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President Barack Obama listens to comments while meeting with healthcare stakeholders in the Roosevelt Room at White House May 11, 2009. At right is Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)
Here we go again.
Cue the false outrage: the Obama administration has announced that it's extending the March 31 Obamacare enrollment deadline for people who have already begun the application process by March 31, but haven't been able to finish the application.
"Another day, another Obamacare delay," said Sen. Jeff Flake (R-AZ), as GOP lawmakers expressed their frustration with the latest delay to the President's health reform law. […]

Officials said last night that the deadline has not changed, that it remains March 31—but if individuals need extra time to finish their applications, they will get that, a distinction without a difference for critics of the health reform law. […]

For those wondering—in §1311 of the health law, the HHS Secretary is given the power to set dates for enrollment—so there is your legal underpinning for any date change.

House Majority Leader is one of those apparently wondering:
The implementation of ObamaCare is decided more by the whims of the White House political office than by the words written in the law.
@GOPLeader
D'oh. I guess that's what Cantor gets for not actually, you know, reading the law.

And, by the way, this isn't the first time an administration has extended a health care deadline: "With pressure mounting to extend next Monday's enrollment deadline for the Medicare prescription-drug benefit, the Bush administration took another small step in that direction Tuesday, waiving penalty fees for very low-income seniors and people with disabilities who sign up late."

Originally posted to Joan McCarter on Wed Mar 26, 2014 at 10:11 AM PDT.

Also republished by Daily Kos.

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Comment Preferences

  •  Tip Jar (23+ / 0-)

    "The NSA’s capability at any time could be turned around on the American people, and no American would have any privacy left, such is the capability to monitor everything. [...] There would be no place to hide."--Frank Church

    by Joan McCarter on Wed Mar 26, 2014 at 10:11:10 AM PDT

  •  But, Joan, you forget the Prime Directive: (4+ / 0-)

    IOKIYAR

    With the Decision Points Theater, the George W. Bush Presidential Library becomes the very first Presidential Library to feature a Fiction Section.

    by Its the Supreme Court Stupid on Wed Mar 26, 2014 at 10:31:24 AM PDT

    •  Please Change The Narrative! (0+ / 0-)
      House Majority Leader [Eric Cantor] is one of those apparently wondering:
      The implementation of ObamaCare is decided more by the whims of the White House political office than by the words written in the law.
      — @GOPLeader
      D'oh. I guess that's what Cantor gets for not actually, you know, reading the law.
      Not trying to be difficult, but what does Cantor actually "get" for not reading the law? Seriously, try and answer that.

      If the current Republican strategy is to lie about issues, and they have determined that there is little political damage in lying about issues, then what repercussions could Cantor ever face? He won't suffer politically, since he is a a safe GOP district. He has no shame about making public distortions, so nothing will "get" him in that regard.

      Joan, it mat be time to change the narrative that implies that Republican leaders will be "gotten" by anything at all that they say concerning the ACA.

      By the way, that Homer Simpson expletive is properly written as "Doh!"

      Advice from what used to be called the 'peanut gallery.' Little ol' me...

      You meet them halfway with love, peace, and persuasion ~ And expect them to rise for the occasion...

      by paz3 on Wed Mar 26, 2014 at 11:29:01 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  You must be dizzy (5+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    zqxj, TJ, nextstep, Dillonfence, mojo70

    Selbelius swore to Congress 2 weeks ago there would not be an extension.  Others on Sunday talking heads said the same.

    So sayeth the NYT:

    Health Mandate Won’t Be Delayed, Sebelius Says

    WASHINGTON — Kathleen Sebelius, the secretary of health and human services, said Wednesday that the Obama administration would not extend the deadline for people to sign up for health insurance or delay the requirement for most Americans to have coverage.
    Oops, an extension.

    This is not going to help us in the midterms, imho.

