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Colbert's Raised Eyebrow
Ashley Parker strains the tea leaves of the North Carolina Senate primary...Maureen Dowd waxes lyrical over Colbert...Kathleen Parker says no one should be afraid of the big bad Colbert... Frank Bruni wonders when it will be time for a Stephanie Colbert... and Ross Douthat complains that right wing propaganda doesn't get equal time... but first...

Dana Milbank on one way that this Congress is better than those that have come before.

I have here in my hand a list of six people who think Darrell Issa is a fellow traveler of Joseph McCarthy.

I compiled these names while watching Issa, chairman of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee, lead his panel’s proceedings Thursday to hold former IRS official Lois Lerner in contempt of Congress. Among the half-dozen Democrats who made the comparison:

“What we’re about today brings us right back to the McCarthy era,” Rep. Gerald Connolly (D-Va.) said.

Rep. Tammy Duckworth (D-Ill.) accused Issa of “stripping away the constitutional rights of an American” in a way that “has not been taken by Congress since the days of Senator McCarthy.”

The ranking Democrat on the panel, Elijah Cummings of Maryland, said Issa was attempting “something that even Joe McCarthy could not do in the 1950s.”

And Rep. John Tierney (D-Mass.) read aloud an opinion that “Issa’s investigations closely resemble Senator Joseph McCarthy’s 1950s red-baiting.”

“I have more, Mr. Chairman,” Tierney added.

Issa tapped his gavel and offered a sardonic reply: “And if you had more time, I’m sure you would use it.”

Sorry to interrupt this Red Scare rerun, but the Democrats are wrong. Darrell Issa is no Joe McCarthy.

It’s not for lack of trying. As I've noted, the California Republican, during his lamentable tenure running the committee, has been reckless, dishonest, vain and prone to making unsubstantiated accusations.

But Issa's McCarthyism is a faint echo of the real thing, for one very important reason. McCarthy was feared; Issa isn't taken seriously. This is a rare bit of good news about modern politics: It’s a bad time to be a demagogue.

There have been demagogues in all eras, but they gain traction only in times of fear, when would-be opponents are afraid to dissent. In McCarthy’s time, government and private-sector workers alike feared workplace loyalty tests, and lawmakers feared losing their jobs. “Even politicians who could see through McCarthy didn’t dare challenge him, because voters were voting people out who challenged McCarthy,” said Landon Storrs, a University of Iowa historian who wrote a book on the Red Scare.

Clearly, Milbank doesn't spend enough time watching them build statues to Issa on Fox News, or visit conservative blogs where the only complaint about Issa is that he's just not demagogy enough.  
There may be some who fear Issa, Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Tex.) or other practitioners of neo-McCarthyism. But at least as many are unafraid to call these men dangerous or buffoons. This is largely because there is no enemy that poses the sort of threat the Soviet Union did. But there is also a felicitous side effect of the polarization of the two parties: Because there is no longer ideological overlap, as there was in the 1950s, Democrats are unafraid to challenge the likes of Issa.
So there you go. A benefit to a Congress that never agrees on anything, is that at least no one is afraid to point out an idiot.

Let's see if anyone else has good news...

Ashley Parker breaks out the field guide to Republicans of North Carolina.

There is a Tea Party candidate who talks about the Constitution and has the backing of Senator Rand Paul. There is a Baptist pastor, endorsed by Mike Huckabee, who wears a “Jesus First” lapel pin and has led the fight against same-sex marriage. And there is a Republican state lawmaker — supported by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and $1 million from Karl Rove’s American Crossroads group — standing up for the party establishment.

In the high-profile Republican primary for Senate here, the divisions that are gripping the party nationally are playing out powerfully, expensively and often very messily. And, after haunting losses in 2012 in which far-right Senate candidates prevailed in primaries only to collapse in the general election, the Republican establishment is determined to stifle the more radical challengers.

...

The Senate race comes at a time when the state’s political identity is in flux. North Carolina is an increasingly purple state — Barack Obama narrowly won it in 2008, and Mitt Romney carried it in 2012. The combination of Research Triangle Park, with its investments in biotechnology and medical research; a strong university system; and Charlotte’s banking and financial centers has attracted an influx of new residents. Yet at the same time, the Statehouse is trending conservative, with Republicans controlling the governor’s office and both houses of the legislature for the first time in more than a century.

Just how is that tea-stained state house working out for North Carolina?
...Thom Tillis, the speaker of the North Carolina House... has attracted the most money from the Republican donor and business class. ...

While Mr. Tillis is viewed as the favorite of mainstream Republicans, he is far from moderate: Under his leadership, the legislature passed broad restrictions on voting, rejected the Medicaid expansion provided under President Obama’s health care law and passed an amendment to ban same-sex marriage, among other measures.

So, North Carolina Republicans, Vote Tillis... if, you know, you can vote after the legislature has worked so hard to stop nasty old democracy.

Maureen Dowd takes a week off from her mean girl shtick to praise the future king of late night.

I don't remember much about being on Stephen Colbert’s show.

It all passed in a blur of fear.

I remember him coming into the makeup room to remind me that he was going to be in character as a jerk.

I remember that he held up my book about gender and asked if it was “soft-core porn.”

I remember he asked me if I wanted to hold his Peabody and I told him I did, so he jumped up to grab the TV award from the mantel.

The experience reminded me of a 1937 musical called “A Damsel in Distress,” where Fred Astaire guided Joan Fontaine, clearly not a dancer, around a lawn, soaring for both of them.

Colbert was as quicksilver with his wit as Fred was with his feet. And like Astaire’s more talented partner Ginger Rogers, who had to dance backward and in heels, Colbert was doing two things at once that were very hard. He was dazzling as a satirist and improv comedian while mimicking a buffoonish right-wing broadcaster.

Jon Stewart once described the level of difficulty to me this way: “It’s as though you’re doing your show in Portuguese.”

The reason “The Colbert Report” worked, Stewart said, when I interviewed the two comics for Rolling Stone in 2006, was that Colbert could act like an obnoxious egoist, but his “basic decency can’t be hidden.”

Colbert is witty and a good interrogator without being twisted, as Johnny Carson was.

Maureen also recognizes what we're giving up in this exchange.
And it’s a sad double blow, after all. It’s not only Letterman who’s retiring, but the blowhard doppelgänger of Colbert.

Carson was the Walter Lippmann of comedy, wielding enormous influence over the reputations of politicians he mocked. Stewart and Colbert took it a step further. They became Murrow and Cronkite for a generation of young viewers.

