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On Tuesday, one of Ukraine's most very violent and bloodiest rebellions started with an attempt to storm the building of the Ukrainian parliament (Verkhovna Rada). It's reported, thus far, 26 people have been killed, with 800 injured. 

In breaking news by RT.com, on Wednesday, a truce was said to have been reached by Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovich and the rebelling opposition.

The president met with the leader of the nationalist Svoboda opposition party, Oleg Tyagnibok, Batkivshchyna opposition leader Arseniy Yatsenyuk, and UDAR party leader Vitaly Klitschko.

Earlier, Batkivshchyna opposition party leader Arseniy Yatsenyuk announced the same thing, according to the party's press office. He stressed that the government was planning to declare state of emergency and a night assault on Independence Square, which has now been canceled.

“The planned assault and clearing off protesters is canceled. A truce has been declared and talks will start to stabilize the situation,” Yatsenyuk said.
.
However, the latest update reports not all will observe the truce:

RT Updates:

Thursday, February 20
01:27 GMT:
The far-right wing of the Ukrainian opposition refuses to observe the truce that was agreed by President Yanukovich and three main opposition leaders. The leader of Right Sector said the group did not sign any agreements and called for the continuation of the “offensive of the resurgent people.”

Wednesday, February 19
23:28 GMT:

Two Ukrainian athletes have refused further participation in the Winter Olympics in a statement of protest against the violence in Ukraine, stating that they are “outraged by recent actions of President Viktor Yanukovich.”

22:56 GMT:
Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovich declared that Thursday be a day of mourning for the victims of the clashes.

22:29 GMT:
NATO Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen said Ukraine’s relationship with NATO will be seriously damaged if the military intervenes against the protesters, Reuters reported.

"I strongly urge the Ukrainian government to refrain from further violence. If the military intervenes against the opposition, Ukraine's ties with NATO will be seriously damaged," Rasmussen said in a statement.

22:12 GMT:
The US is implementing visa sanctions against 20 Ukrainian officials, the State Department said, adding that it believes those individuals are responsible for the use of violence. If the visa sanctions are not enough, the US will be ready for further steps in coordination with the EU to stop the violence in Ukraine, Reuters quoted a senior State Department official as saying.

"Today we moved to restrict visas to some 20 senior members of the Ukrainian government and other individuals we consider responsible for ordering human rights abuses related to political oppression in Ukraine," the official said.

21:59 GMT:
Ukraine's former prime minister, Yulia Tymoshenko, said that Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovich is personally responsible for every person who died in the clashes, according to the statement given to Unian. “We will not be worthy of their memory, if we silently surrender,” she added.

21:42 GMT:
Rioters once again have control of the Ministry of Agrarian Policy and Food in central Kiev.

21:26 GMT:
In the western Ukrainian city of Lvov, “people’s self-defense” brigades have been formed to maintain peace and order. The improvised militia was formed one day after rioters stormed and seized the buildings of the regional administration, local interior ministry and security service departments, and several police departments. A fire was also reported in one of the blocked military installations in Lvov after a Molotov cocktail was thrown at a building.

Meanwhile in Khmelnitsky, a building of the local security service department was set ablaze by petrol bombs. Earlier on Wednesday, four protesters were injured, one critically, by live fire allegedly coming from inside the building during a storming attempt. Conflicting reports said the critically injured woman died in intensive care.

21:17 GMT:
Rioters attempted to storm the local administration building in Poltava, located in central Ukraine.

21:07 GMT:
Rioters shot at police vehicles using firearms, the Internal Affairs Ministry told Unian news agency. Cars were shot at a dozen times, with some shots targeting the drivers.

20:38 GMT:
The meeting between Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovich and the nation’s opposition leaders has just ended. The president met with the leader of the nationalist Svoboda opposition party, Oleg Tyagnibok, Batkivshchyna opposition leader Arseniy Yatsenyuk, and UDAR party leader Vitaly Klitschko. The goal of the meeting was to discuss a peaceful solution to ending the crisis in Ukraine, according to the Batkivshchyna press office.

