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Margot Sanger-Katz:

For decades, the United States has had a fragmented health policy. States called the shots on major elements of how health care and health insurance were financed and regulated. The result: a hodgepodge of coverage and a wide variance in health.

The Affordable Care Act was intended to help standardize important parts of that system, by imposing some common rules across the entire country and by providing federal financing to help residents in all states afford insurance coverage. But a series of court rulings on the law could make the differences among the states bigger than ever.

The law was devised to pump federal dollars into poorer states, where lots of residents were uninsured. Many tended to be Republican-leaning. But the court rulings, if upheld, could leave only the richer, Democratic states with the federal dollars and broad insurance coverage. States that opted out of optional portions of the law could see little improvement in coverage and even economic damage.

Dan Diamond:
"There is a geographic pattern in the distribution of the uninsured that is becoming more pronounced," RWJF's Katherine Hempstead told me.

"We are definitely seeing an increasing share of the uninsured that are both below 138% of the federal poverty level and living in states that did not expand Medicaid—meaning that there is practically speaking no real coverage options for them."

Linda Greenhouse:
Given the avalanche of world-shaking news since last week, the shrug greeting the latest chapter in the long-running affirmative action saga at the University of Texas is understandable. Even the usually lively constitutional law blogosphere has had little to say about the July 15 ruling by which the federal appeals court in New Orleans once again upheld the flagship Austin school’s admissions plan...

The opinion is a masterpiece of judicial craft, the product of two wise and experienced senior judges, one appointed by a Republican president and one by a Democrat, and for these purposes it doesn’t matter which is which. It’s worth unpacking at some length, for two reasons.

One, it’s just so interesting for its explanation of the choices Texas has made.

And two, I’ll go out on a limb and predict that this decision is not only the latest chapter in the yearslong sojourn of Texas-style affirmative action through the federal courts. It’s also the last.

More politics and policy below the fold.

Matthew Dickinson:

The Washington Post’s Chris Cillizza wrote an interesting column two days ago under the headline “It’s Virtually Impossible to be a Successful Modern President.” Cillizza begins his piece like this: “Being president is the most powerful job in the world. At which you will almost certainly fail.”

Both those statements are wrong, of course. As I and other presidency scholars have written repeatedly, the presidency is not a very powerful office and it is certainly not the most powerful job in the world.  Indeed, even among elected chief executives in modern democracies, the presidency is one of the weaker offices. The primary reason, of course, is because the Framers wanted it that way, as indicated by their decision to embed the presidency within a constitutional system of shared powers. That’s why presidents cannot dismiss Congress, call for new elections, or even count on the support of a legislative majority to pass legislation – all expectations that many prime ministers in other nations possess. And, with the ratification of the 22nd amendment, presidents lucky enough to win reelection serve most of their second term as defacto lame ducks. As Brendan Nyhan notes in his column today, however, this weakness has not stopped individuals from exaggerating the president’s potential degree of control over events.

Whenever you hear about anything to do with Andrew Cuomo and ethics, go back and read this Shawn Boburg piece:
Since the mid-1980s, contributions totaling $1.5 billion have been withdrawn from a little-known agency program that allows the governors of New York and New Jersey to direct money to their pet projects or causes, even those with little connection to the agency’s 90-year-old mission as stated on its website: “To keep the region’s commuters, travelers and global shippers moving.”

The recipients of multimillion-dollar grants in the past include New York City museums, a hospital in Jersey City, a Boys & Girls Club in the Bronx, a clam purification plant at the Jersey Shore, a dance theater and an industrial park, according to internal agency documents obtained by The Record.

Boburg recently won a Polk for his GWB reporting.

