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Norm Ornstein:

Sen. Thad Cochran may well lose his renomination in Mississippi, but the batting average for "establishment" Republicans this year will still be over .900. And yet, there are serious and real reverberations here. For one thing, politicians are more moved by vivid example than overall statistics. All it took was one Bob Bennett in Utah to move Senate Republicans significantly to the right in attitude, agenda, and rhetoric. The assault on Cantor as a supporter of amnesty may not have been the main reason for his defeat, but we can be sure that the word "legalization" will not cross the lips of Republicans of many stripes in the months to come, except as an epithet.

The main lesson here may be the populist one. The tea-party movement is not a Republican movement, or a conservative movement. It is radical, anti-institutional, anti-leadership, antigovernment. It is driven by suspicion of the motives and actions of all leaders, including those in the Republican Party. Cantor's glaringly obvious personal ambition fed those suspicions, but his defeat was a defeat for the broader establishment, which compromises too readily and feeds its own interests first. That attitude, by the way, also is embodied in many of the big donors to candidates and outside groups, meaning it represents an ongoing serious headache for party leaders.

Sean Trende (my bold):
First, analysts need to understand that the Republican base is furious with the Republican establishment, especially over the Bush years.  From the point of view of conservatives I’ve spoken with, the early- to mid-2000s look like this: Voters gave Republicans control of Congress and the presidency for the longest stretch since the 1920s.

And what do Republicans have to show for it? Temporary tax cuts, No Child Left Behind, the Medicare prescription drug benefit, a new Cabinet department, increased federal spending, TARP, and repeated attempts at immigration reform.  Basically, despite a historic opportunity to shrink government, almost everything that the GOP establishment achieved during that time moved the needle leftward on domestic policy. Probably the only unambiguous win for conservatives were the Roberts and Alito appointments to the Supreme Court; the former is viewed with suspicion today while the latter only came about after the base revolted against Harriet Miers.

The icing on the cake for conservatives is that these moves were justified through an argument that they were necessary to continue to win elections and take issues off the table for Democrats. Instead, Bush’s presidency was followed in 2008 by the most liberal Democratic presidency since Lyndon Johnson, accompanied by sizable Democratic House and Senate majorities.

You don’t have to sympathize with this view, but if you don’t understand it, you will never understand the Tea Party. Watch Dave Brat’s interview on Fox News here. He is not Tom Tancredo; immigration reform is not his main focus. He’s hitting a lot of the themes that I discuss above, which in many ways echo the Democratic Netroots’ discontent with “Wall Street Democrats” in the mid-2000s (a discontent that led, in part, to Obama’s victory in the 2008 primaries, to the discomfort of some in the Democratic Leadership Council).

Man, between us and them, that's a lot of folks who hate the Bush years. Got that, Jeb?

Rachel Blum:

Two years ago, when I first began researching the Tea Party, I interviewed a Tea Party leader from the outskirts of Richmond. This leader leaned across the table and told me:
“When you pinpoint that the Republican Party is just as corrupt as any other political party, it’s blinding… I think politically, if a conservative resurgence is to take hold in this country, it will only come after a very bloody fight with the Republican Party. I advocated that we put independents into this election to knock out these Republican RINOS—if we put Democrats in I’m ok with that—I mean, Eric Cantor and Rob Whitman—they’re Republicans in name only. It’s called window dressing. The hierarchical nature of how party politics work—you be a good boy or girl and you move up.”
This Tea Party leader was not alone in these sentiments. As seen in the figure below, the third most common topic of posts on Virginia Tea Party blogs is distrust of the Republican Party (which includes posts on holding Republicans accountable and ousting Republicans). After several years of battle with the Republican Party, including a Tea Party upset at last year’s Virginia Republican Nominating Convention (where Ken Cuccinelli and E.W. Jackson defeated mainstream Republican candidates), Virginia Tea Party activists have defeated the “RINO” Eric Cantor, the sitting House Majority Leader.
More politics and policy below the fold.

And from our own David Jarman, this gem on Cantor's fall:

"Hubris" may be the key word here. The climb through the ranks through treachery and intimidation, and then the sudden realization when you're at the top that you've burned through all your allies, is almost allegorical. It's a pattern we've seen many times before, whether it's from the Greek playwrights or Shakespeare, or in the collapse of some of history's nastiest regimes: When the leader who appeared to rule effortlessly suddenly falls with a lot of knives in his back, few people are saddened, while many people are surprised at just how thin and flimsy his support actually was, and how he was just staying in power propped up by a combination of fear and entropy.
Someone asked me how shocking #Cantor's loss was around Capitol Hill. I likened it to intelligent beings from outer space landing on earth.
@DavidMDrucker
Greg Sargent:
“Ted Cruz is a total nihilist, shutting down the government. That and Rand Paul’s isolationism appeal to the lowest common denominator, which would make us a permanent minority in terms of presidential races.”

That’s GOP Rep. Pete King of New York, in a phone interview with me today, commenting on Tea Partyer David Brat’s surprise primary win over Eric Cantor. King says his worry is that Brat’s victory will enable “the Ted Cruz and Rand Paul wing to take over the party,” which “could make us a stronger party in many Congressional districts but it will prevent us from being a national party.”

Matthew Dickinson:
No, That’s Not Why Cantor Lost, and That’s Not What It Signifies

I hesitate to say much more about the composition of yesterday’s electorate without more data, but it wouldn’t surprise me if Cantor lost primarily because many voters viewed him as too concerned with leadership issues and thus out of touch with local district concerns. That’s not very earthshattering, and it is disappointing to those seeking some deeper meaning in Cantor’s defeat. But sometimes the simplest explanations are the best. In the absence of evidence to the contrary, and until more data comes in, that’s my story and I’m sticking to it.

Do note this, though about the "it was/wan't immigration" argument:
@MattDickinson44 agree w/ #3, and your conclusion about why he lost. Disagree re: 1/2, only b/c perception trumps empiricism among pols.
@JeffSmithMO
Dave Weigel:
In my much-amended look at how the media (myself included) largely ignored Eric Cantor's mounting disaster, I scoffed at how newly minted GOP nominee David Brat was portrayed as a "mystery" man. Whose fault was that? Ours, the media's. Sure, I'd talked to Brat once, but I hardly gave him the once-over that a surging challenger should get. Nobody really did.

In the 24 hours since he won, Brat has been slotted into two basic narratives. The first came immediately from Bill Kristol, in The Weekly Standard. (A quick search suggests that the magazine had not previously written about Brat, but I already made a search-engine mistake today.) Brat was a populist. “GOP voters go for Main Street and Middle America and against crony capitalism,” wrote Kristol in two pieces. “Brat used his critique of ‘amnesty’ to launch a broad assault on GOP elites who put the interests of American corporations over American workers, of D.C. lobbyists over American families.”

Go ahead, scoff at Bill Kristol carrying the gilded pitchfork of populism, but he’d been on this tear for a while, and he was joined by – of all sources – The Nation. According to Lee Fang (in a story posted first at Republic Report), Brat had won by “calling out GOP corruption,” by attacking the GOP for not jailing Wall Street crooks after they wrecked America.

Molly Crabapple with a powerful essay about the fogotten/invisible US dissenter:
Empires love their dissidents foreign.

Any regime, no matter how repressive, will gladly fête its enemy’s critics—while homegrown versions of those critics occupy concrete cells. Cooing over foreign dissidents allows establishment hacks to pose like sexy rebels—while simultaneously affirming that their own system is the best.

The dissident fetishist takes a brave, principled person, and uses them like a codpiece of competitive virtue.

The Kremlin loves (American) whistle-blowers. The State Department loves (Russian) anarchist punks.

Mainstream media cherishes these dissidents because they allow journalists the by-proxy thrill of challenging power. They, too, can stand square-shouldered against Putin or Obama, capes billowing behind them in the wind.

These same media figures aren’t always so lippy on their home turf.

WaPo:
The northern Iraqi city of Mosul is burning, as insurgents from an offshoot of al-Qaeda take control while Iraqi security forces leave behind their military uniforms and flee the region. It’s an ugly situation, and it’s unlikely to turn around soon, said a former senior U.S. military commander in Iraq. Here’s why:
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Comment Preferences

  •  There wasn't a peep of dissent by (72+ / 0-)

    the Republican "base" during the Bush years.  They were perfectly happy with our lie-based war and attacking all things  and persons Democratic. This "fury" is a recent invention, as is the "Tea Party" itself.

    The Tea Party has always existed as the fringe element of the GOP.  It was only when the moneyed interests that control the party realized they could achieve their goals by exploiting that fringe that the Tea Party came into existence.

    •  And IF (22+ / 0-)

      there is now retro-dissent it isn't because Bush and CO brought left lean - it's because Bush and Co brought typical GOP values - give money back to the rich, spend money on wealthy corporations, dress up "reform" and in this case education reform so that it does not appear to be aimed at destroying public education and funneling money to corporations looking to make  millions off of pretending to bring improved education to the masses.  We're the GOP!  We aren't screwing you over.  We are enhancing your tolerance for adversity and providing you an opportunity to pull yourself up by yer bootstraps (by knocking you down into the mud and taking your bootstraps).

