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NY Times editorial:

After so many years in Iraq, Americans are justifiably skeptical about what military involvement can accomplish anywhere — and the Middle East is so complicated that even seemingly benign decisions can have unintended consequences.

The United States, Turkey and other allies should move quickly to meet the Kurds’ needs for ammunition and weapons as well as advice on more effectively deploying the pesh merga and integrating Kurdish operations with Iraqi security forces. Under pressure from the United States, Prime Minister Nuri Kamal al-Maliki of Iraq finally agreed this week to cooperate with the Kurds and to provide air support, and should continue to do so.

That will still leave Mr. Obama with the task of framing a broader strategy that involves Saudi Arabia, the Arab League and the United Nations, just to start.

Douglas Ollivant/CNN:
Since there will be no U.S. forces on the ground as target designators or air controllers, being able to see a target from the air will be crucial. So, a column of ISIS trucks or—as seen early Friday morning—a captured artillery piece firing against Kurdish positions, each make easy acquisition. Against these targets, airpower is nearly invincible. One thinks of the devastation released over two decades ago by U.S. airpower on the "Highway of Death" (albeit these forces were not attacking, but retreating—but the signature is the same).
 Objectives of U.S. airstrikes in Iraq Why did U.S. decide to strike ISIS now?
So when President Obama talks about targeted airstrikes to protect American personnel in Baghdad or Irbil, he is, in essence, saying that if ISIS attacks toward these cities, we will use airstrikes on their then-vulnerable forces.
TPM:
ISIL is successful because they understand that Iraqis will run in the face of boldness and brutality. If it’s a small outpost they defeat it, hold the site and link up with resupply from Mosul. The spear head forces now fighting the Kurds are the best of their group. A massive defeat on ISIL could decimate their professional spearhead of veterans and break the image of invincibility. Just one drone and a Special Forces forward control team with a B-1 bomber package with could do that with ease. However, absent US airpower on the offensive, it’s up to the Iraqi air force to strike as they cluster.
Above written (presumably) prior to US air strikes.

More policy and politics below the fold.

Jonathan Cohn:

Conservative state officials and their supporters frequently justify the decisions by arguing that they are simply looking after their states’ finances. Even with the federal government picking up most of the cost, they say, states must put up some money of their own—and the states don’t have the money to spare.

A new report from researchers at the Urban Institute, and supported by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, shows just how shortsighted that decision is. Yes, states have to spend money to expand Medicaid. But they get much, more back from the federal government. That money ends up flowing to medical professionals, hospitals, and other parts of the health care sector.

The Urban Institute researchers have made projections for just how much money each state is implicitly giving up by refusing to expand Medicaid. Georgia is a good example. According to the Urban report, Georgia would have to spend an additional $2.5 billion over the course of a decade in order to finance its share of the Medicaid expansion. But the state is giving up more than ten times that—$33.5 billion—in federal funds.

What’s it like for other states? You can check out the interactive map above. Note that these projections are consistent with a previous report that some of the same researchers did for the Kaiser Family Foundation.

Greg Sargent:
As GOP lurches right on immigration, sane Republicans watch in horror
Amy Walters:
Why an Improving Economy Isn't Improving Obama's Numbers

While economists use data points to make assessments of the economy’s health (unemployment rate, GDP growth, etc.), voters are more likely to use their perceptions of the president to determine if things are getting better or not. Those perceptions are driven as much by partisanship as anything else. The more Washington engages in partisan fire-fights on issues ranging from Obamacare to immigration, the more hardened those partisan perceptions become, which is why even an improving economy isn’t lifting Obama’s approval ratings.

NY Times on a Brooklyn Democratic national convention (Hillary likes the idea, Ed Rendell wants PA):
“You think Philadelphia thinks Brooklyn is the center of youth culture? You people in New York City might see it that way, but Brooklyn has huge problems,” Mr. Rendell said. “No hotels. And how would you like to transport in the middle of rush hour thousands of delegates from Midtown to Brooklyn?”

Asked about Mr. Rendell’s comments on Wednesday, Mr. Ragone replied, “Can you quote me shrugging?”

LTE NY Times:
Doctors ask about gun habits and encourage gun safety because we know that it protects against injury and death. One study found that gun safety improved in 64 percent of patients counseled by their doctors.

In clinic, I see patients who lost a loved one to gun violence or who have post-traumatic stress from witnessing or being a victim of gun violence. Some judges say that asking a question about gun safety is a form of treatment.

As a doctor, I believe that asking this question is part of my sworn duty. Many of my patients wish that a doctor had asked them sooner about gun safety.

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Comment Preferences

  •  There are NO sane Republicans left (25+ / 0-)

    the Chamber of Commerce types are nothing more than rapidly aging white males exiting the stage and being replaced by younger neo-birch society conspiracy mongers  

  •  Great LTE on glocks vs docs (13+ / 0-)

    and it contained several great links, the best of which was to this pdf document: National Physician Alliance: Gun Safety & Public Health -- Policy recommendations for a more secure America

    As we express our gratitude, we must never forget that the highest appreciation is not to utter words, but to live by them. John F. Kennedy

    by JaxDem on Sat Aug 09, 2014 at 05:00:04 AM PDT

    •  Agreed nt (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      I love OCD, JaxDem, rl en france

      I voted Tuesday, May 6, 2014 because it is my right, my responsibility and because my parents moved from Alabama to Ohio to vote. Unfortunately, the republicons want to turn Ohio into Alabama.

      by a2nite on Sat Aug 09, 2014 at 05:41:52 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Good for the Physician Alliance. (10+ / 0-)

      But apparently certain states don't care what proposals are raised by the Alliance, as their legislators pass laws to prohibit physicians from speaking to patients regarding gun safety in the home.  Some states are even prohibiting physicians from asking patients if guns are kept in the home, much less giving advice on safety measures.  And these laws are spreading.  
      It's almost as if Republicans fear the abatement of gun violence in their states believing that less violence will somehow limit their access to guns.  Gun worship is out of control in this society.