Norm Ornstein:

A lot of history to get to the point. What began as a ruthlessly pragmatic, take-no-prisoners parliamentary style opposition to Obama was linked to constant efforts to delegitimize his presidency, first by saying he was not born in the U.S., then by calling him a tyrant trying to turn the country into a Socialist or Communist paradise. These efforts were not condemned vigorously by party leaders in and out of office, but were instead deflected or encouraged, helping to create a monster: a large, vigorous radical movement that now has large numbers of adherents and true believers in office and in state party leadership. This movement has contempt for establishment Republican leaders and the money to go along with its beliefs. Local and national talk radio, blogs, and other social media take their messages and reinforce them for more and more Americans who get their information from these sources. One result is that even today, a Rasmussen survey shows that 23 percent of Americans still believe Obama is not an American, while an additional 17 percent are not sure. Forty percent of Americans! This is no longer a fringe view...

I am not suggesting that the lunatics or extremists have won. Most Republicans in the Senate are not, to use John McCain's term, "wacko birds," and most Republicans in office would at least privately cringe at some of the wild ideas and extreme views. At the same time, the "establishment" is fighting back, pouring resources into primaries to protect their preferred candidates, and we are seeing the rise of a new and encouraging movement among conservative intellectuals—dubbed "Reformicons" by E.J. Dionne—to come up with a new set of ideas and policy prescriptions to redefine the ideology and the party in a positive way.

But there is a darker reality. Many of the "preferred" candidates—including Ernst as well as James Lankford in Oklahoma and Jack Kingston in Georgia—are anything but pragmatic.

Must read.

Emily Badger with a long piece on Paul Ryan's budget proposals:

In reality, some states have worse track records — and differing commitments — to caring for the poor, to providing them health care, to lifting children and families out of poverty, to educating them. While block grants would recognize that a state like Texas has different needs from Minnesota, it would also place greater control in combating poverty in the hands of local governments with weak records on this front.
Charles Blow with a similar subject:
[President of the Center for Neighborhood Enterprise Bob] Woodson’s comments mine familiar conservative rhetoric, hinting at welfare failure and abuse, pinning further harm on liberal intentions to help, while sidestepping altogether conservative callousness and Republican Party platforms that have sought for decades to reward those at the top of the economic ladder while ignoring those at the bottom.

Woodson is a smart man, a MacArthur genius fellow, and he’s made his work focus on the plight of the poor and troubled neighborhoods. But at the heart of his logic — if, indeed, there is heart in his logic — is a particular strand of tough-love, up-by-the-bootstraps, stop-helping-poor-folks-so-much-because-you’re-hurting-them thinking. Woodson isn’t a neutral arbiter, but a fiercely minimal-government partisan with an open disdain for the civil rights apparatus in this country.

In a RealClear Radio Hour interview in May [the host is my long time libertarian friend Bill Frezza - GD], Woodson said of the current civil rights movement:

“It has really abandoned the high ground on which it was founded. It has morphed into a race grievance industry, and it’s been hijacked by the gay movement, it’s been hijacked by the Democratic Party. And so it has lost its authenticity.”

He continued: “The civil rights movement, again, has sold its soul to the highest bidder.”

Huffington Post:
Baseball legend Hank Aaron sent an email to supporters of Democrat Michelle Nunn, who's running for the U.S. Senate in Georgia.

In a Wednesday email, Aaron compared fundraising for Nunn to baseball, where "every hit matters."

"The big ones, the little ones -- they all add up to a chance for your team to win," Aaron wrote.

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Comment Preferences

  •  Sanger-Katz accurately describes Texas (25+ / 0-)

    Republican, opted out of major portions of the ACA, and has little or no improvement in healthcare coverage.  Mr. Perry and his ilk bamboozled poor people who vote rich, then screwed them, and most don't even know it.

  •  Hank Aaron is a class act. (42+ / 0-)

    Despite recently being on the receiving end of a boat load of hate mail:  Atlanta Braves get hate mail after Hank Aaron says reaction to Obama shows we have "a long ways to go" he remains unruffled and steps up big time for Michelle Nunn.

    From the HuffPo link is this excerpt of Aaron's email:

    The 755 home runs I hit in my time mean a lot to me, but there's another record that I'm proud to hold, the all-time record for Runs Batted In (RBIs).

    You see, games aren't won or lost on the efforts of one person, they rest on the shoulders of team. And every RBI is a result of teammates working together to achieve one common goal -- victory.

