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In what could be a landmark case, the European Court of Justice ruled Tuesday that individuals have the right to control their data and can ask search engines to remove results. In other words, they have the "right to be forgotten." Zero chance of such a case happening in the U.S., although it did, I'd would prefer they let me erase myself from the NSA search engine instead of Google.

At The Atlantic, Matt Ford writes Will Europe Censor This Article?

The court's decision comes by appeal of Mario Costeja González, a Spanish man who sought to remove evidence of his home's repossession and auction from the Internet. González argued that the 1998 auction notice in the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia should no longer be linked to his name in Internet searches. Relying upon the EU's data-protection directive—a regulation governing personal data privacy—and the EU's Charter of Fundamental Rights, the judges ruled that González's privacy rights override "not only the economic interest" of Google as a search engine, "but also the interest of the general public in having access to that information upon a search relating to [González’s] name." As a result, they ordered the links stricken from Google's search results.

"As far as I know, this is unprecedented," Jimmy Wales, a founder of Wikipedia who has campaigned against Internet censorship, told me. "It is certainly shocking to have come from the EU rather than from an authoritarian state."

The ECJ ruling didn't order the newspaper itself, La Vanguardia, to remove its original article, as González had also requested. Instead, the court simply ordered Google to remove all links to the auction notice from its search engine. Ironically, the ECJ's ruling explicitly mentions González's auction notice and financial trouble. Will the court order that its own decision be made unsearchable online?

The court recognized what some European legislators call "the right to be forgotten"—the idea of giving ordinary citizens more control over their personal data, including its deletion. Its ruling sets a precedent for both national courts and the ECJ itself in future cases. "If an individual no longer wants his personal data to be processed or stored by a data controller, and if there is no legitimate reason for keeping it, the data should be removed from their system," stated Viviane Reding, the European Commissioner for Justice, when describing the proposed right in 2012. A European Commission memonoted that the right "is about empowering individuals, not about erasing past events or restricting freedom of the press."

Legally obscuring a person's past isn't an entirely new concept. [...]


Blast from the Past. At Daily Kos on this date in 2006Billmon: Surveillance Polls Don't Matter:

Billmon gets "a little crazy in the head" as he contemplates the arguments over whether two-thirds, or one-half, or one-fourth of Americans support being spied upon for their own alleged well-being.
The whole point of having civil liberties is that they are not supposed to be subject to a majority veto. Hobbes may not have believed in natural rights, but our founders did. And their opponents, the anti-Federalists, were even more zealous about restraining the powers of the federal superstate, which is why they forced the Federalists to write the Bill of Rights directly into the Constitution.

It defeats the purpose of having a 4th Amendment if its validity is entirely dependent on breaking 50% in the latest poll. It would be nice to have "the people" on our side in this debate, and obviously a lot of them are, even if Doherty's plurality still prefers Leviathan's crushing embrace. But some things are wrong just because they're wrong—not because a temporary majority (or even a permanent one) thinks they're wrong.

...We can't do anything about how a corrupt, oligarchic system works (or rather, doesn't work) but we can at least stop accepting the other side's terms for the debate. What the government is doing is illegal and unamerican, and that would still be true if the polls showed 99% support—in fact, it would be even more true.

Hear hear! And Amen!

Tweet of the Day:

Texas was going to execute an intellectually challenged man. That’s what they do there: execute them or elect them governor. #inners
@HaroldItz


On today's Kagro in the Morning show, Greg Dworkin rounds up the collapse of 3 major Gop narratives: climate change, voter fraud & ACA repeal. Why are Republicans cut off on all paths by facts? Aversion to science carries a high price. Sandy Hook truthers still bonkers. Don't kiss your camel (not a euphemism). Grayson for Bonkersghazi committee? An excerpt from Greenwald's new book makes the national security state sound like cartoon super villains. Rand Paul on drone policy: principled or opportunistic? Or some of both? Snapchat's central premise of turns out not to be true. What happened to our being saved by libertarian tech bros?