Much as we will all miss Stephen Colbert, I can't wait to meet this other guy... Stephen Colbert.

And hey, if someone else could be James Bond once Sean Connery moved on, why can't someone else step into the Brooks Brother's suit of that other Stephen Colbert? I nominate our own KagroX... he already has the glasses and he's been playing that David Waldman character for years.

Ross Douthat demonstrates that for Republicans, the word "elite"  remains a synonym of "educated."

What the [Brendan Eich and Ayaan Hirsi Ali] cases illustrate, with their fuzzy rhetoric masking ideological pressure, is a serious moral defect at the heart of elite culture in America.

The defect, crucially, is not this culture’s bias against social conservatives, or its discomfort with stinging attacks on non-Western religions. Rather, it’s the refusal to admit — to others, and to itself — that these biases fundamentally trump the commitment to “free expression” or “diversity” affirmed in mission statements and news releases.

This refusal, this self-deception, means that we have far too many powerful communities (corporate, academic, journalistic) that are simultaneously dogmatic and dishonest about it — that promise diversity but only as the left defines it, that fill their ranks with ideologues and then claim to stand athwart bias and misinformation, that speak the language of pluralism while presiding over communities that resemble the beau ideal of Sandra Y. L. Korn.

Look, Ross, let's ignore for the moment that you've lumped together an essay by an undergrad at one college, a dispute over an honorary degree at another, and the actions of a private company in your desire to prove a grand conspiracy. Let's ignore the idea that money and power have nothing to do with being a member of the "elite" but being a college sophomore solidly locks you into that rarefied strata. Let's ignore all the Jell-o on which you constructed your arguments. The truth is, what you're asking for is just... stupid.

No matter how you might wish it, academia is not going to accept climate change denials on the same level as climate scientists who point out the danger. They're not going to accept creationism as equivalent to evolution. They're not going to buy into fantasies that paint every Muslim as a violent terrorist. They're not going to accept that homosexuals are inherently evil or inherently deserving of fewer rights than heterosexuals. That's not because academia has a secret code of liberalism. It's because academia has a very open and public adherence to evidence. to facts, to reality. So long as conservative means "in denial of the basic facts about the world" you can bet it will find little purchase at serious universities.

Diversity does not mean that falsehoods are given the same weight as facts.  And if in your mind "elite" means "stubbornly clings to facts," I can live with that.

Frank Bruni has a problem with the pay gap, and with how it's presented.

Decades into the discussion about how to ensure women’s equality, we have a culture that still places a different set of expectations and burdens on women and that still nudges or even shames them into certain roles.

There was too little recognition of that last week at the White House, where President Obama practiced the timeless political art of oversimplification, reducing a messy reality into a tidy figure and saying that working women make only 77 cents for every dollar that working men earn. He left the impression that this was principally the consequence of direct discrimination in the form of unequal pay for the same job.

Some of it is, and that’s flatly unacceptable.

But most of it isn’t. And the misuse of the 77-cent statistic could actually hurt the important cause of giving women a fair shake, because it allows people who don’t value that goal a way to discredit those of us who do, and because it gives short shrift to dynamics that must be a part of any meaningful, truthful, constructive discussion.

The 77-cent figure speaks to the earnings of all women and all men classified as full-time workers. But it doesn’t adjust for the longer hours that such men generally work. It doesn’t factor in the paychecks of the many men and women who are employed part time.

When all of that comes into play and hourly income is calculated, women make 84 cents for every dollar that men do, according to the Pew Research Center. Even that 16-cent difference, though, isn’t entirely about women earning less money for the same work. It’s influenced by many factors, including the greater percentage of women who slow down their careers because of child-rearing responsibilities and fall behind.

To wit: Among younger women, many of whom have yet to hit that pause button, the hourly “wage gap” is 93 cents on the dollar, according to Pew’s number crunching. Other analyses reach similar conclusions.

But wait. That doesn't mean the gap is imaginary.
In the White House, women made 88 cents for every dollar that men did last year, according to a review by the conservative American Enterprise Institute, and salaries there are determined by hierarchical rank, not managerial discretion. What created the gap wasn't unequal pay for equal work; it was a concentration of women in lower positions. Jay Carney, the White House press secretary, explained this as if it were some sort of exoneration, when it merely raises other, bigger questions. At 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue and elsewhere, why are so many women at the bottom?

Patriarchies, like old habits, die hard. In many arenas, we’re simply accustomed to being led by men. It’s our default, our fallback. With Stephen Colbert’s appointment last week to replace David Letterman, we've continued a period of intense shuffling of the late-night chairs, and each one that belonged to a man went to another man. Chelsea Handler is ending her own show; the days when Joan Rivers was a guest host for Johnny Carson are long gone; and on the major networks around midnight, it’s a boys’ club. Women get to tuck in the children, but not the national television audience.

Okay, I withdraw my nomination. Maybe Lizz Winstead or Katie Halpar could play the next Colbert. Or maybe Negin Farsad. She's already worked with Jon Stewart... and she has the glasses.

The New York Times warns that for many who "failed to start" up the economic ladder during the Great Recession, recovery is just a word.

The Federal Reserve, increasingly optimistic about the economy, is dialing back its stimulus efforts. The International Monetary Fund has raised its forecast for growth in the United States. Congress has long since reduced aid to the economy, with many lawmakers, mostly Republicans, adamant that the economy is better off with less government involvement.

The official line is clear: The worst is over, and recovery has given way to expansion.

But that’s not the whole story. Economic gains so far have mostly benefited those at the top of the income and wealth ladder. Worse, future growth is likely to be lopsided, because the foundation for broad prosperity is arguably the weakest it has been since World War II.

Take, for example, Americans age 25 to 34, the leading edge of the so-called millennials, the generation born in the 1980s and 1990s. They are worse off than Gen Xers (born from the mid-1960s to the late-1970s) were at that age and the baby boomers before them by nearly every economic measure — employment, income, student loan indebtedness, mobility, homeownership and other hallmarks of “household formation,” like moving out on their own, getting married and having children.

My son, who has collected a trio of degrees while chasing anything that looks like a steady job, is squarely in the middle of this age range... and still chasing anything that looks like a steady job.

Katlheen Parker doesn't quite follow the Limbaugh Line in declaring war on CBS.