    "When you're wounded and left on Afghanistan's plains, And the women come out to cut up what remains, Jest roll to your rifle and blow out your brains An' go to your Gawd like a soldier." Rudyard Kipling

    by EdMass on Wed Mar 26, 2014 at 10:34:56 AM PDT

    •  I don't know, they've been jumping up and (5+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Gentle Giant, Sylv, Chas 981, CS in AZ, hbk

      down having conniptions for so long, I think most people have stopped listening.

      “To the world you may be just one person, but to one person you may be the world.”-Brandi Snyder (in memory of my Nick)

      by YellowDogInGA on Wed Mar 26, 2014 at 11:00:18 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  No. (14+ / 0-)

      It isn't delayed.

      ...the Obama administration would not extend the deadline...
      (emphasis mine)

      They didn't delay the deadline. The deadline is not extended. It is still 31March2014.
      BUT, if you started signing up before the deadline, you've made the deadline AND you're allowed to finish your application after the deadline has passed.

      It is a real difference.

      Besides that, so freakin' what?!? The ACA is a mammoth undertaking- larger than RomneyCare MA. There has to be some play, some leeway, to accommodate glitches as they arise.

      "Non-violence is a powerful and just weapon which cuts without wounding and ennobles the man who wields it. It is a sword that heals." - Martin Luther King, Jr.

      by Gentle Giant on Wed Mar 26, 2014 at 11:07:18 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Yeah, that'll work in the midterms (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Gentle Giant
        Besides that, so freakin' what?!? The ACA is a mammoth undertaking- larger than RomneyCare MA. There has to be some play, some leeway, to accommodate glitches as they arise.
        Let me know when a Dem up for re-election or running anew says that.

        "When you're wounded and left on Afghanistan's plains, And the women come out to cut up what remains, Jest roll to your rifle and blow out your brains An' go to your Gawd like a soldier." Rudyard Kipling

        by EdMass on Wed Mar 26, 2014 at 11:11:18 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  They won't. (0+ / 0-)

          It doesn't fit in a sound bite.

          If it doesn't fit in a sound bite, you have to rely on osmosis, which takes several times more time to work than our national attention span.

          "Non-violence is a powerful and just weapon which cuts without wounding and ennobles the man who wields it. It is a sword that heals." - Martin Luther King, Jr.

          by Gentle Giant on Wed Mar 26, 2014 at 11:22:11 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  big yawn (6+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Chas 981, tb mare, rg611, CS in AZ, rabel, Jakeston

          see kaiser today. No one except a republican freaking cares about this. Most people are tired of even talking about it. Hard fact.

          it's the economy, not ACA.

          "It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it!" — Upton Sinclair

          by Greg Dworkin on Wed Mar 26, 2014 at 11:22:38 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

    •  Not only that (0+ / 0-)

      While the law permits the Secretary of HHS to set the enrollment deadline, the administration earlier claimed that the law did not permit the Secretary to change the deadline once set.

    •  actually, this "extension" (17+ / 0-)

      is like extending the voting hours because you are standing in a fucking long line prior to the closing of polls and the Secretary of State allows for keeping the polls open so everyone who STARTED TO STAND IN LINE at the proper time can finish what they came for.

      How exactly is this going to hurt us in the midterms.  Only gaping assholes would not vote for a democrat because of this issue -- and those gaping assholes are already Republicans or Baggers.

      " My faith in the Constitution is whole; it is complete; it is total." Barbara Jordan, 1974

      by gchaucer2 on Wed Mar 26, 2014 at 11:09:20 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Please do let me know (0+ / 0-)

        When HHS and Admin release the statistics showing "who is in line, as of today, or up until 3/31."  That would certainly subvert the forthcoming attacks of the "gaping assholes".  Yes?

        "When you're wounded and left on Afghanistan's plains, And the women come out to cut up what remains, Jest roll to your rifle and blow out your brains An' go to your Gawd like a soldier." Rudyard Kipling

        by EdMass on Wed Mar 26, 2014 at 11:15:04 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Why should she waste her time? (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          hbk, rabel, QuelleC

          And why are you so upset that people are getting a break to get health care?  

          And why should I be concerned about any attacks by the gaping assholes -- they imagine everything is an assault on democracy.

