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Mosul, the second (possibly third after Basra) largest city in Iraq has fallen to the al-Qaeda affiliate/offshoot/rival ISIS.

Iraqi government forces have reportedly left the city and it is now under the control of ISIS.

The residents of Mosul are also reported to be fleeing the city, many of them to the Kurdistan Region of Iraq.

ISIS now controls large parts of Nineveh Province in Iraq (whose capital is Mosul), large parts of Al Anbar Province in Iraq (including Fallujah), much of Deir ez-Zor Governorate in Syria, almost all of ar-Raqqah Governorate in Syria, and much of southern and northwestern Al-Hasakah Governorate in Syria.

These areas under ISIS control on both sides of the Syrian-Iraqi border are predominately Sunni Arab and the local Arab tribes there have very strong historic ties to Arab tribes in Kuwait, Saudi Arabia and Qatar.

ISIS is allegedly supported by Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, and Turkey with tacit Western approval.

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http://www.hurriyetdailynews.com/...

http://www.theguardian.com/...

http://www.cbsnews.com/...

http://www.reuters.com/...

http://rudaw.net/...

A video and some photographs:

http://webtv.hurriyet.com.tr/...

http://fotoanaliz.hurriyet.com.tr/...

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Comment Preferences

  •  Tip Jar (29+ / 0-)

    The world is bad enough as it is, you have no right to make it any worse.
    Lamb chop, we can quibble what to call it, but I think we can both agree it's creepy.

    by InAntalya on Tue Jun 10, 2014 at 07:39:32 AM PDT

  •  Supported by our "friends", how nice (10+ / 0-)

    I'm sure our right wing will froth at the mouth; and of course completely ignore the truth

    "I decided it is better to scream. Silence is the real crime against humanity." Nadezhda Mandelstam

    by LaFeminista on Tue Jun 10, 2014 at 07:45:47 AM PDT

  •  Neolibcon foreign policy sure is stinking (9+ / 0-)

    up the world a treat, as they say.

  •  Odds of covert/overt, extensive U.S. response... (10+ / 0-)

    ...MAY be pretty high in response to this. Why? You ask? On the one hand: Oil. On the other hand, Turks and Kurds have been fiercely going at each other (we're talking a very lengthy--generations--history of flare-ups, if not outright war, albeit not technically that, for the most part) for a very long time. There are NATO "issues" written all over this fiasco.

    This is a big freakin' problem, and it just got a lot bigger, IMHO.

    "I always thought if you worked hard enough and tried hard enough, things would work out. I was wrong." --Katharine Graham

    by bobswern on Tue Jun 10, 2014 at 07:53:14 AM PDT

    •  And it's important to note that the groups who (15+ / 0-)

      are keeping the ISIS in some sort of check in Syria are the Kurdish groups in Syria (who are constantly attacked by ISIS) and now the Kurdistan Regional Government of Iraq is probably the only force in Iraq which can halt the ISIS in Iraq.

      The world is bad enough as it is, you have no right to make it any worse.
      Lamb chop, we can quibble what to call it, but I think we can both agree it's creepy.

      by InAntalya on Tue Jun 10, 2014 at 07:59:21 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  This is the result of US playing opposite sides... (8+ / 0-)

        ...in two countries in the region. Meanwhile, Turkey has its own issues with the Kurds. A true fiasco, all around.

        "I always thought if you worked hard enough and tried hard enough, things would work out. I was wrong." --Katharine Graham

        by bobswern on Tue Jun 10, 2014 at 08:17:00 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  The Kurds Can't Get a Break? (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        InAntalya, corvo, JVolvo
        “Kurdistan is 11 years ahead of the rest of Iraq in terms of political and commercial development,” says Luay al-Khatteeb, head of the Iraq Energy Institute, a London-based think-tank. Kurdistan’s potential oil reserves of around 45 billion barrels are less than a third of those in southern Iraq. Still, the Kurdish oil minister, Ashti Hawrami, believes output of 1m b/d is possible within three years.
        Long sought after independence for Kurdistan could happen, funded by "their" oil, but they need a direct pipeline to Turkey to really make this happen. Unfortunately the Kurds and Turks don't get along very well, so....

        http://www.economist.com/...