      "I'm not left wing because i'm ideological, or passionate, or angry. I'm left wing because I'm informed." - Mikesco

      by newfie on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 04:56:50 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  I think the new (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        a2nite, newfie

        attitude the TP is displaying shows that they have been listening to the Left, Occupy and all those peace nics.  The tps I know never talked about any of these things and I accused them often of only voting for r's so their claim that all pols are crooked and bad was just rhetoric.  Guess they are evolving.

        Everyone! Arms akimbo! 68351

        by tobendaro on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 05:02:55 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Maybe because (6+ / 0-)

          they are losing their establishment backing?

          "I'm not left wing because i'm ideological, or passionate, or angry. I'm left wing because I'm informed." - Mikesco

          by newfie on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 05:26:01 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  you may have something there (7+ / 0-)

            in the end, big money and all the destructive influence it can buy might sour both the left and the right to the political mainstream.  Pocketbook issues, middle class security, health and safety, education--these are what ordinary people want.  When you take away billionaire support for the Tea Party, and they are left to fight on their own, they may still be religious, racist homophobes, but they still want better lives for their families.

            "It ain't right, Atticus," said Jem. "No, son, it ain't right." --Harper Lee, To Kill a Mockingbird

            by SottoVoce on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 05:41:14 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  Or maybe (6+ / 0-)

              some of them are uber religious, some of them are racist, some of them are homophobes, some a combo platter and some are ordinary fed up people of a more conservative lean.  Without corporate artifical grassrootsiness could we possibly see a filtering of these folks?  Could we see a movement form of relatively reasonable and populist folks energized to push for change yet more willing to consider various approaches to problems.

              Maybe pie in the sky.  Maybe that distilled group from the tea party would be very small - the corporate sponsorship did seem to draw a lot of far right radicals.  But, you never know.... maybe.

              "I'm not left wing because i'm ideological, or passionate, or angry. I'm left wing because I'm informed." - Mikesco

              by newfie on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 05:49:50 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

      •  That was before the economy crashed (2+ / 0-)

        and the non-1%ers discovered that the game was rigged in favor of someone other than themselves. The sense of betrayal -- Wall St. got bailed out, the rest of us got shafted -- is intense (and should be).

        What pleases me is that at least some of them recognize that the crash and the unfair (unconscionable) bail-out and amnesty happened during the Bush Administration, so that they don't just blame it all on Obama.

    •  GOP Voters (6+ / 0-)
      The Tea Party has always existed as the fringe element of the GOP
      Yes and no depending on what you mean by "the fringe element."

      The so-called "Tea Party" wing MAY have been one of several "fringe elements" (a large minority GOP party block, really) in the Eisenhower, Nixon, Ford & Reagan years.  However, for the past 20 +/- years, this group has been a solid mainstream faction of the GOP.  In many states, they are the largest faction among the factions that make up the GOP (i.e. that is they are largest umbrella group speaking for the party's bigots, illiberal religious fanatics, Talibanicals, class warfare ignoramuses, war-pigs, haters, the economic and policy illiterates, and falsely self-identified "libertarians").  

      Regarding Tea Party "libertarians." First, the Republican Tea Party mocks liberty and, indeed, despises it. This faction of the GOP is far more at home within the fascist faction of the GOP. Tea-party "libertarians" are those who demand that Gov't deregulate/subsidize -- bestow massive 'liberty -- on large corporations. Their phony "libertarianism" does not extend to you, me or even to themselves. Rather, they are effectively voting for "trickle down liberty." Their phony "libertarianism" is really a fight to give more "liberties" to large corporations such as oil companies, Koch chemicals and other polluting & out-sourcing parasites that suck the federal teat dry then shirk the taxation responsibilities that otherwise burden ALL of us individuals. These mainstream Republicans Tea-baggers are illiberal screechers who care very little, (or not at all), about individualliberties - with the possible exception of liberalizing all of the nation's gun possession laws. Naturally, however, when demanding more "liberal" gun laws, they never actually use the hated "L" word.

      sláinte,
      cl
      -- Religion is like sodomy: both can be harmless when practiced between consenting adults but neither should be imposed upon children.

      by Caoimhin Laochdha on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 05:43:02 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Much of the Tea Party seems to be the (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Caoimhin Laochdha, highacidity

        John Birch Society in a new set of clothes.  The JBS has been on the fringe of the Republican Party since the 1950s.  The ascendency of the Koch Brothers has now given them new leverage.

        "The truest measure of compassion lies not in our service of those on the margins, but in our willingness to see ourselves in kinship with them." Father Gregory Boyle, Homeboy Industries

        by Mr MadAsHell on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 09:23:27 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  I strongly disagree (0+ / 0-)
      The Tea Party has always existed as the fringe element of the GOP.
      This view can be seen in the top three excerpts of today's roundup, and it is a mistake.  Much of the energy of the tea party actually derives from a disgust of politics as usual, especially crony capitalism.  In this, they have much in common with OWS.  What happened, is that the Republicans co-opted this energy and redirected it against government in general.  It's nice to see it turn around and bite them in the ass.
  •  Iraq is a continuing Bush disaster (28+ / 0-)

    I voted Tuesday, May 6, 2014 because it is my right, my responsibility and because my parents moved from Alabama to Ohio to vote. Unfortunately, the republicons want to turn Ohio into Alabama.

    by a2nite on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 04:42:19 AM PDT

  •  And very motivated (12+ / 0-)

    This particular group of TP'ers (Henrico, Spotsylvania Co-VA)were calling for Cantors & Wittmans defeat during the gov. shutdown fiasco. They run candidates at the local level..and win. Cantor did not have his ear to ground...apparently Cantor had his hubris and hands extended to the lobbysist. While may not agree with the TPer's  politics ..gotta admire their convictions and persistence. THATS how you win elections.  

    •  or brains (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      skillet, tb mare, Phoenix Woman

      eom.

      sláinte,
      cl
      -- Religion is like sodomy: both can be harmless when practiced between consenting adults but neither should be imposed upon children.

      by Caoimhin Laochdha on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 05:44:00 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  plenty of brains, not enough common sense (3+ / 0-)

        and relationship-building and maintenance. He forgot that for House members especially, all politics is local, and if you don't work as hard at keeping up those local ties as you do on the phones with big donors and lobbyists, bad things can happen.

        •  Did not mean to sound glib re: "NO" brains (0+ / 0-)

          Yes, he has brains and is a well functioning grown-up. I am confident he could be successfully employed with job duties that expressly excluded ANY responsibility for consequences affecting other people or institutions.  

          What I should have said is that the man has zero critical thinking skills. None. He had/has absolutely no ability to understand matters related to economics, fiscal policy, foreign/national security/defense policy, history, the rule of law or the Constitutional relationship between the three branches of government.

          Also, this is absolutely correct:

          [Cantor lacked] common sense and relationship-building and maintenance. He forgot that for House members especially, all politics is local, and if you don't work as hard at keeping up those local ties as you do on the phones with big donors and lobbyists, bad things can happen
          Cantor is a classic bubble-narcissist and his "maintenance" problems are glaring symptoms. These types of pols are the most easily surprised.

          sláinte,
          cl
          -- Religion is like sodomy: both can be harmless when practiced between consenting adults but neither should be imposed upon children.

          by Caoimhin Laochdha on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 09:33:46 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

  •  links to today's Pew survey (8+ / 0-)

    "It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it!" — Upton Sinclair

    by Greg Dworkin on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 04:44:07 AM PDT

  •  Jeb does need to listen up! (12+ / 0-)
    Man, between us and them, that's a lot of folks who hate the Bush years. Got that, Jeb?
    Jeb Bush Leads GOP pack, But Hillary Clinton has the Edge in National 2016 Poll
    A national poll from St. Leo University finds former Gov. Jeb Bush, R-Fla., leading the pack of potential Republican presidential candidates, but he and other GOP contenders trail former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton in possible 2016 matchups. The poll shows Clinton with double-digit leads over the leading Republican contenders.

    Even though we're two years out, I seriously doubt folks will suddenly warm to the idea of another Bush in the White House.

    As we express our gratitude, we must never forget that the highest appreciation is not to utter words, but to live by them. John F. Kennedy

    by JaxDem on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 04:44:27 AM PDT

    •  I'm a little worried that Jeb can fake (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      a2nite, JaxDem, PrahaPartizan, highacidity

      being a moderate and even a pragmatic one and people will buy it up. "He just seems so nice!"

      "If this Studebaker had anymore Atomic Space-Age Style, you'd have to be an astronaut with a geiger counter!"

      by Stude Dude on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 05:13:40 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Neither Jeb nor Hillary are going to get TP votes (3+ / 0-)

      So look for third party candidate. Rand Paul or Ted Cruz who would not leave the R party to do so. Splitting the R vote? What's not to like about that?

