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Harold Meyerson at The Washington Post declares Market Basket isn’t just a company, it’s a community:

Who is a company? If we speak of the men and women of Boeing, say, or Wal-Mart or Market Basket, a supermarket chain in New England, where this question is being posed most emphatically of late, are we referring to the company’s employees? Its founders? Its founders’ grandchildren, even if they play no role in the company’s endeavors? Its shareholders, even if they hold the company’s stock just for a few months or, in the case of high-frequency trading, a fraction of a second?[...]

So who is Market Basket? The chain appears to have been that rarest of companies in contemporary American capitalism: a community of sorts, in which management has respected and rewarded its workers and consumers no less than its owners. If the Arthur S. wing sells its stake to the Arthur T. side of the family, this community might be preserved. But is there any way to turn the vast majority of U.S. companies into this kind of community, too? The one major nation in which employer-employee community is standardized is Germany, where seats on corporate boards are split between worker and management representatives and where managers are required to work out issues with their employees.

Jessica Valenti at The Guardian writes Feminism makes women 'victims'? I think you've mistaken us for the sexists:
An old canard about feminists is that, in addition to being hirsute bra-burners, we want to turn all women into “victims” – and thanks to “Women Against Feminism”, this particular accusation has gained some moderately mainstream traction in recent weeks.

But feminism doesn’t make women victims. Sexism does.

That inconvenient truth hasn’t stopped conservatives and anti-feminists from using this supposed victimization to bash a movement that won women the rights to vote, have credit cards, not be legally raped by their husbands, use birth control and generally be considered people instead of property, among other things.

Admittedly, to those unfamiliar with stereotypes of the women’s movement, the #WomenAgainstFeminism meme may look more like a parody than anything of serious concern. Many of its participants show a baffling level of ignorance about what feminism actually is – signs reading “I don’t need feminism because my boyfriend treats me right” or “I like men looking at me” are cringe-inducing, for instance. And I’m skeptical of how many new “women’s” Twitter accounts suddenly popped up in the days surrounding the meme’s creation.

But all the cringing and skepticism in the world hasn’t stopped the idea of “Women Against Feminism” from being taken seriously by at least some in the media.

You will find more pundit excerpts below the fold.

Nicholas Kristof at The New York Times writes Our Blind Spot About Guns:

If we had the same auto fatality rate today that we had in 1921, by my calculations we would have 715,000 Americans dying annually in vehicle accidents.

Instead, we’ve reduced the fatality rate by more than 95 percent — not by confiscating cars, but by regulating them and their drivers sensibly.

We could have said, “Cars don’t kill people. People kill people,” and there would have been an element of truth to that. Many accidents are a result of alcohol consumption, speeding, road rage or driver distraction. Or we could have said, “It’s pointless because even if you regulate cars, then people will just run each other down with bicycles,” and that, too, would have been partly true.

Yet, instead, we built a system that protects us from ourselves. This saves hundreds of thousands of lives a year and is a model of what we should do with guns in America.

David Wasserman at The Washington Post writes The most frightening candidate I’ve met in seven years interviewing congressional hopefuls:
As a House analyst for the nonpartisan Cook Political Report, I’ve personally interviewed over 300 congressional candidates over the course of seven years, both to get to know them and evaluate their chances of winning. I’ve been impressed by just as many Republicans as Democrats, and underwhelmed by equal numbers, too. Most are accustomed to tough questions.

But never have I met any candidate quite as frightening or fact-averse as Louisiana state Rep. Lenar Whitney, 55, who visited my office last Wednesday. It’s tough to decide which party’s worst nightmare she would be.

Doyle McManus at the Los Angeles Times writes Is global chaos the new normal?:
It's a chaotic world out there. But we'd better get used to it; this may be the new normal. [...]

Big governments and conventional armies could once command obedience around the world; in the 19th century, five British warships compelled the sultan of Zanzibar to surrender after only 38 minutes of artillery fire. The great powers don't enjoy that kind of military superiority anymore. The United States spent more than a decade in Iraq and Afghanistan but couldn't fully pacify either country.

