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Mridul Chadha of Cleantechnica reports that 38% Of Spain’s July Electricity Demand Was Met By Wind and Solar Power. Low carbon electrical sources supplied 55% of Spains electricity consumption. in the last month. 30% of total electricity was generated by wind. Nuclear accounted or 18% of production.Solar account for 4%.

Do we have any readers other than myself who are old enough to remember the condescending and even mean discussion of long ago where the nuclear advocates will sneer at solar and wind, saying they could now become a major player?  

Is it wrong that I smile every time I read a report like this where solar or wind produce substantially more electricity for a country than nuclear power?

July’s share of wind and solar power technologies was significantly higher than their respective share in power generated during the first six months of the year. Between January and July 2014, the share of wind energy was about 22% while that of solar PV was 3.3%.

The wind energy sector has been consistently increasing its share in Spain power generation sector. In 2013 wind energy had the highest share among all technologies in the country’s generation mix. Wind energy projects supplied 21.1% of all electricity consumed in Spain, followed by nuclear power projects which had a share of 21%. During January, February, March and November, wind energy had the highest share in the generation mix.

Renewable energy technologies – wind, solar PV, and solar thermal – represented 49% of the total power generation capacity added in 2013. Generation from coal, natural gas-based power plants, as well as nuclear power generation fell in 2013. Portugal also reported that 70% of the electricity consumed in 2013 was generated by renewable energy sources.

We shouldn't be surprised to learn that "greenhouse gas emissions from the electricity sector in the Spanish peninsula fell 23.1% to 61.4 million tonnes of CO2."

Time Magazine asks Could This Be Solar Energy’s Big Moment?


Solar power has been on an upswing in the U.S., with usage now standing at six times’ its 2010 rate and the cost of solar installations since 2010 down 60 %. Analysts predict a 29% rise in solar installations in the U.S. by the end of 2014 alone.

This could be solar power’s moment. What’s uncertain is how much of that market growth the U.S. will be able to capitalize on. Currently, almost half of the world’s solar panel production takes place in China, while the U.S. only counts for only 5%.

Isn't great to have one topic area we can always turn to and find good news and encouraging reports after a summer of brutal articles raising painful questions about our human capacity to live  in peace with one another?

In this report wind energy is the hero and we do not need to be weather people to know which way these winds are blowing.

 

Originally posted to SciTech on Thu Aug 21, 2014 at 07:53 PM PDT.

Also republished by Kosowatt, PostHuffPost: Connection-Conversation-Community , Climate Change SOS, and Good News.

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Comment Preferences

  •  Tip Jar (40+ / 0-)

    Humor Alert! No statement from this UID is intended to be true, including this one. Intended for recreational purposes only. Unauthorized interpretations may lead to unexpected results. This waiver void where prohibited. Artistic License - 420420

    by HoundDog on Thu Aug 21, 2014 at 07:53:10 PM PDT

  •  Well, yeah, but (11+ / 0-)
    Do we have any readers other than myself who are old enough to remember the condescending and even mean discussion of long ago where the nuclear advocates will sneer at solar and wind, saying they could now become a major player?
    that was only a year or two ago, so...even I can remember that far back.
    In the 60's & 70's, it really was crazy talk or science fiction to think we could make enough electricity via solar or wind to make any difference at all. Soon it will be priced low enough that most folks may be able to get a few panels or a wind generator in America, which just might decrease the demand enough to take a coal plant or 3 off-line.

    Now...here's a mind blower: cordless/touchless phone chargers. Electricity through the air? Yes. Tesla is grinning somewhere--because that was straight up magic when he was tinkering with it.

    The better I know people, the more I like my dog.

    by Thinking Fella on Thu Aug 21, 2014 at 08:07:00 PM PDT

  •  Yep, renewables are morphing into becoming (12+ / 0-)

    the main choice in quite a few nations.

    In Germany, renewables accounted for 31% of the electricity consumed and 29.5% of the electricity produced in the first half of 2014.

    And that despite the govt. recently trying to throttle the quick ramp-up of solar.

    Tipped and recced.

    "A candle loses nothing by lighting another candle" - Mohammed Nabbous, R.I.P.

    by Lawrence on Thu Aug 21, 2014 at 08:12:13 PM PDT

    •  and Germany is starting to get 74% days (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      HoundDog, ER Doc, Lawrence

      it's summer when people
      are on vacation, but, they could hit 100% soon.

      •  On sunny Sundays during summer, fossil fuels (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        patbahn

        are getting clobbered in Germany.

        They're going to need more storage options pretty soon, so that excess electricity from sundays can be carried into mondays.