      Every human being has paid the earth to grow up. Most people don’t grow up. And you find out what it costs us to love and to lose, to dare and to fail. And maybe even more, to succeed. What it costs, in truth.—Maya Angelou

      by TerryDarc on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 06:57:19 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  I'm thinking that the Goopers (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        JaxDem, Heart of the Rockies

        being get with the program conformists, will vote for any R at the top of the ticket.

        "It's better than some Commie Democrat!"

        "If this Studebaker had anymore Atomic Space-Age Style, you'd have to be an astronaut with a geiger counter!"

        by Stude Dude on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 07:00:52 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Delusional or what? (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Stude Dude, JaxDem

          You can describe Clinton in many different ways (and I would vote for her in a heartbeat against any of the Republicans), but "Commie" is so far from an accurate description that it's just laughable. She could more easily be tarred as part of the 1%, from her elite education to her legal career on behalf of the elites of Arkansas. In other words, there's a populist objection to her -- from either Tea Party and Occupy -- but not, with any accuracy, a charge that she's socialist or communist.

      •  I like your scenario very much. (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Heart of the Rockies, TerryDarc

        All this time the GOP has been displaying bravado at a match up w/Hillary when in fact they know they're in deep trouble going against her.  Toss in that 3rd party choice which would likely be a Tea Party nutcase patriot and the election would be a bloodbath.

        As we express our gratitude, we must never forget that the highest appreciation is not to utter words, but to live by them. John F. Kennedy

        by JaxDem on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 08:13:31 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Sadly the bloodbath would not translate locally (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          petral, JaxDem

          And Hillary'll still have to do with a divided congress at best. I really have no idea what it will take to give CPR to the body politic in the US. Do you?

          Every human being has paid the earth to grow up. Most people don’t grow up. And you find out what it costs us to love and to lose, to dare and to fail. And maybe even more, to succeed. What it costs, in truth.—Maya Angelou

          by TerryDarc on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 04:55:02 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  I just caught your reply this morning and (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            TerryDarc

            it reminded me of a something Robert Reich said in his documentary Inequality For All which is available on Netflix.  I went back to transcribe his point and it follows below.

            In his piece he compares the last historic income inequality of 1928 with the present (see graph here).  Close to the end of the documentary he pointed out an almost identical political polarization during the same historical span.  Here's what he said:

            There does seem to be a correlation between a political polarization and widening economic inequality.  Researchers measured the distance between the median voting patters of one party and the other party and what they found is that in the times of the highest degree of polarization it almost tracks exactly.  (Please see this graph that he used in the film).  
            He then goes on to point out how totally integrated and connected the issue of inequality is to our democracy and what happens when the ultimate guardians of our democracy fail us, i.e. when Congress and the Executive branch fail us then it is left to the Supreme Court.  Cue Corporations are People...

            I was naively unaware of the political polarization tracking in lock step with the tax cuts on the wealthy.  I believed that much of the divide was created by Rush Limbaugh style talk radio, and it does play a big part.  However, I believe more strongly in historical patterns.

            This is what I hope is the end result (gad, I hope it doesn't get worse) of the disastrous tax cuts put in place by the patron saint of the GOP, Ronald Reagan.  

            As we express our gratitude, we must never forget that the highest appreciation is not to utter words, but to live by them. John F. Kennedy

            by JaxDem on Fri Jun 13, 2014 at 06:13:41 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  Thumbs up! (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              JaxDem

              Thanks for the digging up. No, I hadn't connected the dots on income inequality vs. political polarization, but it's believable, even logical when you think about it.

              I was naively unaware of the political polarization tracking in lock step with the tax cuts on the wealthy.
              Connecting one dot further there and also perfectly reasonable.
              I believed that much of the divide was created by Rush Limbaugh style talk radio, and it does play a big part.  However, I believe more strongly in historical patterns.
              But Rush & Co. don't sell "tax cuts for the rich", they sell a lot of retrograde social engineering and demagoguery against people of color (welfare queens just reeked of racism), against drugs (that was how we got into invading Panama/Noriega), pro-Christian/anti-Muslim crusade BS, and so forth.

              What gets sold at the same time are tax cuts for the rich and other presents for the uber-wealthy. The Tea Party are complicit but, I think usually unaware of their complicity, though they may see themselves as wealthy people just waiting for the right opportunity.

              Occasionally they embarrass their corporate masters with a Cantor-defeat or putting forward a Tod Akins. We could learn something from their energy.

              Every human being has paid the earth to grow up. Most people don’t grow up. And you find out what it costs us to love and to lose, to dare and to fail. And maybe even more, to succeed. What it costs, in truth.—Maya Angelou

              by TerryDarc on Fri Jun 13, 2014 at 08:54:59 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  I am glad it resonated with you as well, (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                TerryDarc

                it's always good to get validation like that from someone else.  

                You've framed Rush's part in this very very well...he didn't sell tax cuts per se, but he sure paved the way to what led to them.  He and the GOP pepper their message(s) well with code like catch phrases that play to the basic fears of their base.  And I wholly agree that folks who identify as Tea Party Patriots are, as you so well said:

                ...usually unaware of their complicity, though they may see themselves as wealthy people just waiting for the right opportunity.
                which is precisely what Rush has spewed over the years - they're gonna be rich one day if they vote republican.  Any day now.  

                Thank you, Terry for a very enjoyable and thought provoking exchange!

                As we express our gratitude, we must never forget that the highest appreciation is not to utter words, but to live by them. John F. Kennedy

                by JaxDem on Fri Jun 13, 2014 at 10:03:21 AM PDT

                [ Parent ]

  •  I like Norm Ornstein a lot. (37+ / 0-)

    But his analysis that the tea party mindset isn't really a Republican mindset misses the fact brought up in Keepemhonest's diary that the establishment GOP conspired to go full teabag on Obama before a single Gadsden flag had been unfurled.

    The tea party's coming-out was just an extension of what GOPers on the Hill (and their shadowy overlords) had planned on Jan. 20, 2009: essentially, a low-grade government shutdown that continues to this day with very few exceptions...and with horrendous consequences that they could care less about.

    -

     

    •  Cantor should be the poster child for the GOP (7+ / 0-)

      as to just how fragile things have become for them...the teahadista parasite is calling the shots.

      •  Listening to Sirius Progress channel (6+ / 0-)

        Ari Rabin Havt's show, and one of his panelists was just saying that a year ago, Cantor was a Tea Party hero- the anti-Boehner, as it were.
        I think the problem with Cantor was he was trying to play both sides of the aisle (David Jarman's article), and wound up being hated by both sides.
        But all the celebration by the Tea Party is premature, I think. As many pundits have pointed out, establishment candidates are still winning most of the primaries.
        We have a Cantor type situation with our Senator, Pat Roberts. He never spends time in Kansas (his "residence" is a barn on his brother's property or something), doesn't do anything for his constituents, never visits the state, at least until this year, go figure. His challenger is an unheard of Teabagger, Dr. Milton Wolf. He's kind of a nut bag.

        GOP candidate for U.S. Senate Milton Wolf responded to charges that he posted X-rays of injured gunshot patients on social media and joked about them. Wolf, who says he is a distant relation of President Barack Obama and is the author of First, Do No Harm: The President’s Cousin Explains Why His Hippocratic Oath Requires Him to Oppose ObamaCare, is challenging incumbent Senator Pat Roberts (R-KA) in Kansas’ GOP primary.

        In one instance, Wolf posted an X-ray of a patient “decapitated” by gunfire. “One of my all-time favorites,” he wrote. “From my residency days there was a pretty active ‘knife and gun club’ at Truman Medical Center. What kind of gun blows somebody’s head completely off? I’ve got to get one of those.”

        http://www.mediaite.com/...

        If trees gave off WIFi signals, we would probably plant so many trees, we would save the planet. Too bad they only produce the oxygen we breathe.

        by skohayes on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 05:21:54 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  Totally disagree with Ornstein's statement: (18+ / 0-)
    The tea-party movement is not a Republican movement, or a conservative movement.
    Bunk.  The Tea Party movement was and is nurtured by Republican ideology.  Sorry, Mr. Ornstein, but Republican ideology is "radical, anti-institutional, anti-leadership, antigovernment."

    The Tea Party and the Republican Party are two sides of the same coin.  Sow the wind; reap the whirlwind.

    •  But the Tea Party is not (5+ / 0-)

      a "Republican" movement. or a "conservative" movement.  Just because it doesn't slice, dice, chop and mix like the commercial says doesn't mean it doesn't "slice, dice, chop and mix"!

      So which Republican or conservative definition are you going with  - the advertising or the reality?  Ornstein is obviously using the one from the ads.  That is why I continue to be puzzled by my friends who are republican.  They profess a desire for a conservative fiscal appraoch, a small government etc but refuse to believe that the GOP has never delivered any of that - nor even propose that.

