman on Wed Jan 08, 2014 at 05:57:42 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  You said: (0+ / 0-)
            The failure rate of the concrete casings is 5%.
            Oil and gas casings are made of high strength steel and not concrete.   Failure of casings isn't a significant problem in actual practice.   Your 5% number from Gasland is a misquote and misinterpretation as dramatized by Josh Fox, who cannot be relied on for accurate information.
            Drill a few thousand wells & there goes your water quality.
            There isn't any physical basis or actual effects shown for areawide water quality effects of drilling thousands of oil and gas well.   Thousands of oil and gas wells have been drilled in Michigan with no evidence that any of these operations have harmed water quality.  Accidents can happen but they are not very frequent.  
            The aggregate methane loss is 3.7%, the result is that natural gas via fracking is very harmful to the atmosphere.
            This 3.7% claim is denied by EPA and the Department of Energy   (and the natural gas industry, itself).  

            Gasland-generated numbers on this topic released in that 2011 Howarth paper on well completions were rejected U.S. EPA when they addressed national methane air pollution control problem emission inventory development.  Gasland claims that natural gas to electricity is worse than coal to electricity is faulty engineering analysis and scientific misconduct that is being marketed by Josh Fox with no scientific and engineering credibility at all.  

            Add in profligate waste of water & the potential for earthquakes and it is pretty obvious that the oil companies are the only winners in this arrangement.
            While evidence from the United State Geological Survey that commercial industrial process wastewater deep injection well operations in Ohio and Oklahoma have been associated with an increase in area seismic activity, such operations are not hydraulic fracturing activities and are not physically similar to hydraulic fracturing of tight formations and shale.  

            Commercial deep disposal wells are drilled into porous rock formations for purposes of disposal of very large volumes of industrial wastewater.   The porous formations that a deep disposal well uses are well below any potable water supplies and such acquifers will typically be separated by confining layers of rock that restrict vertical water transport.

            Hydraulic fracturing operations will involve considerably smaller volumes of water than would be directed on an annual basis to a deep disposal well.   Such fracturing operations are also directed to tight shale formations that don't have much gaseous or hydraulic conductivity.

            Large amounts of water use is a significant problem, but not necessarily an unsolvable one.   There's also an effort to treat and re-use water for subsequent re-injection-use.

            If you are really ignorant of the facts, watch Gasland Parts I & II--I suspect your posts have a different genesis however.
            Gasland is not legitimate scientific and engineering analysis of the process safety and environmental impacts of either hydraulic fracturing specifically or the oil and gas industry in general.

            Gasland is not a documentary.   What Gasland and Josh Fox rantings constitute is work product that is drama, performance art, picture painting, fabrication and conflation.   Gasland make erroneous statements about statutory regulations of the oil and gas industry in order to make drama points in presentation.

            Democrats and environmental advocates that traffic in Gasland's scientific misconduct commit an ethical breach of their stewardship responsibilities by relying on a piece of entertainment as their information source to make decisions.  

            Obsessing about a piece of entertainment and confusing that entertainment workproduct with objective reality is the kind of thing republicans do  -- like former vice-president Dan Quayle carrying on about about a television character, Murphy Brown, who played an unwed mother and this portrayal was somehow going to destroy American fatherhood.

            The best thing for Democrats to do is to unplug from the Gasland conflation/fabrication bubble, and to get on with the job of increasing the effectiveness of how the oil and gas industry gets regulated and how demonstrated problems are re-mediated.   Creating an anti-fracking pseudo-science like Josh Fox has produced is not an effective strategy to address problems that the oil and gas industry does cause and to get any needed process and environmental cleanup.

  •  On our way back from Albany, NY (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    divineorder, LinSea

    to protest fracking in NYS, some of our leaders said they were going to the CA rallies.  Once you foul the water, you can't go back.

    "The light which puts out our sight is darkness to us." Thoreau

    by NancyWH on Wed Jan 08, 2014 at 04:11:56 PM PST

  •  whiskey's for drinking, water's for fighting over (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    LinSea

    compared to the importance of water, the lifeblood of our civilization and california's economy, gas is a trifle. it is the height of insanity to waste water to produce gas, in our climate, and utterly unforgivable to risk spoiling water quality and our aquifers for the sake of gas production. brown, of all people, should know better.

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