      "All that is necessary for evil to triumph is for good men to do nothing" - Edmund Burke

      by SueDe on Sat Aug 09, 2014 at 05:51:30 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  First Amendment should trump those laws (8+ / 0-)

        I'd like to see some blustery DA bring charges against a doctor for violating one of these -- For starters, the proof would involve proof of what was said in the examining room, a flat-out violation of centuries of doctor-patient privilege (as well as, likely, 4th Amendment problems).

        Then there's the same issue that has been litigated in the abortion cases where laws require clinics to tell women a bunch of lies ("abortion causes breast cancer and suicide") -- can the state mandate speech, or prohibit speech, that contradicts the professional's medical training, based on public policy?

        As long as doctors keep pushing back, these laws should be toast.

        •  Unfortunately (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          filby, Laurel in CA

          There is no prohibition of the patient reporting what was said.   There will be video stings where the physicians are shown offering reasonable advice- and prosecuted for it.

          As my father used to say,"We have the best government money can buy."

          by BPARTR on Sat Aug 09, 2014 at 07:57:52 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  Probably a First Amendment violation (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Laurel in CA

          Here in California, Dr. Marcus Conant was prosecuted for recommending marijuana to a patient. He raised a First Amendment defense and prevailed in the Ninth Circuit. Seems that the same sort of principles would apply here.

          "Ça c'est une chanson que j'aurais vraiment aimé ne pas avoir écrite." -- Barbara

          by FogCityJohn on Sat Aug 09, 2014 at 12:46:13 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

  •  The President has aged. Did he really know the (47+ / 0-)

    burden the power and reach of his new job will involve back in 2008? I doubt it and I doubt that even he, a brown person, could have guessed the degree to which the putrid stream of racism that runs deep in our nation would manifest in mindless rejection of his most reasonable ideas. But he soldiers on, unflinching in the face of outrageous fortune, partly trying to clean up the unbelievable economic and military mess "W" left behind and partly scraping to implement as many humane, forward looking programs he can. And now the insanity of the Bush/Cheney invasion of Iraq comes back to haunt the world again. My hat is off to him.

    •  Nasty as it is in the U.S., (6+ / 0-)

      this country is certainly not alone in its racist oppression of a particular group of its citizens.  Citizens in the UK have mindlessly despised Africans living in their midst to the same degree that citizens in the U.S. have, especially since the demise of the Empire and the independence of their former African colonies.  The Jewish people do nothing to hide their hatred of the Arabs, particularly the Palestinians, and take extreme measures to oppress and vilify them.  The Chinese government takes extreme measures to obliterate the culture of Tibet.

      All racism is based on fear, founded or unfounded.  But the reason for the hatred is by now unimportant as the bigotry and discrimination for the "other" has, over the years and through persistent repetition, been inculcated in the very fabric of the population.  Finally it becomes easier to rationalize the hatred than refuse to accept it.

      "All that is necessary for evil to triumph is for good men to do nothing" - Edmund Burke

      by SueDe on Sat Aug 09, 2014 at 06:13:41 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  No, not all racism is based on fear (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        singe, ZedMont

        Often it's based merely on contempt.

        "The great lie of democracy, its essential paradox, is that democracy is the first to be sacrificed when its security is at risk. Every state is totalitarian at heart; there are no ends to the cruelty it will go to to protect itself." -- Ian McDonald

        by Geenius at Wrok on Sat Aug 09, 2014 at 07:24:49 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  sometimes racism is based on economics as in (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        filby, ZedMont, Shawn87

        defining "the other" as beasts of burden who can be bought, sold, bred and punished as needed to say, pick cotton. fear grows out of this relationship between the owner and the owned but it may not necessarily be the starting point of the relationship.

      •  A lot of racism is caused by those in inferior (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        singe, Shawn87, Laurel in CA

        social and economic circumstances succumbing to the temptation to be "better" than someone else.  In their minds being "better" than people of color accomplishes their goal, and they don't actually have to do anything to improve themselves.  All they have to do is demonize the "others" based on something as silly as a shade of color.

        This attitude is primal, found all over the world to some extent, and has been perpetuated in the United States, especially in the old Confederacy by being passed down from generation to generation.  It's sort of like being "Christian."  In some regions being "Christian" is a prerequisite to an honorable place in society.  Same way with racism.

        Even when the social and economic circumstances of the racists improve, the racism remains, because they don't realize its source.  It is such an integral part of their personalities that it is virtually impossible to influence, and it is both confirmed by community and encouraged by politicians who can use it for votes.

        I know.  I come from such a circumstance, and while the economic circumstances of everyone in my family of origin has improved dramatically in recent decades, they are still as racist as ever, if not more so.  

        I didn't realize by Dad was until he made an offhand remark to me shortly before he died.  I never heard him say anything negative about black society so this came as quite a shock to me.  It was just that he had been taught from childhood to avoid black people and that was the sole basis for his racism.

        My mom denies being a racist and has black friends, but she is opposed to racial intermarriage.  Her brothers are more blatantly racist.  

        One is almost laughable, because he's been married to a Thai woman who is darker than many American blacks, for over 40 years.  

        The other is a bible-banging racist who hates the president for being black and who, as he grows closer and closer to his final curtain, is more and more interested in his celestial future, which he almost certainly believes will be populated solely by the lily white.  