      "I'm not left wing because i'm ideological, or passionate, or angry. I'm left wing because I'm informed." - Mikesco

      by newfie on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 05:06:09 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  I almost agree. (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Stude Dude, TerryDarc, hlsmlane

      While the TP and the GOP are both doing the "radical, anti-institutional, anti-leadership, antigovernment" dance, there is still some light visible between them.
      That light is mostly along two axes: (1) insider/outsider and (2) corporatist / populist.

      •  The GOP is doing the dance (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Heart of the Rockies

        of small government -- in public -- but it looks to me like their real agenda is a smash-and-grab to siphon as much Federal money (and resources such as oil and gas reserves on Federal land and offshore) as possible into the pockets of their donors and lobbyist buddies.

        •  exactly (0+ / 0-)

          The GOP plan for decades has been to set up processes that pour public money into private bank accounts.

          (1) War = weapons, subcontracted support, and mercenaries;
          (2) charter schools = local public money in private accounts;
          (3) attempt to privatize social security;
          (4) health insurance (before it was Obamacare) = everyone buys private insurance;
          (5) invest in roads (not trains) to put more money in oil company hands;
          (6) undermine development of alternative energy systems;

          I could go on like this for a long time....

    •  Indeed. The differences between the TP-ers and... (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      skohayes, Hoghead99, Turn Left, a2nite

      ...what's left of "establishment" Republicans are not differences of kind but only differences of degree.

      Any attempt to argue that the TP is not a fringe wing of the Republican Party falls flat.

      What's left of the "establishment" Republicans have now drifted in their now fully obstructionist views to where they've become members of "Tea Party Lite", that's all.

      The TP has "half-won" -- it cannot (yet) succeed in carrying out its agenda on a national scale (although it is increasingly effective at the state level in red many states), but it has succeeded in preventing any moral, ethical, logical national government actions from occurring at all.  And the rightward drifting "establishment" Republicans continue to enable them...

    •  The gop base is the "religious right" (5+ / 0-)

      I've renamed them "Christian Nationalists". It was before the Bush disaster and it was after.  

      The base jumped on the "tea party" bandwagon in 2009.

      The demonizing of Obama circulated through CN networks first.
      The assault on public education is primarily a CN thing.

      The  obsession with guns is driven by CN agenda, to a great degree.

      Wall Street republicans used to be able to manipulate these folks, now D. Koch is the primary puppetmaster.

      Brat's "populism" about "Wall Street Bankers" is mainly about this rift between the CN and the Wall STreet gop.
      There's a little anti-semitic jab implied in there that is consistent with CN thinking, but the CN are really all about power, not about "the little guy" in reality.

      You can't make this stuff up.

      by David54 on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 05:37:06 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  We'll see how long it takes Brat to hold his hand (0+ / 0-)

        out and be blessed by Charles and David, even as the PBS News Hour has its hand out to one of their foundations. Hard to turn down MONEY in  the US of A.

        Every human being has paid the earth to grow up. Most people don’t grow up. And you find out what it costs us to love and to lose, to dare and to fail. And maybe even more, to succeed. What it costs, in truth.—Maya Angelou

        by TerryDarc on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 07:31:43 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  Correct. These are Republicans - Ornstein fumbled (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      a2nite

      Ornstein is performing a contortionist act of false equivalency, obliviousness and pundit malpractice.

      His assertion regarding the Tea Party -- somehow existing outside the Democratic and Republican two-party monopoly, is absurd on its face.

      The Republican Party is a the Republican Tea Party. There is NO faction within the GOP that is larger than the Tea-Baggers. They may not control a majority within the GOP, but they are the plurality GOP block in a majority of States AND virtually all Southern states and/or Southern congressional districts.  

      sláinte,
      cl
      -- Religion is like sodomy: both can be harmless when practiced between consenting adults but neither should be imposed upon children.

      by Caoimhin Laochdha on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 05:53:20 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Ornstein has cognitive dissonance issues (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        newfie

        He's a very smart man, and I suspect likes to think of himself as a very moral man.  

        But deep down he knows that what the GOP stands for is immoral as all hell, and that the Tea Party is what you get (in fact, what you must logically expect) when you follow GOP oncological rentier capitalist mindsets to their conclusion.

        To admit this would be to force a confrontation between his ethical self and the part of him that really enjoys picking up fat paychecks for easy work promoting the rentier agenda.

        Visit http://theuptake.org/ for Minnesota news as it happens.

        by Phoenix Woman on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 07:55:59 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  The obvious (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          hlsmlane, Heart of the Rockies

          immoral nature of GOP policies is what has always puzzled me.  How anyone can say that they are a "good christian" or in any way hold themselves up to be a moral person and support GOP policies is a puzzle to me.  Policies based on greed and self interest - and that does not benefit the majority of their voters.  Broken down to the core of the message "Vote for GOP!  We will make policy and enact law to benefit those that bankroll us, promise lucrative future jobs and to line our own pockets.  You will gain from the pleasure of watching me set my family and myself up for life!'

          "I'm not left wing because i'm ideological, or passionate, or angry. I'm left wing because I'm informed." - Mikesco

          by newfie on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 08:25:27 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  not at all fair (0+ / 0-)

          for example:

          Let’s just say it: The Republicans are the problem.

          By Thomas E. Mann and Norman J. Ornstein,

          http://www.washingtonpost.com/...

          "It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it!" — Upton Sinclair

          by Greg Dworkin on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 09:39:53 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

      •  Tea Party - A Sea of White Christian faces. n/t (0+ / 0-)

        I was a liberal when liberal was cool, I was a liberal when liberal wasn't cool, but I always was and always will be a liberal.

        by LemmyCaution on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 01:07:00 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  Post-9/11 US Foreign Policy: Unparalled failure (9+ / 0-)

    Post-9/11 US Foreign Policy: A Record of Unparalleled Failure
    No matter how you define American-style war or its goals, it doesn’t work. Ever.

    trillions on Iraq and Afghanistan war down the drain

    made the world worse

    The United States has been at war -- major boots-on-the-ground conflicts and minor interventions, firefights, air strikes, drone assassination campaigns, occupations, special ops raids, proxy conflicts, and covert actions -- nearly nonstop since the Vietnam War began.  That’s more than half a century of experience with war, American-style, and yet few in our world bother to draw the obvious conclusions.

    Given the historical record, those conclusions should be staring us in the face.  They are, however, the words that can’t be said in a country committed to a military-first approach to the world, a continual build-up of its forces, an emphasis on pioneering work in the development and deployment of the latest destructive technology, and a repetitious cycling through styles of war from full-scale invasions and occupations to counterinsurgency, proxy wars, and back again.

    So here are five straightforward lessons -- none acceptable in what passes for discussion and debate in this country -- that could be drawn from that last half century of every kind of American warfare:

    1. No matter how you define American-style war or its goals, it doesn’t work. Ever.

    2. No matter how you pose the problems of our world, it doesn’t solve them. Never.

    3. No matter how often you cite the use of military force to “stabilize” or “protect” or “liberate” countries or regions, it is a destabilizing force.

    4. No matter how regularly you praise the American way of war and its “warriors,” the U.S. military is incapable of winning its wars.

    5. No matter how often American presidents claim that the U.S. military is “the finest fighting force in history,” the evidence is in: it isn’t.

    this entire article was posted in full on DK by TomDispatch and had 2 RECs and 2 comments which shows me that DK is not interested in what matters

    there is more emphasis on the failures of FOX news than on the totally failure of our foreign policy

    which is a military policy which has come home in the form of the surveillance state and repression

    and is supported by both "factions" hiding as parties

    •  Did you rec? Did you tip? Did you comment? (7+ / 0-)

      Based on those standards it would appear that you are not interested in what matters either.

      Now what could have been happening on Tuesday that people were so focused on?Heck what were you focused on?

      But even if there wasn't a "yet another" school shooting, this diary by Tomdispatch could have been overlooked.  Diaries get overlooked all the time.  That is why we have rescues - to try to catch some of them.

      Not trying to get on your case - I think you have a valid point, I just think it would serve better if you alerted people of what you think is a worthwhile diary rather than make a declarative statement about the whole of DK.  So you find something you think is valuable - post a note on one of the open threads - I'd much rather see that than someone pimping their own diary.

      "I'm not left wing because i'm ideological, or passionate, or angry. I'm left wing because I'm informed." - Mikesco

      by newfie on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 05:24:17 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  i have been working on stuff and not at computer (3+ / 0-)

        all day

        I made a long quotation from the article

        i did a search on DK and found that it had been posted

        so I made a point about it

        whenever I see TomDispatch posted at DK, I do recommend them and write a comment

        i do not have an group of people that I alert to REC a diary

        I do what I can to support diaries that I think are of interest

        •  You don't need to have a (0+ / 0-)

          group.  Just hit an open thread, post "hey this diary by TomDispatch is good go take a look!" and done.  

          My main point is exactly what you posted.  "I've been working on stuff..."  I assume that you aren't alone.  So if something goes unnoticed it isn't necessarily because there is lack of interest but could be a host of other reasons.  Or it could be lack of interest.  I just thought it a bit ironic that you used the fact that there were few comments/recs when you had not done either.