RT.com :Updates
RT.com: Breaking Story
MSN Account
BBC Account

Other sources: CNN, The Guardian

More photos: Buzzfeed 28 Intense Photos From The Bloodiest Day Of Ukraine's Uprising

Enria.org gives an independent look with numerous photos and videos about the revolution. Warning: Many of the article's images are graphic. 
http://enria.org/...

Photos from December 2013

Statue of Lenin toppled in December as over 100,000 protestors gathered in the streets:

 

Originally posted to Leslie Salzillo on Wed Feb 19, 2014 at 04:32 PM PST.

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Comment Preferences

  •  Awesome - thanks for breaking this! (10+ / 0-)

    And I hope the peace holds.

    Wish I could stay  & follow right now but I have to log off and go do stuff.

    Bbl.

    I don't love writing, but I love having written ~ Dorothy Parker // Visit my Handmade Gallery on Zibbet

    by jan4insight on Wed Feb 19, 2014 at 02:40:49 PM PST

    •  NY Times has a summary of what's happening: (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      jan4insight
      "We will come out of Maidan either free or slaves. But we don't want to be slaves."
      SERHIY SOBOLEV, a member of Ukraine's Parliament, describing the protest standoff in Kiev's Independence Square, known as Maidan.
      -----------

      The 1% always want slaves. And then more slaves.

      "Teachers: the Architects of American Democracy"

      by waterstreet2013 on Wed Feb 19, 2014 at 04:51:14 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Truce->Peace? Hope, and does the US have any (5+ / 0-)

    leverage, like aid we can cut off or something?

    "It ain’t supposed to make sense; it’s faith. Faith is something that you believe that nobody in his right mind would believe." - Archie Bunker

    by Banach MacAmbrais on Wed Feb 19, 2014 at 02:45:34 PM PST

    •  The US has cut itself out entirely by virtue of (10+ / 0-)

      the gaffe that Victoria Nuland, Assistant Secretary of State for European and Eurasian Affairs, made in a tapped phone conversation with the US Ambassador to Ukraine, Geoffrey Pyatt, a conversation that ended up on Youtube and destroyed what was left of any collaborative relationship between the US and both the EU and Ukraine.

      She said "Fuck the EU" as they discussed how they wanted the power sharing arrangements to proceed in Ukraine, the players they wanted included and excluded and how they were to accomplish it. The title of the youtube posting referred to their "puppeteering."

      The upshot is that the EU is now even more alienated from the US than the Snowden revelations have made them, and the Ukrainian opposition has turned entirely to the EU for support while the US is on the side lines.  

      There's a lot more to it than that, but that's a pretty good short version. Here's an article about it and the youtube video.

      "Well, yeah, the Constitution is worth it if you succeed." - Nancy Pelosi, 6/30/07 // "Succeed?" At what?

      by nailbender on Wed Feb 19, 2014 at 03:05:57 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Well, great. OTOH, if we have no leverage, that's (0+ / 0-)

        just one less thing to organize around. After all, it's not like we don't have enough to do, with November right around the corner...

        "It ain’t supposed to make sense; it’s faith. Faith is something that you believe that nobody in his right mind would believe." - Archie Bunker

        by Banach MacAmbrais on Wed Feb 19, 2014 at 03:15:21 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  It's worse than that. We have a lot more to do (9+ / 0-)

          now in the sense of bridge mending, if in fact that's even something the idiots at State are even contemplating.  

          Nuland is a neocon, the wife of a cofounder of PNAC for crissake.  She was doing what New American Century dogma demands, trying to foist US intentions on everyone and fuck the consequences.  That she's even in the position she's in (and hasn't been fired, for gods sake) is an indication of how far down the shitter US Foreign Policy is today.  

          IOW, you can work you way back upstream if you've been letting the current drag you to far the wrong way, but climbing out of the toilet after you've pulled the flush handle is another thing altogether.

          "Well, yeah, the Constitution is worth it if you succeed." - Nancy Pelosi, 6/30/07 // "Succeed?" At what?

          by nailbender on Wed Feb 19, 2014 at 03:25:09 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  We really, REALLY need to keep the Senate. (0+ / 0-)

            A gain or two in the House couldn't hurt, either.

            November is coming.