    If each one of us steps up to the plate and contributes during this 24-hour fundraising effort called a "money bomb," I know we can bring home the single biggest fundraising day of Michelle's campaign.

    Now that's an RBI, I'd like to add to my records. Will you help me do it?

    As we express our gratitude, we must never forget that the highest appreciation is not to utter words, but to live by them. John F. Kennedy

    by JaxDem on Fri Jul 25, 2014 at 04:51:31 AM PDT

  •  Hank Aaron (19+ / 0-)

    A true team player !

    Thanks for the Help Hank !

    Hope everyone has a decent day

  •  "Both those statements are wrong, of course." (7+ / 0-)

    Well, just another day at the office for Chris Cizzilla.

  •  For our list of pundits I think we now must add (32+ / 0-)

    Kareem Abdul Jabbar.

    This piece about unionizing college athletes is nothing short of awesome.

    A new survey finds that 60% of incoming college football players support unions for college athletes. The horror! Were such unions allowed, our glorious cities would crumble to nothing more than shoddy tents stitched together from tattered remnants of Old Glory; our government officials would be loin-cloth-clad elders gathered in the rubble of an old McDonald’s passing a Talking Stick; our naked children would roam the urban wilderness like howling wolves, their minds as blank as their lost Internet connection. We would be without hope, dreams, or a future.
    He sounds like a Kossack.
  •  Great APR - I'm now officially running late (14+ / 0-)

    Ornstein had me until this - in what world is electing another Bush a recalibration?

    Of course, there are still courageous mainstream figures like Jeb Bush who are willing to deviate from the new orthodoxy, and it is possible that he can run and get the Republican presidential nomination, win the White House, and begin the process of recalibration.
  •  Unusual day--had to read several whole articles (4+ / 0-)

    instead of getting away with the only the Roundup boildown.

    Are all the regular blatherers on vacation today?

    (Thanks, as always, for the APR, Greg.)

  •  Medicaid expansion states shd prepare for refugees (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    TofG

    to arrive from the other states.

    The 2020 census might reverse prior trends in population and numbers of Congressional districts.

  •  Ornstein's article is a must read, indeed (7+ / 0-)

    With the current state of the Republican party, as Ornstein so eloquently describes it, it is astonishing that the Dems can't do a better job of "taking our country back" from the crazy, anti-government and blatantly anti-American Tea Party "patriots". This is where Obama's style, as much as I respect it, hasn't worked. Professorial management doesn't quash the "crazy".
    Hillary's style won't quash it either. And even if Hillary is the next president, someone else needs to step up, a Howard Dean type, maybe it will be Elizabeth Warren, to help change the narrative. Some of the frustrated middle class whites who have submitted to the stupidity of the Tea Party could be recovered via a populous message such as Warren's.

    "Inequality is the root of social evil." ― Pope Francis

    by GoodGod on Fri Jul 25, 2014 at 05:36:39 AM PDT

    •  The fix is in; they appeal to white resentment; (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      GoodGod, pelagicray, Wee Mama

      they lie & their voters believe it's "the negros'" fault.

      I voted Tuesday, May 6, 2014 because it is my right, my responsibility and because my parents moved from Alabama to Ohio to vote. Unfortunately, the republicons want to turn Ohio into Alabama.

      by a2nite on Fri Jul 25, 2014 at 06:23:22 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Yes, this is the Corporate Masters' Strategy (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        pelagicray

        And unbelievably successful. I would never have predicted that this pathetic strategy could be so effective. But, apparently, Frank Luntz's panels did predict it. And they have acted. And they have proved just how gullible voters can be.

        "Inequality is the root of social evil." ― Pope Francis

        by GoodGod on Fri Jul 25, 2014 at 06:59:58 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  There are a lot of white people with (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Wee Mama, I love OCD, rwgate

          resentments towards us.

          I listen to it a lot. I'm glad they are at least polite enough to not say the n-word in front of me. They do use Obama and Obamacare as a slur.

          It's effective because it has worked since the first Africans were brought here. Evil rich people blame the negro; they get obedient white people to nod and agree to whatever abuse.