          I believe you do what you can.  Good on you.  Just don't lose faith.

          "I'm not left wing because i'm ideological, or passionate, or angry. I'm left wing because I'm informed." - Mikesco

          by newfie on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 07:14:58 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

      •  Don midwest is an active participant (0+ / 0-)

        on Daily Kos and always makes comments of interest and provides material of interest.  I think your comment is overly harsh and condescending, despite your last paragraph.

        I have been disgusted that Cantor has gotten so much attention given that we had another public shooting and other issues of concern to talk about this week.  We turned off MSNBC Tuesday evening  because they left issues of interest to focus exclusively on Cantor.

    •  Au contraire (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      mmacdDE
      4. No matter how regularly you praise the American way of war and its “warriors,” the U.S. military is incapable of winning its wars.
      The US military kicked Saddam Husseins butt and could do so to any military force on the planet. But THAT's not the problem. It wasn't the problem in post Saddam Iraq and it's not in Karzai's Afghanistan.

      It's that classical warfare or what morphed into classical, Murican warfare after Vietnam, it's the peace that follows. That is kind of your point #3.

      3. No matter how often you cite the use of military force to “stabilize” or “protect” or “liberate” countries or regions, it is a destabilizing force.
      It's particularly not true in the Muslim world, the growing Muslim world. How to approach that is a bit beyond our foreign policy today. Peace or kick-the-shit-outta-em? We've tried both periodically and sporadically. Neither seem to work in a one size fits all methodology. But we need to get better at it, whatever IT is.

      Every human being has paid the earth to grow up. Most people don’t grow up. And you find out what it costs us to love and to lose, to dare and to fail. And maybe even more, to succeed. What it costs, in truth.—Maya Angelou

      by TerryDarc on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 07:40:07 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Couple more worth looking over: (10+ / 0-)

    Harold Meyerson's "[Eric Cantor’s loss is likely to widen the immigration debate]" not for the obvious from the title but for (my bold):

    Juxtapose those numbers against Tuesday’s Cantor debacle and the result can only be a widening of the parties’ differences on an issue of major electoral import. House Republicans, the vast majority of them safely cocooned in neatly gerrymandered, right-wing, lily-white districts, will continue to block efforts at immigration reform. President Obama is likely to respond by extending his do-not- deport policy, currently applicable to undocumented immigrants brought to the United States as children, to a wider range of people — perhaps to the undocumented parents of U.S.-born children. Latinos will have every reason to go to the polls, particularly in presidential election years, to punish Republicans. (As polling has shown that Latinos favor a bigger government delivering more services, they’d vote heavily Democratic anyway, but the deepening of Republican nativism will only boost their turnout.) The Democrats’ hold on the White House will grow stronger. The Senate will eventually tilt more Democratic, too, since states will become more racially diverse and their boundary lines can’t be gerrymandered. But the rightward movement of the Republican House will continue apace.

    Unless the Democrats can wrest control of the House from the GOP — no mean feat, considering the gerrymandering and voter-suppression battlements that Republicans have thrown up around their districts — gridlock will intensify.

    And, as I said yesterday, we don't have time for that fiddling as "Rome burns."

    The second is  Dan Balz and "Pew poll: In polarized America, we live as we vote" and what (nothing new) is a major factor (my bold):

    Liberals say ethnic and racial diversity are important factors in determining where they want to live, with three-quarters of the most consistently liberal saying that. Among those who are most conservative, however, just one in five put a premium on such diversity in selecting a place to live.

    In contrast, a majority of conservatives say that living near people who share their religious faith is an important feature in deciding where to live. But fewer than one in five Americans with consistently liberal attitudes say that sharing the religious faith of their neighbors is an important factor in where they live.

    Yep, that "those people" attitudes and diversity and choice are evil. That is increasingly the sort factor.

    The only foes that threaten America are the enemies at home, and those are ignorance, superstition, and incompetence. [Elbert Hubbard]

    by pelagicray on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 04:58:27 AM PDT

  •  The Rs I know loved Bush until (8+ / 0-)

    Immigration reform & the "Wall Street before Mainstreet" bailout.

    They like a mean daddy figure.

    I voted Tuesday, May 6, 2014 because it is my right, my responsibility and because my parents moved from Alabama to Ohio to vote. Unfortunately, the republicons want to turn Ohio into Alabama.

    by a2nite on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 05:01:35 AM PDT

    •  Not necessarily a Daddy figure (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Ohkwai, tb mare, Phoenix Woman

      He was a chest beater, playing at being president, while more involved minds ran the country.
      That display on the aircraft carrier, "Mission Accomplished", the "Bring it on" to terrorists while our men and women were fighting in Iraq and Afghanistan, the joking about looking for WMD at the press dinner.
      A guy playing out his fantasies of being his daddy.

      If trees gave off WIFi signals, we would probably plant so many trees, we would save the planet. Too bad they only produce the oxygen we breathe.

      by skohayes on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 05:29:56 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  The lesson for progressives from VA-07 (12+ / 0-)

    Is organize, organize, work, work, work.

    Time for a personal assessment.  I've put in over forty hours in so far this election season.  Organizing meetings, calling, walking, etc.  

    It is June already.  

    What have you done?

    There is always something you can do.  If you are too introverted to call and unable to walk show up for a few minutes and hand out water or snacks.  There is always something to do.

    And leaders make sure there is always something to do.

    It is June already.  

    The highest form of spiritual practice is self observation with compassion.

    by NCJim on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 05:01:41 AM PDT

  •  Funny how quickly (5+ / 0-)

    the establishment turned on Cantor...well, okay not really. I think it was the siren Huffpo headline that said even his staff was a pack of assholes.
    What time is McCain coming on my teevee to advocate for another Iraq surge (or blame Obama for the "ugly situation" that has been going on there for 100 years, take your pick...)

  •  Sorry for being blunt, but... (7+ / 0-)

    ... the Teabaggers, from cowlick to barefeet, sound like Nazis updated to the 21st Century and translated into 'Mer'kin.

    If they take power for real, very little of the USA, much less the ideals of America, will remain.  And they blame it on exactly the same causes they blame now, because it's only an argument whether their dishonesty or greed or stupidity or pride in their ignorance are the greatest force within their mean, bigoted, flat heads.

    •  I had this thought as well. (4+ / 0-)

      Fortunately for us they are emerging after the wave has crested not before.

      (However I wouldn't have used the word "Nazis" -- too easy, too loaded and not necessarily helpful.)

      The highest form of spiritual practice is self observation with compassion.

      by NCJim on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 05:09:47 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Nazis/Fascists etc. (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      I love OCD, Heart of the Rockies

      Use whatever label fits. Both of the above do fit.  The bottom line is that these folks are, at their core, bigoted fascists in the textbook meaning of those words, and the Tea-Baggers  behavior/viewpoints represent textbook fascism.

      I call them "Fascists," because, well, that's what they are.  "Nazism" is it's own particular type of fascism. While there are countless parallels between Nazism and Tea-Baggerary, I do not think "Nazi" translates well or helps further the discourse.

      I there use "Fascist" when referring to the mainstream GOP approach to policy/Gov't because that is, at its core, where the GOP is today.

      sláinte,
      cl
      -- Religion is like sodomy: both can be harmless when practiced between consenting adults but neither should be imposed upon children.

      by Caoimhin Laochdha on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 06:05:30 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Except for that Godwin thing. (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Caoimhin Laochdha

        I'm guilty of way overusing Fascist in my twenties in the '80s because I was young and angry.

        Then again if you're been so unpopular for too long that you don't even like yourself, then everybody's "Fascist"....

        "If this Studebaker had anymore Atomic Space-Age Style, you'd have to be an astronaut with a geiger counter!"

        by Stude Dude on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 06:31:08 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Not sure where the "overuse" line is (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          petral

          Fascism was an ever present threat and global enemy of civil society that pre-dated Hitler.

          Hitler was not the first, and certainly not the last "Fascist" leader or powerful political figure.

          See, e.g., Italy, (pre-German fascism) or Portugal & Spain, which suffered under post-WW2 fascist governments into the mid 1970s. There are openly fascist parties/leaders operating - and winning votes - in Greece, Austria and particularly Hungary.

          Most ominous of all is Hungary's Jobbik Party, which recently won 20.7 percent of the vote in national elections (that was on top of the majority won by the center-right Fidesz party), and is projected to do even better in the upcoming EU elections. With links to paramilitary groups, a fondness for demonizing the country's Roma population, and an enthusiasm for organizing and inspiring allied far-right parties in Poland, Slovakia, Croatia, and Bulgaria, Jobbik is the real deal: a genuinely fascist movement with a solid electoral base and trans-national ambitions.

          Just last month, Greece elected 3 Fascists (among 20 Greek members) to represent the country in the European parliament.  

          While Adolph Hitler is - for many - fascism's poster-boy, fascism (sadly) did not begin or end with his 13-year tenure as leader of Germany's National Socialist German Workers' Party.