The reason isn't that the great powers are no longer powerful; the difference is that their opponents—balky local governments, insurrectionists and jihadists alike — are more potent than they used to be. They're better equipped, better funded and more skilled at guerrilla warfare.

At the same time, outside powers like the United States have lost their appetite for fighting long counterinsurgency wars. It's become harder and more costly to keep a lid on the developing world's disorders, so we're more reluctant to try.

The Editorial Board at The Miami Herald says Right issue, wrong response on children at the border:
The current situation on the border is unacceptable. It encourages children to make a hazardous trek from Central America to the U.S. border, crossing Mexico with no guarantee of being able to stay in this country. It taxes the resources of the Border Patrol and the entire immigration system. It distracts border agents from the job of stopping real criminals and dope smugglers.

But replacing the orderly system of determining which children might actually have a legal right to remain in this country under current law with a hastily erected process of quickie justice, or allowing border agents to make on-the-spot decisions, is not the answer.

Nor is it right to change the law to eliminate rights bestowed in the bill passed by Congress in 2008—and signed by President Bush—in an effort to deter child sex trafficking and other crimes that victimize young people.

The Republican proposal would also deploy National Guard troops to the border to assist in the care of unaccompanied children coming across. That’s no solution, either.

Dave Zirin at The Nation writes At Least My Hospital Isn’t Being Bombed:
I’m in the hospital as I write this, getting ready to be cut open for some kind of intestinal surgery. I feel stressed, a little scared, yet given the news in the world, oddly grateful. I’m grateful that this clean facility, and its overworked but exceptionally kind staff, is not in the process of being bombed by the Israeli Defense Forces.

It is a sick sign of our times that human beings throughout the world cannot take for granted the concept that your hospital will not have a bullseye on its roof, but this is exactly where President Benjamin Netanyahu has dragged us. He is not the first, and he will not be the last, to take this tactic as a legitimate means of war. But defending these actions by saying, “George W. Bush has done it!” or “Assad does it, too!” is only an argument the morally bankrupt could possibly make.

Patrick Cockburn at The Independent writes Israel's propaganda machine is finally starting to misfire:
To many readers the New York Times coverage of the war in Gaza comes across as neutered or as having a pro-Israeli bias. But not to Ron Dermer, the Israeli ambassador in Washington, who lambasts the paper for failing “to mention that a million Israelis were in bomb shelters yesterday as 100 rockets were fired at our civilian population.”

Mr Dermer is considered so close to Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu that he has been called “Bibi’s brain”. He is also a former student and employee of Frank Luntz, the Republican strategist who produced a confidential booklet in 2009, promptly leaked, advising Israeli spokesmen how best to manipulate American and European public opinion. “Don’t confuse messages with facts,” Dr Luntz advises the spokesmen as he explains how facts should be selected and best presented to make Israel’s case.

It is a sophisticated document based on wide-ranging opinion polls, suggesting, for instance, that the removal of Israeli settlements from the West Bank should be denounced as “a kind of ethnic cleansing”. Dr Luntz stresses that spokesmen must demonise Hamas, but above all emphasise that they feel for the sufferings of Palestinians as well as Israelis.

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Comment Preferences

  •  Outrage of the day (22+ / 0-)

    Thanks, Dave Zirin. Yes, the worst fact-averse candidate David Wasserman ever interviewed would win most days, but:

    It is a sick sign of our times that human beings throughout the world cannot take for granted the concept that your hospital will not have a bullseye on its roof, but this is exactly where President Benjamin Netanyahu has dragged us. He is not the first, and he will not be the last, to take this tactic as a legitimate means of war. But defending these actions by saying, “George W. Bush has done it!” or “Assad does it, too!” is only an argument the morally bankrupt could possibly make.
    Perfect. It's not Israel, it's the current Israeli government. QED.