In selecting Stephen Colbert to replace David Letterman as host of its “Late Show,” CBS has waged war on America’s heartland — or so proclaims that Palm Beach font of heartland mirth, Rush Limbaugh.

But wait, there’s more. CBS also must be waging war on Asian Americans since a Twitter activist who calls herself Angry Asian Woman called for an end to “The Colbert Report” late last month following a joke she didn’t like.

Apparently, Colbert, in his pretend role as a loudmouthed, conservative blowhard (keep guessing), made a crack about the “Ching-Chong Ding-Dong Foundation for Sensitivity to Orientals or Whatever” in response to the new Washington Redskins Original American Foundation created by team owner Dan Snyder, who refuses to change the Redskins name. It was satire, folks.

If you have to explain a joke . . . you may be living in post-humor America. ...

Here’s the thing, and I say this with all due respect: Colbert is a comedian whose shtick is to present an exaggerated impression of a conservative talk show host. He’s a character! Sort of like, spoiler alert, Bill O’Reilly.

...

To put it plainly, the fellow who will be sitting in the “Late Show” chair is nothing like the character on the “Repor(t),” which is both a delightful and grievous prospect. Many will mourn the exit of Comedy Central’s Colbert, but millions more will celebrate his new role. Having met the real-life Colbert, the lad who grew up in Charleston, S.C., I’m confident viewers will find him every bit the Everyman as was all-time favorite Johnny Carson.

Wait. If we had Bill O'Reilly replace say... maybe that guy who sells knives at 2AM, would he also drop his "shtick to present an exaggerated impression of a conservative talk show host?" I'd kind of like to see that.

Leonard Pitts begs for relief from CNN.

Dear CNN:

Enough, already.

Please, for the love of Cronkite: Give us a break from the missing plane. Yes, we all wonder what happened to it. Yes, our hearts go out to the families seeking resolution. But really, CNN . . . enough. Put your hands up and step away from the story.

I’m in the doctor’s office the other day, right? I’m waiting for my missus and the TV is on and I’m half watching, half reading and you’re covering the plane. And time passes. And you’re covering the plane. And commercials intervene and you come back and you’re covering the plane. And my wife comes out and it’s time to go and it’s been a solid hour and you’re still covering the plane. Nothing but the plane.

I’m on your website maybe six times a day, CNN, grazing for news. Have you had another lead story in the last month? Has nothing else of importance happened to any of 7.1 billion people on this planet?

Has CNN covered the theory that CNN took the plane in order to give CNN something to talk about? It's a lot more credible than black holes, alien abduction, and supernatural hoodoo. So, CNN, take a look behind those holographic doodads and see if there's a plane hiding back there.

ScienceDaily covers a small, distant discovery...

Titan, Europa, Io and Phobos are just a few members of our solar system's pantheon of moons. Are there are other moons out there, orbiting planets beyond our sun?

NASA-funded researchers have spotted the first signs of an "exomoon," and though they say it's impossible to confirm its presence, the finding is a tantalizing first step toward locating others. The discovery was made by watching a chance encounter of objects in our galaxy, which can be witnessed only once.

"We won't have a chance to observe the exomoon candidate again," said David Bennett of the University of Notre Dame, Ind., lead author of a new paper on the findings appearing in the Astrophysical Journal. "But we can expect more unexpected finds like this."

Well, we might get another chance if NASA makes some progress on that warp drive. But really, the idea of exomoons shouldn't be surprising. In just the last decade we've discovered that planets are far more common than we once suspects, and that planetary systems come in varieties we never predicted when using the Solar System as our only example. No doubt moons are equally plentiful, and equally exotic.

Meanwhile, Ross Douthat is steamed that NASA hasn't hired anyone to express the theory that stars are just pinholes in the divine firmament.

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Comment Preferences

    •  It's funny actually, Douthat is what you get (6+ / 0-)

      when you force a movement based on strawmen and demagoguery to try and write intellectually coherently. They just can't. So they are forced to write vapid and sophomoric pieces full of multiple logical fallacies. Many people when forced  to confront this become more liberal (hence university's progressive indoctrination program) as they confront their own biases and have to look at facts and other's views. Douthat is too stubborn and arrogant to ever admit his mistakes, so he'll never change.

      -1.63/ -1.49 "Speaking truth to power" (with snark of course)! Follow on Twitter @dopper0189

      by dopper0189 on Sun Apr 13, 2014 at 08:22:46 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Stephen Colbert (0+ / 0-)

      Please, Stephen, don't sell out when you move to the big time.  Satan took Jesus up on a high hill, and promised him the world if he would sell out.  Please follow Jesus' example.  Please, please, continue to fight the forces of evil.  If you get only one season to show your integrity, show it.  30 years of selling out isn't worth as much as one year of representing your values and beliefs.

      Warren/Grayson 2016! Yes We Can!

      by BenFranklin99 on Mon Apr 14, 2014 at 02:10:16 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Douthat... (36+ / 0-)
    Douthat: "What the [Brendan Eich and Ayaan Hirsi Ali] cases illustrate, with their fuzzy rhetoric masking ideological pressure, is a serious moral defect at the heart of elite culture in America."
    No Ross, what these cases illustrate is that the right-wing does not understand there is no Constitutional right to be a CEO or win some honorary degree.

    "Patients are not consumers" - Paul Krugman

    by assyrian64 on Sun Apr 13, 2014 at 04:15:59 AM PDT

    •  Got it, thanks (6+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      JaxDem, DRo, Stude Dude, hbk, Aunt Pat, assyrian64

      nosotros no somos estúpidos

      by a2nite on Sun Apr 13, 2014 at 04:30:38 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Ah, but what components of the right wing do (20+ / 0-)

      understand is that you can sham big time and fool a lot of people.

      So long as conservative means "in denial of the basic facts about the world" you can bet it will find little purchase at serious universities.
      So, you use your donor base, religious and/or political, to create "universities" churning out the credentialed indoctrinated to act like counterfeit currency in diluting the real. You produce "advanced degree" people with a background of Jesus riding dinosaurs and such.

      Then you collectively hop up and down screaming discrimination if anyone judges those pieces of parchment as not worth much in employment. You do so  particularly in public employment where anti-discrimination and hiring process is strong and, like Justice, wears a blindfold more so than in at will private employment.

      Ever wonder how many of these people holding credentials that are largely based on such idiocies get into public service? Into jobs where such non-scientific garbage can be dangerous to your health and safety? Ever run into a medical office "in network" where referral for some women's issue is difficult because of a "believer" that some drug or inoculation or procedure is against their god's will?