High Impact Posts. Top Comments.

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Comment Preferences

  •  Shocker! (12+ / 0-)

    Dishonest serial plagiarist, Rand Paul, lied about his opposition to Republican Voter Suppression laws.

    That dreamy Rand Paul, he's so bold, he came out against Republicans' voter-ID crusade! Oh wait, his spokesman clarifies: "Senator Paul was having a larger discussion about criminal justice reform... At no point did Senator Paul come out against voter ID laws." Courage!

    http://gawker.com/...

    “I would like to get rid of the homophobes, sexists, and racists in our audience. I know they're out there and it really bothers me.” ― Kurt Cobain

    by Jeff Y on Tue May 13, 2014 at 08:33:36 PM PDT

  •  Ooooo, LOVE that tweet! (7+ / 0-)

    ROFL!

    "Suppose you were an idiot. And suppose you were a member of Congress Chris Christie. But I repeat myself." ~ Mark Twain, (with a twist) ;o)

    by Terre on Tue May 13, 2014 at 08:33:47 PM PDT

  •  I'm BACK! I finally got my computer from the shop. (9+ / 0-)

    It's diagnosis was "dead mouse,"  

    •  His opponent "founded a public school" (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      JeffW

      which of course is a charter school, utterly privatized.

      "A new kind of leader," that Cousin Tom kinda guy.

      "Stealing kids' lunch money makes them strong and independent." -- after Paul "False Prophet" Ryan

      by waterstreet2013 on Wed May 14, 2014 at 07:20:19 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Go fuck yourself with freedom fries, Republicans (11+ / 0-)
    Republicans want an exception to a recent federal rule requiring higher pay for fast-food-workers on military bases, because paying Joey 10 bucks an hour to salt the fries will drive BK out of business, and the troops will miss their Whoppers, and why do you hate the troops?

    http://gawker.com/...

    “I would like to get rid of the homophobes, sexists, and racists in our audience. I know they're out there and it really bothers me.” ― Kurt Cobain

    by Jeff Y on Tue May 13, 2014 at 08:45:53 PM PDT

  •  i don't golf, but i did play some billiards. (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    LinSea, Jeff Y, high uintas, nellgwen

    this is for your corner pocket.

    How did the government come to spy on millions of Americans? In United States of Secrets, FRONTLINE goes behind the headlines to reveal the dramatic inside story of the U.S. government's massive and controversial secret surveillance program -- and the lengths it went to try to keep it hidden from the public.
    good. a relative word, but good.

    TRAILHEAD of accountability for Bush-2 Crimes? -- Addington's Perpwalk.

    by greenbird on Tue May 13, 2014 at 08:51:41 PM PDT

  •  Thanks MB. (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Jeff Y, LinSea, JML9999

    What ever happened to Billmon

    ...We can't do anything about how a corrupt, oligarchic system works (or rather, doesn't work) but we can at least stop accepting the other side's terms for the debate. What the government is doing is illegal and unamerican, and that would still be true if the polls showed 99% support—in fact, it would be even more true.
    Something occurred to me last night after reading David Harris Gershon's post that Susan Rice had requested that the NSA spy on UN members before some vote. I had just written that it might  be more efficient from this point on for us to just start a list of important people the NSA has not spied on, if we could find any.

    I copies that into post so I could work on it later when it occurred to me that if the British had possessed even probably 10% or less of the intelligence capacity that the NSA has today our American revolution never could have occurred and we'd all still be speaking English and driving on the wrong side of the streets.

    British soldiers would not even have had to have rounded up the leading 300 or so revolutionaries without which our country would not have been founded.

    The mere knowledge of the British intelligence capacity to know who they were, who they were talking to, even approximately that they opposed the Stamp Act, or that their "Iphone" were being tracked would have intimidated all of them into not attended any of these late night meeting, nor talking to any of their neighbors about this revolution, for fear of being but in the equivalent of Guantanamo, which was probably ... well I don't want to say for fear of antagonizing significant sections of my recommending reading base.