    All it takes is security in your own civil rights to make you complacent.

    by Dave in Northridge on Thu Jul 31, 2014 at 04:51:11 AM PDT

  •  How about this: Climate Deniers Kill People (9+ / 0-)

    Killer Summer Heat: Death Toll in US Cities from Rising Temperatures Due to Climate Change

    Climate change is literally killing us. According to NRDC's "Killer Summer Heat" report, more than 150,000 Americans could die by the end of this century due to the excessive heat caused by climate change. And that estimate only covers America's top 40 cities.
    Nifty interactive map at the link

    Not only that, but over 5 million illnesses annually are linked to climate change:

    Global Warming Leads to 150,000 Deaths Each Year

    Global warming is not only a threat to our future health, it already contributes to more than 150,000 deaths and 5 million illnesses annually, according to a team of health and climate scientists at the World Health Organization and the University of Wisconsin at Madison—and those numbers could double by 2030.

    Research data published in the journal Nature show that global warming may affect human health in a surprising number of ways: speeding the spread of infectious diseases such as malaria and dengue fever; creating conditions that lead to potentially fatal malnutrition and diarrhea; and increasing the likelihood of heat waves and floods.

    As we express our gratitude, we must never forget that the highest appreciation is not to utter words, but to live by them. John F. Kennedy

    by JaxDem on Thu Jul 31, 2014 at 04:53:32 AM PDT

    •  It's only going to get worse nt (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      JaxDem, Egalitare, cowdab, Albanius

      I want 1 less Tiny Coffin, Why Don't You? Support The President's Gun Violence Plan.

      by JML9999 on Thu Jul 31, 2014 at 05:10:15 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  The Fossil Fuel Company Execs (5+ / 0-)

      better really be enjoying their profits right now (the ones they leave for themselves after buying congress). The time will come when they are held to account for the damage, death and destruction that they are unleashing. The environmental lawyers are waiting in the wings.

      "Inequality is the root of social evil." ― Pope Francis

      by GoodGod on Thu Jul 31, 2014 at 05:30:44 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  GoodGod, you're more of an optimist than me. (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        slampros, tb mare, cowdab

        I don't think they'll ever have to answer for anything.

        Lead with Love. Forgive as a reflex.

        by Gentle Giant on Thu Jul 31, 2014 at 06:58:04 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  If the Tobacco Industry is the Template (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Gentle Giant

          then no, they won't be held individually responsible. But the health effects of smoking tobacco was partly the responsibility of the smoker. Climate change's primary victims have less direct responsibility for their fate. And people will be more upset and via social media will express it. If I was a fossil fuel co. exec, I'd move my assets to renewables and change my public tune, and fast.

          "Inequality is the root of social evil." ― Pope Francis

          by GoodGod on Thu Jul 31, 2014 at 10:49:29 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

    •  Here is an action step you can take (6+ / 0-)

      Call Out the Climate Change Deniers

      Ninety-seven percent of climate scientists agree -- climate change is real, it's caused largely by human activities, and it poses significant risks for our health. Some members of Congress disagree with this simple, scientifically proven fact. We need to work to curb climate change, and a big step is to raise our voices to change the conversation in Washington. Call these deniers out. Hold them accountable. Ask them if they will admit climate change is a problem.
      Find your state representative(s) and call them out!

      As we express our gratitude, we must never forget that the highest appreciation is not to utter words, but to live by them. John F. Kennedy

      by JaxDem on Thu Jul 31, 2014 at 05:43:53 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Memo to GOP.....Closing your eyes....Clicking your (12+ / 0-)

    heels together three times.....and saying 'There's no place like home'.....Will not make the Teahadistas go away.

    Just sayin.

  •  I wonder if the Right is gaming the memory hole (8+ / 0-)

    Feminism is still getting flogged over the Victim Chic era of 20-some years ago. The Left still gets flogged over PC posturing of 20-some years ago. But the GOP faliures are so conveniently forgotten in less than two years between W and the Tea Bag wave of '10 and afterwards.

    "If this Studebaker had anymore Atomic Space-Age Style, you'd have to be an astronaut with a geiger counter!"

    by Stude Dude on Thu Jul 31, 2014 at 05:33:51 AM PDT

  •  Am I the only late Boomer (6+ / 0-)

    That likes Studebakers? Sometimes I feel like I'm the only one.

