Skip to main content

Tom Hayden, a co-founder of Students for a Democratic Society and former California state legislator, has been a political activist for more than 50 years. He is now director of the Peace and Justice Center in Culver City, California. In the latest edition of the PJC's newsletter, he writes The Great Unifier: California Against Climate Change. Here are some excerpts:

My dream is that California under Governor Jerry Brown's leadership will become a multi-cultural world-class economy powered entirely by renewable resources and energy conservation, and a model to which President Barack Obama can point during the critical global talks on climate change in December 2015. This vision is one in which the whole is more than the sum of its parts. The overarching goal of projecting California as a renewable model for the world should unite the many tangled strands of California environmentalism.

The challenge of climate change can be "The Great Unifier," in the words of a February 2014 state report.

Tom Hayden
Tom Hayden
The international goal is an enforceable climate treaty preventing greenhouse gas emissions from increasing global temperature another 2 degrees Celsius above current levels. Since that goal is impossible to achieve by top-down means, demonstrable bottom-up progress from places like California is the only way forward. Additionally, since previous treaty negotiations have collapsed because of the rich nation/poor nation divide; the battle against climate change, in California or the planet, is interwoven with the environmental justice movement. If the California model improves conditions for all its residents, including those most affected by pollution and unequal opportunity, California will have a message for the world.

California already leads in many ways. We are the most energy-efficient state in America. Since our renewable investments began with Jerry Brown and the no-nukes movement four decades ago, we have achieved 1.5 million clean energy jobs, $74 billion in consumer savings, and become the magnet for two-thirds of the clean energy venture capital investments in the country. We have rejected those myopic corporate voices that once warned that California needed 65 nuclear power plants built on our magnificent coastline. Today only one nuclear plant, Diablo Canyon, stands in the way of California becoming a nuclear-free state.

There's much more. The governor campaigned on a promise of 500,000 new clean energy jobs over his two terms. He is going to increase the percentage of our electricity generated from renewables, now at 23 percent, to at least 33 percent by 2020. There will be 1.5 million zero-emission vehicles in California by 2025. The plan is to cut in half emissions from passenger transportation. Brown seeks 75 percent recycling and composting by 2020. Under Title 24 of the state building code, "zero carbon buildings" will be sprouting, in which the annual energy consumption is no great than the renewable energy produced on site.

Brown knows that California is the leverage point for achieving a national transformation towards clean energy and climate protection, just as California standards in the 70s led to vast efficiencies in transportation, building, and appliance standards. The tailpipe emission standards ultimately adopted in California in 2003 became federal standards by 2010.

California is beginning to invest $120 billion in renewables and clean energy between this year and 2020. California is in the process of spending at least $20 billion per year fighting climate change through an alternative energy budget. It's no moonbeam fantasy to visualize California as a clean energy model for the US and the world. [...]

President Obama and Gov. Brown need each other more than ever. Obama does not receive enough notice for the unprecedented $71 billion for clean energy initiatives contained in his 2009 stimulus package. But there the "green New Deal" stalled, as coal-breathing Republicans took control of the House of Representatives in 2012. Now, however, the Obama administration is poised to sharply limit carbon pollution with new EPA rules. The conservative US Supreme Court recently ruled that the EPA can regulate pollution, which drifts from 28 mainly coal-based states to the East Coast. In June the EPA will issue Obama's most important regulation so far, a sweeping order to cut CO2 emissions which, if Obama succeeds, means a cut of 700 million tons of carbon pollution yearly by 2020, and will be a serious obstacle to present and future coal plants.

Assuming Rolling Stone is correct that the Obama administration will reject the Keystone XL pipeline, the president will be looking for serious partners outside the climate change-denying House of Representatives as he prepares for the December 2015 Paris talks on a global treaty to reduce the carbon plague.

Enter Jerry Brown. Obama's pending decisions will accelerate the need for a growing clean energy economy, which California is poised to deliver. [...]

Brown and California therefore are pivotal for the US, China, and the planet on climate change issues. None of this will be easy, but a common vision of "the great unifier" - the challenge of climate change - is critical to navigating the many divisions and stumbling blocks which stand in the way, and which often exhaust environmentalist energy.