        If there is such a future and there is enough forgiveness to get him to the pearly gates, I just don't know if his soul can handle standing in line with people of color. His looking up to see that St. Peter is Barack Obama's doppleganger would be the ultimate schadenfreude for me.

        I am proud to say that neither my wife nor any of our three children have a racist bone in their bodies.  That is no accident.  It's the result of a lifelong struggle with both myself and my world.

        Ted Cruz president? Pardon my Vietnamese, but Ngo Pho King Way.

        by ZedMont on Sat Aug 09, 2014 at 09:02:30 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  All Presidents age (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Diana in NoVa, singe

      as do the rest of us. The burden is too much to bear, and yet they bear it.

      That said, I strenuously disagree with the decision to resume bombing Iraq. I understand the reasons why he decided to do it, and still believe that it is likely to lead in the long run to even more radical Islamic theology and more determined anti-US fighters, plus destruction of infrastructure and countryside, plus the ever-present collateral damage.

    •   a show tune from the 1949Rodgers and Hammerstein (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      singe, Shawn87

      You've got to be taught to hate and fear,
      You've got to be taught from year to year,
      It's got to be drummed in your dear little ear,
      You've got to be carefully taught.

      You've got to be taught to be afraid
      Of people whose eyes are oddly made,
      And people whose skin is a diff'rent shade,
      You've got to be carefully taught.

      You've got to be taught before it's too late,
      Before you are six or seven or eight,
      To hate all the people your relatives hate.

      You've got to be carefully taught.

      Inquiry is how we get a grip on life

      by 2curious on Sat Aug 09, 2014 at 07:04:56 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Artistic rendition of aged Obama (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      singe

      Back in 2008 there was a graphic of what someone projected Obama would look like after his term(s) in office (i.e. not good). I wish I could remember where I saw it. TV I think.

  •  The "economy" around Labor Day... (6+ / 0-)

    ...is the "economy" that most voters take into the voting booths (or their mail-in forms) in November.

    The Village will spend inordinate amounts of reporting and analysis on how Libor or housing starts in mid-October might impact the election, but that will be meaningless to probably 99.9% of the likely electorate in this cycle.

    Change does not roll in on the wheels of inevitability, but comes through continuous struggle. --Martin Luther King Jr.

    by Egalitare on Sat Aug 09, 2014 at 05:06:40 AM PDT

    •  And the economy isn't doing all that well. (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Buzzer, Stude Dude, glitterscale

      6% unemployment is a disaster, not something to cheer about. And the 2nd quarter 4% growth in GDP has to be discounted by 1st quarter's negative 2.1%.
         Inexplicably, President Obama joined the Republicans in austerity mongering when he could have at least proposed a set of expansionary policies, even if the Pubs rejected them.
         Instead, he went so far as to propose chained CPI - AND WRITE IT INTO HIS BUDGET -thus pissing away the one big advantage Dems have always had: A firewall on Social Security.
        The Democrats should have had an insuperable advantage on economic issues. Instead, the Dems have fuzzed the line between them and the Republicans on that issue.

      •  Except you forgot the part about (7+ / 0-)

        raising the benefit for the lower tiers, offset by chaining CPI for the higher tiers IF they also have other retirement funds.  That was the original proposal.  He knew that wouldn't fly so laid it out as bait to get Republicans on record with their real plans for SS.  

        Your austerity claims are also unfounded.  Don't mistake words for actions.  In the political realm actions are what counts.  

        I'm not looking for a love that will lift me up and carry me away. A love that will stroll alongside and make a few amusing comments will suffice.

        by I love OCD on Sat Aug 09, 2014 at 06:11:17 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  "Vision 2025" from Social Security... (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Stude Dude, glitterscale

          Congress ordered a third party (GUESS WHO?) to prepare a "vision statement" for Social Security.

          The "Third Party" drafted a proposal for Social Security that would close all field offices and require people to contact the agency through the Internet or expanded call centers.

          The proposal also gives pink slips to 30,000 Agency employees who work in field offices.

          Now just imagine how that will work for people who don't have computers or internet access.

          BTW the "neutral third party" that prepared the report is underwritten by a certain billionaire whose name just happens to start with a "P"who has waged war against Social Security for years.

          •  Just because they dream about killing (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Shawn87

            SS doesn't mean they'll get away with it.  There's way too much fear around this.  Raising the FICA cap would be good, but there's so much noise about any change we can't be smart about improving it.  

            I'm not looking for a love that will lift me up and carry me away. A love that will stroll alongside and make a few amusing comments will suffice.

            by I love OCD on Sat Aug 09, 2014 at 10:34:08 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

      •  That was a budget (5+ / 0-)

        proposal designed to get Republicans to the table- he also attached $600 billion in new taxes to that chained CPI, and no Republican in office right now would have ever voted FOR Obama's budget, and most especially not one with $600 billion in new taxes attached.
        He was smart enough to know that.

        If trees gave off WIFi signals, we would probably plant so many trees, we would save the planet. Too bad they only produce the oxygen we breathe.

        by skohayes on Sat Aug 09, 2014 at 06:21:56 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  The Dems are betting the farm on identity politics (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Stude Dude, glitterscale

          Problem with that approach is, African-Americans and Hispanics and gays and lesbians are invested in Social Security and Medicare, too.

        "Le ciel est bleu, l'enfer est rouge."

        by Buzzer on Sat Aug 09, 2014 at 06:23:42 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  Sane Republicans watch in horror (6+ / 0-)

    Yeah, nobody elected to office as a Republican right now fits the description of "sane Republican".  The sane one already have left.