    But I think we all know who we are thinking of. (humor alert. I'm not really thinking of "that colony at all" Bad dog, bad dog. Woof, woof!)  

    Humor Alert! No statement from this UID is intended to be true, including this one. Comments and Posts intended for recreational purposes only. Unauthorized interpretations may lead to unexpected results. This waiver void where prohibited.

    by HoundDog on Tue May 13, 2014 at 08:59:37 PM PDT

  •  So can the 3 Nazis Germany arrested recently (9+ / 0-)

    have their names and personal history removed from the Internet as well, or would that be considered Holocaust denial?

    Such a slippery slope this judge weaves.

    Contrary to popular belief, zombies are quite intelligent and excel in anagrams.

    by Patience John on Tue May 13, 2014 at 09:03:37 PM PDT

    •  How about (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      mmacdDE, Patience John

      Delete all my criminal records, pedophilia arrests, the fact I am a catholic priest, and that I like traffic lights?  You may not be able to put the genie back in the bottle, but you can at least try to keep the others from getting out...

      ''The guarding of military and diplomatic secrets at the expense of informed representative government provides no real security for our Republic.'' - Justice Hugo L. Black of the Supreme Court

      by geekydee on Wed May 14, 2014 at 05:45:02 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  DELETE MY FUCKING ACCOUNT, EUROPE! (10+ / 0-)

    There is an endless supply of white men, there has always been a limited number of Human Beings

    by ratprique on Tue May 13, 2014 at 09:08:52 PM PDT

  •  So, Satan = free market? (6+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    JML9999, JeffW, LinSea, annieli, nellgwen, geekydee
    Fired HGTV hosts: Satan using his gay ‘demonic agenda’ to silence us:

    Two brothers who were recently fired by HGTV after their anti-gay views came to light said this week that they had been silenced by a “demonic agenda.”

    In an interview on Monday, The Blaze’s Glenn Beck told Jason and David Benham that the same “agenda” that had forced them out for comparing same-sex marriage to Nazism was now celebrating gay football player Michael Sam.

    Jason Benham pointed out, however, that the LGBT community would destroy Sam as soon as he “changes his lifestyle.”

    David Benham argued that they had been attacked by the same “spirit” that had been “punching nations since the beginning of time.”

    Beck agreed, and connected that spirit back to Nazism in “eastern Europe and Germany.”

    “We’re headed down the book-burning road,” Beck warned.

    http://www.rawstory.com/...

    “I would like to get rid of the homophobes, sexists, and racists in our audience. I know they're out there and it really bothers me.” ― Kurt Cobain

    by Jeff Y on Tue May 13, 2014 at 09:08:59 PM PDT

  •  Person of Interest-tonight (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    MTmofo, Jeff Y, annieli

    In the context of Bilmon

    For those who don't follow the show put simply it's

    Enemy of the State meets Colossus the Forbin Project meets Minority report Meets Highway to Heaven.

    A PRISM on rocket fuel identifies terrorists and their intended target. As a 'bug" it identifies future victims of violent crimes. It's inventor a low key humble incarnation of Bill Gates and a presumed dead CIA assassin save peoples lives.

    Well in the mythos the system identifies another system like itself and it's flipped on and we're all doomed.

    I want 1 less Tiny Coffin, Why Don't You? Support The President's Gun Violence Plan.

    by JML9999 on Tue May 13, 2014 at 09:14:48 PM PDT

    •  I've been watching since the show started. (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      JML9999, annieli

      It provokes a vast array of thoughts.

      Good thing I'm not given to paranoia.