        They already have 6.5 GW of pumped hydro storage and are planning to double that in the next ten years.  That might tide them over until grid-scale battery storage becomes inexpensive and feasible.

        "A candle loses nothing by lighting another candle" - Mohammed Nabbous, R.I.P.

        by Lawrence on Fri Aug 22, 2014 at 09:33:02 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  that or they need cheap switched demand (0+ / 0-)

          stuff with positive externalities, that you can use
          to improve the world.

          1)  Desalinators, so that you can fill lakes and ponds with clean water.

          2)  Bubblers to increase oxygen levels in the bottom of rivers, lakes, etc.

          3) aluminum smelting, iron smelting, glass smelting, particularly for recyclables.

          4) sewage treatment bubblers, to increase oxygen in processes.

          5) UV sterilizers to crack organics in drinking water.

          Come up with some other ideas, like ammonia generation.

          •  Not sure about smelting. (0+ / 0-)

            Smelting is not the kind of think I imagine that can be switched on/off quickly, I think they require some sort of start-up time.

            Also for sewage treatment, having something variable in a biological/chemical process that involves rendering sewage safe is not exactly easy.

            I would argue mass/cheap energy storage system such as liquid metal battery. Even if it's very lossy, you still get something out of it as the electricity would otherwise be thrown away.

    •  Portugal hit 70% renewables (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Lawrence

      over a few months.  

      This is your world These are your people You can live for yourself today Or help build tomorrow for everyone -8.75, -8.00

      by DisNoir36 on Fri Aug 22, 2014 at 08:55:29 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  The world is moving (16+ / 0-)

    America needs to start moving or get left behind.

    •  It's Not Really a Country, It's More a Location. (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      ER Doc

      Parts of it and some of the markets here will move, other part won't.

      About all we can do as a unit is dismantle programs that promote the general welfare. We've been promised to put that policybreaking on steroids after the election.

      We are called to speak for the weak, for the voiceless, for victims of our nation and for those it calls enemy.... --ML King "Beyond Vietnam"

      by Gooserock on Thu Aug 21, 2014 at 09:11:12 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  the phrase I use for dirty power is: (5+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      KenBee, HoundDog, ER Doc, flavor411, oslyn7

      "19th-century energy sources."

      This is useful when talking to climate denialists.

      GOTV as if your life depends on it, because somebody's life does.

      by G2geek on Thu Aug 21, 2014 at 09:31:33 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  The dirty energy crowd sneer at the technology (8+ / 0-)

    that gives you clean energy when it is in it's infancy and not competitive.

    When it is competitive?

    That's when I am both overjoyed and deeply wary.

    About the crazy and the greedy perfect storm.

    I am very enthusiastic about the barriers being broken and the promise of awesome new technology.

    And I feel a sense of familiar dread about it.

    I wish the only barriers to a new dawn was entirely about technological viability issues and that the limitations were innovation based obstacles.

    When does this become a bigger front in the American culture wars?

    When oil and gas freaks out.

    I suspect that good news for the rest of humanity is wary news for them.

    I recall reading that Kansas, or maybe it was Oklahoma, put some kind of ugly tax on putting solar panels up that, basically, punishes you for going green.

    That's insane. But viable. All because there is a resentment-fueled caucus for insane but pisses off people I hate.

    Our political opposition is, essentially, rewarded by the self-injuriously irrational resentment-fueled deranged.

    When I was younger, and living in Massachusetts, an old townie who had been in politics for most of his life introduced me to the concept of "the asshole tax". An "asshole tax" is a tax on people you hate. A spite-based levy. I don't want people from out-of-state fishing in my beloved local waters, so, here, a ridiculous fee on you. Asshole.

    I don't believe the dystopian Sci-Fi theme of some Omni Corp assassinating the guy or gal who invents a fusion reactor is what should be keeping me up at night.  

    How could the bad guys fuck with this progress.

    That is what keeps me up at night.

    The tax on solar panels was a Tea Party meets Koch Brothers dreaming up an asshole tax on solar panels.

    I laughed at idiot Michelle Bachmann when she tried to make refusing to use the new lightbulbs in favor of the obsolete pieces of shit an act of patriotism. But as stupid as it was, it was a warning sign of just how fucking derpy the other side of progress is willing to plunge to out of 'if liberals like it, I'm against it'.

    That strikes me as being the kind of public policy you get more and more of from Koch Brother crowd Tea Party alliance.

    I think there is a bad faith fueled shitstorm coming in the progressive energy front, and I wonder how flat-footed the good guys might be caught when it hits.

    I've always suspected that the Petroleum industry and its allies in public power will easily shift from sneering and mocking to a more ominous argument about needing to inhibit or curb alternatives based on the idea of economic disruption of existing industries leading to nightmare scenarios the industry cooks up.