          " My faith in the Constitution is whole; it is complete; it is total." Barbara Jordan, 1974

          by gchaucer2 on Wed Mar 26, 2014 at 11:28:02 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  Thanks for the truly impressive (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          rabel

          demonstration of critical thinking.

          Is it lonely, trembling in the trench, awaiting the next volley of incoming Republican bullshit?

    •  Yeah, no (10+ / 0-)

      People already in the process of getting signed up get to continue the process of signing up. That's all.

      Delaying the deadline would be saying all comers have a few more weeks/months, whatever to apply. Not the same thing.

      "The NSA’s capability at any time could be turned around on the American people, and no American would have any privacy left, such is the capability to monitor everything. [...] There would be no place to hide."--Frank Church

      by Joan McCarter on Wed Mar 26, 2014 at 11:13:30 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  The finesse (0+ / 0-)

        and political acumen of Dkos as to these issues is not my concern.  The way it plays to the electorate by the opposition is my concern.  We don't seem to be doing a very good job of this, and it so far, is not getting better.

        "When you're wounded and left on Afghanistan's plains, And the women come out to cut up what remains, Jest roll to your rifle and blow out your brains An' go to your Gawd like a soldier." Rudyard Kipling

        by EdMass on Wed Mar 26, 2014 at 11:20:14 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  The way it plays to the electorate (6+ / 0-)

          People will have more time to sign up. More people will sign up for the law.

          How is that a bad thing?

        •  untrue (1+ / 0-)
          Crucially, a majority, 53 percent, say they are tired about hearing about the law and want to move on to other issues. Only 42 percent think the Obamacare debate should continue. A majority of independents has had enough  (51-45). Even 47 percent of Republicans are done with it.
          http://www.washingtonpost.com/...

          see also:

          Views of the ACA remain unfavorable, but the gap is narrowing. The new poll finds that in March, 38 percent viewed the law favorably, versus 46 percent who saw it unfavorably. That’s a substantial narrowing from the 34-50 spread during the dark days of January, and a return almost to where opinion was in September (39-43), before the rollout disaster began.

          – Support for repeal continues to shrink. Only 18 percent want to repeal the law and not replace it, while all of 11 percent want to repeal and replace it with a GOP alternative — a grand total of 29 percent. Meanwhile, 49 percent want to keep the law and improve it, and another 10 percent want to keep it as is — a total of 59 percent.

          Among indys, that keep/improve versus repeal/replace spread is 52-31. Republicans are all alone here, with their spread at 31-58.

          That overall keep-versus-repeal spread has improved for the law since February (when it was 56-31), and even more so since December and October, suggesting a clear trend.

          For the record, the election is not today. There are major issues ahead for D's but ACA is not "The reason" slam dunk.

          "It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it!" — Upton Sinclair

          by Greg Dworkin on Wed Mar 26, 2014 at 11:27:02 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  I don't see why you think it's a big deal. (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          CS in AZ

          Yeah, well, you know, that's just, like, your opinion, man.

          by NMDad on Wed Mar 26, 2014 at 11:28:32 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  You think voters will be SO upset that people who (0+ / 0-)

          started their enrollment by the deadline are going to -- gasp! -- be allowed to complete the process, that democratic voters won't vote in November? Because a few more people were able to get insurance? hokay then.

  •  Eric Cantor: "Bush who?"nt (3+ / 0-)

    I have been thinking that I would make a proposition to my Republican friends... that if they will stop telling lies about the Democrats, we will stop telling the truth about them. Adlai E. Stevenson

    by shoeless on Wed Mar 26, 2014 at 11:04:00 AM PDT

  •  This is a good thing, there are a F-load of (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Gentle Giant, reginahny, ferg, highfive

    document requirements in some instances, simply because all of the bureaucratic elements haven't been standardized

    Warning - some snark may be above‽ (-9.50; -7.03)‽ eState4Column5©2013 "I’m not the strapping young Muslim socialist that I used to be" - Barack Obama 04/27/2013 (@eState4Column5).

    by annieli on Wed Mar 26, 2014 at 11:06:01 AM PDT

  •  ACA's Individual mandate penalty for not (0+ / 0-)

    complying allows for a person to be uninsured for upto 3 months and not be subject to a penalty.