          Don't give a shite about persuading any of them any more. We have to get our side out to vote.

          I voted Tuesday, May 6, 2014 because it is my right, my responsibility and because my parents moved from Alabama to Ohio to vote. Unfortunately, the republicons want to turn Ohio into Alabama.

          by a2nite on Fri Jul 25, 2014 at 07:15:13 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  And it worked for decades and decades in the Ole (4+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          arlene, Wee Mama, TerryDarc, GoodGod

          South to keep the Dixiecrat wing of the Democratic party stubbornly in support of Jim Crow. Economically the situation of poor white voters may have been only marginally better than blacks, a sharecropper is a sharecropper, but if you can convince them that they matter because of their white skins (when cleaned up) and those blacks will "take" from them . . .

          I'm old enough to remember exactly that in campaigns from local to state office. It never truly died and now seems back with a vengeance. It is a sad and dire day for this nation to have to admit it is often working on a wider basis than since the Civil Rights Act.

          The only foes that threaten America are the enemies at home, and those are ignorance, superstition, and incompetence. [Elbert Hubbard]

          by pelagicray on Fri Jul 25, 2014 at 07:20:52 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

    •  If my Facebook feed means anything, Elizabeth (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      CJB2012, TerryDarc, GoodGod

      Warren and Bernie Sanders are already kicking ass and having a major impact.  Without the 'Third Way DLC' infighting.  I follow a bunch of Progressive sites and share their posts.  Based on comment threads there are huge numbers of Democrats who HAVE the populist message, are working on the ground to get it out, don't give a shit about 2016 until 2014 breaks Republican hearts across the land.  

      It's actually keeping me sane these days when too much of this site seems dedicated to Hillary Wars and being devastated by both sides doing it, whatever it is.  

      Wendy Davis, Letitia Van de Putte, Alison Lundergan Grimes, Sandra Fluke- and many others- are pressing hard on income inequality, paycheck fairness, and mostly the good that government can do when Dems are in charge.  That's a message worth voting for.

      I'm not looking for a love that will lift me up and carry me away. A love that will stroll alongside and make a few amusing comments will suffice.

      by I love OCD on Fri Jul 25, 2014 at 07:51:06 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  You have to convert people and change minds (0+ / 0-)

        I have seen no evidence Sanders and Warren appeal to anyone who wouldn't normally find them appealing.

        I am a Liberal. I am not a Progressive. If you are a Progressive you are part of the problem, not part of the solution.

        by LemmyCaution on Fri Jul 25, 2014 at 04:02:07 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Why does that matter? Getting Democrats off (0+ / 0-)

          their butts is what matters.  Texas has tens of thousands of activists working every day to GOTV.  When we vote we win.  When we win the country wins.

          I'm not looking for a love that will lift me up and carry me away. A love that will stroll alongside and make a few amusing comments will suffice.

          by I love OCD on Fri Jul 25, 2014 at 10:08:38 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  So Sanders and Warren (0+ / 0-)

            are getting non voting democrats off their butts? Show me the votes.

            I am a Liberal. I am not a Progressive. If you are a Progressive you are part of the problem, not part of the solution.

            by LemmyCaution on Sat Jul 26, 2014 at 04:24:04 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  Let's see how well Wendy Davis does in (0+ / 0-)

              November.  She may not win but I'm betting Republicans will sweat bullets when they see how well she does.  

              I'm not looking for a love that will lift me up and carry me away. A love that will stroll alongside and make a few amusing comments will suffice.

              by I love OCD on Sun Jul 27, 2014 at 11:12:24 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

  •  This part of the Sanger-Katz article is why I (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Livvy5, aznavy, a2nite

    thought the ruling would not destroy the ACA but ratheer confine its benefits to the states with state plans:

    The law was devised to pump federal dollars into poorer states, where lots of residents were uninsured. Many tended to be Republican-leaning. But the court rulings, if upheld, could leave only the richer, Democratic states with the federal dollars and broad insurance coverage. States that opted out of optional portions of the law could see little improvement in coverage and even economic damage.
    Now 14 states plus Washington, D.C., after November probably add PA and maine, and perhaps VA, Fla., Wisc., etc. That should make a clear population majority, and leave most deep red states regrettably in a self-imposed medical ghetto---with many needless deaths resulting.
    •  Just a thought (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      TofG, figbash

      What if the Red, poor states were treated to the same ethic  currently being proposed by the Republican Party for poor people, i.e., let them starve.  As I understand it the proposal is that when they get hungry enough or fed up enough with their lot in life -- they will do something about it.