          When I refer to "Nazis," I am referring to Hitler.  
          When I discuss "fascism," I am referring to current events and/or the movement's multiple leaders and the ideology's historical influences over the past 100+ years.

          sláinte,
          cl
          -- Religion is like sodomy: both can be harmless when practiced between consenting adults but neither should be imposed upon children.

          by Caoimhin Laochdha on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 10:20:46 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

    •  I agree but was afraid to say so earlier (0+ / 0-)

      Tea party supporters (not necessarily Tea party leaders who I believe are playing a power game) believe they have been betrayed by the establishment (Left and Right). They are not deep thinkers, they are feelers and they feel something is wrong with America now vice America then. Similar to good Germans who felt betrayed by their leaders loosing WWI and then the policies of the Wiemar Republic.  

      I was a liberal when liberal was cool, I was a liberal when liberal wasn't cool, but I always was and always will be a liberal.

      by LemmyCaution on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 01:15:13 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Memo to Allison Grimes.....Embrace your base. (4+ / 0-)
    •  what's the KY base? (3+ / 0-)

      not the CT base, for sure.

      "It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it!" — Upton Sinclair

      by Greg Dworkin on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 05:31:22 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  True, but don't ignore your base (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Caoimhin Laochdha

        in favor of attacking the ACA when hundreds of thousands of people in your state benefit from it.
        I know she's in a hard place with regards to coal, but playing to the Republican base and ignoring the people who will get out the vote for you is not the solution.

        If trees gave off WIFi signals, we would probably plant so many trees, we would save the planet. Too bad they only produce the oxygen we breathe.

        by skohayes on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 05:34:19 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  This is good news for Grimes (6+ / 0-)
        Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) railed against Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) on Wednesday for failing to support her student loan refinancing proposal, which the Senate killed in a 56-38 vote earlier in the day.

        Warren's bill would have enabled millions of Americans to refinance their student loans into cheaper debt by increasing taxes on wealthy households. Following the bill's defeat, Warren told MSNBC that McConnell, who called the proposal a "show vote," has made clear where his allegiance lies.

        "Mitch McConnell is there for millionaires and billionaires," Warren said. "He is not there for people who are working hard playing by the rules and trying to build a future for themselves."

        When MSNBC's Chris Hayes asked Warren how she planned to fight back, the senator gave a response that could shake things up in Kentucky, where McConnell faces a tough race for reelection against Democrat Alison Lundergan Grimes.

        "One way I'm going to start fighting back is I'm going to go down to Kentucky and I'm going to campaign for Alison Lundergan Grimes," Warren said. "She's tough, she's feisty, she endorsed the student loan bill, said she wanted to bring down interest rates for Kentuckians. ... So my view is I'm going to get out there and try to make this happen for her."

        http://www.huffingtonpost.com/...

        If trees gave off WIFi signals, we would probably plant so many trees, we would save the planet. Too bad they only produce the oxygen we breathe.

        by skohayes on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 05:42:22 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Which dumb Democrats (0+ / 0-)

          Voted against student loan refinancing? (Grrr!!)

          "If this Studebaker had anymore Atomic Space-Age Style, you'd have to be an astronaut with a geiger counter!"

          by Stude Dude on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 06:05:42 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  None. (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Stude Dude, skohayes

            The tally was 56 for, 38 against, which shows once again that 59.5% (that's 59.5% of the 94 present, not the total 100) for a vote isn't enough to get it through the Senate.  I think it went in with the usual filibuster shortcut of a 60 vote threshold.

            All Democrats present voted for it (although Reid switched his vote at the end for the usual procedural reasons).  McCaskill was the only Dem absent, but she supports the legislation (and two more votes plus hers were required to meet the threshold, so her absence did not doom it).

            Collins, Corker, and Murkowski also voted in favor, the rest of the Republicans present voted against it.  I didn't see anyone in the absents who would be likely to support it (Ayotte, Cochran, Graham, Moran, Scott).

            As noted by Steve Benen in his post about it yesterday:

            GOP senators offered no alternative, preferring instead to just block the Senate from voting on the bill.
      •  Her base (3+ / 0-)

        To large extent, your "base" is what you build. An enthusiastic, committed group of "Bases" grows and pulls in others. Passive GOP or Democratic leaning voters are stagnate pools.

        Framing economically populist views/policies in ways that attract blue collar/middle class/lower-middle class brings in prime low-hanging fruit. There are a dozen other groups that can be build into a "base." Starting now, with the most traditional and reliable liberal, progressive, Democratic voters is step one.

        No one is Kentucky has an established "base" that will turn out 50% of the voters merely by running a solid GOTV.  However, their are enough disaffected or un-recruited voters that can be assembled and brought to the polls for a challenger to one of the GOP ugliest incumbents.

        sláinte,
        cl
        -- Religion is like sodomy: both can be harmless when practiced between consenting adults but neither should be imposed upon children.

        by Caoimhin Laochdha on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 06:15:20 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  It is really to understand the loss (6+ / 0-)

    A congressman's first priority is to service their constituency not their own political careers.  If they tend more to their home district offices and less to the Wall Street donors they have long careers.

    It may not be glamorous but congressmen that go to bat for an veteran having trouble with the VA, an elderly person not getting their SS check, a community group trying to clean up a river and other "boring" matters - they do well.

    •  and bothering to show up (0+ / 0-)

      I used to pooh-pooh politicians (my Congressman is one) who seemed to always show up, with camera crews, at every ethnic parade, farmers market, ribbon-cutting, etc. etc. etc. But they're right, and people do notice, and it matters. It's hard to do given their schedules in Washington, but the good ones do it anyway -- and the great ones genuinely enjoy it.

      I suspect that a lot of people kept voting for Ted Kennedy, not because they necessarily agreed with all of his positions, but because he had showed up for their mother's wake or at least written a personal note, or shook their hands at the St. Patrick's Day parade, or helped a family member who was having difficulties with some government agency.

  •  What Mr. Ornstein MEANT to say: (6+ / 0-)

    Ornstein:

    Cantor's glaringly obvious personal ambition fed those suspicions, but his defeat was a defeat for the broader establishment, which compromises too readily and feeds its own interests first. That attitude, by the way, also is embodied in many of the big donors to candidates and outside groups, meaning it represents an ongoing serious headache for party leaders.

    . . . but his defeat was a defeat for the broader Republican Tea Party (RTP) "establishment." To the extent the RTP has "suspicions" about the Democratic "establishment," any suspicions are irrelevant because this is the Republican Party and the Tea Party/Republican merger does not affect votes for/against Democrats in November.

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Ornstein:

    The tea-party movement is not a Republican movement, or a conservative movement. It is radical, anti-institutional, anti-leadership, antigovernment.
    Again, what Mr. Ornstein meant to say is: The so-called "tea-party" movement is a Republican phenomena.

    Today's Republican Tea Party is the logical extension/conclusion/result of two generations of aggressive recruitment by the GOP of bigots, wingnut anti-government neanderthals who seek handouts from public institutions the decry, along with anti-Constitutional and anti-reality radicals. These are the "Republicans" who salivate over every failed illiberal policy that has previously, or will tomorrow, basic U.S. Constitutional civil society.

    This is not an aberration within the Republican party, this is merely a prosaic snapshot of the GOP. Particularly in the South, the Republican Tea Party IS the "establishment GOP and GOP voter" when it comes to voting at the Congressional/National level. The RTP also represents mainstream views among RTP/GOP voters in the rest of the U.S.

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Ornstein:  
    What Mr. Ornstein means when he says "The tea-party movement is not a Republican movement" is: "The so-called "tea party" voters are Republicans. In reality, the newly recognized Republican Tea Party is a movement born in, existing it and voting in, the Republican party. The "tea-party" voters are the hard-earned and eagerly recruited GOP voters of the last 40 years. They were the predicable and are the predicted logical extension of mainstream Republican voters.

    sláinte,
    cl
    -- Religion is like sodomy: both can be harmless when practiced between consenting adults but neither should be imposed upon children.

    by Caoimhin Laochdha on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 05:12:46 AM PDT

    •  The Southern Strategy's bitter fruit (2+ / 0-)

      This actually started, informally, when Strom Thurmond took his Dixiecrat racist base with him into the GOP, which welcomed them with open arms.

      It got codified in 1968.

      It is still in use today.

      And it will, as America's demographics change, mean the doom of the GOP.

      And Ornstein can't admit it.

      Visit http://theuptake.org/ for Minnesota news as it happens.

      by Phoenix Woman on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 08:06:41 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  You are absolutely correct PW (0+ / 0-)

        I should not have said 40 years -- the Dixiecrats blew the bugle much earlier and the dog whistling has continued to recruit as many hate groups as the GOP can assemble.

        sláinte,
        cl
        -- Religion is like sodomy: both can be harmless when practiced between consenting adults but neither should be imposed upon children.

        by Caoimhin Laochdha on Wed Jun 18, 2014 at 01:22:52 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  Too bad for Iraq. Not our problem. nt (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    a2nite, on the cusp, Ohkwai, tampaedski
  •  Eric Cantor was in his position as Majority Leader (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Hoghead99

    because he was the best the Republican party has to offer.....
    Now, things are just going to get worse....