    Then again, if the older Boom liked them, being the last generation who could buy them new and supposedly the trend-setter of generations, they'd probably still be making them.

    How could they resist the frumpy cute charms of the Lark? ;3

    "If this Studebaker had anymore Atomic Space-Age Style, you'd have to be an astronaut with a geiger counter!"

    by Stude Dude on Thu Jul 31, 2014 at 05:42:12 AM PDT

  •  Oh, K-reist. Doctor Luntz. (5+ / 0-)

    Doing the world a favor.
    Duct tape.

    "He went to Harvard, not Hogwarts." ~Wanda Sykes
    Teh Twitterz, I'z awn dem.
    Blessinz of teh Ceiling Cat be apwn yu, srsly.

    by OleHippieChick on Thu Jul 31, 2014 at 05:45:00 AM PDT

  •  Here's a thing. (3+ / 0-)

    No El Nino means extreme weather for Floorduh. Mean Season is here. No El Nino means those bowling-ball-like tropicals shooting straight at us from Africa won't steer up the east coast, they'll smack right into my house, goddammit.

    "He went to Harvard, not Hogwarts." ~Wanda Sykes
    Teh Twitterz, I'z awn dem.
    Blessinz of teh Ceiling Cat be apwn yu, srsly.

    by OleHippieChick on Thu Jul 31, 2014 at 05:52:46 AM PDT

  •  Kristof writes a whole article comparing (6+ / 0-)

    car safety innovations and regulations to guns, yet fails to come up with hardly any examples of how we can reduce gun deaths.

    Some of these should be doable. A Quinnipiac poll this month found 92 percent support for background checks for all gun buyers.

    These steps won’t eliminate gun deaths any more than seatbelts eliminate auto deaths. But if a combination of measures could reduce the toll by one-third, that would be 10,000 lives saved every year.

    For the record.. I think we need stringent background checks - most especially getting rid of gun show loopholes, but I highly doubt they would affect gun deaths by more than a miniscule amount.

    "Trigger locks and smart guns" are his only other suggestions.

    I think he missed the one action that we could take to make the biggest impact on preventable gun deaths.

    Training.  We don't let a person behind the wheel of a car without extensive training.  We give our high school students a full semester of driver's ed.  

    We test drivers before they get a license and periodically thereafter.

    To me, it's a no-brainer.  Have all the guns you want.. just prove that you are competent with them before you can be licensed.

    My other pet peeve regarding gun safety is the lack of public service messages focusing on gun safety.  A campaign on gun safety, storage and handling could prevent many accidental gun deaths every year.

    •  How many gun deaths come from lack of training? (5+ / 0-)

      As opposed to murders and suicides primarily. But even most of the accidents don't really seem to me to be from lack of competence. More of a "familiarity breeds contempt" kind of deal. "I know what I'm doing, I've done this a thousand times. Boom."
      I'm sure the vast majority of people who've had accidental discharges could recite all the standard gun safety lines, including the ones they violate regularly.

      Driving a car is a skill. You need to learn how to do it and maintain that skill. (BTW, I don't think we retest drivers regularly. I've never been retested.) Shooting accurately is a skill. Not shooting someone isn't. Not having your gun go off accidently isn't.

      A public service gun safety campaign could help. Probably mostly by encouraging people to keep guns locked up where kids can't get at them.

      The Empire never ended.

      by thejeff on Thu Jul 31, 2014 at 06:07:52 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Familiarity breeds contempt (0+ / 0-)

        I previously worked in a probation department in the Texas Panhandle.  One of our "clients" was drunk, at home, playing with his 45 revolver, spinning it around his finger up in the air while slumped over on the couch, and it went off.  

        The bullet ripped through the outer muscles of his upper arm and nearly hit his humerus.  I saw it when it was completely healed, and it left a fist sized indentation in his upper arm.

        And while driving and shooting are both skills, defensive driving and gun safety awareness are both learned habits.  Every driver should have to take DD at least once a decade, if not more often, and gun owners should have to take gun safety classes on a regular basis as well.  