        "We are beyond law, which is not unusual for an empire; unfortunately, we are also beyond common sense." Gore Vidal

        by Superpole on Tue Jun 10, 2014 at 09:14:42 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Kurdistan needs 3 countries to sign off on it (4+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Superpole, InAntalya, jlb1972, JVolvo

          Turkey, Iraq, and Iran.  The Turks lost their entire empire after WWI and had to fight a second war to get what they have now, because Woodrow Wilson was totally prepared to give the west coast to Greece and the east to the Kurds.  Iraq is another of those ex-colonies that has become real over time, especially since the Sunni Arab territories in the west have no oil of their own, so they want to keep either the Shiite Arab south or the Kurdish north (and preferably both) under their control.  Iranians with their memories of being one of the big fish are also going to be very reluctant to surrender any territory in their far northwest.

          From what I've heard the Kurds, while brave people, are not particularly united: theirs is a clannish society where every mountain valley is a world unto itself and traditional authorities carry far more weight than any liberalized/Westernized leaders that might be installed - like Afghanistan.  Kurdistan seems to me to run the risk of being a weak buffer state torn apart by proxy terrorism between Turkey and Iran - historically the only real (native) powers in the Middle East - or a deeply corrupt and backward petrostate dominated by the Barzanis.

          Domestic politics is the continuation of civil war by other means.

          by Visceral on Tue Jun 10, 2014 at 10:09:39 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

    •  The narrative tools used to describe and discuss (6+ / 0-)

      episodes like this seem kind of narrow to me. What draws men, always men, to this kind of organizing principle? We say "the Taliban" or "ISIS" or "Nusra Front" as if those summary labels mean something, as if they set out the self-sufficient reality that gets processed by policy types as "where to send arms and boots to respond 'vi et armis,'" http://legal-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/.... If one spends some time looking through the huge collection, growing daily, of video snippets amassed and cataloged at syriavideo.net, or searches "Syria violence" in youtube, you can get a flavor of the dynamics and ranges of behavior and the horror and the BandofBrotherliness and that liberating jump beyond the boundaries of the commandment not to kill, the recognition and revulsion most of us have at the killing of prisoners, ordinary citizens not admitted to the "faith bond" or little circle of so often temporary agreement to find, fix and kill Other humans. Note the randomness of so much of it: I won't post links to the horror, it's too much for many sensitive souls, but there's lots of pix of laughing dudes, little covens of assorted ages but mostly young, bearded dudes crowing or muttering "Allahu Akhbar!" as they launch unguided 122 mm rockets or fire off home-made mortar rounds from rube goldberg ad hoc mortar tubes, propped up on piles of rubble, in the general direction of somebody else. Look at what used to obviously be beautiful structures, including mosques (a taboo long since blown past), now faceless and undergoing serial demolition by tank and RPG and "barrel bomb" and mines and hand-placed high-velocity explosive charges. It's a Paintball game, and you can see the excitement, the transcendent joy these creatures feel, as they fuck up the landscape and snipe the skulls off of dudes across the street that is the current most important piece of terrain on the planet as far as they are concerned and the other emotions, the rage and sort of sorrow and vindictiveness as they poice up and hustle away the dead-meat carcasses of their for a time at least fellow warriors.

      GUNmen. That's a label that actually means something, as I see it. The AK-47 and M-4 have been correctly identified as the real weapons of mass destruction, as deployed by our various less-than-visible "security apparatuses." More and more guns dumped into these sorrowful places by all the usual Players in the game, the sneaky-petes from our own and other governments, the military presence of most especially the US Empire that has made for itself the mission of training and equipping armies and national police forces subject to Imperial military control and direction. And that "training" is not the bland thing you might think -- worried about the militarization of US local police forces? That's what the "training" leads to, and what a surprise that so often the "Sepoys," http://en.wikipedia.org/... , go off the reservation, under the charismatic domination of a "renegade," there are too many instances to list, all leading to disintegration of whatever ties that might bind the people in a given ares into some kind of sustainable polity.

      Ironically ..., the atomic bomb, paved the way for the rise of the lower-tech but deadlier AK-47. The A-bomb's guarantee of mass destruction compelled the two Cold War superpowers to wage proxy wars in poor countries, with ill-trained combatants exchanging fire -- usually with cheap, lightweight and durable AKs.

      When one war ended, arms brokers gathered up the AKs and sold them to fighters in the next hot spot. The weapon's spread helps explain why, since World War II, so many "small wars" have lingered far beyond the months and years one might expect. Indeed, for all of the billions of dollars Washington has spent on space-age weapons and military technology, the AK still remains the most devastating weapon on the planet, transforming conflicts from Vietnam to Afghanistan to Iraq. With these assault rifles, well-armed fighters can dominate a country, terrorize citizens, grab the spoils -- and even keep superpowers at bay.

      http://www.washingtonpost.com/...