    If a person were not otherwise excluded from the penalty,
    does this mean, people who are not insured for the first 4 months of the year but have insurance in May will be exempt from the individual mandate penalty?

    The most important way to protect the environment is not to have more than one child.

    by nextstep on Wed Mar 26, 2014 at 11:07:27 AM PDT

    •  My understanding (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      hbk

      is that person would not have to pay the full penalty, but a prorated rate for the time not insured.

      "The NSA’s capability at any time could be turned around on the American people, and no American would have any privacy left, such is the capability to monitor everything. [...] There would be no place to hide."--Frank Church

      by Joan McCarter on Wed Mar 26, 2014 at 11:17:37 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Frankly, (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    ferg, OregonWetDog, hbk, Jakeston

    I find myself ceasing to care what the GOP thinks and feels about anything as their reactions are predicated solely by what is politically expedient for them. You can't trust that anything they express is at all genuine.
    For example, budget deficits meant nothing to the GOP, and they even said so, during the two terms of George W Bush. They only got frantic and wild-eyed about budget deficits when they wanted to restrict how much financing Democrats could get to achieve their goals- to accomplish something while a mixed-race American Democrat is President of the United States.

    You.can't.believe.republican.emoting. They just aren't genuine about anything.

    "Non-violence is a powerful and just weapon which cuts without wounding and ennobles the man who wields it. It is a sword that heals." - Martin Luther King, Jr.

    by Gentle Giant on Wed Mar 26, 2014 at 11:13:51 AM PDT

  •  Oh come on. It IS another delay. (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Gentle Giant, Dillonfence

    Just like the ones that kept slipping til March 31.

    No, it's not good news.
    No, it's not a shining example of a well-oiled machine.

    But, in the end, it is what it is, and how much will it matter 5 years from now? Ten years?

    I know there's a lot of focus on November, but this is hardly a big enough deal -- especially after all of the 4th quarter fiascos -- to matter.

    If anything, it's a selling point: The administration has the flexibility to react to problems so that people aren't screwed.

    LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

    by dinotrac on Wed Mar 26, 2014 at 11:13:58 AM PDT

    •  Not a delay, imho, but I agree with your (0+ / 0-)

      sentiment.

      NBD. Really. NBD.

      But we know how "some people" love to create false scandals and beat them to death and beyond hoping something sticks. This will be in that vein. Not really a scandal, but the same process applies.

      If the GOP says something often enough, weak-thinking people like, say, their voting base, will come to believe it's true. And the minority who know better will embrace the meme anyway in a conscious effort to misinform.

      It isn't new. And there are signs its effectiveness is weakening among those who aren't true-believing koolaid partiers.

      "Non-violence is a powerful and just weapon which cuts without wounding and ennobles the man who wields it. It is a sword that heals." - Martin Luther King, Jr.

      by Gentle Giant on Wed Mar 26, 2014 at 11:20:07 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  It's really not a big deal (3+ / 0-)

      you're right there. But no, not a delay.

      To use the metaphor that they used for the Dec. 31 deadline, when they let people in the process of applying keep applying, it's like election day when everyone standing in line gets to vote, even if the polls are officially closed.

      "The NSA’s capability at any time could be turned around on the American people, and no American would have any privacy left, such is the capability to monitor everything. [...] There would be no place to hide."--Frank Church

      by Joan McCarter on Wed Mar 26, 2014 at 11:22:00 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  It's not a delay (3+ / 0-)

      Delaying the employer mandate is a delay. A part of the law, in that case, is not being implemented.

      This is about making sure everyone who wants to sign up can.

      And I think that's the main reason the GOP is upset. More people signing up makes repeal that much harder.

      •  Call it what you will, but the deadline has been (0+ / 0-)

        extended again.  in my view, that's exactly what a delay is.

        If I were the GOP, I'd make hay over it, too, but...