    •  We replaced a right winger (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Caoimhin Laochdha

      Majority Leader with a no name right winger. Now there's a big fight for the leadership positions, and I'll bet you won't see many of the Tea Party caucus being courted for those positions.
      It all boils down to one Republican being replaced by another one. In the long run, it will make very little difference.

      If trees gave off WIFi signals, we would probably plant so many trees, we would save the planet. Too bad they only produce the oxygen we breathe.

      by skohayes on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 05:38:08 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Elites Beware: Cantor's Defeat May Signal pop revo (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Stude Dude, tampaedski, hlsmlane

    what if voters (no longer have citizens - shucks the people can't even determine who gets to vote)

    if the voters realize that both factions work for the oligarchy, there might be

    there just might be

    a populist revolution

    and how will Obama respond to the change in the wind?

    Elites Beware: Eric Cantor's Defeat May Signal a Populist Revolution
     Democrats and Republicans need to ask themselves:'What side of the barricades am I on?'

  •  Tea-party movement is not a Republican movement (7+ / 0-)

    That's 100%, complete, unadulterated bullshit, for all the reasons that commenters above have pointed out.

    The "Tea Party" was fertilized in Republican test tubes, transferred to a Republican vat, and hatched in a Republican nursery. No Tea Partiers vote for any political party other than the Republican Party.

  •  Relax...the Tea Party is nothing but a guerilla (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    a2nite

    posse......

    They can be whipped up at times to defeat fellow Republicans in a primary....
    But in a general, they still are considered scum...
    Albeit, so was the Nazi party at one time in Germany....

    But US demographics and the demise of the "establishment" Republican party should keep the Tea Party on the sidelines in national politics permanently....

    Also a growing economy will disband the crazies as quickly as they can be summoned...

  •  Populist GOP? (6+ / 0-)

    Yeah, umm, no.

    Talk to any of these jail-the-bankers! Republicans about the GM bailout and all you'll hear is that this socialist/communist/fascist President rewarded the workers (union) by penalizing the bondholders.

    Kristol is a piece of crap. And Matthew Dowd is delusional with his constant yammering that the Republican Party is the party of Main St.

    Yeah, the Dems have drifted too far to the corporate teat, but they're still looking far to the corporate right to even see the GOPers on the horizon.

    And if these tea partiers/GOPer intellectuals are so Main St., then why do they so hate Elizabeth Warren?

    Seriously, why hasn't the cognitive dissonance blown their heads to pieces yet?

  •  OWS/tea party (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    skohayes, Stude Dude, Amber6541

    A couple of years ago I was online with a guy in a tent at Zucotti.  I was commenting on the mayhem and he shared this with me.  He had a circle chart on the back of his tent that showed the overlap in goals of the TP and OWS.  The areas of agreement were on comprehensive tax reform and ending the rampant crony capitalism of Washington.  I then realized why the elites of both parties were attacking the movements so vociferously.  The movements were going after the two things that keep them in power, the corrupt tax code and money from their cronies.
      I quit criticizing OWS even though I am conservative.  I even took bottled water to the local camp.  Was there outrageous behavior among both groups? Yes.  Is that a reason to discount their goals? No!  
    I read that OWS will be back in NYC this summer.  As a conservative I say "It's about time guys!  Put the heat on the elites".

    •  Before the Tea Party became (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Amber6541, tb mare, hlsmlane

      corrupted by the Republicans, they had some admirable goals, many in line with the OWS movement.
      The Tea Party got taken over by Republicans, OWS never translated their power into political clout, but they certainly got the country talking about inequality. The Tea Party's message got muddled in with the Republican racist and misogynist base, OWS just drifted off into the ether.

      If trees gave off WIFi signals, we would probably plant so many trees, we would save the planet. Too bad they only produce the oxygen we breathe.

      by skohayes on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 05:50:32 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  OWS did not just "drift off." (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        mmacdDE, skohayes

        Occupy alumni have taken that experience and put it to good use in other social movements. (I know a number in the push to shut down the Brayton Point coal plant in Massachusetts, others in the fast food strike / minimum wage / living wage fights, others in pushing back against police brutality and racial profiling.) And Occupy itself could well come back in some form.

        And the 1%-99% narrative has taken hold even in mainstream circles. That alone is a huge accomplishment, compared to where the public discourse was before Occupy.

      •  Not really! (0+ / 0-)

        The Republican establishment hates the tea party.  Boehner likes Pelosi better than any Republican tea party member.  He should since they are both members of the political elites club.
        As a movement they have had a rough start politically like the Akin fiasco.  They were not smart enough to realize that his campaign was secretly funded by McCaskill supporters.
        I am excited to hear that OWS may be back this summer.  I hope they continue to not be used by the elites.

    •  I'll just have to ask. (0+ / 0-)

      SInce you're a Conservative here, what do think of the DailyKos in general?

      I'll 'fess up that I'm not really all that Liberal. I mostly hang around here because I'm lonely. And Quarkstomper was here. Oddly he was a Christian Conservative back in the '80s. But I'm really sore at the GOP for the Farm Crisis back then and the union busting now.

      "If this Studebaker had anymore Atomic Space-Age Style, you'd have to be an astronaut with a geiger counter!"

      by Stude Dude on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 06:38:30 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  new (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Stude Dude

        I have been pleased so far.  I have not had the low intellect comments like "bagger, Faux news" and the usual dismissive comments from people who can't think of a rational thing to say.  I have seen some on here though.  For the most part the level of dialog is much higher than Huffpo.  Since they went to Facebook exclusively many of us have left which is why I am here.

    •  Here's hoping that OWS comes back. (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      ausmth

      And even learns how to be more effective this time around.

      "If this Studebaker had anymore Atomic Space-Age Style, you'd have to be an astronaut with a geiger counter!"

      by Stude Dude on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 06:47:31 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  The most likely comment on Cantor's loss: (8+ / 0-)

    Why should you listen to the analysis of people who never saw it coming?

    Amen.

    Easiest takeaway is nothing new:

    Representatives who don't take care of business are on shaky ground.  Most polls showed him to be very unpopular in his home district. Add in a little ratfucking, a few people coming out to vote just because they can't stand the guy, pile on the anti-immigration hardheads, and just about any other factor that people have come up with, and you've got a big-time loser.

    Oddly, makes me think of Al Gore in 2000. Nobody would have thought twice of Florida if Gore had carried his home state of Tennessee.

    LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

    by dinotrac on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 05:47:29 AM PDT

    •  funny post, there (6+ / 0-)

      http://washingtonexaminer.com/...

      All this having been said, it was amazing to follow the news and see how the same experts who had no idea this upset was brewing - and who hadn't even followed the race closely - could turn around within seconds to confidently explain precisely why Cantor lost, and even how, to the extent that it doomed comprehensive immigration reform legislation, that it was bad news for Republicans heading into the 2016 electio
      n.

      "It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it!" — Upton Sinclair

      by Greg Dworkin on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 06:00:43 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  You have to love this line: (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Mr MadAsHell
        there are still big knowledge gaps when it comes to understanding voter behavior.
        Ummm....yeah, sure. Sounds like we're talking physics class here.

        All right, class, when you apply X television ads + Y public appearances, shake and heat over a bunsen burner, you will get Z votes!

        Seems to me voters are most mysterious only to those who consider them to be some other, generally lower, form of life.  

        LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

        by dinotrac on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 06:27:13 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  One other piece to it (0+ / 0-)

      It was a primary. By definition, the only people who turn out are those that feel strongly about the candidates, in one way or another.

      Cantor was supposed to win in a walk. Cruise to victory. Outcome is not in doubt, yadda yadda yadda.

      In that case, why bother to vote UNLESS you either really like the OTHER guy, or hate Cantor's guts? Remember, he's not expected to lose, it's not even supposed to be close.

      And that's what happened to Mike Castle too. He was supposed to win, and win easily. So the average guys, the moderates, the meh voters, didn't bother.

      But the ones who hated him in some way or another all showed up.

      In a primary, that's enough to win. And quite possibly turn the supposed general election result on its head.

      •  There is definitely an element of that -- and a (0+ / 0-)

        close relative.

        I wonder how many of those 20,000 voters who didn't vote last time decided to show up specifically to vote against Cantor?

        LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

        by dinotrac on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 09:28:43 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  One more thing: I worry about you, Greg. (0+ / 0-)

    You included Dickinson's piece, which included yet another discussion dismissing the value of mega-dollars.

    And, face it, so does the very acknowledgement that this election even happened.

    You must be skirting excommunication by now.

    But all is not lost: you can get back on track simply by chainging "Citizens United bad" all day, interspersed with the occasional "Darned old Kochs are buying all the votes".

    LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

    by dinotrac on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 05:51:39 AM PDT

    •  this one's for you, dino (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Caoimhin Laochdha, Mr MadAsHell

      the revolution's coming. What side of the barricade are you on?

      http://www.nationaljournal.com/...