      Getting together with a bunch of other men under the direction of an effective combat leader and playing Capture the Flag To The Death, http://grandparents.about.com/... can be exciting, and give meaning and organization to life, and speaking from the experience of a little bit of it, it can also be good old FUN. (Women, for all the feminist discourse of the generation I grew up in, '60s and 70's, now are fighting for the opportunity to have a crack at experiencing the same sensations.) Hear it from Winston Churchill, a major player in the long industrialization of the world and the mechanization and consumption and profit opportunities that we call "War," the thing that nation-states do: "There is nothing more exhilarating than to be shot at without result." This link puts the pronouncement into context: http://fisticmystic.wordpress.com/...

      We hear the nomenclature and salivate in response: "ISIS did this." "Al Quaeda did that, took this town, set off this bomb, blew up this mosque or shot up this airport or hotel." ACTION MUST BE TAKEN! The people are in place, the props, of many calibers (the AK is 7.62 x 39mm, e.g.), and the mental processes are pre-wired.

      We don't ALWAYS go down the same road, so there might be hope that eventually the idiocy might diminish, as the weapons wear out and are not replaced, but then "Talilban" tribesmen can build one for you out of scrap metal and hand tools in a day or so. Here's a big part of the problem: http://www.gunsandammo.com/... Guns are seductive, give you the power of life and death, over yourself and others, and most of us, myself included, are GUNmen at heart. (I prefer the friendly Ruger Mini-14 in .223 caliber, myself, but vacillate between 9mm and .40 cal in the handgun department -- S&W makes some very inexpensive semi-auto pistols so you can play around. Stainless Chinese-Remington 12ga, for home defense of course.)

      We all tend to forget that there's an arc to these spasms of violence, the murders and rapes and repression and patriachalism and all that. Over time, the parties and players get exhausted or distracted, decency and comity infiltrate and weaken the GUNmen, and even Beirut and Baghdad and Belfast have gone through the cycles and been rebuilt, again and again. We act and think at one time scale, when longer views might lead to better outcomes. No idea on how to fix any of that. Any of this.

      Kurds and Turks, Assad and all those Others, the US imperial military and Everyone Else That Resists Hegemony,  the Germans v. Europe, Brits as Faded Empire Hanging On. As you say, given the structures we have created to manage our view of the world and make it "safe" for our Elite, http://www.merriam-webster.com/... getting them to the always unattainable goal of MORE!, there are what we all understand when you say it, even though what that portends is just more idiocy by a species that has so shitted up its own nest that it's on the point of auto-extinction, there are "NATO 'issues'" written all over it. You know that the Battlespace Managers of the US Imperial Global Network-Centric Interoperable Battlespace, the set of self-proclaimed "areas of responsibility" that divvy us all up into nothing more than assets and problems in their Combatant Commands, are all over this, with the infinite amounts of planning and logistics and deployments that their behavior set calls for...

      "Is that all there is?" Peggy Lee.

      by jm214 on Tue Jun 10, 2014 at 09:08:16 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Funny an extremist Muslim group names itself (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    InAntalya, Wee Mama

    after an Egyptian goddess. Or maybe something is lost in translation.

  •  Consequence of Syria's meltdown (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    InAntalya

    Had the moderate rebels in Syria received more support from the West, groups like ISIS wouldn't have gained power. Right now Syria is stuck between a murderous dictatorship and theocratic fundamentalists.

  •  So then, what does ISIS want? (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    InAntalya, corvo

    They have formed into a powerful faction on what grounds?  Maybe it would be best to go back to pre-Ottoman Empire days for this area and let the areas be as they once were.

  •  Saddam ruthlessly shut all this down, but if (0+ / 0-)

    you don't want a ruthless strongman, how does anyone hope these primitives can govern themselves?

    "The poor can never be made to suffer enough." Jimmy Breslin

    by merrywidow on Tue Jun 10, 2014 at 08:29:50 AM PDT

    •  'these primatives' ??? (8+ / 0-)
      ... how does anyone hope these primitives can govern themselves?
      If your are saying what it seems you are, 'primative' might be a correct description of your intellect.

      The world is bad enough as it is, you have no right to make it any worse.
      Lamb chop, we can quibble what to call it, but I think we can both agree it's creepy.

      by InAntalya on Tue Jun 10, 2014 at 08:38:39 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Uncool. (8+ / 0-)

      Right wing argument.