        There be dragons there.

        How about this for a talking point:

        "Yeah, yeah, I don't like the way things have gone, either, but...we could push things off for a month of Sundays and you would still get something before the Republicans get around to it."

        "With all of their brilliant insights, I wonder why Republicans didn't roll up their sleeves and help us make a better law instead of sitting on the sideline and pouting."

        etc.

        LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

        by dinotrac on Wed Mar 26, 2014 at 12:24:38 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  In the senate.....Barrasshole gives his usual ACA (0+ / 0-)

    sux routine this AM......Chris Murphy gives an ACA is working pitch about half an hour ago....Barrasshole 'races' down to the floor to tell Murphy he's all wrong...it still sux........Last one out is a rotten egg.

  •  Rush is apoplectic about the delay (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    StillAmused

    Evidently he want the government to impose the penalties immediately.  Not so sure how that will play with Dittoheads since they are one of the groups that seems to be slow about signing up.

    My response to wingers is to compare ACA rollout to Part D rollout or the Medicare rollout or the SS rollout which took years to accomplish

  •  For people who supposedly love law and (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    jan4insight, StillAmused

    hate regulation, they don't seem to have much of a grasp on the difference between law and regulation.

  •  it is only fair to let people - website still (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    QuelleC

    crashes (probably)..it took me 1 month of quite a few phone calls for my application to process.. It completed the day before they took it down for 3 days during the Feb 15th deadline!  I was lucky to have insurance for March.

  •  Gasp, I agree with Cantor... (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    HangsLeft, mojo70

    If Obama had merely limited the extensions to those who had difficulty signing up because of the initial access problems, then it would seem reasonable. That he has made exceptions for everyone and their grandma in spite of the law calls into question any delay - even reasonable ones.

    And why is the extension needed?

    In my mind, I'd make this thing like tax day. Its fucking April 15. That's the day. Sign up or you're late. If you need extension because its too complicated for you or you need more info, ask for a personal exception (before the deadline) and you'll probably get it.

    Stop soft peddling this thing. Either it is critical that people get covered, or its just a good idea. If its the latter, then just tackle this issue like smoking cessation and obesity and quit issuing red lines that keep moving.

     

  •  For those Republicans (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    tb mare, hbk

    forced to divide their time between groveling for Koch money and taking their scheduled turn pissing on the White House fence, achieving a modest grasp of the difference between enabling legislation and resulting administrative regulation is simply a bridge too far.

  •  Since I'm in limbo, that gives me some hope... (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Illegitimi non carborundum

    I'm supposedly enrolled for April 1 but, after three weeks, the insurance company still has not received my paperwork. Because my issue has been "escalated" to a higher level for resolution by the ACA folks, I've been advised not to scrap my application and start over as that could confuse things even more than they are now. I am going to try to get the insurance company to push my start date back to May 1 to allow more time to straighten it all out and give notice for my existing policy.

    Just another faggity fag socialist fuckstick homosinner!

    by Ian S on Wed Mar 26, 2014 at 11:46:45 AM PDT

  •  So government is being flexible and responsive (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    skillet, hbk

    ... not rigid, calendar-bound, and bureaucratic.

    You know, the kinds of pro-consumer practices adopted by the business community. Republicans should like that, right?

  •  The push toward single payer steps up... (0+ / 0-)

    This usual media hysteria from the tea party GOP is all the proof we needed about their agenda.

    Numbers showed that 48000 Americans a year died for lack of healthcare access, even if they were insured at the time with the worthless policies they had through employers at the time. When reforms entered, insurers had to drop those policies and offer policies that were worth paying for. That delayed sign ons for some.

    Congress again shot itself in the collective congressional foot. When the tea party GOP fooled around with reforms, they screwed over their insurer buddies in the financial services industry. Some of their party defected and Boehner & McConnell lost more influence. Boehner had actually been playing the market and got caught by a fellow GOP member in FL. That charge was dropped later. Somebody talked to somebody in the GOP, as usual.