The first challenge to this agenda is to prevent industrial fracking from going forward in California during Brown's next five years. Environmentalists are united in opposing expanded fracking. Labor and legislative Democrats are sharply divided over fracking in California’s vast Monterey Shale deposits. The opposition to fracking is so intense among community groups and fracking-focused environmental groups that any attempts even to regulate the process are denounced as legitimizing an apocalypse.

The oil thought to lie in the Monterey Shale formation must "stay in the ground" if this scenario is to be avoided, “fracktivists” say. The very concept of regulation, they add, implies that fracking can be managed safely. The threat of methane emissions and water contamination during a historic drought, make fracking a leading environmental menace for this generation.

Brown's caution on fracking so far has drawn such vigorous environmental protests that it damages his credibility as a global leader on climate. [...]


Blast from the Past. At Daily Kos on this date in 2002"Security" at airports means empty guns:

For months I have been telling anyone who listened that National Guard troops in airports were probably carrying unloaded weapons. I was right.

It's funny to me how the AP is breathlessly reporting this "scoop". Anyone with any kind of military service would know that the armed forces rarely trust their troops with loaded guns. I served in the US Army during the Gulf War. As my Germany-based unit didn't deploy, we were forced to do guard duty around our post. Yet, while we were on high alert for terrorist attacks, we never once received ammunition to properly defend ourselves.

Aside from that, the National Guard is a poor force to help guard airports. Their M-16 weapons are Vietnam-war era vintage. My rifle in 1989 was a newer model than those I saw in the airports. And, the M-16 is not design for close-quarters combat. It's a medium-range weapon. Airport security in countries outside the US usually carry short range submachine guns, such as Uzis. The M-16 is unwieldy and awkward when facing enemies just meters away.

Finally, regular Army units, and National Guard units, I presume, do not receive training in close-quarters combat. That has always been the domain of the Special Forces. Thus, we have had ill-trained, ill-prepared and unarmed civilian-'warriors' patrolling our airports. And not to increase security, but to "[calm] people down and [give] them the assurance that we were doing something." Too bad they really weren't "doing something".



Tweet of the Day
So, the Pope is in Israel with an Imam and a Rabbi. .. If they don't walk into a bar, it's all been for nothing.
@Welshtabby



On today's Kagro in the Morning show, back after a long weekend of rough news, Greg Dworkin joined us to discuss the #YesAllWomen global phenomenon, open carry blowback in TX, the VA issue narrative vs. reality & how Burr stepped in it. Even as the tide turns on marriage equality, we're reminded that some think they can turn it on a dime, because "tradition." And the oldest House Member ever looks to win his primary. Dark money at work in AR-SEN. Twitter's buzzing about corporate social media. Boston's "fusion center" tracked Occupy while missing the marathon bombing. Boing Boing notes  Baquet spiked the biggest pre-Snowden NSA story. The prescience of Justice Brandeis.



High Impact Posts. Top Comments.

EMAIL TO A FRIEND X
Your Email has been sent.
You must add at least one tag to this diary before publishing it.

Add keywords that describe this diary. Separate multiple keywords with commas.
Tagging tips - Search For Tags - Browse For Tags

?

More Tagging tips:

A tag is a way to search for this diary. If someone is searching for "Barack Obama," is this a diary they'd be trying to find?

Use a person's full name, without any title. Senator Obama may become President Obama, and Michelle Obama might run for office.

If your diary covers an election or elected official, use election tags, which are generally the state abbreviation followed by the office. CA-01 is the first district House seat. CA-Sen covers both senate races. NY-GOV covers the New York governor's race.

Tags do not compound: that is, "education reform" is a completely different tag from "education". A tag like "reform" alone is probably not meaningful.

Consider if one or more of these tags fits your diary: Civil Rights, Community, Congress, Culture, Economy, Education, Elections, Energy, Environment, Health Care, International, Labor, Law, Media, Meta, National Security, Science, Transportation, or White House. If your diary is specific to a state, consider adding the state (California, Texas, etc). Keep in mind, though, that there are many wonderful and important diaries that don't fit in any of these tags. Don't worry if yours doesn't.