    We live in a country where something with absolutely no value as a piece of public policy other than 'it pisses off liberals and that is good enough for me' is good enough for an entire House majority.

    'My God, Do you know how many millions of people will be adversely economically effected if the oil and gas industry collapses? Someday this will be the way forward. Someday. But not today.

    I spend the entire years George W. Bush was in office imagining what shit Dick Cheney was saying to Dubya along those lines. Our government got bullshitted into a crushing grinding war that was one of the longest in history because, to some, the oil and gas era, and its masters, are as sacred as Supply-Side Trickle Down Jesus is to the MegaChurch set.

    "Real journalism is printing what someone else does not want printed. Everything else is public relations." -George Orwell

    by LeftHandedMan on Thu Aug 21, 2014 at 08:33:58 PM PDT

  •  Yes, it is (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    6412093, Joffan
    Do we have any readers other than myself who are old enough to remember the condescending and even mean discussion of long ago where the nuclear advocates will sneer at solar and wind, saying they could now become a major player?  

    Is it wrong that I smile every time I read a report like this where solar or wind produce substantially more electricity for a country than nuclear power?

    Yes, it is wrong, and it makes you look either ignorant or intent on manufacturing your own version of the past.

    Practical large-scale generation of power from solar and wind sources is very much a thing of the past fifteen or twenty years. Before that, as another poster has pointed out, both sources were for niche markets at best.

    It's very good that they have finally gone mainstream. But is it too late?

    In the meantime, we have had thirty or more years when we could have been getting most of our electricity from nuclear power. However, certain persons felt that that was not necessary. Even though the science has been in on global climate change since the 1920s, these people indulged in the luxury of rejecting nuclear power in favor of oil, gas, and coal.

    What? You say that anti-nuclear activists were not in favor of dirty fuels? But they never attacked them with one-tenth the vigor. If you hinder one side, and do not hinder the other, you are de facto supporting the other side.

    Still feel good about yourself? That thirty or so years of carbon in the atmosphere -- you own it, or at least part of it. You helped it happen.

    Have a nice day. There may not be too many of them left.

    This is the landscape that we understand, -
    And till the principle of things takes root,
    How shall examples move us from our calm?

    (Mary Oliver, "Beyond the Snow Belt.")

    by sagesource on Thu Aug 21, 2014 at 08:41:01 PM PDT

    •  Wow. (5+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      TakeSake, jasan, Jim P, Gooserock, vernonbc

      So next you will tell us the nuclear waste storage solution was found 30 years ago to and I prevented that from happening too?  

      You know what--you might mean well but you are just mean.  Go back to drinking.  

      Well, now you are just trying to be reasonable...and I'm in NO mood to be reasonable!

      by quiet in NC on Thu Aug 21, 2014 at 08:56:30 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Yep, that's right - Yucca Mountain (0+ / 0-)

        The proposed repository was studied ad nauseum and the safety report was ready to publish, showing that it was indeed a safe storage solution.

        Greg Jaczko, the now-confessed anti-nuke head of NRC, shut down the project after many billions-worth of studies and blocked publication of the results.

        This is not a sig-line.

        by Joffan on Fri Aug 22, 2014 at 01:20:58 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  The Record of What Progressives Accomplished Over (0+ / 0-)

      the past years is difficult to sum up.

      We are called to speak for the weak, for the voiceless, for victims of our nation and for those it calls enemy.... --ML King "Beyond Vietnam"

      by Gooserock on Thu Aug 21, 2014 at 09:13:30 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  So with 400 plants we average a meltdown a (8+ / 0-)

      decade (counting Fukushima as only one) for a generation, and the 2000, 4000 plants you would have built with imaginary trillions ($10,000,000,000 per plant on average, add three zeros and double or quadruple the "10" and you've got $20-$40 TRILLION) to get us five or ten meltdowns a decade.

      More than the US has spent on defense/intelligence/war-making since Vietnam.

      Fucking great reality-based thinking you've got going for you.

      Meanwhile, on the real planet we live on, Jimmy Carter was pushing the alternative fuels spirit and mindset (though the syn-fuel part wasn't that great) forty years ago and got shot down by the Killer Fuels Industry and their buddies in Congress and the Media.

      You want to make up alternate histories, the one where we write off a section of the earth every few years for money nobody could afford was never REMOTELY possible. The one where people moved ahead with Carter's initiative could have stood us very very well indeed.


      A government is a body of people usually notably ungoverned. -- Firefly

      by Jim P on Thu Aug 21, 2014 at 09:18:23 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  You nailed it. (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        oslyn7

        If Carter's visionary plans hadn't been smashed into pieces by the Reagan Administration, we could have had inexpensive solar and wind at least 15 to 20 years earlier.