    When everybody is a member of the same club, it is hard to press charges since everybody is guilty. They are all bought in along with traitor Dems who need to be removed and sent back to the GOP. Max Baucus is one Dem we don't need. He opposed healthcare reforms early on. He then sang a different tune later on.

    This is the most popular market offering insurers have ever seen. As the pool of insured grows larger, costs decrease for insurance products. Insurers actually benefit from more insured. The policies have to be worth paying for. This is how insurance always worked before the Bush & Co administration got orders from buddies in Congress.  

    Since this program is so popular, costs decrease for everyone. That popularity proves that good products sell and by the millions. Insurers see this.

    States that did not expand Medicaid either have to get on board or find another way to fund their meager offerings in state/federal programs. The fewer people on these programs, the more likely those taxes sent to those programs decrease. That allows more money to remain in the domestic economy which enriches everyone, esp small biz which provides 80% of hiring in this country. SBA is busy promoting start ups for veterans and minorities and females. That has been successful so far.

    If the GOP continues to resist reforms due to commands from insurers, they will end up alone. When the bulk of the population has coverage, who is left to fight the futile battles of the financial services industry? Boehner and McConnell as a devoted couple. Everybody else in the remaining GOP can run away if they choose and get elected which is all they care about anyway.

    Do insurers need Boehner and McConnell anymore? I don't think so. Where do these two longtime corrupt pols go for financial support now? They may go for cash to Ag or real estate. They have that now.

    (FYI: The Obama admin previously selected those two for removal due to obstruction of needed infrastructure improvements in KY/Ohio. That was a handy issue to use to again make it clear that those two are on the outs. Kasich backed up the GOP dysfunction in Ohio by removing 56 million from our transportation projects thus harming Cincinnati Ohio, which is "urban" and Dem. See how the GOP works against jobs and investment? We are supposed to blame the feds and Dems etc. Preventing us from voting is the next emphasis from the Kasich admin here in "urban" and Dem Cincinnati. That failed before, too.) Sorry for the tangent but this is scenario we see in SW Ohio. GOP influence is on the wane and entirely due to their own activities.

    In order to cope with the economic drain from the financial services/insurance industry, we can now go ahead with the original plans to have a single payer system and keep our own money here. If we choose to have an intelligent system, we could own our own products and keep the proceeds here to enrich our domestic economy. That is the big push right now and from all sides. Any program this popular will have competition and it looks like all the handpicked financial services slaves in Congress did was push that idea forward. Their opposition backfired as usual and now with that kind of demand made clear, competition will heat up. Why not? This is an attractive market with pent up demand.

    The smart money may be betting on a domestic program in which we make money here. That was posed by Pres. Nixon back in the 1960's. We would see biz and job growth out of that single payer effort as well as cost savings. You can see where insurers after short term, fast cash really screwed themselves over. Greed is not good for their own market.

    The future looks like a single payer push so far. Over time, our own domestic economy would benefit tremendously from ownership. The billions we send elsewhere to foreign corps in the financial services industry could be kept here.

    At this time, I would put a bet on the success of domestically owned single payer system for the US. Other stuff has to be cleaned up, namely taxes. If successive administrations make this a priority, the US grows wealthier and small biz grows again. In that case, hiring again grows and we see where that goes. Higher wages are also possible. The demand for goods and services would grow as a result of consumers have more discretionary income. That creates more jobs.

    Costs of business decreases as the demand for the products expands. Jobs with benefits are then possible again. A normal market is possible once we can remove the burdens of carrying water for certain industries which pay no taxes and which send our money elsewhere.

    When Wendell Potter said that insurers have rendered themselves irrelevant, he may be right. These reforms are the first step in removing the influence of the financial services industry over own government and our domestic economy. If enough informed Americans vote for qualified candidates for office, the insurers are sent back to their sector as businesses. They would no longer run Congress and determine law for us. If we decide to own our own healthcare services, the insurers have little say at all. That would be a dramatic shift in elections and campaign financing right there. Transparency in campaign financing would render special interest funders an opportunity to be held accountable. I don't think they want that at all.

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