      •  And, erm....nakedly racist. (7+ / 0-)

        ProTip - the people who like to play PVP MMORPG's often see this site as one.

        by JesseCW on Tue Jun 10, 2014 at 08:45:03 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Damn close. (6+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          InAntalya, corvo, JesseCW, Mikey, jlb1972, JVolvo

          At least she didn't say 'subhuman'.

        •  I'd HR the comment, but (4+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          InAntalya, JesseCW, jlb1972, JVolvo

          the last thing I want to do is trip the string on the banhammer.

          You never know who is whose friend in admin these days.

          Dogs from the street can have all the desirable qualities that one could want from pet dogs. Most adopted stray dogs are usually humble and exceptionally faithful to their owners as if they are grateful for this kindness. -- H.M. Bhumibol Adulyadej

          by corvo on Tue Jun 10, 2014 at 08:57:05 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  I am an "educationist" though not a racist. (0+ / 0-)

            it is the lack of education or the education in only the Koran that keeps these countries tinderboxes. These fundy militias can't get past old wounds,and it is because their only education is religious jihad

            talking militias now, not the poor people just trying to survive who don't care about power struggles

            "The poor can never be made to suffer enough." Jimmy Breslin

            by merrywidow on Tue Jun 10, 2014 at 09:20:32 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  Yeah. It's got nothing to do with the legacy (7+ / 0-)

              of colonialism or the current reality of imperialism.

              The people funding and "educating" these guys don't give a flying fuck about the Koran.  They've got mistresses on four continents, kids in Western boarding schools, and coke habits.

              The people manufacturing and shipping the arms?  That's us.

              Their natural resources have been stolen, in return for nothing but a small vig paid to an elite few corrupt local tyrants.  What economy they may have had was destroyed by decades of war waged by or on behalf of the West.

              The problem isn't that they're "lacking education".  It's that they're being actively crushed.

              ProTip - the people who like to play PVP MMORPG's often see this site as one.

              by JesseCW on Tue Jun 10, 2014 at 09:59:05 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  Agree! We messed up natural borders and forced (0+ / 0-)

                disparate people into our new borders, and colonialism messed them up too. And we sell every one arms, agree on all counts and the only way out is education.

                but democracy cannot flourish without an educated population see our founding fathers words....so if they only have madrases and women can't read, primitive thinking reigns, and primitive means animal survival instincts are the main force, and for all the reasons above, and religious oppression, a BIGGIE

                "The poor can never be made to suffer enough." Jimmy Breslin

                by merrywidow on Tue Jun 10, 2014 at 11:14:59 AM PDT

                [ Parent ]

            •  Doesn't matter what you believe; (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              InAntalya, jlb1972

              all that matters is whose friend you are on this site. ;-)

              Dogs from the street can have all the desirable qualities that one could want from pet dogs. Most adopted stray dogs are usually humble and exceptionally faithful to their owners as if they are grateful for this kindness. -- H.M. Bhumibol Adulyadej

              by corvo on Tue Jun 10, 2014 at 10:22:42 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

            •  That's far too simple (3+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              InAntalya, corvo, JVolvo

              They're not a few good books away from turning into Alexis de Tocqueville.  Either in Iraq or Syria, they would have grown up under secular dictatorships.  These are deliberate, terrible, choices they're making, not delusions of unenlightened minds.

              •  When education can flourish, the society itself (0+ / 0-)

                must be getting more peaceful, I guess chicken and egg here but education does change things, WOMEN educated changes things faster

                "The poor can never be made to suffer enough." Jimmy Breslin

                by merrywidow on Tue Jun 10, 2014 at 11:16:15 AM PDT

                [ Parent ]

                •  I'm all for education (5+ / 0-)

                  And it's absolutely true that educating women can radically change societies.  But there's a reason that these groups are emerging into power now, and it's not because of some sudden backslide into ignorance.  It's a time of huge crisis, a culmination of generations of imperialism.  

                  And of course, very, very educated people built the atomic bomb, and just as well educated people used it.

