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Smoke trails tear gas canisters fired into the air after protests in reaction to the shooting of Michael Brown turned violent near Ferguson, Missouri August 17, 2014. Shots were fired and police shouted through bullhorns for protesters to disperse, witnes
Leonard Pitts on political court cases, Ruth Marcus on Obama's legacy, Tamar Jacoby on immigration policy, Ross Douthat on acid, but first...

Kevin Horrigan takes us back to Ferguson to show another way that this small St. Louis suburb is representative of larger problems.

One of the great ironies of the continuing furor in Ferguson is that the burned-out QuikTrip, ground zero for the protests, is located less than a mile from the headquarters campus of Emerson Electric. ...

Emerson is No. 121 on the Fortune 500 with 2013 revenues of $24.6 billion. Some 1,300 St. Louisans are employed at the Ferguson campus, most of them doing highly skilled financial and management work.

Emerson employs a lot of less-skilled people to make a lot of different stuff, but not in Ferguson. In Mexico, Central America, South America, Germany, France, Romania, Russia, Turkey, Ukraine, Poland, China, India, Japan, the Philippines and other nations, in 230 manufacturing centers, Emerson employs 130,000 people, including 33,000 at 80 locations in the U.S. and Canada.

Emerson’s companies make familiar stuff, like garbage disposers, power tools and ceiling fans, as well as highly technical stuff that controls other highly technical stuff. They make electronic controls for industrial automation machines that displace human beings. They make climate control stuff for server farms that power the Internet and displace other human beings. ...

Many people in Ferguson and the rest of St. Louis could really use basic manufacturing jobs. Too bad. Ask the people who used to work at Ford-Hazelwood or Chrysler-Fenton. It costs too much money to do basic manufacturing in the United States. The future is advanced manufacturing, the kind that requires technical expertise.

In 2009, David Farr, then as now Emerson’s chairman and CEO, told analysts in Chicago that President Barack Obama’s ideas for the environment, health care reform and labor could “destroy” U.S. manufacturing.

“What do you think I’m going to do?” Farr asked his audience. “I’m not going to hire anybody in the United States. I’m moving.”

Farr's threat was ridiculous. Emerson had already moved. Those jobs were long vanished from these shores. Like so many corporate bigwigs railing against regulation, the truth is Farr played all his cards years ago. Everything else is just a bluff.
Last year, David Farr was paid $25.3 million, placing him No. 5 on Equilar’s list of America’s best-paid executives.
A mile up the road from the place where Michael Brown died, where the school is broke and under control of the state, and where the unemployment rate is two times the average for the rest of the state, David Farr is raking in megabucks while openly promising that he will not create American jobs.

That's the story, not just of Ferguson, but of the path America has followed for the last thirty years.

Come on in, let's make the pundit rounds...

Leonard Pitts would rather politicians settle their issues at the polls than in the courts.

A few words of definition before we proceed. The reference here is not simply to lawsuits and prosecutions with political import. Obviously there has been no shortage of those. But the sins and alleged sins of Rod Blagojevich, William Jefferson, Larry Craig, Bob McDonnell, Tom DeLay and others — money laundering, corruption, disorderly conduct — are at least recognizable as crimes.

By contrast, Republican Speaker of the House John Boehner is suing President Obama for issuing an executive order. Faced with mulish obstructionism from the GOP, Obama chose that route to make a technical change in a law — the Affordable Care Act — Boehner’s party hates. Now here’s Perry, indicted on felony abuse of power charges that could theoretically send him to prison for over a century. His crime? He issued a veto.

...

Things were not always thus. Once upon a time, the losing party felt itself bound to accept the will of the electorate with some modicum of grace. You weren’t happy about it, but you embraced the role of loyal opposition and bided your time until the next election in hopes your fortunes might change.

But that’s so 20th century.

For six years, the GOP has been trying to undo the election of 2008; Boehner’s lawsuit is only the latest of their many loopy schemes. Now, if Travis County is any bellwether, at least some Democrats are doing the selfsame thing.

I'm sure there are plenty of people who can explain why what Perry did is worthy of being hauled before a judge. Just be sure it's worth the risk to the system before you go there.