  •  Cohn.....And the winner is.......Florida!!!..... (9+ / 0-)

    66.1 billion over ten years.....Followed closely by Texas!!

    Stand up and take a bow guyz!

  •  I suspect the election will be quite different (12+ / 0-)

    from the spin.  No one's really looking at women and how we'll vote.  Everyone assumes blacks and Latinos are disengaged.  We'll see.

    I have an Evangelical family branch, the matriarch is posting daily on FB about the murder of Christians by ISIS.  Curious about the impact of Obama's actions on this group.  Wouldn't it be interesting to have Evangelicals For Obama start popping up?  

    I'm not looking for a love that will lift me up and carry me away. A love that will stroll alongside and make a few amusing comments will suffice.

    by I love OCD on Sat Aug 09, 2014 at 05:16:05 AM PDT

  •  Of course: The rich get richer (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Stude Dude
    That money ends up flowing to medical professionals, hospitals, and other parts of the health care sector.
    It's true that Republicans and Democrats are not the same. Not the same at all.
    Unless you measure on a rich get richer scale.

    LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

    by dinotrac on Sat Aug 09, 2014 at 05:20:51 AM PDT

    •  I know a just graduated doctor. (9+ / 0-)

      She went to school as a single parent in her 40's and achieved her goal.  She feels doctors are getting the shaft in Obama care. She has loans and her salary won't be enough to pay them off.  I say maybe, maybe not.  I told her to get active and stop the insurance companies from taking the money and instead pay the doctors more.  My view is that the medical professionals have power they aren't using. They need to unite and force things to happen. I get a shrug every time I mention such ideas to doctors.  They must be getting enough pay if they aren't interested in changing things.  The most used excuse is that they are so busy saving lives they don't have time to do all of the heavy lifting for fairness in the health sector.  This women is a podiatrist.  Works nine to five.  No on duty weekends.  

      Everyone! Arms akimbo! 68351

      by tobendaro on Sat Aug 09, 2014 at 05:34:15 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  How exactly does this newly-minted doctor (6+ / 0-)

        think the ACA is negatively affecting doctors (by which I assume she means their income)?  If she just wants to be angry she should turn her ire on the insurance companies which in effect are controlling doctors' salaries by determining the rate of reimbursement for services.  The ACA has nothing to do with doctors' incomes except to the extent that the law requires doctors to now follow up on their patients' recovery.

        "All that is necessary for evil to triumph is for good men to do nothing" - Edmund Burke

        by SueDe on Sat Aug 09, 2014 at 06:22:15 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  To what extent does the law require doctors to (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          YellerDog

          follow up on their recovery in ways that they weren't already doing?

          I wasn't aware that it did.  I've seen no evidence of it in my family's interactions with doctors.

          LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

          by dinotrac on Sat Aug 09, 2014 at 06:24:41 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Actually it does (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            tobendaro

            Hospitals, at least, get penalized (not paid, I think) for readmissions (within 30 days of discharge? something like that) that are deemed preventable. I believe this is true now for Medicare (and Medicaid? not sure on that), and may expand to other ACA policies.

            So, for example, if a person gets discharged with a paper prescription and oral advice to see their doctor next week, and they don't do either (maybe because they're homeless and disorganized, maybe because they don't have a car, maybe because they can't afford the co-pay, maybe they don't have a regular doctor), and get sick again, the hospital is on the hook. So hospitals and docs are figuring out how to do much better follow-up so people don't fall between the cracks.

            And increasingly, the reimbursement model for primary care physicians is a "medical home" where they get a set amount per patient -- more if the person has chronic conditions that require more care -- instead of a fee for services. That is designed to create incentives for keeping on top of conditions like diabetes, for example with regular phone calls from a nurse, instead of waiting until someone has a crisis and then charging big bucks to fix it.

            If you have family members who aren't getting good follow-up care, you may need to be the squeaky wheel to insist on it. I'm sure many medical practices haven't quite gotten the message yet.

             

            •  Ha! If anything, we were getting too much (0+ / 0-)

              follow up care in the past, padding pocketbooks.

              If you assume that doctors and hospitals were doing there jobs in the past, it's hard to imagine the policies you describe making any significant difference.  Insurance companies have never been eager to pay money they didn't have to pay, and readmissions due to negligence would be the basis for malpractice actions.

              LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

              by dinotrac on Sat Aug 09, 2014 at 08:11:36 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

        •  I tried to point that out to her. (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Shawn87

          She had some mumbo jumbo as to why OCare is to blame and I promptly placed the blame on insurance companies and left her with the question, "Why do you think it is ok for people to not have adequate access to healthcare?"

          Everyone! Arms akimbo! 68351

          by tobendaro on Sat Aug 09, 2014 at 11:48:35 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

      •  That just-grad Dr. is blaming her low SALARY... (5+ / 0-)

        ... on Obamacare?

        That is an utter non sequitur. Doctors are supposed to be logical creatures, at least on diagnoses, and rely on the evidence before them.

        I hope podiatry doesn't prove too complicated for her!

        2014 is HERE. Build up the Senate. Win back the House : 17 seats. Plus!

        by TRPChicago on Sat Aug 09, 2014 at 06:32:31 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  She's right, but what does it mean? (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        tobendaro

        Obviously, I cannot comment on the specifics of the woman you reference.  But, I can comment on the political situation vis-a-vis physicians and insurance companies.  The medical community is no longer monolithic, like the AMA was a generation ago.  Specialists are doing very well while family practice doctors are getting the shaft.  She's right though, the burdens of a medical education are not consistent with the salaries some physicians are going to be making in our emerging medical care system.  I'm guessing that your podiatrist is expressing the same judgement as my many doctor relatives, shaking their heads and thinking, "If only, ..."  