      Unfortunately over the last few decades I've run into more cases, both the above specifically, that demonstrate an infiltration of the scientifically unqualified or religiously biased people in places they should not be (as opposed to religiously associated) if "peer reviewed" as in real science during the employment "process."

      The only foes that threaten America are the enemies at home, and those are ignorance, superstition, and incompetence. [Elbert Hubbard]

      by pelagicray on Sun Apr 13, 2014 at 05:22:24 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  I don't read Douthat much, but (0+ / 0-)

      at least with this point he is correctly criticizing elitists in our nation. saying they have a serious moral defect.. WHEN do you ever hear something like this from the usual talking bobbleheads?

      "We are beyond law, which is not unusual for an empire; unfortunately, we are also beyond common sense." Gore Vidal

      by Superpole on Sun Apr 13, 2014 at 05:45:55 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  I expected a slightly different closing from him. (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      gffish, Aunt Pat, brn2bwild

      From Doubthat's conclusion:

      It would be a far, far better thing if Harvard and Brandeis and Mozilla would simply say, explicitly, that they are as ideologically progressive as Notre Dame is Catholic . . . .
      I thought he'd have noted today's editorial theme, and said "as Stephen Colbert is Catholic."
    •  Of all the moral defects in all the world, (0+ / 0-)

      Douthat had to walk into that one. Here's looking at you, dick.

      Voting is the means by which the public is distracted from the realities of power and its exercise.

      by Anne Elk on Sun Apr 13, 2014 at 10:20:13 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Water in space (7+ / 0-)

    there is plenty of water in space but most of it is found in frozen comets.

    An idea I once read was to nudge these comets out of their orbits and crash them into Mars as a form of terraforming.

  •  Frank Bruni has been caught in a blantant lie..... (16+ / 0-)
    But it doesn’t adjust for the longer hours that such men generally work.
    This is the tired, old bullshit that has been around forever.  Perhaps it refers to a time when back breaking labor was required, and it was mostly men with the strength to do such labor.   Men working longer than women holds no water today.

    I would challenge someone to produce solid evidence that men work longer hours than women.  But first I would have someone define what "real" work is.  Does work include, playing golf with clients, commute time?  Running a household vs running a department or corporation....the list is endless.....

    "A weed is a plant whose virtues have not yet been discovered." Ralph Waldo Emerson

    by Yo Bubba on Sun Apr 13, 2014 at 04:34:49 AM PDT

    •  How they figure that (6+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      hbk, Yo Bubba, mmacdDE, gffish, Aunt Pat, Inland Jim

      is to include the number of days women take off to take care of their children and to have babies. Were more men to take up the child care responsibilities, that would even out somewhat.
      They used to say that women couldn't work in factory jobs, then along came WWII and Rosie the Riveter. Women were allowed to fly planes and drive trucks in the military, something that had never happened before.
      Then they said women couldn't be cops or firefighters or airline pilots or even have their own credit cards.
      Again and again, the male establishment has been proven wrong.
      They can make all the excuses they want, but the fact remains, whether it's 7 cents or 27 cents, women are getting ripped off.

      Your beliefs don't make you a better person. Your behavior does.

      by skohayes on Sun Apr 13, 2014 at 06:15:38 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  And don't forget the standard false equivalency (5+ / 0-)
        In the White House, women made 88 cents for every dollar that men did last year, according to a review by the conservative American Enterprise Institute, and salaries there are determined by hierarchical rank, not managerial discretion. What created the gap wasn't unequal pay for equal work; it was a concentration of women in lower positions. Jay Carney, the White House press secretary, explained this as if it were some sort of exoneration, when it merely raises other, bigger questions. At 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue and elsewhere, why are so many women at the bottom?
        Well, there ya go! Obama is just a big stupid hypocrite, and he should leave these well-meaning, patriotic, job-creating CEOs alone, because THEY know what's best for us, and for these sweet little wimmins who need more time off to make kids and take care of them while THE MAN works and slaves at the company store -- as God intended!

        Child, PLEASE! The CEO of GM is at the top of the hierarchical pyramid, even if she doesn't know about long-term problems with her company's ignition systems. She's getting $4.4 million in total compensation, but only $1.8 million in actual salary. And even if we stick with the big number, that's about $5 million less than the guy who let those ignition problems go on for YEARS!

        White Hot FAIL, Bruni! Wanna try again?

        "If you're going to go down with the ship, make it a submarine." - Wayne Shorter

        by Oliver Tiger on Sun Apr 13, 2014 at 07:53:27 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  But, but, but the missing plane story (14+ / 0-)

    was supposed to save CNN from, well from themselves.  

    Dear CNN:  Even Vince Lombardi would tell you to quit.

    As we express our gratitude, we must never forget that the highest appreciation is not to utter words, but to live by them. John F. Kennedy

    by JaxDem on Sun Apr 13, 2014 at 04:37:32 AM PDT

    •  I was thinking about all OJ, all the time... (6+ / 0-)

      From CNN and other news in the middle '90s. Sort of a jump the shark point for at least CNN.

      We got four helicopters with cameras pointed at a Bronco parked in a driveway for hours on end. It makes me cranky(er) towards the media and jock culture.

      The other day, I was thinking about how the original musical Chicago was inspired by post-Watergate cynicism about the news. And how the '90s revival had to do with post-OJ cycnicism about the news and celebrity.

      "If this Studebaker had anymore Atomic Space-Age Style, you'd have to be an astronaut with a geiger counter!"

      by Stude Dude on Sun Apr 13, 2014 at 06:37:35 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Excellent point and example. (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        gffish, Aunt Pat, Stude Dude

        They are all guilty of tunnel vision when there is a story like OJ, but CNN especially reveals how they favor a one trick pony approach.

        As we express our gratitude, we must never forget that the highest appreciation is not to utter words, but to live by them. John F. Kennedy

        by JaxDem on Sun Apr 13, 2014 at 07:15:09 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  Dammit, not pinholes in a divine firmament! (12+ / 0-)

    How many times do I have to tell you that it is a giant crystal ball, with each light representing god's love of mankind, while the blackness represents the evil of Satan which is sure to follow if you don't drop all rational thinking and replace it with pure faith in the Lard.

    You should also notice that this revolves around MANkind, as women simply don't have brains big enough for full understanding of these complexities. After all can you name one philosophical idea that the little lady ever came up with?  Just one.

    See?