You can add a private note to this diary when hotlisting it:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary from your hotlist?
Are you sure you want to remove your recommendation? You can only recommend a diary once, so you will not be able to re-recommend it afterwards.
Rescue this diary, and add a note:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary from Rescue?
Choose where to republish this diary. The diary will be added to the queue for that group. Publish it from the queue to make it appear.

You must be a member of a group to use this feature.

Add a quick update to your diary without changing the diary itself:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary?
(The diary will be removed from the site and returned to your drafts for further editing.)
(The diary will be removed.)
Are you sure you want to save these changes to the published diary?

Comment Preferences

  •  1,026,650 registered users on dKos now. (18+ / 0-)

    Here are the 10 newest registered users on dKos.  Hope to see their comments and diaries here soon!  (If they're not spammers.)

    Shawntaxp22
    Daysi2506h
    Pattievoh (user #1,026,643: already banned)
    Jc2517jg
    Alvin094h
    Marjoryex1938
    Tameraokk17m
    Elaina072zv
    David2455fez1
    Jamesgxm2269


    And since our society is obsessed with numbers that end in a lot of zeros as milestones, here's a special shoutout to users:
    #1,025,900: relevantperspective
    #1,026,000: nospa (spammer)
    #1,026,100: Emmittvq405 (already banned)
    #1,026,200: ai symphony
    #1,026,300: Angelynhbt (already banned)
    #1,026,400: bvaisanen
    #1,026,500: Romandn (already banned)
    #1,026,600: stew7blood

    We've added 785 more users in the last two days.  There's definitely been a recent increase in spammers in the last couple weeks.


    And for your Diary Rescue music pleasure, here's Elton John's "The One".

  •  That post from 2002 about the Nat'l Guard (9+ / 0-)

    in the airports was so good. Damn, I'm sorry I didn't know about this place until the 2008 primaries started heating up. And it took me a few months of lurking to finally join.

    GOP 2014 strategy -- Hire clowns, elephants, and a ringmaster and say "a media circus" has emerged and blame Democrats for lack of progress. Have pundits agree that "both sides are to blame" and hope the public will stay home on election day.

    by ontheleftcoast on Tue May 27, 2014 at 08:35:13 PM PDT

  •  How. Always HOW. (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Aunt Pat, susans, Jeff Y, StrayCat

    Everything is like the weather. Everybody bitches about it, but they don't go out of their way to actually DO anything about it.
    We need a MLK in every area. Otherwise, we're stuck with the ad nauseam what, where, when and why.
    Nobody knows who the OWS people were. But, my God, look what they accomplished. Imagine some MLK's.

     

    Courtesy, please. Unless the reply is idiotic. Then everybody's on their own.

    by franklyn on Tue May 27, 2014 at 08:39:52 PM PDT

  •  Check out (13+ / 0-)

    "If Wall Street paid a tax on every “game” they run, we would get enough revenue to run the government on." ~ Will Rogers

    by Lefty Coaster on Tue May 27, 2014 at 08:47:00 PM PDT

  •  MSNBC: UCSB massacre (11+ / 0-)

    Chris discussed the massacre with Jessica Valenti and Shannon Watts.  Ari Melber, still filling in for Lawrence, had on Richard Martinez, the father of one of the murder victims, and then discussed it further with Krystal Ball and John Feinblatt.

    Chris also discussed the GOP's climate change denial with Rep. Rush Holt (D-NJ).  Rachel looked at it in terms of their creationist museum as the White House held its annual science fair.  Ari discussed fracking with Josh Fox.  And Ed talked about it with Mary Anne Hitt and Jon Wood.  He also noted that Hillary has stayed quiet on Keystone XL with former Montana Gov. Brian Schweitzer (D) and Connie Schultz.

    Chris also brought us the amazing story of right-wing nutjob T.J. Fabby, running tonight in the GOP runoff in Texas for a state house seat, who attacked his primary opponent for getting a contribution from... a MUSLIM!  Not a terrorist-connected Muslim.  Just a person who happened to be Muslim.  He discussed this with comedian Dean Obeidallah, who did one heck of a troll job on Fabby after hearing about it.

    (Update: Fabby LOST the runoff tonight.  Heh.)