            "It ain’t supposed to make sense; it’s faith. Faith is something that you believe that nobody in his right mind would believe." - Archie Bunker

            by Banach MacAmbrais on Wed Feb 19, 2014 at 04:58:21 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

      •  The EU never misses an opportunity to miss an (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        greengemini, ChadmanFL

        opportunity.  They shot themselves in the foot in Turkey by dragging their feet on Turkish membership in no small part due to anti-Muslim tendencies throughout Europe that really dwarf North America's issues and, in part in response to that alienation from Europe, Erdogan was elected.  Way to go, Europe.  They have the same issue in the Ukraine; by not reaching for the opportunity to be inclusive of some Eastern European countries, they left the Ukrainians in limbo for too long.

        So, while "Fuck the EU" is certainly impolite, it's accurate and the phone call was indeed meant to be private.

        "The first drawback of anger is that it destroys your inner peace; the second is that it distorts your view of reality. If you come to understand that anger is really unhelpful, you can begin to distance yourself from anger." - The Dalai Lama

        by auron renouille on Wed Feb 19, 2014 at 04:59:45 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  It isn't just impolite, it's imperious. (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Mark Lippman

          She's a true neocon. I once heard another PNAC signatory, James Woolsey (Clinton's CIA director), in a debate with Juan Cole just prior to the invasion of Iraq; here was his response to Cole's deprecation of Bush's laughable Coalition of the Willing, which was indicative of how isolated the US had become in their hegemonic mania:

          If you want a friend, buy a cocker spaniel.
          This isn't how you accomplish FP objectives, it's how you fuck them up.

           And to fault the EU for not bringing Turkey fully into the fold, a country larger than any current member state other than Germany, with intractable internal issues that dwarf that of any current members, is ludicrous. Their Kurdish problem and the seething tension between their military and the burgeoning sectarian politics of the AKP is each reason enough to keep them at bay.  And Erdogan was the mayor of Istanbul, for crissake, back in the 90s. He didn't appear on the scene nlike a golem, like Ahmadenijad did in Iran after Bush drove the moderate Khatami out of power via the idiotic Axis of Evil declaration.  That's how you fuck up a foreign policy,

          "Well, yeah, the Constitution is worth it if you succeed." - Nancy Pelosi, 6/30/07 // "Succeed?" At what?

          by nailbender on Wed Feb 19, 2014 at 06:10:25 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  I'd expect the US to prefer a more (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            nailbender

            isolationist foreign policy considering how little most Americans know about the rest of the world. It would be so much better for everyone.

            Some people might add Cyprus to the list of unresolved issues with Turkey. It still claims the part of the island it occupied, setting up an international border recognized by no country in the world, except Turkey. What Turkey practices there contradicts some of the core principles of the EU: the free flow of people and goods, the use of diplomacy. There are still UN peacekeepers there. The Republic of Cyprus was admitted to the EU but its capital, Nicosia, is technically a divided city on a hostile border.

            There is no existence without doubt.

            by Mark Lippman on Thu Feb 20, 2014 at 04:33:02 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  If the US were a functioning democracy instead of (0+ / 0-)

              a corporatocracy, we would be relatively isolationist, using our DoD for, well, defense instead of hegemony.

              "Well, yeah, the Constitution is worth it if you succeed." - Nancy Pelosi, 6/30/07 // "Succeed?" At what?

              by nailbender on Thu Feb 20, 2014 at 06:39:09 AM PST

              [ Parent ]

      •  ASS Victoria Nuland also let out of the bag that (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        ChadmanFL

        the US has pumped $5 billion into aiding "democratic forces" in Ukraine, basically, I suppose, paying people to riot.

        Was it worth it? Is it the kind of meddling we should indulge in?

        Just asking.

        But $5 billion sure is a lot of food stamps, isn't it?

        We're shocked by a naked nipple, but not by naked aggression.

        by Lepanto on Wed Feb 19, 2014 at 05:24:31 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Uh... no. (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Loge

          What Nylund said is that the US has put $5 billion into the last twenty years, and remember how much of that was post-Soviet reconstruction:

          Since Ukraine’s independence in 1991, the United States has supported Ukrainians as they build democratic skills and institutions, as they promote civic participation and good governance, all of which are preconditions for Ukraine to achieve its European aspirations. We’ve invested over $5 billion to assist Ukraine in these and other goals that will ensure a secure and prosperous and democratic Ukraine.
          During the 1990s, Ukraine received the most US aid of any other country, after Israel and Egypt.   You can see the budget breakdown for 2014 (around $94 million, which is about $10 million less than last year) in specific detail here (pdf)

          Also, there was nothing "let out of the bag" here: this was an official speech, and it's posted on the IIP website.