      So, if the people in Red states continually elect Republicans to represent them, they get what they deserve.  When they get fed up they will change it.

      Now, as a progressive person, I don't actually propose leaving these poor deceived persons to suffer what they have done to themselves without trying to help them out.  But, what if . . . .?

      "Get your facts first, then you can distort them as you please" Mark Twain

      by andersr on Fri Jul 25, 2014 at 05:52:31 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Two words: Gerry Mander. (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        pelagicray

        No, I take that back; moar words ...

        Problem is there are plenty of people in the red districts who have gotten clobbered by the majority that rules.  Until we can do something about the crazy way congressional districts have been drawn, this will just get worse.  I hold out hope for the 2020 census, but as long as the nuts shake the tree, lots of people will continue to get screwed thru no fault of their own.

        Paging Lani Guinier, we need you!

        Inspiration is hard to come by. You have to take it where you find it. --- Bob Dylan.

        by figbash on Fri Jul 25, 2014 at 06:30:05 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Qualify that statement please! (0+ / 0-)
          I hold out hope for the 2020 census
          I held hope for the 2010 census. Then a whole lot of "progressives" and others I thought would tilt the balance failed to show up on election day to make sure their state representatives were not the bat shit insane gerrymanderers. Hell, don't vote for "disappointing Obama" if that is your snit. Failure to make sure the state termites aren't screwing you for a decade is just plain stupidity and laziness.

          Do it again, let the top office govern your vote, in 2019/20 and then "hold out hope for the 2030"! Hell, by then sea level rise may be doing a bit of coastal gerrymandering itself!

          The only foes that threaten America are the enemies at home, and those are ignorance, superstition, and incompetence. [Elbert Hubbard]

          by pelagicray on Fri Jul 25, 2014 at 07:27:18 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Huh? (0+ / 0-)

            What snit?  Looks more like a nit to me and you're picking it.

            I did qualify my comment about hope for 2020.  I do have hope - most particularly that people are capable of wising up and that they will.

            Inspiration is hard to come by. You have to take it where you find it. --- Bob Dylan.

            by figbash on Fri Jul 25, 2014 at 07:52:30 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  HUH? Big time right back. (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              rwgate

              There was a definite fall off, and this site was full of the "snit" with Obama and threats to "stay home," during the critical election that populated state legislatures with those responsible for redistricting. In my state, Virginia with a 2009 election, it was very definite as I've documented such an idiotic departure of voters for an election that, even if the top candidate had been downright unacceptable, should have been seen as no miss critical.

              It just goes to show how shallow and unthinking even some of our people here on a "political site" can be when it comes to elections and voting. Some saw it as a vote of confidence in their "disappointing" Obama or some politician running for governor. The real issue was longer term and structural: make sure the legislatures setting that 2010 census in stone for a decade were not populated by political enemies.

              We (and I voted) failed. We all must contend with twisted and contorted political results, most dramatically seen nationally in the U.S. House, down to how our vote counts or does not count in populating those state legislatures—and those state election districts got gerrymandered to hell as well. Every progressive, liberal, young, person of color, gay, respecting science or just Democrat that failed to at least vote those state legislative office races and is whining about gerrymandering should get an ass kicking machine and use it frequently.

              If you think that is a "nit" then there is just nothing more to say.