        Just like doctors, lawyers, accountants, and other professionals take continuing education courses to stay current in their professions, drivers and shooters should also continue to educate themselves.

        To the left, to the left....

        by CWinebrinner on Thu Jul 31, 2014 at 09:04:54 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  What is that class going to teach your client? (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          CWinebrinner

          There's no need to take continuing education courses to stay current in gun safety. It's not like there are constant changes and advances like there are for doctors, lawyers, accountants, and other professionals. It's mostly common sense and just remembering that they're dangerous, not toys.

          I'll bet even your client, if asked when not drunk, could have repeated all the standard gun safety lines. What are they going to teach that will actually build those learned habits? Unless you're doing it at least weekly, you're not building habits. What would you even be saying in a weekly gun safety class?

          The Empire never ended.

          by thejeff on Thu Jul 31, 2014 at 09:52:01 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  True, you can't fix stupid (0+ / 0-)

            But some of the more irritating gun owners now seem to me to be buying them the way irritating boys buy hopped up four wheel drives with 36 inch mud tires; as compensation for their shortcomings.  

            I'm more interested in educating the person who is buying for other reasons, and the person who has owned a gun forever, but maybe has never had to think about kids messing with it, for whatever reason (lived alone, getting married, having kids, etc).

            If insurance companies put a rider on homeowner's policies that gave a discount for attending a gun safety class, like they do for defensive driving classes in some states, I think people would take it, assuming the class was affordable.  If the class was combined with an hour or two of range time, I think even more would take it.

            To the left, to the left....

            by CWinebrinner on Thu Jul 31, 2014 at 11:43:28 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

  •  That is perhaps the best batch of punditry ever (4+ / 0-)

    -- especially McManus, Cockburn, Kristof and Zirin. Just bang on. Perhaps very bad times bring out the best in some. Having had heart surgery some years ago I thought back to that event as Israel bombed the hospital in Gaza -- I cannot think of a ghastlier thing to do.

    We have only just begun and none too soon.

    by global citizen on Thu Jul 31, 2014 at 06:01:13 AM PDT

  •  Kristof gets something right, good nt (0+ / 0-)

    I voted Tuesday, May 6, 2014 because it is my right, my responsibility and because my parents moved from Alabama to Ohio to vote. Unfortunately, the republicons want to turn Ohio into Alabama.

    by a2nite on Thu Jul 31, 2014 at 06:22:17 AM PDT

  •  Walker, Christie, Murdoch, (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    a2nite, Gentle Giant, CWinebrinner

    Cliven Bundy, that brat that did the ACORN video.... Is it me, or is it just frustrating that they're taking so long to go down? I'd though they're done in by now.

    As for Murdoch, Fox flirting with buying Warners is not a good sign.

    "If this Studebaker had anymore Atomic Space-Age Style, you'd have to be an astronaut with a geiger counter!"

    by Stude Dude on Thu Jul 31, 2014 at 06:28:58 AM PDT

    •  They have evil big money supporting them nt (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Stude Dude

      I voted Tuesday, May 6, 2014 because it is my right, my responsibility and because my parents moved from Alabama to Ohio to vote. Unfortunately, the republicons want to turn Ohio into Alabama.

      by a2nite on Thu Jul 31, 2014 at 06:56:14 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Market Basket tries classic Trump bluff (5+ / 0-)

    Speaking of Market Basket, today the Arthur S-appointed CEOs announced that if workers don't return by Monday, they're fired. And they've announced a 3-day job fair to hire scabs.  This being Massachusetts, I seriously doubt it will be well attended, or that anyone would dare show up as a scab.  Meanwhile, 68 of the 71 stores' managers announced their support for Arthur T and that they too would leave if he's not reinstated.

    Arthur T's bid to buy out his relatives is on the table, and the value of the company without him is in free fall, making it unattractive to the usual vultures (Dan Quayle, Mitt Romney, etc.).  Any other buyer would be getting an empty shell, and if the value is below what Arthur T has offered, he could probably sue the board for failure to carry out their fiduciary responsibilities.