Robert Lifton asks if climate change can signal political change.

Americans appear to be undergoing a significant psychological shift in our relation to global warming. I call this shift a climate “swerve,” borrowing the term used recently by the Harvard humanities professor Stephen Greenblatt to describe a major historical change in consciousness that is neither predictable nor orderly.

... Experience, economics and ethics are coalescing in new and important ways. Each can be examined as a continuation of my work comparing nuclear and climate threats.

The experiential part has to do with a drumbeat of climate-related disasters around the world, all actively reported by the news media: hurricanes and tornadoes, droughts and wildfires, extreme heat waves and equally extreme cold, rising sea levels and floods. Even when people have doubts about the causal relationship of global warming to these episodes, they cannot help being psychologically affected. Of great importance is the growing recognition that the danger encompasses the entire earth and its inhabitants. We are all vulnerable.

This sense of the climate threat is represented in public opinion polls and attitude studies. A recent Yale survey, for instance, concluded that “Americans’ certainty that the earth is warming has increased over the past three years,” and “those who think global warming is not happening have become substantially less sure of their position.”

Well, it's always good when people who are dangerously wrong start to get a hint that they're wrong. However, right now Americans as a whole rank environmental issues somewhere behind lutefisk Thursdays in importance when it comes to how they vote. If we can't get past the false "good environment = bad for jobs" idea that's been carefully constructed by companies that are entrenched in the smokestack economy, things aren't going to get much better.

Ruth Marcus dashes into the future, to look at the legacy of President Obama.

I’ve thought for some time that the Obama administration could look better in the rearview mirror of history than it does in the bumpy ride of the day to day. That may still turn out to be correct.

Yet events of the past few months — specifically, the rise of the Islamic State and the accompanying specter of a renewed terror threat to the United States — have raised the alarming prospect of a legacy even more dismal than suggested by the current grim poll numbers.

Obama inherited an economy in free fall and, within the limits of the politically possible, did what he could to contain the damage and to prevent a recurrence (the Dodd-Frank financial reform legislation). ...

Next, at least to his, and his party’s, short-term political peril, Obama seized the fleeting moment to enact health-care reform, setting the stage for the twin achievements of expanding coverage to millions of uninsured Americans and slowing the relentless growth of health-care costs.

So, Obama took the economy out of the ditch, got health insurance in the hands of millions, and dragged us out of two wars of our own creation. And the thing that could screw up his legacy, is that other people in other nations which we do not control are doing things that we don't like.  Ummm.

Frank Bruni has been watching the boys, and the girls, of summer.

If you were looking last week for a thread of hope amid all the hurt in America and savagery abroad, for something to thrill to and cheer about, this is where you found it, on a baseball diamond in central Pennsylvania that really did amount to a field of dreams.

It was here, at the Little League World Series, that Mo’ne Davis captured the country’s hearts. A 13-year-old wunderkind from Philadelphia, she was believed to be the first black girl to play in the series. She was definitely the first girl ever to pitch a shutout. She landed on the cover of Sports Illustrated, exploded stereotypes about women and sports and did it with a poise and grace that most people twice or even four times her age struggle to muster.

Mo’ne Davis is definitely an athlete who is even more impressive when being interviewed, than she is on the pitcher's mound.

Ross Douthat is nattering on about ISIS.

In his remarks on the murder of James Foley, the American journalist decapitated by the terrorists of ISIS, President Obama condemned Foley’s killers, appropriately, as a "cancer" on the Middle East and the world. But he also found room for the most Obama-ish of condemnations: “One thing we can all agree on,” he insisted, is that the would-be caliphate’s murderous vision has “no place in the 21st century.”

The idea that America’s foes and rivals are not merely morally but chronologically deficient, confused time travelers who need to turn their DeLorean around, has long been a staple of this administration’s rhetoric. Vladimir Putin, Bashar al-Assad and tyrants in general have been condemned, in varying contexts, for being on the dreaded “wrong side of history.” Earlier this year, John Kerry dismissed Putin’s Crimea adventure in the same language Obama used last week: “19th-century behavior in the 21st century,” foredoomed by its own anachronism. ...