              The only foes that threaten America are the enemies at home, and those are ignorance, superstition, and incompetence. [Elbert Hubbard]

              by pelagicray on Fri Jul 25, 2014 at 08:38:36 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

    •  I don't see how it can survive if this stands (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Amber6541

      The problem is that all the mandates and standards and requirements would remain without the subsidies needed to actually get the mandated coverage. Technically it would work as you say if left in place, but it would be politically disastrous. Suddenly Obamacare would just be punishing people and companies, not providing anything.
      While we know who the culprits really are, it would be a field day for the right proclaiming this is what they've been saying about Obamacare all along.
      I don't think the Democrats in Congress would dare let the situation stand and I know the Republicans would accept nothing less than dismantling the whole thing.

      All that said, I don't see this ruling being upheld by the Court. Even by this Court.

      The Empire never ended.

      by thejeff on Fri Jul 25, 2014 at 05:57:08 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Sentiments shifting here (10+ / 0-)

    in the red part of Connecticut.  Headline in the Waterbury Republican-American which is owned by a Bircher is "Israel Pounds U.N. School" with a tragic picture of an injured, crying Palestinian child.  I stay out of the I/P discussions because I am not as enlightened as many here.  I can, like most sane people, have a visceral reaction to mass casualties of innocents.

    " My faith in the Constitution is whole; it is complete; it is total." Barbara Jordan, 1974

    by gchaucer2 on Fri Jul 25, 2014 at 05:39:41 AM PDT

  •  I am almost 45 years old (29+ / 0-)
    “It has really abandoned the high ground on which it was founded. It has morphed into a race grievance industry, and it’s been hijacked by the gay movement, it’s been hijacked by the Democratic Party. And so it has lost its authenticity.”

    He continued: “The civil rights movement, again, has sold its soul to the highest bidder.”

    I do not remember a time in my life when Movement Conservatives have not attacked the civil rights movement, and those who walk and have walked walls for it, as a "race grievance society" that was not legitimate. The National Review was smearing Martin Luther King from day one.

    I also do not remember a time in my life when they haven't been given some form of a pass that enables them to be as vile as they want to be, without having to be labeled as such every time they do what they do.

    The only thing the modern Right understands is the political bloody nose. That's it. They will take and take and take, until you stop them with pain.

    I wish there was some other way, but there isn't.

    They get pain. That's it.

    Ted Cruz types who march in honor of Martin Luther King, because that is what you do to avoid being called out later on, and who then try to gut everything he fought to achieve are hustlers and scammers. Thriving in an age of mass media one-sided civility meta and forced assumings of good faith to prove that you are better than the Roves making it a bigger sin to call them what they are than for them to be what they are.

    All you have to do to be called a "race hustler" is believe that equality cannot wait for the transformative personal evolution of the most bigoted person in the nation before major and lasting progress can occur.

    All you have to do to pay even a modest price for that sort of politics is to go so over-the-top in your rhetoric that you set a new low. As long as you are not going from zero to Ted Nugent in six seconds flat, you have a lot of room to lower the bar.

    It bothers me when columnists focus on how smart or accomplished somebody is, as if that should somehow mean that they should not be forces of reactionary regression. Intelligence doesn't equal decency. Being elitely educated doesn't directly lead to being open-minded or compassionate.

    Ben Carson, who is a brilliant surgeon, is one of the most ruthless and cold-blooded reactionaries in America.

    Nothing should be a surprise anymore. Not bad faith. Not heartlessness. Not hypocrisy. There is no bottom. There is only a new floor to dig a new hole.

    I think you have a responsibility, as a non-Conservative, to recognize that Movement Conservatism is dangerous and has to be stopped. That you cannot afford to, ever, assume good faith or noble motives until you have verified that this is the case. But I put on Chris Hayes, or pick up a paper, and I still see shock and surprise at how awful the Right is. At how low they can go. At how bad the bad faith is. I don't think you can fully fight something dangerous as effectively as you can until you completely let go of living, even a little bit, in the world (or with the GOP or the Right) that you wish existed rather than the savage and vile one that does.

    First, let’s set the stage: Some of the poorest states in the country consistently vote for Republican presidential candidates, have Republican governors and Republican control of the statehouses. Many of these are the same states that refused to expand Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act, which would have extended health care to more low-income Americans. What could possibly go wrong?
    Everything.