          Saint, n. A dead sinner revised and edited. - Ambrose Bierce

          by pico on Wed Feb 19, 2014 at 06:08:33 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

  •  Beware of astroturf revolutionaries... (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    chuckvw, Mr Robert, Lepanto, ChadmanFL

    bearing CIA/neolib gifts.

    This is the second attempt by the "west" to take over the Ukraine for the sake of profit.

    •  as opposed to a putin clone? (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Doctor RJ, FG

      play a different record for once. . .

      Difficult, difficult, lemon difficult.

      by Loge on Wed Feb 19, 2014 at 03:07:07 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  It's the U.S. that always plays the same tune. (4+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        chuckvw, Mr Robert, Lepanto, ChadmanFL

        "Freedom!" as an excuse for bringing neoliberalism, austerity and oppression to people around the world.

        •  i don't think you have any argument (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          pico, FG

          the protesters are "astroturf," and to say that willfully ignores the ethnic and linguistic divisions in Ukraine.  I also see no reason to think issues like income inequality or overly close ties between state and business, particularly dirty energy, is a good way to differentiate the U.S. from Russia, from your perspective.  You have a hammer, thus problem is nail.  

          Difficult, difficult, lemon difficult.

          by Loge on Wed Feb 19, 2014 at 03:50:21 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

      •  it's a choice between oligarchs (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        blueoasis, peacestpete, ChadmanFL

        Russian oligarchs and European oligarchs. That is all.

        I don't see that either side is any more benevolent than the other. Whether it's the EU who wants that cheap labor force without all those pesky European labor regulations to keep them from squeezing the Ukrainians for every last drop, or the Russians who want to keep the Ukrainians tightly in their geopolitical orbit as a buffer against the US, no one is looking out for the Ukrainians.

        The politicians of Western Europe, even more than those of the US, love to pat themselves on the back about their concern for human rights and democracy, while looting and pillaging as rapaciously as anyone else. One does well to remember Gandhi's famous riposte when asked about western civilization: "I think it would be a very good idea."

        This long ago stopped being a local protest and instead became a conflict between powerful gangs of international plutocrats. The fates of the Ukrainians are not being decided today by Ukrainians, but by impersonal economic forces before which nation-states are impotent.

        "In America, the law is king." --Thomas Paine

        by limpidglass on Wed Feb 19, 2014 at 04:10:05 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  that's one way of looking at it, (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          pico, peacestpete, Texas Lefty

          but the protestors themselves have legitimate aspirations and shouldn't be so casually dismissed as somehow inauthentic.

          Difficult, difficult, lemon difficult.

          by Loge on Wed Feb 19, 2014 at 04:29:34 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  there are always some protestors (3+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            ManhattanMan, Lepanto, ChadmanFL

            who always have legitimate grievances. Everywhere. Doesn't mean that the government should be toppled.

            The 1% have long since learned how to take existing unrest in an unstable country and manipulate it into an astroturf "revolution" in order to advance their economic interests, as argued here.

            The protestors are a diverse crew. They're not all believers in liberal democracy (although some are) nor are they all simple folk yearning for liberation from the neo-czarist tyranny (although some are); there are also some hard-core skinhead nationalist types who simply see an opportunity to kick some ass. Strange how people who see quite clearly that Putin's brand of Russian nationalism leans heavily on blood-and-soil ideas believe Ukrainian nationalism is totally exempt from these tendencies. "Ukraine for Ukrainians" can mean many, many things.

            I don't know whether a majority of Ukrainians want closer EU integration, no one polled them on this. Yanukovich made the wrong decision (as far as the EU is concerned) and suddenly a revolution springs up on his doorstep. Convenient, wot?