So writing off the West’s challengers as purely atavistic is a good way to misunderstand them — and to miss the persistent features of human nature that they exploit, appeal to and reward.

Two things: first, the basis of Douthat's piece seems to be that people always have been brutes and always will be. In other words, the essence of conservatism. Second, last week I found myself agreeing with him. It was scary. Fortunately for me, Douthat's writing this week has sailed so far into the overwrought purple prose that it's become ultraviolet.
...to contend for mastery, to threaten us the way Nazis and Communists once did, they would need to do more than demonstrate, by their continued depredations, that history doesn’t have necessary destinations. They would need to somehow persuade the world that history’s arc might actually be about to bend toward them.
I may actually agree with Douthat again, but my sanity is guarded by the fact that I'd need a translator to find out.

Tamar Jacoby says we need more than a patch to fix immigration policy -- though a patch would be nice.

White House staffers are hard at work this month, deliberating about what should go into the executive order the president is expected to issue after Labor Day: his do-it-yourself, go-it-alone version of immigration reform. The smart money is betting he will grant some sort of temporary legal status to as many as 4 million unauthorized immigrants.

This would be a huge relief for those who qualify and their families. There won't be a path to citizenship — only Congress can provide that. But together with the president's 2012 memo granting legal status to young people brought to the U.S. illegally as children, it could allow more than a third of the nation's unauthorized immigrants to remain in the country and work without fear of being deported. ...

An executive order mandating legalization alone won't address what's wrong with the immigration system. And the danger is that once Obama acts, that may be the end of what Washington does to address the issue — this year or for many years to come.

A one-time legalization would ameliorate a symptom of what's broken. But it would do nothing to tackle the underlying cause: the dynamic that draws immigrants to come to the U.S. illegally in the first place — supply and demand.

Increasingly, the only choices in any contentious political issue are 1) take whatever President Obama can generate through executive order, or 2) settle for nothing happening until at least 2016 with no guarantee that the right won't commit itself to hamstringing the next president just as it has the current president.

When the choice is something -- no matter how small -- now, or a small change of a bigger something later (with no idea how much later and a fair chance it won't happen at all) now is the only reasonable choice.

Stephanie Rosenbloom looks at what to do when on-line people are aggressively vicious.

Anyone who has ever been online has witnessed, or been virtually walloped by, a mean comment. “If you’re going to be a blogger, if you’re going to tweet stuff, you better develop a tough skin,” said John Suler, a professor of psychology at Rider University who specializes in what he refers to as cyberpsychology. Some 69 percent of adult social media users said they “have seen people being mean and cruel to others on social network sites,” according to a 2011 report from the Pew Research Center’s Internet and American Life Project.

Posts run the gamut from barbs to sadistic antics by trolls who intentionally strive to distress or provoke. Last week, Zelda Williams, the daughter of Robin Williams, said she was going off Twitter, possibly for good, after brutal tweets by trolls about her father’s death. Yet comments do not even have to be that malevolent to be hurtful. The author Anne Rice signed a petition a few months ago asking Amazon.com to ban anonymous reviews after experiencing “personal insults and harassing posts,” as she put it on the site of the petition, Change.org. Whether you’re a celebrity author or a mom with a décor blog, you’re fair game. Anyone with a Twitter account and a mean streak can try to parachute into your psyche.

Sometimes, it's easy to forget the balance we've carved out in this space. Daily Kos isn't perfect (no? really?) and I've had my ego bruised and my anger stoked more than a few times by comments delivered in this place. Like any long time resident, I've learned that there are some things you just don't talk about unless you want to engage in a kind of kabuki ritual of repeated arguments ending in insults (by the way, the answer is: Mary Ann, and you're an idiot for ever thinking otherwise).  Even so, the balance we hold here is really quite amazing. I think we've all experienced debates--genuine, spirited debates, conversations in which people have put their hearts on the line--and come away without the discussion disintegrating into a tangle of remarks on your parent's bedroom habits, and places you might insert your private parts.

Having recently been on the receiving end of a lot of tweets and emails composed almost entirely from words of four letters, I'm finding myself extraordinary grateful for a place that engenders argument without necessarily resorting to verbal assault.