      See second part of sigline. :)

      "Go well through life"-Me (As far as I know)
      This message will self-destruct upon arrival in the NSA archives in Utah.

      by MTmofo on Tue May 13, 2014 at 09:25:23 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  What is "legitimate" to forget? (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    JeffW, franklyn

    Dance lightly upon the Earth, Sing her songs with wild abandon, Smile upon all forms of Life ...and be well.

    by LinSea on Tue May 13, 2014 at 09:20:36 PM PDT

  •  want the same thing.... so it's exactly why (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    LinSea

    I wrote w new diary on the series finale for Person of Interest tonight http://www.dailykos.com/...

    In what could be a landmark case, the European Court of Justice ruled Tuesday that individuals have the right to control their data and can ask search engines to remove results. In other words, they have the "right to be forgotten." Zero chance of such a case happening in the U.S., although it did, I'd would prefer they let me erase myself from the NSA search engine instead of Google.

    Warning - some snark may be above‽ (-9.50; -7.03)‽ eState4Column5©2013 "If we appear to seek the unattainable, then let it be known that we do so to avoid the unimaginable." (@eState4Column5)

    by annieli on Tue May 13, 2014 at 09:32:36 PM PDT

  •  If a corporation can be a 'person', ... (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    nellgwen, JeffW

    why not a government?

    We can use the Mitt Romney logic:

    "Corporations are people, my friend."
    "Everything corporations earn ultimately goes to people."
    "Human beings, my friend."

    So, why not the same logic?

    "Governments are people, my friend."
    "Everything governments tax ultimately goes to people."
    "Human beings, my friend."

    Is Uncle Sam appropriate? Is it a benevolent uncle that helps you get by in tough times, or the crazy uncle that shows up on holidays looking for drinking money?


    I’m not a big fan of vegetable gardens. Like my chickens, I prefer my salads to be cage free.

    by glb3 on Tue May 13, 2014 at 09:55:25 PM PDT

  •  The Chickens Come Home To Roost (0+ / 0-)

    The "right to be forgotten" policy has been supercharged over the years by all the anti-government conspiracy thinking coming from both right and left.

    For example, with the NSA, while there are legitimate issues raised, much of the debate is overtaken by sensationalism, as people on both right and left compete with one another to allege criminal wrong doing.  When these claims are shown to be false, it doesn't register - the damage is already done as it feeds a narrative that "Big Government" is watching you constantly a la Orwell.  This notion of the all-seeing-eye only brings head-shaking from those who know how the US Government - a collection of fallible human beings, often underpaid and understaffed - actually functions.  This real harm continues a long trend since Reagan of undermining people's faith in public institutions.

    If you truly believe that The Man is watching you, then the idea of a "right to be forgotten" becomes not only logical, but essential.

    And so here we are.  This is going to cause havoc.  

    "Hidden in the idea of radical openness is an allegiance to machines instead of people." - Jaron Lanier

    by FDRDemocrat on Tue May 13, 2014 at 10:08:27 PM PDT

    •  You're Doing What You Accuse Others Of Doing (0+ / 0-)

      What really damages faith in government is this sort of waving arms and carrying signs all saying "HOORAY FOR OUR SIDE". It allows rot to fester until the structure falls down.

      On the Internet, nobody knows if you're a dog... but everybody knows if you're a jackass.

      by stevemb on Wed May 14, 2014 at 03:41:04 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Interesting perspective (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Rich in PA, JeffW
    "I'd would prefer they let me erase myself from the NSA search engine instead of Google."
    I personally am much more worried about google having my information than the NSA.

    Google et al  having your info can directly hurt the life of the average american.  Price manipulation,  career profiling etc.

    Meanwhile to me  the fear of the NSA having your info is much the same as the republican claim that they need guns to defend against the "govment"

    "The court recognized what some European legislators call "the right to be forgotten"—the idea of giving ordinary citizens more control over their personal data, including its deletion."
    Just a fyi, as somone who has worked as a developer for some stuff on the big world wide web.

    The right to be forgotten is entirely impossible to implement.