        "A candle loses nothing by lighting another candle" - Mohammed Nabbous, R.I.P.

        by Lawrence on Fri Aug 22, 2014 at 09:47:21 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  some of us invested in Negawatts. (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      HoundDog

      i dropped my heating bills by 75%.

      You can too.

    •  Until the recent subsidies hike (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Lawrence, oslyn7

      the free market decided not to build one nuclear plant in the U.S. in 30 years.

      So you are wrong to blame it one me. A generation source that take 13 years to build and cannot be built unless the government guarantees profitability is not going to be a major player in our next 30 years by virtue of market forces  - can't blame this one on political activists.

      We have been and still are correct in this. Scientifically this is been clear to anyone looking objectively for a long time.

      If one includes external costs in comparative calculations such as risk of dirty bombs etc. nuclear is not something we want to spread in unstable third world nations.

      The last I checked there is a 10 delivery delay on a containment domes. The per unit cost of nuclear generation is going up as more problems keep raising cost.

      The cost to solar panels has fallen by about three quarters in the last four years and give every appearance of continuing to do so.

      The economics rule.

      Humor Alert! No statement from this UID is intended to be true, including this one. Intended for recreational purposes only. Unauthorized interpretations may lead to unexpected results. This waiver void where prohibited. Artistic License - 420420

      by HoundDog on Fri Aug 22, 2014 at 04:54:24 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Actually we don't own jack shit (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Lawrence, oslyn7

      It was motherfuckers who voted Reagan in who own it.  Nuclear was wrong then, it's STILL wrong now and even more so in the future.  If we had just listened to Jimmy Carter on this solar and wind would have been much more mainstream 35 years ago when he put solar panels on the White House.  Instead we elected some asshole who promptly took them off and embraced nuclear energy.  

      So thank you very much but those 30 years of carbon in the atmosphere are owned by people like you not by us.

      This is your world These are your people You can live for yourself today Or help build tomorrow for everyone -8.75, -8.00

      by DisNoir36 on Fri Aug 22, 2014 at 09:07:11 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Damn, that's good news. Seeing this is (7+ / 0-)

    good after I just posted something about climate change and rising seas.

    "The soil under the grass is dreaming of a young forest, and under the pavement the soil is dreaming of grass."--Wendell Berry

    by Wildthumb on Thu Aug 21, 2014 at 08:43:36 PM PDT

  •  I'm glad to read this. (6+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    jasan, bear83, Jim P, fixxit, KenBee, vernonbc

    Its especially good news for Spain whom I believe lacks coal and gas sources, so they are saving big dough and helping their balance of payments.

    “The answer must be, I think, that beauty and grace are performed whether or not we will or sense them. The least we can do is try to be there.” ― Annie Dillard, Pilgrim at Tinker Creek

    by 6412093 on Thu Aug 21, 2014 at 08:59:56 PM PDT

  •  Although manufacturing jobs are important (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    KenBee, vernonbc, HoundDog, kurt
    This could be solar power’s moment. What’s uncertain is how much of that market growth the U.S. will be able to capitalize on. Currently, almost half of the world’s solar panel production takes place in China, while the U.S. only counts for only 5%.
    No matter who makes them, putting them on American roofs means putting Americans up on the roofs to do the work. The expansion of solar in the US is a huge job creator - and I hear it has some sort of environmental benefits - which is generally all it takes for Republicans to hate it.

    Election Day is Nov 4th, 2014 It's time for the Undo button on the 2010 Election.

    by bear83 on Thu Aug 21, 2014 at 09:18:00 PM PDT

  •  Is there a single municipality in this (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    KenBee

    vast, wealthy and carbon spewing country that has passed a law requiring even 25 percent of new residential or commercial construction be outfitted with solar?  How about 10 percent? Any percent?  

    "And now we know that government by organized money is just as dangerous as government by organized mob." -- FDR

    by Mogolori on Thu Aug 21, 2014 at 09:59:56 PM PDT

  •  But we live in dumbfukistan (0+ / 0-)

    where fossil fuels run the government, and we are an extraction colony for the .01%.

    •  Wind power is now cheaper than coal power. (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      JeffW

      Solar will be cheaper than coal in three to five years, maybe sooner.  Coal mine owners are crying because they can't compete with natural gas and wind.  When the price of NG goes  up because fracked wells drop production much faster than conventional ones, wind will still be cheaper than coal.  Now electric companies want wind.  

      "My country, right or wrong; if right, to be kept right; and if wrong, to be set right." -- Sen Carl Schurz 1872

      by Calamity Jean on Mon Aug 25, 2014 at 11:42:19 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

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