        Without going on, and on, insurance companies are dominant in that political contest too.  Here, it seems to me, is an area where collective action needs a boost from our governments to either reduce the way the cost of their education is borne or adjust the income disparity of the various types of specialties.  As long as insurance companies are being given the job of managing doctor's salaries and determining what treatments are going to get funded, they will play some against others and screw the whole bunch.  It seems to me that on multiple fronts, the solution to our problems is to reduce the power of those companies through deliberate governmental action.

        •  Hmmm...the concern should be applied more broadly (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          dinotrac, tobendaro, salmo

          "She's right though, the burdens of a medical education are not consistent with the salaries some physicians are going to be making in our emerging medical care system."

          Couldn't the same be said about the burdens of just about all education not being consistent with salaries that graduates will be making? Seems to me the same could be said not just about the medical field, but numerous other fields. The cost of education - and financing it - is staggering in comparison to when I attended in the late 70's and early 80's. Just a thought.

          •  That's one thing that has always irked me about (3+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            tobendaro, LemmyCaution, Shawn87

            doctors.

            Never mind that they lump in their internships and residencies with their education  -- even though they are making more than most graduates make in their first jobs out of school -- but, generally, they expect to make a LOT of money.

            Lots of people have extended educations, including social workers and teachers who don't make doctor money.

            Nobody wants doctors to starve.  Hell, I think most of us would agree that doctors should do pretty darned well for themselves.

            But here's the thing: Even those poor shafted family doctors are six figure people.  Lots of people with student loans would like to be so shafted.

            LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

            by dinotrac on Sat Aug 09, 2014 at 08:15:26 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  Let's start with some math (0+ / 0-)

              Lots of people aren't carrying $350,000 to $400,000 in student loans though.  Med school tuition runs about $80,000 per year, plus living expenses.  Add in student loans for undergraduate studies, and some very substantial debts are incurred along the way to their degrees.  Looking to the repayment estimator for what that might cost here, monthly repayments are going to run $2000 to $5000 ($24,000 to $60,000 annually, depending on what the loan is and what repayment terms are chosen).  

              Rural family practice docs around here are earning $125,000 to $150,000 (occasionally a bit more, and sometimes much less), but I'm closely related to a couple of docs who get that sort of income while working 70 to 80 hours per week to earn it.  Regardless, the student loans are going to reduce that income by at least 25%, perhaps much more.  That's still not poverty, but dividing their hours into their income, the effective wage is less than what professionals commonly earn, let alone professionals that take the kinds of responsibility and risks doctors do.  Frankly, if rural family practice doctors are in that part of the profession for the money, they should have become plumbers or electricians instead.  

              I have a lot of family members in the doctor business, so I know that recruiting staff for their rural family practice jobs is very difficult - the salary and the hours are a problem.  Our health care system assumes more people will be filling those positions, in fact, it depends on it.  That isn't happening now, suggesting that we ought to take the concerns of that young podiatrist, and a whole bunch of my relatives, very seriously.  A good place to start would be some substantial reduction in the debts incurred by those willing to take on family practice and similar roles.

              •  Average student loan debt for doctors is $170,000 (0+ / 0-)

                and that's pretty rugged -- althouch 3% interest helps.

                But nobody's asking Doctors to work for starvation wages, and -- after those student loan are paid, SHAZAAM! They get to keep all of the money they make!

                All kinds of people carry heavy student loan debt, people who don't make anywhere near the money even general practitioners can make.

                Yeah. Doctors work long hard hours.  Surely they knew that when they decided to go to med school.

                They make good money.  Not always the money they want to make, but good money.

                And complain,complain, complain, complain.

                LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

                by dinotrac on Sat Aug 09, 2014 at 11:13:18 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

          •  Agreed - but we were addressing med school debts (0+ / 0-)

            The thing is, we know how to get it done because our society used to do that sort of thing as a matter of course.  We understand the costs and the benefits.  There's rocket science involved, and a lot of other stuff, but the politics ought to be a lot less difficult, and a lot less complicated to explain.

  •  I wish both conventions could be in Cleveland. (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Stude Dude, tobendaro, I love OCD, a2nite

    A battle of the bands in the Heart of Rock & Roll.

  •  It's hard for me to do an 180 (0+ / 0-)

    And support Obama's hawkish actions. Like Libya then. Or back to Iraq now.

    "If this Studebaker had anymore Atomic Space-Age Style, you'd have to be an astronaut with a geiger counter!"

    by Stude Dude on Sat Aug 09, 2014 at 05:23:48 AM PDT

    •  I don't support genocide either (11+ / 0-)

      President Obama, January 9, 2012: "Change is hard, but it is possible. I've Seen it. I've Lived it."

      by Drdemocrat on Sat Aug 09, 2014 at 05:29:38 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  One of Bill Clinton's Greatest Regret ... (7+ / 0-)

        ... is that he didn't do more to stop the genocide in Rwanda.  I suspect that is weighing on Obama's mind as he watches the violence against the Yazidi.

      •  Drdemocrat - Same here. Obama's actions (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Stude Dude

        against ISIS have to be discounted by his support for genocide in Gaza, though.
          Dem support for that was the deal breaker for me.

        •  I'll be interested in seeing how many deaths (4+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Stude Dude, bufffan20, vcmvo2, askew

          in Gaza were from Hamas rockets.  They're doing very well in the social media war but many Palestinians hold them responsible for this bloodbath.  