    The effort it would require to remove the trace statements, and implement anonymous/deletive user structures for current software would require the commitment  the size of the GDP value of the world for the next 5 or so years.

    In addition to that it would reduce new product development to a standstill.

    The impossibility of any true privacy negates the value of any attempt.  

    You cant stop the tide from coming in, you cant stop this change in the expectations of privacy.

    •  As an aside (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      JeffW, mmacdDE

      I was just also reading a discussion on the exact same topic from a community I believe has a little more in depth understanding of the the issue.

      http://yro.slashdot.org/...

      The most relevant quotes ive seen

      "I like the idea of being able to make someone like facebook delete all your personal information but that's not how this tool is going to be used. It's going to be used by a politician to force Google to delete links to all stories about an affair they had. It will be used to censor the news not to maintain privacy as claimed. Frankly it's a politicians wet dream."
      and
      "Sure, at first glance it looks good, but really this is a bad decision. We're going to see Scientologists demanding removal of any anti-Scientology material. The whole thing is a bit Stalinesque... people feel they have the right to erase the past just as Stalin erased those who fell out of favor from photographs.

      Once what you do is in the public record, it's out there. You have no more right to demand its removal from the Internet than you do to demand libraries cut out articles about you from archived newspapers."

      •  I think these arguments (given since (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        JeffW

        the beginning of the internet and open source code was discussed) have lost their meaning.

        You have the right to withdraw an article from being published in the print world. Nobody can force you to publish something you don't want to in print format.

        You are forced to enter data into the internet for daily activities which you CAN NOT do anymore WITHOUT using the internet.

        So, in fact, thousands of people can demand removal of something, but they do ONLY have the right to remove their own data, not other people's data.

        I am not a Stalinesque evildoer if I ask to remove from the internet what I was forced to post there against my will.

        •  . (0+ / 0-)
          "Yesterdays decision is a blow to freedom of speech. It allows sweeping factual, legitimately published information under the rug simply because the subject doesn't like the fact that the information is public. It is censorship and nothing less."
          "The so-called "right to be forgotten" would be more accurately described as the "right to force other people to forget". There is no such right, as you point out."
      •  False premise (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        waterstreet2013

        The ECJ ruling would have no effect on politicians who are exempted from the rulings as "public persons".  It is in line with the Charter of Fundamental Rights in the EU where personal data is specifically mentioned. The deletion would be from the results returned by a search engine which has processed the data rather than the original record.

        "Come to Sochi, visit the gay clubs and play with the bears" - NOT a Russian advertising slogan.

        by Lib Dem FoP on Wed May 14, 2014 at 04:29:38 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  if that is the case, the citizens should (0+ / 0-)

      demand that all interactions of citizens with government and business entities could be done "off the net".

      Because we are forced to use the internet in all of our activities, we are slaves of the internet's impossible feature to produce unerasable data for ever. That is a total destructive technology. Nature has births and deaths and goes in cycles. Internet data can't die, but are constantly born. In that regard we are completely exploitable and abusable.

      We can't stop the tide? I would say we must, or accept to be enslaved for life by our own technological inventions. Basically we are already.

      •  Everything can be done offline (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        emmasnacker

        The choice to do anything online is the choice to give up your privacy.

        By choosing to do everything online people willfully or ignorantly are signing away privacy.  

        I do enjoy keeping some things private, thats why I do not post much on the interwebs.

        In addition to my own choices, Ive also accumulated a social network that does the same. As such I do not expect random videos of me showing up on the net.

        People who post random pictures on twitter or videos of that wild night of fun on facebook are not my friends.

        Those with uniformed networks are going to find themselves unemployable (or at least un-promoteable) due to  internet based negative histories.