                  •  Things in America are worse due to the low (0+ / 0-)

                    information voters, we are sliding backwards in education and look what happens, uneducated people are paranoid about Area 21 or whatever crap they can be made to believe, so more gun violence...keep going and we will look like Syria.

                    education matters and democracy cannot take hold without it

                    "The poor can never be made to suffer enough." Jimmy Breslin

                    by merrywidow on Tue Jun 10, 2014 at 12:00:18 PM PDT

                    [ Parent ]

                    •  Proof from another diary that we are stupid now (0+ / 0-)

                      It gets much worse.  More than two-thirds of Americans, according to surveys conducted by the National Science Foundation, are unable to identify DNA as the key to heredity. Nine out of ten don't understand radiation and what it can do to the human body, while one in five adults believes the sun revolves around the earth
                      Werleman points the finger at two causes for this scientific illiteracy,
                      America remains scientifically ignorant for two reasons : the resurgence of fundamentalist religon during the past 40 years, and secondly the low level of science education in American elementary and secondary schools, as well as many tertiary colleges

                      "The poor can never be made to suffer enough." Jimmy Breslin

                      by merrywidow on Tue Jun 10, 2014 at 01:08:29 PM PDT

                      [ Parent ]

      •  It isn't, but if it were, are alternate opinions (0+ / 0-)

        not allowed here?

        I am a total lefty but really, did you NOT expect that Iraq would to to hell once we left them to their civil war?

        "The poor can never be made to suffer enough." Jimmy Breslin

        by merrywidow on Tue Jun 10, 2014 at 09:17:56 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  They are. uneducated mobs under the thrall (0+ / 0-)

      of religious strong men in these militias, they are still living in the stone age in their thinking....and I think it is very clear that no country in that region is doing well with democracy because they are all still fighting battles from hundreds of years ago

      and the WEST did it to them by installing strongmen, letting all this stuff fester under the surface

      was not being racist, just look at the facts, Libya, a mess, Syria, Iraq, Afghanistan, a mess, still avenging old wounds

      "The poor can never be made to suffer enough." Jimmy Breslin

      by merrywidow on Tue Jun 10, 2014 at 09:16:49 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  The Iraqis never took back Fallujah (9+ / 0-)

    and I believe parts of Ramadi were also being held by al-Qaeda.

      Basically Iraq is becoming a haven for terrorists.

    "The oppressors most powerful weapon is the mind of the oppressed." - Stephen Biko

    by gjohnsit on Tue Jun 10, 2014 at 08:31:56 AM PDT

  •  Talk About Blowback (13+ / 0-)

    The best reporting on this, by far, is by the Independent's Patrick Cockburn, Alex's brother.  Check out his five part series about how al Qaeda has capitalized on the proxy war in Syria to occupy an area the size of Great Britain in the heart of the middle east.

    This aggression will not stand, man.

    by kaleidescope on Tue Jun 10, 2014 at 08:33:25 AM PDT

  •  The neo-Con plan was 1) Conquer, and if (11+ / 0-)

    that is not possible, 2) destabilize. The neo-Liberals seem to be on board with that plan as well. The theory behind it: make it difficult for any opposition to the US to coalesce, or to work in partnership with our 'real enemies' who are Russia and China.

    'Nobody could foresee" (to use the all-American excuse for damned near any obvious thing) that destabilization means the empowerment and enhancement of radical elements. eg, Libya, where the arms have gone out to Mali, Niger, Nigeria, and even Syria, while terrorist themselves gain ground in Libya.

    Humanity and nature itself are mere pawns in games of glory and wealth, and nobody really cares about ending terrorism. Hell, if there weren't terrorists, they'd have to be invented for the scheme to work.


    A government is a body of people usually notably ungoverned. -- Firefly

    by Jim P on Tue Jun 10, 2014 at 08:53:29 AM PDT

  •  By the way (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    InAntalya, corvo

    Who's in charge in Iraq?  I've been woefully behind on the news, and the last thing I can find is that there was an election in April which gave Maliki a plurality, but not a clear path to form a government.

    Has he?

    •  As far as I know there are ongoing negotiations, (8+ / 0-)

      by Maliki, to form a government, but one of the main reasons for the ISIS's current offensive is to destabilize the country and by extension these negotiations in order to prevent the formation of a new government.

      The world is bad enough as it is, you have no right to make it any worse.
      Lamb chop, we can quibble what to call it, but I think we can both agree it's creepy.

      by InAntalya on Tue Jun 10, 2014 at 09:37:11 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Yeah (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        InAntalya, corvo

        That's about where I ended up when researching it.  I should note that in the Times coverage, it's stated that Maliki has declared a state of emergency.  

        It's mentioned in the Constitution as requiring a 2/3ds vote of legislature on joint application of the president and prime minister.  No clue if that's happened, and the Constitution just says that the PM gets the power to run things.  