    •  The only Market Basket I've ever been in was in (0+ / 0-)

      Victor, NY. It was a pit. Nice people, lousy building. They closed with no fanfare and the real estate is now under pavement.

      Lead with Love. Forgive as a reflex.

      by Gentle Giant on Thu Jul 31, 2014 at 07:06:37 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  I have a rabid teabagger facebook "friend" (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      red rabbit, tb mare, a2nite, CWinebrinner

      who is a big supporter of AT and the workers in the Market Basket situation.  I've been razzing her a little that THIS kind of action is what I've been about for decades!  But because this is local for her, and she knows people who work/ed there, this is different (insert my eye roll here!)

      I'm always amazed how some people just can not or will not put on someone else's loafers for a little while and walk around.  They have to wait until it happens to them to see what so many of us see all the time.

      "Do the best you can until you know better. Then when you know better, do better.: Maya Angelou

      by PsychoSavannah on Thu Jul 31, 2014 at 07:07:39 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  The idea of feminism making women "victims" (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    a2nite, CWinebrinner

    makes my blood boil. More than half the citizens of this country were able to cast off the yoke of second-classism and have myriad doors open to them and gain freedom of choice over their own bodies and that somehow made them victims???

    Can this be more Orwellian? This newspeak bullshiz needs nipping in the bud. All you have to do to rile up anti-feminists is call it the opposite of what it is. Since that's what they'd like to believe, they'll embrace it and run with it- reiterating talking points until the brain goes soft and naive or willfully ignorant others join in.
    That's one reason this Conservatism beast won't die. It's too mythologized to give up its ghost.

    Lead with Love. Forgive as a reflex.

    by Gentle Giant on Thu Jul 31, 2014 at 07:14:28 AM PDT

  •  Employee Owned Employer Communities (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    a2nite
    If the Arthur S. wing sells its stake to the Arthur T. side of the family, this community might be preserved. But is there any way to turn the vast majority of U.S. companies into this kind of community, too?

    Yes. Organize companies' employees into buying stock in the company. If not the majority share, then enough to form a voting block with another minority share to control the company. Then vote for the directors who will hire, discipline and fire executives who will run the company. Pay the employees with their share of the profits, plus at least minimum wage and whatever else the company decides. Keep the company shares in tax-preferred investment accounts, for sale upon retirement (or not, or whenever else).

    US capitalism can be adapted to communities. Indeed, if it doesn't do some adapting, it will face the kind of crisis it did starting in the 1930s when actual Communism, not merely community, was sought as the alternative - resulting in the small socialist concessions we know as Social Security, Medicare and the rest of the welfare state.

    "When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro." - HST

    by DocGonzo on Thu Jul 31, 2014 at 07:29:00 AM PDT

  •  Believe it or not, things are moving forward (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    belle1

    The fact that there's even an open debate over issues like equal pay, women's reproductive health and sexual and domestic violence today means that American women are miles ahead of where we were forty years ago, backlash or no. During the heyday of the Women's Liberation movement you could barely find a kind word for feminism outside of explicitly feminist oriented media.  

    Having said that, anyone of any gender who says they're against feminism is either ignorant or stupid.

  •  There was a group 'Ladies Against Women' (0+ / 0-)

    ... in Albany NY some years ago, who did hilarious send-ups ofthe Phyllis Schlaflys of this world.

    There's no such thing as a free market!

    by Albanius on Thu Jul 31, 2014 at 10:55:48 AM PDT

  •  Demoulas Market Basket also helps neighborhoods (0+ / 0-)

    in which stores are located. There are several of the markets that have been built on cleaned up derelict sites bringing back very unproductive land to usefulness and saving green space. This is not only the case for the New Bedford Mass store, but it is also located in an economically distressed area of an old manufacturing city. Poor and working class neighbors have walking access to a large market with a huge array of food products, fresh produce and fish and meat at reasonable prices neighbors appreciate. The sacked Arthur T Demoulas has a business model of minimizing asset debt financing so as to keep prices low and pay employees decent wages.  Harvard B school please take note.

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