  •  Nice to hear Senator Wyden speak out (0+ / 0-)

    Senator Wyden Getting Techy With It, Takes Reddit Questions On Net Neutrality

    Wyden writes on reddit that he’s been a “defender of the Open Internet since I had a full head of hair and rugged good looks.”
    heh

    "Suppose you were an idiot. And suppose you were a member of Congress Chris Christie. But I repeat myself." ~ Mark Twain, (with a twist) ;o)

    by Terre on Tue May 13, 2014 at 10:32:19 PM PDT

  •  This joke took ive years to reach the punchline (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    this just in, Square Knot, IQof20

    No light, no dark, no up, no down. No life. No time. Without end. My people called it The Void. The Eternals called it The Howling. But some people call it The Tea Party.

    by kamrom on Tue May 13, 2014 at 10:53:47 PM PDT

  •  Many interactions with government and (0+ / 0-)

    business entities can ONLY be done online using the internet. Services were you can walk in, fill out paperwork, whereby the necessary documents the government or business want to keep are stored in paper format, don't exist anymore.

    These papers could be stored and archived by the governement surveillance and spying entities. They could eventually be shared without your knowledge, but that's about it. In addition you yourself have control of the paperwork you submitted to the government. You have copies at least. That's not the case anymore, if all data you submit are digitized.

    As long as people are forced to interact online and have no option to have services offered offline, I think a person should have a right to delete her own data, she/he was forced to post on the internet servers.

    The authoritarian role is in the hands of the internet servers and providers, the fact that a person can't control any of the data anymore that they have posted to the internet, even if they didn't want to post them, is unacceptable, imo.

    No options are given anymore do to business and interactions "off the net". And if that is the case persons should have the right to control their own data that are "on the net". The whole exchange of data is not a voluntary process anymore from the side of the user. And that's were the "fascist" aspect of the "internet eternal storage philosophy" of data against your own will starts, most of the time well propagandized as a democratic process, transparency etc. Only the highlevel IT experts are capable to analyze the data in depth and eventually find "proof" of a person, who lied. The average person though can't do it, and if someone claims a person is lying, that person can't defend himself due to lack of IT capabilities to access those data.

    So, here is the voice of the authoritarian EU and even from a German. What could be more telling, right?

    Could it be that you are blinded in your prejudices?

    •  "Her Own Data" (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      IQof20
      I think a person should have a right to delete her own data
      So, why is the record of John Doe failing to pay a debt to Richard Roe a piece of data that "belongs" only to John and not to Richard? That's what is being asserted here, and it's absurd even if the premise of personal data ownership is stipulated.

      On the Internet, nobody knows if you're a dog... but everybody knows if you're a jackass.

      by stevemb on Wed May 14, 2014 at 03:44:32 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  I don't understand this comment, beyond (0+ / 0-)

        my paygrade.

      •  Personal Data (0+ / 0-)

        In this context, it is the information in the data that is personal, not the ownership of the file, which is why the newspaper was not ordered to take the original reference down. Section 8 of the Charter of Fundamental Rights is quite explicit about personal data and makes this clearer.

        Protection of personal data
        1. Everyone has the right to the protection of personal data concerning him or her.

        2. Such data must be processed fairly for specified purposes and on the basis of the consent of the person concerned or some other legitimate basis laid down by law. Everyone has the right of access to data which has been collected concerning him or her, and the right to have it rectified.

        3. Compliance with these rules shall be subject to control by an independent authority

        In the EU for example, companies cannot take the information you give about you to any other organisation without your express permission to use it for the purposes. So you will often see a couple of tick boxes on forms asking you to confirm that this is being given so, for example, they can sell your name to mailing lists.  

        There is a scheme for the English NHS to collate anonymized data from GPs and other providers to improve provision across the board. However there is a possibility of this data then being taken and used to identify an individual - the UK postcodes for example can identify an individual block of apartments, short stretch of road or even an individual property like a farm. Using that and some other data, it's possible to spot a patient from other data included but "anonymous". There are other reasons for objecting to the scheme and one is allowed to tell your doctor that you do not wish your data to be included in their return (some things like infectious diseases may be excluded from this restriction, on public health grounds).  