    And women were destined to filth and sin on a monthly basis! Why does the moon take a month to go around our good flat earth? And why does the little lady go (ahem) a little off in the same timeframe? (I refuse to even mention that blood thing - it's just so . . .  unchristian of her!)  Obviously lunacy and menses are identical! And to think the little lady wants the vote. Isn't that quaint? And cute? As if she has a clue of who baseball's MVP should be.

    What we call god is merely a living creature with superior technology & understanding. If their fragile egos demand prayer, they lose that superiority.

    by agnostic on Sun Apr 13, 2014 at 04:48:04 AM PDT

  •  BTW, the “warp drive” is bunk (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Stude Dude, Aunt Pat, Inland Jim

    ...unless you believe in travel backward in time. This is a geometric truism that applies to anything that moves from one point in spacetime to another faster than light, and fiddling with local spacetime doesn’t change this. It’s a fact about the Minkowsky geometry of our relativistic universe. Reference frames and all that.

  •  If you build it they will come Jeb....or maybe not (8+ / 0-)
  •  FYI Kathleen is spelled wrong (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Aunt Pat

    nosotros no somos estúpidos

    by a2nite on Sun Apr 13, 2014 at 05:01:59 AM PDT

    •  No surprise (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      skillet, Inland Jim, stringer bell

      McCrory ran as a 'moderate' based on his record as Charlotte mayor. He's governed like the far right politician that he really is.

      McCrory's Approval-Disapproval - 40-45

      NC Lege Approval-Disapproval - 23-48

      Raising minimum wage to $10/hour - 54-37

      2016 Governor, McCrory vs Roy Cooper 43-43

      2016 President
      Hillary Clinton leads Jeb Bush 45-44, Chris Christie 46-44, Rand Paul 47-43, and Mike Huckabee 48-43.

      http://www.publicpolicypolling.com/...

      If republicans nominate Tillis, his record as Speaker will give Kay Hagan plenty of ammo. She should probably start talking about raising the minimum wage and expand Medicaid - it's what voters want.

      Election Day is Nov 4th, 2014 It's time for the Undo button on the 2010 Election.

      by bear83 on Sun Apr 13, 2014 at 07:36:19 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  It's why I stopped watching CNN. (15+ / 0-)

    And no, I stopped well before the Malaysian jet story. I think it was because of the Boston marathon coverage.

    Al Jazeera news is so much better. And, there's the added benefit that having an Al Jazeera America network drives the cultural conservatives stark raving crazy.

    You will not be punished for your anger. You will be punished by your anger.

    by mstep on Sun Apr 13, 2014 at 05:28:36 AM PDT

    •  Almost anything that drives reichwingnuts crazy... (5+ / 0-)

      ... is what I favor.

      I have been laughing hysterically over the near-stroke-our and/or heart attack about to be had by Billo and McLimpdick over the faux "issue" of Stephen Colbert taking Letterman's place in a few months.  You can see the veins in their heads throbbing and their faces are alarming shades of red (major high blood pressure, anyone?).

      They're so green with envy they're sweating chlorophyll, it seems...!

      ;-D  Schadenfreude is mine, mine, mine!!!  ;-D

      Bwahahahahahahahahahaaaaaaaaaa....!

      Laughter is good for the soul....

      I'm sick of attempts to steer this nation from principles evolved in The Age of Reason to hallucinations derived from illiterate herdsmen. ~ Crashing Vor

      by NonnyO on Sun Apr 13, 2014 at 05:50:38 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  I have Al Jazeera on my iPhone and I love it! (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Stude Dude, skohayes, mstep

      It is so very agreeable to get news on one's phone while waiting for something. That's one good thing about having access to tech nowadays--one need never be bored, even at the doctor's office where they have absolutely NOTHING to read.

      "Religion is what keeps the poor from murdering the rich."--Napoleon

      by Diana in NoVa on Sun Apr 13, 2014 at 06:09:07 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Stupidity is alive and well in Louisiana (14+ / 0-)
    Louisiana might make the Bible its state book
    [More at link; short article.]
    Louisiana’s House of Representatives’ Municipal, Parochial, and Cultural Affairs Committee voted on Thursday to recommend legislation that would name the Bible as their official state book. House Bill No. 503’s sponsor, State Representative Thomas Carmody, R-Shreveport, says, “The Holy Bible would be appropriate for the state of Louisiana,” because of the state’s “strong religious ties,” according to The New Orleans Advocate.
    < bangs head on desk >

    I'm sick of attempts to steer this nation from principles evolved in The Age of Reason to hallucinations derived from illiterate herdsmen. ~ Crashing Vor

    by NonnyO on Sun Apr 13, 2014 at 05:31:19 AM PDT

    •  Louisiana needs to read... (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      NonnyO

      ...that Constitution thing...that pesky 1st Amendment to it kinda gets in the way of the notion...I suggest The Poky Little Puppy instead...

      "All great truths begin as blasphemies." ~ George Bernard Shaw

      by theBCI on Sun Apr 13, 2014 at 08:34:46 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  As long as they're making new "state" things... (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      NonnyO, Brecht

      Why not just have declare fundamentalist Christianity the state religion and be done with it.

      The Supreme Court should have no trouble stomping this in any case. Of course, we are talking about the Roberts Court.

      •  Therein lies the rub... (0+ / 0-)

        Which version of fundie Xianity???

        Aren't at least three members of SCOTUS self-identified as Catholics, Roberts being one of them?  Carrying things to extremes - as some "secret court" with "secret legal opinions" seems to have done - makes me surprised that they haven't recalled Bloody Mary's ghost to set up torture in dungeons to make people recant their faith (or agnosticism or atheism) in favor of Catholicism, followed with death at 'burning fields' already.

        Then there's the 'office of faith-based initiatives' that Dumbya set up to thank his Xian supporters (and Obama retained), and Dumbya's officially one of the protestant varieties of fundyism, isn't he (I don't care; that he's a hypocrite to his alleged religious beliefs is infuriating)?  I think the Obamas are another brand of fundyism, but I don't know which one (nor do I care).  The toe in the door that the 'office of faith-based initiatives' represents as the office to play battering ram moral conscience to those who write laws based on someone's religious ideas that are increasingly wiping away a woman's choices in reproductive health is nothing short of the first step toward instituting a government-mandated religion.