    Chris also looked at how veterans groups slammed Sen. Richard Burr (R-NC) when he attacked them for not calling on Eric Shinseki to resign immediately.  And he talked about Obama's news about Afghanistan with Anand Gopal.

    Rachel also covered Burr's attack on veterans groups.  She discussed the situation in Afghanistan with Richard Engel.  She noted that states are changing their execution drugs with Richard Dieter.  And she closed by noting that longtime Rep. Ralph Hall (R-TX) was defeated tonight in the GOP runoff.

    Ari also covered the latest round of Moral Monday protests in North Carolina with Rev. William Barber.  He then talked with Sam Kass about how the House GOP is trying to slash the school lunch program championed by Michelle Obama to... spite her?

    Ed talked with Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-OH) about Sen. Ted Cruz's (R-TX) bullshit about the First Amendment and Citizens United.  He blasted Dr. Ben Carson for saying the VA scandal was a gift from God.  And he looked at the Florida Governor's race with Mitch Ceasar.

  •  The NRA and their Republican flunkies (12+ / 0-)

    have distorted the meaning of the 2nd amendment so much as to make it nearly unrecognizable.

    When the 2nd amendment was written, militias were the equivalent of what the present day National Guard is. The 2nd amendment didn't mean guns everywhere, unrestricted. It meant a WELL REGULATED National Guard.

    Legal Basis of the National Guard:

    The National Guard's charter is the Constitution of the United States. Article I, Section 8 of the U.S. Constitution contains a series of "militia clauses," vesting distinct authority and responsibilities in the federal government and the state governments. These clauses and follow-on legislation have sculpted the Guard as you see it today. Here are summaries that will help you understand how the Guard came to be what it is today.

    http://www.arng.army.mil/...

    Elliot Rodger Was a Product of America's Gun Culture:

    When the subject of lethal firearms and mass killers and gun regulations comes up, as it will again and again, keep this quote handy. These are the words of Elliot Rodger on getting home with his first handgun, not long before his massacre in Isla Vista:

    "After I picked up the handgun, I brought it back to my room and felt a new sense of power. I was now armed. Who's the alpha male now, bitches? I thought to myself, regarding all of the girls who've looked down on me in the past."

    Elliot Rodger was a legend in his own mind, and he made guns a part of that legend. His case doesn't merely brook a conversation about gun regulations and whether we make it too easy to own a firearm. His case should force us to confront America's gun culture, and to ask whether we make it too desirable to own a firearm.

    http://gawker.com/...

    “I would like to get rid of the homophobes, sexists, and racists in our audience. I know they're out there and it really bothers me.” ― Kurt Cobain

    by Jeff Y on Tue May 27, 2014 at 08:50:30 PM PDT

  •  And already... (12+ / 0-)

    you have some Ron Paul fans claiming the UCSB massacre was a "false flag operation".

    Wow... swear this feels like a scam to me..... might be some kind of false flag. The propaganda on this thing is in full effect.
  •  Tomorrow I give a solar presentation (18+ / 0-)

    to city managers in the region along with another organization. I hope they show up. And I hate public speaking. Blech. The goal is to get a bug into their ears about moving forward with city-wide solar initiatives and creating solar-ready communities.

  •  BTW, I wasn't around here last night... (10+ / 0-)

    because I was here instead.

    And now there's also that awkward feeling when you realize The Onion's article about the massacre uses a picture from our vigil that features a good friend of mine in it.

  •  Brown is light years ahead of any governor (7+ / 0-)

    on subjects green, and has been starting decades ago. Yeah, fracking is a problem for him, but overall, Jesus, people look at what he does do. It's phenomenal, and a national
    benchmark. If I saw even one third of this country following Brown's example on almost everything green, I'd be giddy.

    "The soil under the grass is dreaming of a young forest, and under the pavement the soil is dreaming of grass."--Wendell Berry

    by Wildthumb on Tue May 27, 2014 at 09:11:26 PM PDT

  •  HOLY CRAP my mind has just been blown (15+ / 0-)

    I'm watching the latest episode of 'The World Wars' on the History Channel (it details the major figures of the wars, their history, personalities and the decisions they made), and one of the 'expert commentators' they have on is Senator Boat Anchor, John McCain. The scene was showing Neville Chamberlain and Winston Churchill arguing about whether it was time to go to war against Germany, and McCain came on with one of the most stunning quotes he's ever spoken;

    "War is not a political game."