        "Come to Sochi, visit the gay clubs and play with the bears" - NOT a Russian advertising slogan.

        by Lib Dem FoP on Wed May 14, 2014 at 05:53:01 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  lobbyist trying to ban gays from NFL (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    waterstreet2013

    press in England report that some lobbyist (Burkman?) wants to boycott everyone being good to Michael Sam eg Visa, and have a law banning gay players from the NFL.....

    I can see some salivating at the prospect, but that law ain't gonna happen, right?  Or do we need to hope for an early court case and a sensible federal judge...?

    And any boycott is surely likely to be matched by extra support - look at the sales of Sam's shirts.  Please.....

    Christian values, he says, he has to defend them.  Let's hear it for the Pope's much better understanding of Christian values.

  •  A Distinction Without A Difference (0+ / 0-)
    "It is certainly shocking to have come from the EU rather than from an authoritarian state."

    On the Internet, nobody knows if you're a dog... but everybody knows if you're a jackass.

    by stevemb on Wed May 14, 2014 at 03:28:10 AM PDT

    •  I disagree with this. (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Lib Dem FoP

      Thinking of the TSA scanners, in Europe the scan image was shown as a representation of a person, basically an electronic graphic. In the U.S., the scan was authentic, body parts and all. Both scans accomplished the same thing, however,  European sensibility avoided the prurient aspects of the security scan from the get go.
      There is something about the 'right to be forgotten' that speaks to this same European sensibility in a way that has nothing to do with an authoritarian state.

  •  Europeans should just do what we do here. (0+ / 0-)

    Run for President on the Republican ticket.  

    It's not the side effects of the cocaine/I'm thinking that it must be love

    by Rich in PA on Wed May 14, 2014 at 04:25:51 AM PDT

  •  Disturbing implications? Boo hoo. (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Drobin, Lib Dem FoP

    Companies have been going great guns over the last few decades, acting as if privacy didn't exist and that anybody who wanted some was a Luddite.

    Cheers to the EU court for their decision.

    And -- as to the United States, you left out one of the most important rights to be forgotten for US citizens: the expungement of credit data from credit bureaus as it ages past seven years.  There is no point to that if the information is readily available on the internet.

    Multiple societies figured out years ago that some sort of forgetfulness and forgiveness serves useful purpose. Not only does it let people reclaim their lives, but it lets society benefit from those reclaimed lives.

    The only really disturbing implication for this decision is that anybody might find it disturbing.

    LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

    by dinotrac on Wed May 14, 2014 at 05:14:16 AM PDT

    •  Quite (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      dinotrac, JeffW

      There must be many thousands of people in the USA who had their homes repossessed by the bank in the downturn. Is it really fair that in future, maybe 30 years later somebody with a prurient interest in them - just a nosey neighbor will be able to easily find the information?

      What about a search that returns a damning piece of information but relates to another person with the same name and living in the same city (there were at least 5 other people with my name in the London phone directory and mine is not a particularly common one).  Say person who is arrested for a serious criminal offense (rape?) but the allegation proved false and malicious? There may well be a report of the arrest but not the rest.

      "Come to Sochi, visit the gay clubs and play with the bears" - NOT a Russian advertising slogan.

      by Lib Dem FoP on Wed May 14, 2014 at 06:09:41 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  A piece of unwarranted optimism.... (0+ / 0-)
    "An excerpt from Greenwald's new book makes the national security state sound like cartoon super villains."
    Would that the NSA top management and their corporate overlords were so incompetent, so easily defeated.

    Also that they had incompetent underlings. NSA's work force is quite intelligent.

    "Stealing kids' lunch money makes them strong and independent." -- after Paul "False Prophet" Ryan

    by waterstreet2013 on Wed May 14, 2014 at 07:27:29 AM PDT

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