        But whose religion?  A new, made up religion for everyone?  That wouldn't sit well with the jeebus believers who want him included in everything.  The religion of each successive president?  What?  there are too many differing opinions regarding religious beliefs to make any religion a 'one size fits all.'  The thing to be feared most then would be wars over religious belief, and those who have never studied history don't realize how bloody and awful that can be..., but it was 'recent history' for our Founding Fathers, so they gave us all freedom of choice for religious beliefs.

        What is not to understand with the freedom OF religion and freedom FROM religion granted to each of us as the first words of the First Amendment???  That should be enough for any person of faith.

        Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof....;
        Oh, heavens, but we DO need someone with a firm grasp of reality and firm logical grasp of constitutional principles to balance things out and make common sense regarding religion the norm again - or, at least things felt a lot more 'normal' before the insertion of 'under god' in the Pledge of Allegiance in 1954 (I was in third grade and those two words were hard to remember to insert).  I nominate Jonathan Turley who seems to be able to explain the US Constitution in such simple terms even a child could understand (like he used to do when he was a fairly frequent guest on Keith Olbermann).
        The purpose of separation of church and state is to keep forever from these shores the ceaseless strife that has soaked the soil of Europe with blood for centuries.
             — James Madison, 4th President of the US, and one of the principal architects of the US Constitution
        For the fundies of all kinds who are never satisfied with merely beating everyone over the head with their proselytizing fanatically-held beliefs, but also insist on cramming them down our throats even if we don't wish to join any religion, I give you my fellow Minnesotan:
        The right to be heard does not automatically include the right to be taken seriously.
             — Hubert H. Humphrey

        I'm sick of attempts to steer this nation from principles evolved in The Age of Reason to hallucinations derived from illiterate herdsmen. ~ Crashing Vor

        by NonnyO on Sun Apr 13, 2014 at 11:10:15 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  They'll call it (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      NonnyO

      "The Ronald Reagan state book of Louisiana".

      •  St. Ronnie of RayGun... (0+ / 0-)

        ... is a figment of the collective gooper imagination.

        He was going senile while in office, and no one talked about it.

        [My grandfather was going senile at the same time so I recognized all the signs, the vacant stares, the looks of confusion when his brain wouldn't / couldn't process questions asked of him, etc.  It always amazed me no one in media mentioned these symptoms.]

        I'm sick of attempts to steer this nation from principles evolved in The Age of Reason to hallucinations derived from illiterate herdsmen. ~ Crashing Vor

        by NonnyO on Sun Apr 13, 2014 at 12:27:39 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  It's perfect... (0+ / 0-)

      What else would you expect to find under a moldy blanket on a wooden deck overlooking a swamp? What else would you expect an itinerant sociopath to quote from in order to win the heart and meager savings of a young woman with a prosthetic leg? What else would you expect a jail warden to put his coffee on while planning the next lethal injection?

      This has Flannery O'Connor written all over it.  Of course this is the right book for Louisiana.

      “If the misery of the poor be caused not by the laws of nature, but by our institutions, great is our sin.” Charles Darwin

      by ivorybill on Mon Apr 14, 2014 at 07:08:31 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  I don't recall ever having read any books... (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        ivorybill

        ... by Flannery O'Connor, altho I know her name in connection with southern authors from Am Lit classes in college.  OTOH, Southern Gothic was never my main interest - it's not British or European history prior to 24 March 1603 or genealogy reference works, which comprises most of my library.

        Oppressively hot heavy humid nights full of nasty-tempered alcoholics (e.g. Cat on a Hot Tin Roof) and swamps full of alligators, poisonous snakes, and assorted other pesky and/or poisonous bugs were never appealing to me.

        I'm sick of attempts to steer this nation from principles evolved in The Age of Reason to hallucinations derived from illiterate herdsmen. ~ Crashing Vor

        by NonnyO on Tue Apr 15, 2014 at 03:40:59 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  "Post humor America"? (15+ / 0-)

    No, Ms. Parker, America hasn't lost it's sense of humor. It's just that conservatives don't get irony and they only seem to laugh at other peoples' misery and they are in charge of almost all major media outlets. Please don't take the failings of a few loud and obnoxious conservatives and tar the rest of the country with them.

    "Given the choice between a Republican and someone who acts like a Republican, people will vote for a real Republican every time." Harry Truman

    by MargaretPOA on Sun Apr 13, 2014 at 05:33:05 AM PDT

  •  When Jesus wrote the Constitution, He didn't (14+ / 0-)

    mention evolution.  So there.

    Think about the baby Jesus. Up in that tower, letting His hair down so that the three wise men could climb up and spin the dreidle and see if there's six more weeks of winter. -- Will and Grace

    by Rikon Snow on Sun Apr 13, 2014 at 05:34:32 AM PDT

  •  Are taciturn literary figures discussing topical (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    UnionMade, Mark Sumner

    issues again?  I hope they have Frankenstein's monster on again. He's very exciting of a monster of so few words.

    Slow thinkers - keep right

    by Dave the Wave on Sun Apr 13, 2014 at 05:49:51 AM PDT

  •  N.Carolina environmental regulators side with Duke (9+ / 0-)

    Energy. This is pretty amazing, the state is siding with the energy company against the interests of its citizens and environment! My friends from NY who have retired to Asheville just didn't understand that old times there are not forgotten... I mean like holy shit!

    http://www.nytimes.com/...

    "State regulators are joining with Duke Energy in appealing a judge’s ruling on cleaning up groundwater pollution from the company’s coal ash dumps."

     

  •  Ignorance is promoted everywhere today. (6+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    skillet, singe, skohayes, aznavy, gffish, 417els

    Or at least that's what I was thinking while watching the History Channel yesterday. Did you know our government doesn't want us to know the truth about Mayans living in Georgia, & future Knights Templar being in pre-Tucson? If there is something you never knew before, it's because the govmint.
    And ghosts. Lotsa ghosts on tv.

    It seems every idea, no matter how mired in superstition & ignorance, is equally worthy of consideration.

    Oh, and have you heard about those jet trails cleverly placed thousands of feet out of our reach? Mind control drugs. They load them in fake passenger jets, spray them in the sky & they waft down over us! Guvvermint! They don't want us thinking for ourselves, so they spray us.

    Yes. There are people who belive this.

    "Non-violence is a powerful and just weapon which cuts without wounding and ennobles the man who wields it. It is a sword that heals." - Martin Luther King, Jr.

    by Gentle Giant on Sun Apr 13, 2014 at 05:59:42 AM PDT

  •  pronounce (4+ / 0-)

    Will the "t" in Colbert be pronounced in this new incarnation?  My hope is the buffoon O'Reilly character appear at least once a week when interviewing a politician.