    Excuse me, I have to go vomit.

    "Jika Anda membutuhkan produk untuk meningkatkan kualitas hubungan seksual Anda atau membutuhkan produk obat pembesar penis!" - Bintangpasutri

    by Fordmandalay on Tue May 27, 2014 at 09:31:44 PM PDT

  •  Man, this guy freedumbs so damn hard (7+ / 0-)
    Cliven Bundy leaves GOP to join fringe party that wants to reverse laws that offend God:

    Ever determined to be relevant, racist separatist cattle rancher Cliven Bundy has announced he's leaving the Republican Party to join the Independent American Party, which recently endorsed a "wackaloon" conspiracy theorist and Sandy Hook truther.

    http://www.rawstory.com/...

    “I would like to get rid of the homophobes, sexists, and racists in our audience. I know they're out there and it really bothers me.” ― Kurt Cobain

    by Jeff Y on Tue May 27, 2014 at 09:37:44 PM PDT

  •  The March for Democracy makes it to Bakersfield (14+ / 0-)

    And Dolores Huerta joins them on Day 11 towards the end of the day.  Here she is marching into Bakersfield;

    Day 11 Dolores Huerta photo Day11DoloresHuerta_zps9740a285.jpg

    Cesar Chavez was and still is an inspiration.

    Previous diaries;

    March for Democracy Day 1

    March for Democracy Day 3 and 4

    March for Democracy - Day 9 - Interview with Kai Newkirk

    Daily Kos an oasis of truth. Truth that leads to action.

    by Shockwave on Tue May 27, 2014 at 09:42:29 PM PDT

  •  Open thread query ... (0+ / 0-)

    Looking for SD savvy dkos-connected politicos' commentary on Bosworth.

    In re: http://www.kdlt.com/...

    Who is funding her? She has a brilliant response for what appears to be a virulent anti-woman attack.  Her response is partisan which makes the story suspect.  But we all know here how anti-woman even some partisan Democratic "men" can show themselves to be.

    Still it all seems like a junior high school staging.

    "You can't teach an old dogma new tricks." - Dorothy Parker

    by Glinda on Tue May 27, 2014 at 09:58:27 PM PDT

    •  Oh crap ... (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      nellgwen

      I posted that as I was listening to her 15 minute rambling diatribe.  I just got to her linking this to the shootings in San Diego.  Oh my effin' deity!

      She is a train wreck.  But so is (was) Michele Bachmann. Please tell me she is merely a joke.

      The quotes! The quotes!  Her mouth makes Palin seem Churchillian.

      I'm hoping this is merely a Hail Mary pass.

      "You can't teach an old dogma new tricks." - Dorothy Parker

      by Glinda on Tue May 27, 2014 at 10:03:44 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  the eighth largest economy in the world (2012) (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Eric Nelson, LinSea
    The international goal is an enforceable climate treaty preventing greenhouse gas emissions from increasing global temperature another 2 degrees Celsius above current levels. Since that goal is impossible to achieve by top-down means, demonstrable bottom-up progress from places like California is the only way forward. Additionally, since previous treaty negotiations have collapsed because of the rich nation/poor nation divide; the battle against climate change, in California or the planet, is interwoven with the environmental justice movement. If the California model improves conditions for all its residents, including those most affected by pollution and unequal opportunity, California will have a message for the world.
    California already leads in many ways. We are the most energy-efficient state in America. Since our renewable investments began with Jerry Brown and the no-nukes movement four decades ago, we have achieved 1.5 million clean energy jobs, $74 billion in consumer savings, and become the magnet for two-thirds of the clean energy venture capital investments in the country. We have rejected those myopic corporate voices that once warned that California needed 65 nuclear power plants built on our magnificent coastline. Today only one nuclear plant, Diablo Canyon, stands in the way of California becoming a nuclear-free state.