    Which is why non-Conservatives should be ruthless and unrelenting in making an argument against Movement Conservatism, and in favor of replacing it with policies that have a proven track record and work. Paul Ryan is a math guy who can't do math. An idea guy who has no ideas of his own. He's a fraud. People will not get that he is a fraud until he is labeled a fraud.  

    At the bare minimum?

    Don't go so easy on them in terms of assuming good faith. At this point, they have not earned that stance.

    I see so much 'this could have been written in the DC of 1986' that it just eats at me.

    There should be sharper edges to the rhetoric that meet these retched people. First because people who do not easily feel shame cannot be shamed by pointing out how awful they are being. But second? Show that you get the battle that is, rather than the one you wish you were engaged in. Please.  

    We have to look beyond the catchphrase dance — poverty prophet, grievance industry, undeserving poor — and be reminded of the data. Ryan and Woodson may well come forth with a plan with good intentions, but a wider road to the soup kitchen may just as well be paved with those intentions.
    There is no "catchphrase dance". They don't give a damn about "data". You can have all the facts and figures, but in the end you still "hate" America. There is no "good intentions" paving the road to the soup kitchens. Making the poor even poorer and the least powerful even less powerful IS the plan.

    This is a deadly serious and long-term campaign to make anything but Movement Conservative rule seen as a hijacking of America.

    This is a deliberate and premeditated campaign to label non-Conservatives as Other. If you are not conservative, there is no legitimacy to your time in office. To your policies. Ideas. Actions. It is okay to imply that you have had people assassinated, are setting up secret labor camps in the desert, want to burn the Constitution.

    Assuming good intentions, or good faith, or a debate in the face of that is scary to me. Even if it is just a rhetorical device to hang your point on. It still re-enforces the notion that this is an ordinary debate or discussion that is anything but.

    I sometimes despair at the disconnect between how the Right dominates our politics and our discourse, and the lack of an ideological and partisan fight to stop them in so many areas of our politics is enabling, or, at the very least, helpful to them. We should be long past the point of being shocked and profoundly disappointed by the Right being the Right. It's 2014. 1994 was a long time ago.

    Talk to me like you get what is going on.
       

    “We cannot and should not generalize about poor people. There are the deserving poor and the undeserving poor. It used to be that way, and it became politically incorrect."
    This is not somebody you are in a debate with.

    This is somebody who is trying to destroy the possibility of functioning government by those who are not him or like him.

    "Real journalism is printing what someone else does not want printed. Everything else is public relations." -George Orwell

    by LeftHandedMan on Fri Jul 25, 2014 at 05:46:43 AM PDT

    •  Looks like an excellent diary, rec'ed for top (6+ / 0-)

      comments.

      I voted Tuesday, May 6, 2014 because it is my right, my responsibility and because my parents moved from Alabama to Ohio to vote. Unfortunately, the republicons want to turn Ohio into Alabama.

      by a2nite on Fri Jul 25, 2014 at 06:11:28 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Got lots of years on you and tend to agree, maybe (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      LeftHandedMan

      a bit too kind to the kind of crap the right—and "Conservative" is like calling Lenin or Trotsky or Mao "leftist"—now is peddling. They have corrupted all meaning of "conservative."

      Much of the stuff is subversive and, if acted upon pure treason. Personally, actual action on that Texas plank

      That all federal "enforcement activities" in Texas "must be conducted under the auspices of the county sheriff with jurisdiction in that county.
      if implemented should be met by swift capture, treason trial, conviction and firing squad.

      The only foes that threaten America are the enemies at home, and those are ignorance, superstition, and incompetence. [Elbert Hubbard]

      by pelagicray on Fri Jul 25, 2014 at 07:35:49 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  The 1911 B.T. Washington quote... (6+ / 0-)

    ...cited by Blow in his article:

    “There is another class of coloured people who make a business of keeping the troubles, the wrongs, and the hardships of the Negro race before the public. Having learned that they are able to make a living out of their troubles, they have grown into the settled habit of advertising their wrongs — partly because they want sympathy and partly because it pays. Some of these people do not want the Negro to lose his grievances, because they do not want to lose their jobs.”
    Caused me to reflect that the "troubles" that Washington would have Black folk ignore or minimize included lynchings, Jim Crow,voter disenfranchisement, share-cropping, etc. And it conveniently ignores that he was paid very handsomely for his "job" as Apologist-in-Chief. Bob Woodson similarly never has to worry where his next 1st class airline ticket is coming from.