      "It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it!" — Upton Sinclair

      by Greg Dworkin on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 05:57:49 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Thanks! I enjoyed that. I've always said -- with (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Mr MadAsHell

        much derision here -- that the Occupy folks and the Tea party people had much in common with each others.

        Not the designated "leaders", of course.
        And there are plenty of differences that divide them. Today.

        But, if people ever start really hungering for a better country, one that works, they might just focus on those commonalities and fractured populist uprisings turn into a more cohesive populist movement.

        At least for a while.

        LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

        by dinotrac on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 06:05:44 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  Ron Fournier? Rove and McCain buddy? Populist? (0+ / 0-)

        Yeah, he's really trustworthy on this or any other subject- NOT.

        http://www.sourcewatch.org/...

        Visit http://theuptake.org/ for Minnesota news as it happens.

        by Phoenix Woman on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 08:32:22 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  worry about yourself (0+ / 0-)

      there are plenty of differing viewpoints here, and posting an article that doesn't fit with whatever narrow-minded, idiotic strawman version you have of the membership is hardly significant.  
      I imagine it must be hard to see a fellow idiotic, condescending douche with a vastly overinflated sense of his own importance such as Cantor go down in flames.  

      •  Hooray! Another hoppety input. (0+ / 0-)
        I imagine it must be hard to see a fellow idiotic, condescending douche with a vastly overinflated sense of his own importance such as Cantor go down in flames.
        Don't be silly.  Your smiling face is always welcome sunshine in an otherwise dreary day.

        LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

        by dinotrac on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 09:24:53 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  Brat is a lightning strike, not a normal thing (0+ / 0-)

      All other things being equal, the guy with more money beats the guy with less money.  (Notice that there were no other lightning st strikes on Tuesday.)

      What took out Cantor, despite polls - and not just the ones from his much-mocked John McLaughlin - showing him with 20- to 30-point leads?

      A whole bunch of things.  His blowing off his constituents may have been the biggest single thing, but other factors were involved (such as widespread crossover voting) .

      Visit http://theuptake.org/ for Minnesota news as it happens.

      by Phoenix Woman on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 08:21:12 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Vergara (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    petral

    This is supposed to be students' rights thing. From the same Conservative forces that would tell any oddball student to get with the program.

    "If this Studebaker had anymore Atomic Space-Age Style, you'd have to be an astronaut with a geiger counter!"

    by Stude Dude on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 06:21:22 AM PDT

  •  This: (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Stude Dude, Ohkwai, I love OCD
    ...including a Tea Party upset at last year’s Virginia Republican Nominating Convention (where Ken Cuccinelli and E.W. Jackson defeated mainstream Republican candidates),
    and look how well that worked for the Tea Party.

    Thanks for the roundup, Greg!

    "Religion is what keeps the poor from murdering the rich."--Napoleon

    by Diana in NoVa on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 06:22:43 AM PDT

  •  "moved the needle leftward on domestic policy"??? (0+ / 0-)

    I agree with most of Trende's description of the Bush years -- except for the description "leftward." "Big government" is not a left-wing concept. What Bush did was a huge increase in the Federalizing of traditionally local matters, from education to policing, plus the biggest increase in Medicare via Part D. That is (rightly) anathema to the "shrink government" folks. It is also problematic for progressives, because it increased the most repressive aspects of the militarized state, and imposed huge constraints on public education.

    But we need to push back against the allegations that those moves were in any way "leftward." They're not. They were right-wing, repressive, and aimed at increasing the power and wealth of the 1% and of the national security state.

  •  I am wondering if the big dems understand (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    tb mare, hlsmlane, petral

    how pissed off many of us are with their corporate love and tolerance? That would include Hillary (an her unyielding love for Wall Street).

    My advice to the dems would be to watch out... the same populist feelings on corporations/middle America are alive and well among dems and independents (and folks like me that are well left of most dems).

    The dems did basically NOTHING to the banks and corps that caused so many Americans so much harm. They'd better think carefully about how they "proceed".

     

    The only hawk I like is the kind that has feathers. My birding blog: http://thisskysings.wordpress.com/

    by cany on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 07:24:00 AM PDT

    •  that would be the point of this (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      cany

      "It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it!" — Upton Sinclair

      by Greg Dworkin on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 07:28:44 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Indeed. But the question is, are the dems deaf? (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        hlsmlane

        Do they understand this?

        Americans' long-brewing discontent shows clear signs of reaching a boiling point. And when it happens, the country will judge its politicians through a new filter—one that asks, "Which side of the barricade are you on? Is it the side of the out-of-touch political class that clings to the status quo by protecting those at the top and their own political agendas, or is it the side that is fighting for the kind of change that will make the government work for the people—all the people?"
        For instance, if everyone says their dem is not responsible, then why are we in the mess we're in and why wasn't anything done?

        The anger out here on the streets IS palpable. It will just take the right figure to open the door to allow all that anger to pour out.

        Which side of the barricade, indeed. And that applies to Hillary in great measure. She'd better think long and hard about her own convictions because I don't think she gets it.

        The only hawk I like is the kind that has feathers. My birding blog: http://thisskysings.wordpress.com/

        by cany on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 07:45:08 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  And Ron Fournier is believable on this... why? (0+ / 0-)

        This Ron Fournier?

        http://www.sourcewatch.org/...

        Visit http://theuptake.org/ for Minnesota news as it happens.

        by Phoenix Woman on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 08:36:20 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  dated (0+ / 0-)

          he's been at NJ for some years.

          there's the Ron Fournier that called out Romney for racism, the one that (when pushed) admits the GOP sucks, just thinks D's do, too.

          Whatever. I don't believe in character assassination, though there's plenty to criticize in his writing.

          "It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it!" — Upton Sinclair

          by Greg Dworkin on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 09:44:27 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

  •  The Simple Reason (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Greg Dworkin, mmacdDE

    You ignore your constituents and take them for granted, they boot you out.  This should be taken as a lesson for Dems. also.

    "Some men see things as they are and ask, 'Why?' I dream of things that never were and ask, 'Why not?"

    by Doctor Who on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 07:26:31 AM PDT

  •  That's odd (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    red rabbit

    all I remember hearing during the Bush years was cheering.

    Get busy living or get busy dying

    by Kaiser Soeze on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 07:30:38 AM PDT

    •  me too (0+ / 0-)

      there was no "tea party" before Obama was President, they only claim to give a shit about debt or deficits or bailouts when a Democrat is in the WH, then it's right back to "deficits don't matter".  
      And what are the policies of the teabagger Repubs after they're elected?  From what I can tell it's all anti-abortion, anti-birth control, anti-gay, typical christian conservative bullshit that we've had from the Republicans for decades now, along with the typical pro-corporate, anti-worker, anti-consumer policies.  None of the populist economic policies matter to them more than the social conservative ones do, so whatever overlap there might be is really irrelevant as long as the social issues, anti-immigration, racism, and xenophobia is their priority.  

    •  RNC co-opted them nearly five years ago (0+ / 0-)

      And they've stayed co-opted:

      http://news.firedoglake.com/...

      Whatever they were in 2008 - breakaway Republicans or glibertarians or whatever - now they are nothing more and less than the GOP base, marinated in (Koch-founded and funded) John Birch Society crapola and Rushdoony bigotry encouraged by the use of the Southern Strategy.

      Visit http://theuptake.org/ for Minnesota news as it happens.

      by Phoenix Woman on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 08:46:37 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Corporate Media's Waterloo (0+ / 0-)

    They've lost the ability to report on "the Individual" .
    The 60,000 people that DID come out to vote.

    They can't even come up with a reason for the lost.
    These are journalist? Reporters? Stenographers ?

    They KNEW Cantor outspent this guy.
    They must believe money wins elections, and they turned their back on a guy doing the door-to-door.

    Cantor will of course take a K street job and the corporate media will never tie the votes he took on behalf of the American people to his new employer.

    P.S.
    After 6 Years of Obama bashing , Obama is the Last man standing. Obamacare would be HIS Waterloo.
    WOW

    Keep It Real Folks

  •  duplicity (0+ / 0-)

    " And they're hard to resolve when you've got a president who won't engage."

    which doesn't exactly comport with:

    "We got 97% of what we wanted"

    I suppose he wants to "negotiate" the remaining 3%.

  •  It is extremely possible and likely (0+ / 0-)

    that shortly all three branches of the government will be controlled by these crazies and they will be free to implement whatever policies they want unfettered by presidential veto power, congressional filibuster or judicial review.
    Think about it.
    I am hard pressed to think of a similar situation of crisis, other than the Civil War, to compare it to.
    There will be no legal remedy to their exercise of power.

    I was a liberal when liberal was cool, I was a liberal when liberal wasn't cool, but I always was and always will be a liberal.

    by LemmyCaution on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 12:57:17 PM PDT

  •  Icing on the Cantor cake .... AIPAC will need t... (0+ / 0-)

    Icing on the Cantor cake ....

    AIPAC will need to groom a new point man in Congress.

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