          I'm not looking for a love that will lift me up and carry me away. A love that will stroll alongside and make a few amusing comments will suffice.

          by I love OCD on Sat Aug 09, 2014 at 06:02:39 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  At the same time, (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Stude Dude, I love OCD

            Israel is losing the world wide support it used to have with it's brutal tactics. The media is now giving far more attention to the destruction in Gaza and the bombings of hospitals and schools and shelters than it ever did before. Social media is getting the Palestinian story out, and people aren't liking what they see.
            This will make a lot more difference in the future than how many Palestinians support Hamas.

            If trees gave off WIFi signals, we would probably plant so many trees, we would save the planet. Too bad they only produce the oxygen we breathe.

            by skohayes on Sat Aug 09, 2014 at 06:27:53 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

      •  And let's make sure that any ISIS (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Stude Dude

        fighters from western countries are not allowed back into the west.  Hopefully they'll be killed over there.

      •  Why us? (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Stude Dude

        ISIS was originally backed by the Saudis and some of the Gulf states, but now threatens the entire region - the "Levant" as they call it.  So where are the countries in the region, the "backyard" of Iraq and Syria, that are most affected (or soon to be) by this group?  Why is the United States called on to intervene from half-way around the world while neighboring countries can effectively bow out of involvement or throw money at the problem?  Genocide is horrifying, disgusting and outrageous, so why is it acceptable for Iraq's neighbors to sit out the conflict and just  observe the mayhem while expecting the U.S. to take action?  Why should we feel compelled to try to alleviate the murderous rampage of ISIS, if not stop it altogether?

        I'm really tired to the point of disgust with the Mid East's fomenting this type of mayhem and then sitting back and watching the rampage transpire.  The Saudis especially seem to delight in subsidizing such chaos.  We have no allies in that part of the world, much as we would like to think so in order to keep the oil flowing.

        "All that is necessary for evil to triumph is for good men to do nothing" - Edmund Burke

        by SueDe on Sat Aug 09, 2014 at 06:48:48 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  It's the post-Benghazi factor (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      I love OCD, Stude Dude
    •  Maybe we need new concepts. Hawk or Dove (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Stude Dude, METAL TREK, pelagicray

      just doesn't take reality into account.  In the 21st Century we need 21st Century nuance and understanding.  ISIS is cutting off children's head because they're the wrong religion.  They decreed that every woman in Mosul undergo genital mutilation.  These aren't people you can negotiate with they're rabid lunatics hiding behind religion.  Mostly scared little boys who only feel powerful when they can hurt someone.  

      I'm not looking for a love that will lift me up and carry me away. A love that will stroll alongside and make a few amusing comments will suffice.

      by I love OCD on Sat Aug 09, 2014 at 05:54:31 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  So the choice regarding reaction to genocide is (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Stude Dude

      either all or none?  I think that the reality has to be something like the cop's response to a stopped speeder; "I can't get them all, I just have to get the ones I can."  At least the vaguary would work like random drug tests in that no aggressor party could  be quite sure when, or at what point, we would react.  At any rate, the pursuit of total consistency is ultimately paralyzing.  I think that might have been what Emerson had in mind with his statement about "hobgoblins".

  •  the Amy Walters analysis is interesting but... odd (0+ / 0-)

    Sure, Republicans are relatively pessimistic about the economy during Democratic presidencies (and vice versa). And, yes, that polarization is more extreme under Obama than it was under Clinton. But the key here seems to be:

    More importantly, Clinton’s approval ratings among independents were in the low-mid 50s, while Obama’s ratings among independents have remained consistently in the mid-high 30s.
    Yes, that does seem more important (to the extent that independents now are comparable to independents then), and her narrative about partisanship doesn't seem to address it, at least directly.

    Hmm. Gonna be arguing with myself about this for a while. Damn you, Greg! ;)

    "Democracy is a political system for people who are not sure they are right." —E. E. Schattschneider

    by HudsonValleyMark on Sat Aug 09, 2014 at 05:24:28 AM PDT

    •  One Difference might be ... (5+ / 0-)

      ... that the rising income inequality is more noticeable than before. Macro economic indicators are pretty good. But "blue collar" isn't doing so well. If you ignore the "anti-Obama" framing, I thought the WSJ did an ok job of laying out the "pro" and "con" sides of the economic recovery - although I don't consider SNAP an economic indicator.

      http://blogs.wsj.com/...

      This is an economic recovery. But it is not evenly distributed throughout the economy.

      •  "The economy is on the upswing" (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        TellerCountyBlue

           When an American blue-collar (and increasingly, white-collar) worker hears stuff like that, and sees no improvement in his or her personal economic situation, it often transfers to a negative assessment of our leaders.

          This happened to GW Bush, too. Obama's embrace of third-way nonsolutions for our economy has simply continued that misguided trickle-down trend... and kept his own ratings trickling down.

           Sorry to say it, but November's going to be a bloodbath for the Democrats. And it'll an entirely voluntary, self-inflicted bloodbath.

        "Le ciel est bleu, l'enfer est rouge."

        by Buzzer on Sat Aug 09, 2014 at 06:16:52 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Does anybody with their ear to the ground? (0+ / 0-)

          Agree or disagree with this?

          This is almost head in the oven depressing.

          Especially when we should have an insane advantage over reproductive, LGBT, and minority rights and how badly states like Kansas and North Carolina are managed.

          "If this Studebaker had anymore Atomic Space-Age Style, you'd have to be an astronaut with a geiger counter!"

          by Stude Dude on Sat Aug 09, 2014 at 10:34:08 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  well... (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Stude Dude

            My ear isn't to the ground in a competitive Senate state, but:

            I doubt it has much to do with people hearing that like "The economy is on the upswing" and reacting against it. That sounds like how pundits think about politics, more than most actual voters. But I can easily believe that lots of people aren't sold on economic improvement yet, and certainly the improvement has been slower for people who don't own piles of stock.