    Change does not roll in on the wheels of inevitability, but comes through continuous struggle. --Martin Luther King Jr.

    by Egalitare on Fri Jul 25, 2014 at 06:12:53 AM PDT

  •  Woodson sounds like another genteel white (0+ / 0-)

    supremacist.

    His dog whistle is much more elegant. He can go to the devil with all of the racist movement extremely radical RW "conservatives".

    "Cons" have never liked nor respected the civil rights movement. We have plenty to continue to be aggrieved about when the police & other white citizens can lynch our men with bare hands or a gun.

    I voted Tuesday, May 6, 2014 because it is my right, my responsibility and because my parents moved from Alabama to Ohio to vote. Unfortunately, the republicons want to turn Ohio into Alabama.

    by a2nite on Fri Jul 25, 2014 at 06:21:09 AM PDT

    •  Oops, he's a sellout black man who's talking (0+ / 0-)

      about himself:

      "has sold its(his) soul to the highest bidder"

      Give the negro credit, he sounds like another evil white supremacist.

      I voted Tuesday, May 6, 2014 because it is my right, my responsibility and because my parents moved from Alabama to Ohio to vote. Unfortunately, the republicons want to turn Ohio into Alabama.

      by a2nite on Fri Jul 25, 2014 at 06:49:05 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  i've said Halbig was a transfer from red to blue (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    aznavy

    which would be nice.

    about time the red states chipped in to the pot.

  •  The Republican Party doesn't have a soul (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    rwgate

    Without at all disagreeing with the Ornstein article's point about the radicalism in the party, he is simply and completely wrong about the radicalism representing any sort of new force taking over a once-sane party.

    Look, the single most radical element in the conservative movement at the moment is their five-man Court majority.  It's also the most respectable, establishment, Old Guard, element in their party and movement -- not even a trace of Tea Party influence in any of the five.  Yet they are the most rigidly, dogmatically and effectively reactionary element of the movement.

    They have always been the party of economic liquidationism, the party of Andrew Mellon's response to the Great Depression, the party that served the interest of the Malefactors of Great Wealth.  That stance destroyed them -- and rightly so -- as a national party.  But instead of being buried, like the Federalists and the Whigs before them, as a dead party should have been to make way for a new opposition to the Ds, the Rs lived on as an undead zombie party, through an era of a fake bipartisanship in which they were mostly RINOs who agreed to not challenge the New Deal in order to survive in a political atmosphere in which the New Deal was the new consensus.  To bring the party back to life again, to make it once again competitive in national elections, they then proceeded over the decades to take on all the other political tendencies that had been tossed out of the national consensus.  They took over the nativist franchise, and the segregationist franchise, and then the fundamentalist franchise.  They embraced every stupid and vicious impulse of the American id that had been rejected and marginalized as our politics become more conscious and conscientious.  

    They had to use dog whistles to keep it all together, partly because these stupid and vicious impulses are often at cross purposes, and the right hand often can't be allowed to know what the other right hand is doing.  But mostly, the American superego had enough hold over enough of that great mass of voters who aren't paying close enough attention, that just baldly coming out for stupid, vicious public policy would scare away too many voters.

    What we're seeing now isn't any sort of struggle for the control or direction of their party, it's just the final abandonment of the pretense that they have ever been anything but nativist, racist, know-nothing liquidationists.  They won't hide behind dog whistles anymore.  They're out, loud and proud, as the mindless cheerleaders for everything vicious and stupid that could possibly be proposed as public policy.  The few Rs and other movement figures who want them to go back to using dog whistles aren't at all a saner or more moderate force, they're just less honest.  

    The states must be abolished.

    by gtomkins on Fri Jul 25, 2014 at 11:16:30 AM PDT

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