    Warning - some snark may be above‽ (-9.50; -7.03)‽ eState4Column5©2013 "If we appear to seek the unattainable, then let it be known that we do so to avoid the unimaginable." (@eState4Column5)

    by annieli on Tue May 27, 2014 at 10:12:34 PM PDT

  •  Again we still pretend -- (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    tardis10, Thatsitfortheotherwon

    that something other than NOT CONSUMING FOSSIL FUELS (which means NOT PRODUCING FOSSIL FUELS) will mitigate global warming.  I know!  Alternative energy!  Efficiency!  Let's talk about something else y'know.

    "What used to pass for education now looks more like ignoration/ Take the people's money and slip it to the corporation" -- Bruce Cockburn

    by Cassiodorus on Tue May 27, 2014 at 10:24:42 PM PDT

    •  I've lived in SW Germany since 1992. (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      SouthernLiberalinMD

      All the hilltops around here have sprouted windmills in the last 15 years or so. Most houses have some solar panels on the rooftops. Even solar farms have sprung up in a place not necessarily known for lots of sunshine.

      •  Cass is saying that as long as the fuel is mined (0+ / 0-)

        it will be sold and burned, and as long as that keeps happening, we are on a path to mass extinction.

        Alternative energy and energy efficiency not going to stop that, in his view.

        Problem is, it's not just civilians buying and burning the stuff.

        There is no way for a citizen of a Republic to abdicate his responsibilities. ---Edward R. Murrow

        by SouthernLiberalinMD on Wed May 28, 2014 at 08:40:50 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  I get the problem (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      JeffW, Cassiodorus

      you're pointing to:  stop production. But to stop production you either have to convince the militaries of the world to go off fossil fuels (AND get civilian use of fossil fuels reduced to near nothing) or millions have to march on the sites where such drilling is being done and stop it by some means--and when they get gunned down, beaten, imprisoned, etc. more have to come behind them until the cost to the system of maintaining the constant beatdown is not worth what the system gets out of fossil fuel mining. Given how valuable fossil fuels are, that's a lot of lives going to be lost and ruined, and you have to have millions, probably tens of millions of people, willing to lose their lives or have them ruined. I doubt very much if you've got millions willing to do that. I don't.

      Alternatively, you could have somebody invent a more efficient and productive form of energy and sell it to the militaries of the world, essentially "out-competing" fossil fuels. Except that the political corruption of the bought and paid for fossil fuel politicians tends to obstruct that process.

      There is no way for a citizen of a Republic to abdicate his responsibilities. ---Edward R. Murrow

      by SouthernLiberalinMD on Wed May 28, 2014 at 08:39:40 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  You're suggesting a hostage situation. (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        SouthernLiberalinMD

        The thing is, though, that millions of lives are already at stake with global warming, and that really, seriously, they're going to die anyway -- famine, plague, rising ocean levels, and so on.  So it's not as if the hostages have a choice.  They're going to die anyway.  So the hostage situation is going to end in tragedy, and all that's left at this point is to wait out the insane people with the weapons until they give up their terror-scene and we start to negotiate something else.

        But it's not just the world military situation, now in its third decade of lame, half-assed excuses for why we can't have a peace dividend, that resembles a hostage situation.  It's the whole of the capitalist system, which is busy dismantling ecosystems around the world for profit while its proxy force, the US military, claims the world's power.  That's a hostage situation too.

        Capitalism has always been a half-assed substitute for what we really needed, though you might get a nice "great society" for awhile when you create a system in which all the players view the world as a profit-generating machine, and we had that.  At some point, though, you discover about the capitalist machine that, like many other machines devised by the human race, it follows the general rule about machines: when using them, it's easier to break stuff (in this case, the "stuff" is the Earth's world-ecology) than it is to nurture and properly manage stuff.

        All in all, there might have been a fair justification the capitalist system "on balance" throughout most of the 20th and even into the 21st century.  We used arguments such as: capitalism is what we have, the purveyors of "actually existing socialism" didn't make it, most people will tolerate it, and so on.  At this point, however, there doesn't appear to be anything in the future but an increasing downward spiral of capitalist malice, leading to something that won't be capitalism anyway because it will be worse.  

        The whole justification for the fossil fuel thing, for why we need such absurd quantities of the stuff to run a world-society anyway, is capitalism.  Power might emanate from the barrel of a gun, but the people holding the guns have to have justifications.  At present, then, we need to reveal the insanity of their justifications in full light.  Then we wait out the hostage situation until the insane people with the guns give up.