            Anyhow, the Ukrainians are not being offered the benefits of European democracy. No one in the EU is talking about ensuring their political rights or human rights. No, they are being offered free trade. Join our free trade zone, the EU says, and all sorts of good things will follow! Well, we've heard that one before.

            Not every protest is another #Occupy. You could tell #Occupy was genuine by the fact that all elites everywhere feared it.

            This is of a quite different flavor, as the US--the country with a worldwide network of flying robotic death machines daily raining down missiles over a dozen nations--has decided to step into this one and support this revolution to avoid bloodshed.

            "In America, the law is king." --Thomas Paine

            by limpidglass on Wed Feb 19, 2014 at 05:18:52 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  I have no opinion on the toppling, (0+ / 0-)

              as an endgame, but the govts tactics are clearly out of hand and I'm ok aligning against them.

              Difficult, difficult, lemon difficult.

              by Loge on Wed Feb 19, 2014 at 06:42:30 PM PST

              [ Parent ]

            •  This is a joke, right? (0+ / 0-)
              I don't know whether a majority of Ukrainians want closer EU integration, no one polled them on this.
              I'm not sure if you're serious about this or not: the issue's been relentlessly polled since EU market integration began five years ago (and even more broadly before that).  The trend lines are long established: geography, youth, and education are all big factors in EU support.

              Worse, I don't get this cynicism at the idea that the protests began when Yanukovych reneged on the EU process and began talks with Russia.  You clearly have not been following this issue.  Ukraine's been in the middle of a fairly tense set of negotiations about its future, and the various protests, which have been going on since his election (here's a big one from last March), only caught on so powerfully in late November because Yanukovych had his police raid the protest camps and beat up protestors.  Just because Western media hasn't been diligent in covering a country they're rarely interested in doesn't mean that that country's political situation sprang up the moment the cameras arrived.

              I understand the cynicism that greets any sense of American or western oligarchy, because lord knows we have the history to warrant it.  But this idea that Ukraine's protests are astroturf is the stuff of fantasy.

              And this:

              Anyhow, the Ukrainians are not being offered the benefits of European democracy. No one in the EU is talking about ensuring their political rights or human rights. No, they are being offered free trade.
              Are you just completely unfamiliar with the legal requirements of the trade agreement?  (Check out section 3, re: implementation of standards under the European Court of Human Rights, reform of their prison system, justice system, etc.)  This set of requirements were actually passed in March.

              Saint, n. A dead sinner revised and edited. - Ambrose Bierce

              by pico on Wed Feb 19, 2014 at 06:46:02 PM PST

              [ Parent ]

    •  These nations have to be connected with some bloc (0+ / 0-)

      same with Croatia. Either they are connected with the EU, or they are back in the old Soviet Union / Warsaw Pact. And there are serious consequences either way. I am not there, and not an expert on these things, but it looks to me like most people there would rather be part of Europe -- the EU -- than back in the USSR.

  •  Good news (8+ / 0-)

    I have a staff member in Kiev right now, stuck while visiting family.

  •  That's not from Reuters (4+ / 0-)

    but Russia Today, a pro-Kremlin site, and the only source is Yanukovich.  I hope it's true, but the risk in reporting a story like this is the govt is putting this out as an excuse for further crackdown when the opposition fails to "honor" it.  

    Difficult, difficult, lemon difficult.

    by Loge on Wed Feb 19, 2014 at 03:05:31 PM PST

  •  Despite the truce, special forces are still (5+ / 0-)

    throwing occasional sound grenades. But at least it looks like there won't be another assault tonight.

  •  Today's liveblog from The Interpreter (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    pico, peacestpete, jan4insight

    Is here.

    They are also reporting a truce, but are offering cautions as well.

    As through this world I've wandered,
    I've seen lots of funny men;
    Some will rob you with a six-gun,
    Some with a fountain pen.
    -- Woody Guthrie

    by Senor Unoball on Wed Feb 19, 2014 at 03:08:17 PM PST

  •  Why are we citing RT? (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    FG

    They're hardly a neutral party in this.  IMHO, please revise with reliable links :(.  It's kind of a moot point as this is now more widely reported in the Western press anyhow, but going to RT is like going to the Washington Times; they don't even try to pretend that they're neutral.