            I think the bit about "Obama's embrace of third-way nonsolutions" is off point. Sounds like the Green Lantern theory of the presidency.

            I don't think Democrats should expect to get much advantage on reproductive, LGBT, and minority rights except against especially bizarre candidates. And perversely, it's possible for congressional Republicans to benefit when state Republicans tank their states under a Democratic president, as long as it isn't too incredibly obvious. (I don't think that's a big factor, although I haven't looked closely.)

            "Democracy is a political system for people who are not sure they are right." —E. E. Schattschneider

            by HudsonValleyMark on Sat Aug 09, 2014 at 02:19:29 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

    •  The Wall Street type Republicans (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Stude Dude

      LOVE Democratic presidents.  They still donate to get them out of office but know the economy will thrive and so will they.  

      I'm not looking for a love that will lift me up and carry me away. A love that will stroll alongside and make a few amusing comments will suffice.

      by I love OCD on Sat Aug 09, 2014 at 06:04:36 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  "Just one drone" (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Stude Dude

    "Just one drone"
    "Just one drone"
    "Just one drone"
    "Just one drone"
    "Just one drone"
    "Just one drone"
    "Just one drone"
    "Just one drone"
    "Just one drone"
    "Just one drone"
    "Just one drone"
    "Just one drone"
    "Just one drone"
    "Just one drone"
    "Just one drone"

    Who would've thought foreign policy could be so easy?

    "Wrong, Do it again!" "If you don't learn to compete, you can't have any pudding. How can you have any pudding if you don't learn to compete?" "You! Yes, you occupying the bikesheds, stand still laddy!"

    by ban48 on Sat Aug 09, 2014 at 05:26:50 AM PDT

  •  The POSER PATRIOT Press: (0+ / 0-)

    Who's condemning, and making fun of this present CiC, continued deadly
    tragic present events and demanding more robust military actions, some
    even comparing to the one night instant growth and deadly attack on the
    U.S. consulate in Benghazi:

    The bushco's rubber stamping
    conservative congresses, with some 70%plus support of the country, in
    abandoning the missions and those sent to accomplish so quickly after
    9/11, destroyed that pandora's box and greatly enhanced the growth and
    spread of the al Qaeda, and like groups, type criminal terrorism!!

    As
    said over and over before, the world, especially those in these area's,
    will be living, dying, with the results from for the next decades!!

    Why
    those that fully supported and defended, still do, the extremely failed
    policies, every action and cost under, including much of the press, of
    the bushco and conservative controlled congresses!!

    And neither
    war has yet to be paid for, DeJa-Vu, especially the long term results
    from, the people's responsibility the VA, two tax cuts especially for
    the wealthy, with No Demand To Sacrifice By Those Served!!

    "If military action is worth our troops' blood, it should be worth our treasure, too; not just in the abstract, but in the form of a specific ante by every American." -Andrew Rosenthal 10 Feb. 2013

    by jimstaro on Sat Aug 09, 2014 at 06:00:36 AM PDT

  •  A few strikes are needed on IS around Baghdad (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    I love OCD, waterstreet2008

    We had two days of strikes helping the Kurds, Baghdad is being nice at the moment in supplying the Kurds ammo and other things they need right now, but psychologically its important.

    Iraqi Shia have long memories of 1991 and the U.S. providing real help to the Kurds and letting hundreds of thousands of Shia be slaughtered after Bush told them to rise up because they believe that was what the Gulf Arabs wanted from Washington.

    They are having flashbacks to 1991 right now were they are facing an even worse foe that wants to commit genocide against them and so far no U.S. strikes to help.

    CBS News BTW has been the first to call what ISIS is doing to the Shia genocide.

    http://www.cbsnews.com/...

    •  Strikes near Baghdad much riskier (0+ / 0-)

      because they will certainly kill civilians and/or damage vital civilian infrastructure.

      Bombing cities cannot limit the damage to military targets, and therefore creates all manner of hostility in the civilian population -- as well it should.

  •  Right Wing Christian gay haters (0+ / 0-)

    descend on Iowa:

    This weekend, a who’s who of far-right activists and politicians will convene in Iowa for the 3rd annual Family Leadership Summit, hosted by anti-gay and anti-choice organization The Family Leader and sponsored by Religious Right groups including the National Organization for Marriage, the Family Research Council’s political wing, Alliance Defending Freedom and Focus on the Family’s CitizenLink.

    In an effort to establish themselves with social conservative voters, potential Republican presidential candidates including Ted Cruz, Rick Perry, Mike Huckabee and Rick Santorum are joining a roster of speakers who push far-right views on LGBT rights, women’s equality and religious pluralism.

    - See more at: http://www.rightwingwatch.org/...

    If trees gave off WIFi signals, we would probably plant so many trees, we would save the planet. Too bad they only produce the oxygen we breathe.

    by skohayes on Sat Aug 09, 2014 at 06:35:22 AM PDT

  •  Ollivant is tactically inept. Not the first time. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    vcmvo2

    Read through this. It's what passes for "Defense Intellectual" brilliance:

    So what can U.S. airstrikes accomplish? Airpower is incredibly potent when properly used, but nearly useless in the wrong situations. ISIS will present both these alternatives in Iraq.

    Put very simply, airpower is incredibly effective against an enemy who is on the offense. If an enemy—be it a person or a vehicle or a weapon system—is on the move and/or fighting, they create a "signature" that is easy to spot from the air.