        "What used to pass for education now looks more like ignoration/ Take the people's money and slip it to the corporation" -- Bruce Cockburn

        by Cassiodorus on Wed May 28, 2014 at 10:42:49 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  I'm down with your views on capitalism (0+ / 0-)

          But what I see is a rotten vicious cycle in which the military with its need to guzzle fossil fuels is linked to one of the most pernicious pieces of corporate capitalism:  the dirty energy sector. They justify each other, essentially. And yeah, it feels like a very ugly hostage situation; there was a time when I hoped that certain parts of the military would want to break that nasty mutually parasitic relationship they've got with the fossil fuel barons--a lot fewer of them would die, it would be a lot more efficient, and, let's face it, "law and order," which is something they usually like, will not survive the lawless greed of that part of the corporate sector very long. "Law and order" will die with civilization under the centrifugal force of the climate destruction caused by the fossil fuel companies. Some among the military are smart enough and honest enough to see that that's the case. But good luck in getting them to actually side against power.

          We can reveal the insanity just fine; we're well-equipped to do so. But there's a few pieces we need to put in place in order to make such revelations effective.

          It occurs to me you and I should talk about this further. Perhaps we could chat at VOTS.

          There is no way for a citizen of a Republic to abdicate his responsibilities. ---Edward R. Murrow

          by SouthernLiberalinMD on Wed May 28, 2014 at 02:24:34 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  It's also, let me admit, difficult (0+ / 0-)

          as much as I know that probably billions will die by the end of this century, it's still difficult to make oneself a criminal, walk into the guns of the security corps that are guarding the fossil fuel barons, risk injury or death to oneself or one's loved ones or even allies.  We talk about this stuff really casually, and even condescend to the American people because they're not brave enough or man enough or something to walk into the guns often enough or persistently enough. But this stuff is hard.

          There is no way for a citizen of a Republic to abdicate his responsibilities. ---Edward R. Murrow

          by SouthernLiberalinMD on Wed May 28, 2014 at 02:27:20 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

  •  I really hope Tom is correct... (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Eric Nelson, LinSea

    ...but it is difficult for me to get past my cynicism...

    Brown's caution on fracking so far has drawn such vigorous environmental protests that it damages his credibility as a global leader on climate. [...]
     Well, my risky maneuver to almost get myself evicted worked and accomplished it's goal.  

    So maybe I should abandon my skeptical disbelief and sing Halleluja (sp)!

    "...a silent coup has taken place in Washington and rampant militarism now rules..." Daniel Ellsberg via John Pilger

    by dharmasyd on Tue May 27, 2014 at 11:26:22 PM PDT

  •  Tom (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Eric Nelson, greenbird

    was my professor at Santa Monica college (Religion & the Environment). At the time I was the only student to ace every test. Also, I was the first to drive his electric car when he brought it to school instead of his usual bicycle. Love him ,

  •  This is good: instead of Ca. a leader in oil/gas (5+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Simplify, kosta, StrayCat, JeffW, LinSea

    ..boom as a key oil state the industrialists touted.. (see below)
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    From tonight's Tom Hayden piece:

    The Fracking lobby notes that 150,000 horizontal wells have been drilled during the past decade alone, increasing employment in the oil and gas sector by 40 percent since 2007.[iv] They claim that a new era of American energy supremacy is at hand, "so long as politicians don't get in the way.”[v] But a new government study could deflate the fracking lobby. The federal government's Energy Information Administration last week reduced its estimate of Monterey Shale oil by an astounding 96.5 percent.
    The study:
    Next month, the US Energy Information Administration (EIA) will publish a new estimate of US shale deposits set to deal a death-blow to industry hype about a new golden era of US energy independence by fracking unconventional oil and gas.
    So the Oil & Gas industrialist lobbies "game changer" story doesn't pan out:
    The Monterey formation, previously believed to contain more than double the amount of oil estimated at the Bakken shale in North Dakota, and five times larger than the Eagle Ford shale in South Texas, was slated to add up to 2.8 million jobs by 2020 and boost government tax revenues by $24.6 billion a year.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    ..California will instead, be the leader as a clean renewable energy boom state.