    "The first drawback of anger is that it destroys your inner peace; the second is that it distorts your view of reality. If you come to understand that anger is really unhelpful, you can begin to distance yourself from anger." - The Dalai Lama

    by auron renouille on Wed Feb 19, 2014 at 04:54:13 PM PST

    •  Enria.com is also sited along with several (0+ / 0-)

      newsgroup links at the bottom.

      "In this world, hate has never yet dispelled hate. Only love can dispel hate." ~ Buddha

      by Leslie Salzillo on Wed Feb 19, 2014 at 04:58:43 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Who is Frank Enria? I've Googled for a long time (0+ / 0-)

        but can find no information at all about him.

        "The first drawback of anger is that it destroys your inner peace; the second is that it distorts your view of reality. If you come to understand that anger is really unhelpful, you can begin to distance yourself from anger." - The Dalai Lama

        by auron renouille on Wed Feb 19, 2014 at 05:04:47 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  The USA has a lot of nerve... (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    ypochris, ChadmanFL

    ...calling on Ukraine to use less violence against protestors.

    I don't know if the protests are legit or not, but I do know if American protestors used molotov cocktails on American police, they would be shot dead.

    The Ukraine government has showed a lot more restraint than we would have. Anyone who doesn't believe me should try building barricades and starting fires and throwing gasoline bombs in Times Square. See if the NYPD uses "violence" to suppress you...

    •  It's not like Times Square (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      ChadmanFL

      It's the Capital, the White House, and all the government offices all over DC.

      So yes, the US government would respond with force. Massive force.

      I have a lot of sympathy for the goals of the protests. But violence against government buildings and people (and police) tends to provoke such a severe backlash that it's rarely a good option.

  •  Just found this amusing tweet: (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Leslie Salzillo, amyzex

    I don't love writing, but I love having written ~ Dorothy Parker // Visit my Handmade Gallery on Zibbet

    by jan4insight on Wed Feb 19, 2014 at 05:49:22 PM PST

  •  thanks for the diary. i've been following this on (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    jan4insight

    the guardian's site & the threads there are being bombarded by pro-putin/kremlin trolls who claim the the whole thing is being engineered by the us & the protesters are neo-nazis paid by the cia -- which is really hilarious given what a fascist putin is & the fact that he paid ukraine's prez a $2+billion bribe aid to pull out of their deal with the eu.

    this is definitely damaging putin's image & he's such a narcissist his head is probably exploding right about now.

    The modern conservative is engaged in one of man's oldest exercises in moral philosophy; that is, the search for a superior moral justification for selfishness. ~ J.K. Galbraith

    by bluezen on Wed Feb 19, 2014 at 06:55:20 PM PST

  •  Hey, okay, we don't have a viable government path (0+ / 0-)

    but isn't there something we can do?  

    "It ain’t supposed to make sense; it’s faith. Faith is something that you believe that nobody in his right mind would believe." - Archie Bunker

    by Banach MacAmbrais on Wed Feb 19, 2014 at 07:24:05 PM PST

  •  Early reports (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    FG

    is that one of the opposition groups, the Banderas, are breaking/rejecting the truce.  Not surprising, they have the most to lose.  The Ukrainian Insurgent Army
    http://en.wikipedia.org/...
    More here.  Virulently Anti Russian, highly nationalistic.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/...

    Germany and Merkel are supporting ex world class boxer, sports hero, and pHD, Vitali Klitschko, a former supporter of the current PM, now an independent opposition leader.  

    The US and Vicky Nuland don't want to back Klitshko (recal  the F*U) statement on phone call.

    The US seems to be supporting Arseniy Yatseniuk, an economist, civil servant, former FM, and very western leaning.  He ran in 2010 and 102, but could never get much momentum.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/...

  •  May I suggest the BBC instead of (0+ / 0-)

    RT and CNN, who are both unreliable and prone to exaggeration and subsequent denial?

    Really, RT and CNN reporting is equally crappy and I would not use them as primary sources on general principle, and in the case of RT, certianly not in the case of this conflict.

    You realize RT is a state propaganda organ, no?

    But then, so is CNN, so maybe they balance.

    No one is coming to save us, the future is in our hands.

    by koNko on Thu Feb 20, 2014 at 08:15:37 AM PST

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