    Actions speak louder than petitions.

    by melvynny on Sun Apr 13, 2014 at 06:03:48 AM PDT

  •  My day is already ruined because I read the WaPo (6+ / 0-)

    this morning. Although careful to skip over the columns of "femscold" Melissa Henpecker and "Obamascold" Ruthie Marcus I weakly allowed my gaze to wander over the bletherings of Dan Balz and Dana Milbank.

    Thank you, Hunter, for this excellent roundup, which is acting as an antidote to the poison I just absorbed.

    It's a beautiful day here in NoVa, just right for planting lettuce, spinach, and other things and hunting for the scarlet runner beans and lovage seeds I hid away the last time we had visitors. It's time to plant them.

    Today I'm just going to think about nice things. How can I not? There are tons of yellow daffodils in evidence and my front yard is full of jolly birds who are evidently holding a conference in the apple trees.

    Hope everyone will have a good day and that nothing AWFUL happens anywhere!

    "Religion is what keeps the poor from murdering the rich."--Napoleon

    by Diana in NoVa on Sun Apr 13, 2014 at 06:04:52 AM PDT

  •  Now that Cliven Bundy had blown over. (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    RiveroftheWest, a2nite, annieli, Brecht

    Were the Conservatives really trying to cause a revolution yesterday?

    I was wondering if they were really trying to cause a Rodney King Riot type situation (which was the beginning of the end of Poppa Bush) or a Katrina sized disillusionment (like with W and the GOP in the middle '00s) except for the Democrats in an already tricky '14 midterms?

    Then there was a diary yesterday about a lot fo Koch owned media flaming discontent to prime a nautral resource rights grab which was probably another prong in this. I can so image the Kochs playing the Bundy types against the Big Bad ol' Gubment and then throwing them under the bus to grab their natural resources.

    "If this Studebaker had anymore Atomic Space-Age Style, you'd have to be an astronaut with a geiger counter!"

    by Stude Dude on Sun Apr 13, 2014 at 06:51:07 AM PDT

  •  Since we brought up NASA (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    skillet, Ishmaelbychoice

    Your beliefs don't make you a better person. Your behavior does.

    by skohayes on Sun Apr 13, 2014 at 06:52:02 AM PDT

  •  Chris Wallace....Obama and Holder complaining at (0+ / 0-)

    the National Action Network is by inference race baiting....Rethuglican govenators making it harder to vote is by inference FREEDUMB!!

  •  Colbert Latenight (5+ / 0-)

    Am I the only one who is not secretly hoping that Colbert and Amy Sedaris (and their extended network) would create some subversive, improv, late night version of Regis & Kathie Lee?  Let's leave 'The Desk' behind along with the gender kerfuffle.  

    The Colbert Report character has been great work.  I hate to see him mothballed for just another formulaic late night show.   Dare I hope for something this side of 'Fernwood 2 Night'?

  •  Parker on Colbert (0+ / 0-)

    Parker: "Apparently, Colbert, in his pretend role as a loudmouthed, conservative blowhard (keep guessing), made a crack about the “Ching-Chong Ding-Dong Foundation for Sensitivity to Orientals or Whatever” in response to the new Washington Redskins Original American Foundation created by team owner Dan Snyder, who refuses to change the Redskins name. It was satire, folks."

    Nice, but I don't think it was Colbert who made the comment. Wasn't it the folks at Comedy Central using a Twitter account with Colbert's name in it, not his real account @StephenAtHome?

  •  Regarding millenials (0+ / 0-)

    I'm so so thankful my kids have about 5 years until they are entering the workforce. Hopefully the economy will be in a better place for them.

    Dementia, you better treat me good. ~Conor Oberst "Slowly (Oh So Slowly)"

    by NotActingNaive on Sun Apr 13, 2014 at 07:47:32 AM PDT

  •  Rec'd just for this (0+ / 0-)
    And hey, if someone else could be James Bond once Sean Connery moved on, why can't someone else step into the Brooks Brother's suit of that other Stephen Colbert? I nominate our own KagroX... he already has the glasses and he's been playing that David Waldman character for years.
    And I'd pay to see it, too :)

    This all started with "what the Republicans did to language".

    by lunachickie on Sun Apr 13, 2014 at 08:31:54 AM PDT

  •  Oh, and about "that plane"? (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    drmah

    I know this isn't funny to the victims families, but it's a sideswipe at CNN, who is probably still covering "That Plane" even as I type this.

    In case you were interested, (in all seriousness), this is the latest...

    Up to 11 military aircraft, one civil aircraft and 14 ships on Sunday will search an area of up to 57,506 square kilometres, about 2200km northwest of Perth, where it is believed the plane crashed after mysteriously vanishing en route from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing with 239 people on board on March 8.

    This all started with "what the Republicans did to language".

    by lunachickie on Sun Apr 13, 2014 at 08:36:43 AM PDT

  •  What the slot formerly taken by Colbert needs (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    a2nite

    is the Sippy Cupp or Megyn Kelly version of Colbert.

    "Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity." --M. L. King "You can't fix stupid" --Ron White -6.00, -5.18

    by zenbassoon on Sun Apr 13, 2014 at 08:38:12 AM PDT

  •  ASDF (0+ / 0-)
    So, North Carolina Republicans, Vote Tillis... if, you know, you can vote after the legislature has worked so hard to stop nasty old democracy.
    Oh, but Mark...

    NC Republicans have nothing to fear from their party's efforts to block the vote. Of course they will still be able to vote in November...

  •  Wait a minute, Mark (0+ / 0-)
    They're not going to accept creationism as equivalent to evolution. They're not going to buy into fantasies that paint every Muslim as a violent terrorist.
    If this is a reference to Ayaan Hirsi Ali, you have strayed off the tracks as far as Douthat. She has been tested in fires that the rest of us can only imagine and her razor sharp intelligence is so much more nuanced than "every Muslim...a violent terrorist" you should be ashamed.

    This is what she would have said at Brandeis

    One year ago, the city and suburbs of Boston were still in mourning. Families who only weeks earlier had children and siblings to hug were left with only photographs and memories. Still others were hovering over bedsides, watching as young men, women, and children endured painful surgeries and permanent disfiguration. All because two brothers, radicalized by jihadist websites, decided to place homemade bombs in backpacks near the finish line of one of the most prominent events in American sports, the Boston Marathon.