    This needs fixing though:

    In summary, California environmentalists can count on a guaranteed clean energy stimulus package of $120 billion over the next six years. There may be no comparable opportunity to forge a clean energy anywhere in the country. By comparison, the United Kingdom, with nearly twice the population of California, is spending $110 million, one-twentieth of California's annual clean energy budget, on renewable sources like wind farms.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Very cool

    Thx MB

  •  Another story we've heard before (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Simplify, emmasnacker, StrayCat

    Obama to Expand U.S. Role in Syrian Civil War | WSJ Live

    See video at link (no print story, just video)....

    This, on top of the US military soldiers sent elsewhere in Africa to "protect" elephants.

    I wonder if this is a forewarning of what will happen if HRC becomes prez and - per her statement at the Benghazi hearing - her recommendation to increase the US military presence in Africa "to protect US interests there."

    Ordinary people in America are sick and tired of being sick and tired of illegal and unconstitutional war, war, and more illegal and unconstitutional wars.

    The only ones who could possibly benefit are the fucking MIC & oil corporations and diamond mine corporations.  Oh, and likely more mercenary corporations if they run out of enlisted personnel to send off to be killed or maimed in these totally unnecessary expensive illegal and unconstitutional wars.

    I'm sick of attempts to steer this nation from principles evolved in The Age of Reason to hallucinations derived from illiterate herdsmen. ~ Crashing Vor

    by NonnyO on Wed May 28, 2014 at 12:20:47 AM PDT

  •  Need a little help (0+ / 0-)

    How do I link to a hate site without their coming here/knowing they've been linked to? I found a PUA site that WOULD qualify as "hate" material if you switched out any racial category for "women" in their crap and that is defending the Isla Vista shooter while engaging in some major misogyny and gay bashing, with a side of actual racism too. :(

    I'm thinking of just dropping it for whoever really wants to deal with it once I can find a way not to draw the assholes back to us (because there's a ton of meat there for someone better skilled at dealing with misogynists and homophobes - my reaction to seeing that hate site is an impromptu cover of Buck-Tick's "Nakayubi," which probably isn't too productive hahaha http://youtu.be/... NSFW ;) )

    "There was no way to make a living from being a musician. You were labeled as someone who had given up on life. But because of this, we fought with all our might against the world that restrained us." Sawada Taiji RIP 1966-2011

    by rosetribe on Wed May 28, 2014 at 02:05:21 AM PDT

    •  Go to your public library and use the computers (0+ / 0-)

      available there.

      Patriotism may be the last refuge of scoundrels, but religion is assuredly the first.

      by StrayCat on Wed May 28, 2014 at 07:55:20 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  I don't think you get the point :) (0+ / 0-)

        I mean, I want to link the site but without trolls getting the backlink and flooding this site. Public library won't stop that.

        "There was no way to make a living from being a musician. You were labeled as someone who had given up on life. But because of this, we fought with all our might against the world that restrained us." Sawada Taiji RIP 1966-2011

        by rosetribe on Thu May 29, 2014 at 02:08:11 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  Can't talk about fracking without water (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    StrayCat, JeffW, LinSea, Eric Nelson

    The hydraulic part of hydraulic fracturing is mostly water. The southern end of the San Joaquin Valley has been the site of some of the greatest water resource atrocities in the US. We knew this with regard to diversion of water with the vanishing of the Great Tulare Lake, the largest fresh water lake in the US west of the Mississippi, and the empipement of five great rivers. What we did not know up to 2010 was the extent of groundwater removal, which happens away from public scrutiny. GRACE satellite imaging suggests that about 10 cubic kilometers annually above replenishment rates is taken. We all are born with a right to reasonable access to water and reasonable use, but how reasonable use and fracking go together in the same sentence is a stretch. Here's a simple rule that should calm groundwater theft theft: "If you subside, you must abide." That is, your land gets retired as do the subterranean activities.  

    It is not easy to see what you are not looking for, or to know what it is you do not know.

    by kosta on Wed May 28, 2014 at 04:06:01 AM PDT

Subscribe or Donate to support Daily Kos.

Click here for the mobile view of the site