    Since there will be no U.S. forces on the ground as target designators or air controllers, being able to see a target from the air will be crucial. So, a column of ISIS trucks or—as seen early Friday morning—a captured artillery piece firing against Kurdish positions, each make easy acquisition. Against these targets, airpower is nearly invincible. One thinks of the devastation released over two decades ago by U.S. airpower on the "Highway of Death" (albeit these forces were not attacking, but retreating—but the signature is the same).

    So when President Obama talks about targeted airstrikes to protect American personnel in Baghdad or Irbil, he is, in essence, saying that if ISIS attacks toward these cities, we will use airstrikes on their then-vulnerable forces.

    Note that the President did not say that airstrikes would be used to eject ISIS forces from Mosul or Kirkuk or Fallujah. For in densely populated cities like these, airpower has real limitations. An enemy in defensive positions, particularly in urban terrain, is very difficult to engage with airpower. Even if the target can be hit, the possibility for collateral damage that causes civilian casualties is very real. And if the target is missed, the collateral damage can be exponentially higher, even catastrophic.

    That's "Can air power stop ISIS?" at CNN dot com.

    First off, there's no reason to rely on aerial spotting in Iraq. There's thousands of locals in every part of the country who are nothing if not afraid of ISIS. And their people all know how to use binoculars, radios, and GPS mappers.

    Contact spotting is always preferable. A pair of 20x80 binos and a comm-disguise radio come cheap. Not that the drones are bad, but fixed position/ camouflaged ISIS assets are better ID'd by humans.

    Second, Kirkuk ??? The Kurds hold Kirkuk and they have up a heavily artillery perimeter that extends out to 10 kilometers plus the range of their howitzers.

    ISIS trucks are soft targets when they get zeroed by artillery.

    Third, whazzup ignoring the Persians? Iran has two battalions in Iraq with full equipment and logistics support. Together with Asa'ib Ahl al-Haq and Iraqi Army units under Iranian command, they are holding Samarra and Tikrit.

    Last week ISIS lost 80 at Samarra and another 250 back up the road to a short counterattack.

    Question: did Douglas Ollivant serve in the military? He's a Petraeus wonk. Long time student of the military. A planner and writer. But please, try to find a full bio on this guy....

    •  I like posting interesting things (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      waterstreet2008

      vetting them is your job. ;-)

      Very interesting comment, and thanks, but do look at the explanatory from TPM (second piece) by a guy who did serve, and train. That's the one with a comment about TTF (Toyota Task Force).

      "It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it!" — Upton Sinclair

      by Greg Dworkin on Sat Aug 09, 2014 at 07:51:24 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Well, O.K. (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Shawn87
        "Why is ISIL so successful? Simply put they attack using simple combined arms but they hold two force multipliers – suicide bombers and a psychological force multiplier called TSV – Terror Shock Value. TSV is the projected belief (or reality) that the terror force that you are opposing will do anything to defeat you and once defeated will do the same to your family, friends and countrymen. TSV for ISIL is the belief that they will blow themselves up, they will capture and decapitate you and desecrate your body because they are invincible with what the Pakistanis call Jusbah E Jihad “Blood Lust for Jihad”. I have worked the Iraq mission since 1987 and lived in and out of Iraq since 2003. TSV was Saddam’s most effective tool and there is some innate characteristic of the Iraqis that immobilizes them when faced with a vicious, assuredly deadly foe who will do exactly as they have done to others – and they will unsuccessfully try to bargain their way out of death by capitulating. The Kurds are not immune to ISIL’s TSV -90% of which is propaganda seen on Facebook, Twitter and al-Arabiya. The Kurds have not fought a combat action of any size since 2003 and like the Iraqi Army it will take the Americans to give them the spine to get them to the first hurdle – they need a massive win to break the spell of ISIL’s TSV."
        And it's the Iranians of Qods Force doing that at Samarra and Tikrit. And as a guess a couple thousand QF up with the Kurds at Erbil and Kirkuk.

        The Persians expect to kill these ISIS SOBs. All of them. And they brought the howitzers and ammo to make it happen.

  •  I do wish the filthy old traditional media would (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    se portland, waterstreet2008

    stop referring to those Iraqi insurgents by the acronym of "ISIS." That sets every Pagan's teeth on edge, considering that Isis is one of the most revered goddesses of our pantheon. There is a perfectly acceptable alternative, "ISIL," which they could use.

    "Religion is what keeps the poor from murdering the rich."--Napoleon

    by Diana in NoVa on Sat Aug 09, 2014 at 07:09:33 AM PDT

  •  Really (0+ / 0-)

    We've got wars going on in Israel and Gaza and Ukraine and Iraq and Syria and that is the best the pundits can do?

    How bout saying how miserably we have failed in creating peace in our time with our bomb first diplomacy later policy? How bout confessing that as savior of the world we suck?

    ALL of our institutions have been hollowed out by the greed ethos. There are none left with heart intact or souls for that matter. So the zombie is all around us - me

    by glitterscale on Sat Aug 09, 2014 at 07:40:10 AM PDT

    •  it's early (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      glitterscale

      there was almost nothing to choose from yesterday, and not that much today when I was putting this together.

      I'm sure there'll be more as time goes on.

      "It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it!" — Upton Sinclair

      by Greg Dworkin on Sat Aug 09, 2014 at 07:53:58 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Pete Wilson and California is all you really need (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Diana in NoVa, waterstreet2008

    to know about the future of the R party with the current position on brown folks from south of the border.

    I think that spending all that campaign money on broadcast media is a vast waste.  Spend instead on a massive door to door canvassing and get out the vote program.  This must happen in all the elections, most importantly the mid-term elections.

    It seems like D party effort and attention is all about the prez and far to little about the down ballot elections.  The R's may be outnumbered, but they know how to capture the state legislatures.

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