    All of you in the Class of 2014 will never forget that day and the days that followed. You will never forget when you heard the news, where you were, or what you were doing. And when you return here, 10, 15 or 25 years from now, you will be reminded of it. The bombs exploded just 10 miles from this campus.

    Related Video
    Associate books editor Bari Weiss on Brandeis University's decision to withdraw its offer of an honorary degree to women's rights activist Ayaan Hirsi Ali. Photo credit: Associated Press.
    I read an article recently that said many adults don't remember much from before the age of 8. That means some of your earliest childhood memories may well be of that September morning simply known as "9/11."

    You deserve better memories than 9/11 and the Boston Marathon bombing. And you are not the only ones. In Syria, at least 120,000 people have been killed, not simply in battle, but in wholesale massacres, in a civil war that is increasingly waged across a sectarian divide. Violence is escalating in Iraq, in Lebanon, in Libya, in Egypt. And far more than was the case when you were born, organized violence in the world today is disproportionately concentrated in the Muslim world.

    Another striking feature of the countries I have just named, and of the Middle East generally, is that violence against women is also increasing. In Saudi Arabia, there has been a noticeable rise in the practice of female genital mutilation. In Egypt, 99% of women report being sexually harassed and up to 80 sexual assaults occur in a single day.

    Especially troubling is the way the status of women as second-class citizens is being cemented in legislation. In Iraq, a law is being proposed that lowers to 9 the legal age at which a girl can be forced into marriage. That same law would give a husband the right to deny his wife permission to leave the house.

    Sadly, the list could go on. I hope I speak for many when I say that this is not the world that my generation meant to bequeath yours. When you were born, the West was jubilant, having defeated Soviet communism. An international coalition had forced Saddam Hussein out of Kuwait. The next mission for American armed forces would be famine relief in my homeland of Somalia. There was no Department of Homeland Security, and few Americans talked about terrorism.

    Two decades ago, not even the bleakest pessimist would have anticipated all that has gone wrong in the part of world where I grew up. After so many victories for feminism in the West, no one would have predicted that women's basic human rights would actually be reduced in so many countries as the 20th century gave way to the 21st.

    Enlarge Image

    Associated Press
    Today, however, I am going to predict a better future, because I believe that the pendulum has swung almost as far as it possibly can in the wrong direction.

    When I see millions of women in Afghanistan defying threats from the Taliban and lining up to vote; when I see women in Saudi Arabia defying an absurd ban on female driving; and when I see Tunisian women celebrating the conviction of a group of policemen for a heinous gang rape, I feel more optimistic than I did a few years ago. The misnamed Arab Spring has been a revolution full of disappointments. But I believe it has created an opportunity for traditional forms of authority—including patriarchal authority—to be challenged, and even for the religious justifications for the oppression of women to be questioned.

    Yet for that opportunity to be fulfilled, we in the West must provide the right kind of encouragement. Just as the city of Boston was once the cradle of a new ideal of liberty, we need to return to our roots by becoming once again a beacon of free thought and civility for the 21st century. When there is injustice, we need to speak out, not simply with condemnation, but with concrete actions.

    One of the best places to do that is in our institutions of higher learning. We need to make our universities temples not of dogmatic orthodoxy, but of truly critical thinking, where all ideas are welcome and where civil debate is encouraged. I'm used to being shouted down on campuses, so I am grateful for the opportunity to address you today. I do not expect all of you to agree with me, but I very much appreciate your willingness to listen.

    I stand before you as someone who is fighting for women's and girls' basic rights globally. And I stand before you as someone who is not afraid to ask difficult questions about the role of religion in that fight.

    The connection between violence, particularly violence against women, and Islam is too clear to be ignored. We do no favors to students, faculty, nonbelievers and people of faith when we shut our eyes to this link, when we excuse rather than reflect.

    So I ask: Is the concept of holy war compatible with our ideal of religious toleration? Is it blasphemy—punishable by death—to question the applicability of certain seventh-century doctrines to our own era? Both Christianity and Judaism have had their eras of reform. I would argue that the time has come for a Muslim Reformation.

    Is such an argument inadmissible? It surely should not be at a university that was founded in the wake of the Holocaust, at a time when many American universities still imposed quotas on Jews.

    The motto of Brandeis University is "Truth even unto its innermost parts." That is my motto too. For it is only through truth, unsparing truth, that your generation can hope to do better than mine in the struggle for peace, freedom and equality of the sexes.

    What stronger breast-plate than a heart untainted! Thrice is he arm'd, that hath his quarrel just; And he but naked, though lock'd up in steel, Whose conscience with injustice is corrupted. Henry VI Part II Act 3 Scene 2

    by TerryDarc on Sun Apr 13, 2014 at 08:43:24 AM PDT

  •  Hey Mark, (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Mark Sumner

    are you going to be doing a weekly GoT diary?
    Will it be every Monday?

    Please say 'yes' twice.
    Thx!

  •  I interview the energy department heads and (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    offgrid

    in fact they ARE so feared that agencies are crippled.

    The then director of the loan guarantee program rescinded entire interview comments because he was going to testify before Issa during the cutoff to the Loan Guarantees to renewables, right before the House passed the No More Solyndras Act.

    Routinely, these officials ask me to pretend that Republicans are not against renewables, to leave out the facts.Because they sincerely believe that riling em up makes them worse, their behaviour is that of a cowed government, unable to function honestly.

    A current leader of one of DOE programs reached out to our renewable industry privately to signal that there are loan guarantees available(hidden in what the Republican House WILL allow to be funded ie the fossil program.)

    Why is this not on the DOE site? Because they are scared. So they are evading detection in funding renewables.

    Once it is under the rubric of fossil energy the House cannot control which project they lend to (as long as it reduces ghgs from fossil energy, under Section 1703) because now there is only this 'fossil' funding.

    Thanks Democrats! My Obamacare is permanent coverage no one can take away - and saving $3,000 is nice too

    by sotiredofusernames on Sun Apr 13, 2014 at 04:34:16 PM PDT

  •  But... (0+ / 0-)

    ...nobody was as good as Connery in the role of Bond.

    They were different, each has his own persona, but none was as good as Connery.

    Similarly, nobody can be as good as Colbert in what he does. Anyone else would be seen as a pale imitation.

    If the Comedy Channel wants to continue with a same or similar format, they'll have to come up with an approach that is completely dissimilar to Colbert's present show.

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