        •  I have to check but I remember that he (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          corvo

          asked for a state of emergency to be declared.

          The world is bad enough as it is, you have no right to make it any worse.
          Lamb chop, we can quibble what to call it, but I think we can both agree it's creepy.

          by InAntalya on Tue Jun 10, 2014 at 09:54:30 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Do you know (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            InAntalya, corvo

            Whether he would ask the old parliament or the new one?  I don't have time to dig into the constitution, but it says that there are elections 45 days before the end of the term.  Election Day was April 30, so we are still (barely) in that range.  

          •  Ah (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            InAntalya, corvo

            He is asking for one; he has not yet declared one.

            http://www.aljazeera.com/...

            Nouri al-Maliki said on Tuesday that he would ask parliament to declare the emergency after the overnight takeoverby groups including the Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant.

            He said: "We will not allow Mosul to be under the banner of terrorism, We call on all international organisations to support Iraq and its stance in fighting terrorism. The entire world will suffer if terrorism spreads."

            He stated that the government would arm and equip civilians who volunteered "to defend the homeland and defeat
            terrorism".

            Osama al-Nujaifi, the parliament speaker, said Iraqi soldiers abandoned their posts in Mosul when the attack began, action he described as "a dereliction of duty".

            Nujaifi said parliament would discuss the call for a state of emergency on Thursday.

    •  The More Accurate Question is: (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      InAntalya, corvo, amyzex

      how long can Maliki remain in control?

      "We are beyond law, which is not unusual for an empire; unfortunately, we are also beyond common sense." Gore Vidal

      by Superpole on Tue Jun 10, 2014 at 10:02:46 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Probably not long (0+ / 0-)

        From what I've read about the guy he seems quite weak and ineffectual.  If he had anything close to a firm grip on things ISIS wouldn't already have taken control of a significant portion of the country.  His recent election numbers (only a plurality) were not very impressive either.

    •  You mean in the parts under government control? (0+ / 0-)

      "Victory means exit strategy, and it's important for the president to explain to us what the exit strategy is." - George W Bush

      by jfern on Wed Jun 11, 2014 at 02:54:16 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  I've seen this movie before (5+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    InAntalya, corvo, jlb1972, gjohnsit, JVolvo

    Bush Manchild had barely changed out of his codpiece when I started reading reports that the Taliban had re-taken 3/4 of Afghanistan.

    Know that $20 I owe you? Well, since money equals speech, then speech, of course, must equal money. C'mere and I'll read you the Tao Te Ching.

    by thenekkidtruth on Tue Jun 10, 2014 at 09:53:00 AM PDT

  •  The question now: what will Iran do? (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    InAntalya, amyzex

    Will they tolerate a major Sunni-terrorist base of operations right next door?   Would we?

    This might be a prime opportunity for the US, the US-backed Iraqi government, and the Iranians to cooperate against a common enemy - something we should be doing anyway IMO.

    •  The Iranian government, the Iraqi government (5+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      corvo, jlb1972, aliasalias, amyzex, dizzydean

      and the Iraqi Kurdistan Regional government already have fairly good relations and it is possible that they will cooperate against ISIS.

      The world is bad enough as it is, you have no right to make it any worse.
      Lamb chop, we can quibble what to call it, but I think we can both agree it's creepy.

      by InAntalya on Tue Jun 10, 2014 at 11:05:15 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  more "birth pangs of Democracy"? as Mrs. (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    InAntalya, corvo, protectspice, jfern

    Mushroom cloud! Rice said when asked about the social upheaval in Iraq after the USA did its usual number on that Country by bombing it into rubble.

    All jokes aside I imagine Saddam Hussein looks damn good to many Iraqis now and the USA has become more hated, not just there but all around the world.

    without the ants the rainforest dies

    by aliasalias on Tue Jun 10, 2014 at 11:44:27 AM PDT

  •  Just remember (0+ / 0-)

    The Bush administration's own State department listed Iraq as one of the few countries in the middle east that didn't have Al Qaeda active in it. The US was one of the countries listed as having active Al Qaeda. Well, thanks to the Bush administration, and all of the Democrats like Hillary who enabled them, Iraq has some seriously active Al Qaeda.

    http://johnmckay.blogspot.com/...

    "Victory means exit strategy, and it's important for the president to explain to us what the exit strategy is." - George W Bush

    by jfern on Wed Jun 11, 2014 at 02:44:00 AM PDT

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