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Comment Preferences

  •  Not the movie star? Or the professor? (18+ / 0-)

    After all, smart is the new sexy.

    What we call god is merely a living creature with superior technology & understanding. If their fragile egos demand prayer, they lose that superiority.

    by agnostic on Sun Aug 24, 2014 at 04:10:45 AM PDT

  •  Yesterday, Kos posted the nutpickpalooza (34+ / 0-)

    which was neck-deep in heinous racist comments, shocking to many here.

    CNN has posted a lot on the Ferguson Issue and recently has closed off comments, for reasons I can only imagine.

    They opened up comments for this: White House sending 3 officials to Michael Brown's funeral

    The comment section is filled with unmoderated comments "awaiting moderation".

    The comments I could read looked a lot like Kos's post yesterday.

    Boffer Bings • 6 hours ago

    Strong armed robbery of a convenience store...
    Assault on a convenience store clerk...
    Assault on a police officer...
    Hero to Black America

    mme Citizen • 5 hours ago

    For the WH to even acknowledge this bully who was killed by the police is an affront to all law abiding citizens ... no matter what color they are! If O is so concerned with black kids being murdered maybe he should go stand in Chicago and have a little rant there.

    Joe • 6 hours ago

    Really they are sending white house staffers to the funeral of a kid suspected of one and possibly 3 felonies before a cop had to kill him. Take the shooting out of the equation and he was still a suspected felon. imagine the clerk he roughed up. This piece robs your store in broad daylight and roughs you up and then the president makes him into a friggin hero. Obama should have remained neutral on this because he was not a hero. He was throwing gang signs in gang colors in a neighborhood associated with that gang. I have worked with gang members from St.Louis Chicago and Detroit and I have worked in the prison so you can't tell me he wasn't throwing gang signs. The white house has looked bad on this one flat out and I am sure law enforcement isn't happy with them either.

    THIS is CNN.*

    I live in a heinously racist country.

    •  I did get on one of them for saying Obama (9+ / 0-)

      is "predigest".

    •  And today's news has an interesting bit of (4+ / 0-)

      background. Front page Washington Post is "Darren Wilson’s first job was on a troubled police force disbanded by authorities" in which we read:

      The small city of Jennings, Mo., had a police department so troubled, and with so much tension between white officers and black residents, that the city council finally decided to disband it. Everyone in the Jennings police department was fired. New officers were brought in to create a credible department from scratch.
      and
      Police faced a series of lawsuits for using unnecessary force, Stichnote said. One black resident, Cassandra Fuller, sued the department claiming a white Jennings police officer beat her in June 2009 on her own porch after she made a joke. A car had smashed into her van, which was parked in front of her home, and she called police. The responding officer asked her to move the van. “It don’t run. You can take it home with you if you want,” she answered. She said the officer became enraged, threw her off the porch, knocked her to the ground and kicked her in the stomach.
      and down in the middle of the article:
      The structure of policing in these small St. Louis communities, as in many places in the United States, is innately combustible.
      Places where police not living in the community and not under the control of the community—largely through the community's own lack of involvement in elections—act like an occupying army without even the rules our own post WW II forces had in place.

      I hope that if nothing else is learned or resolves that the African American community that for sometimes good reasons has sat things out locally will be at the registrar's office, registering (or filing federal lawsuits) and voting with a vengeance in local elections. As I said elsewhere, Obams in the White House has damn all to do with how your local government, including police, treat you. The Constitution does not allow federal intervention in a murder case not on federal lands or in a federal installation so even if video surfaced showing the final shots to be an execution of someone down and of no threat Obama can do nothing much. Vote local, every election.

      The only foes that threaten America are the enemies at home, and those are ignorance, superstition, and incompetence. [Elbert Hubbard]

      by pelagicray on Sun Aug 24, 2014 at 08:36:50 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  David Farr wants America to fail. (43+ / 0-)

    Mark, truer words were never spoken (well, written):

    ...David Farr is raking in megabucks while openly promising that he will not create American jobs.

    That's the story, not just of Ferguson, but of the path America has followed for the last thirty years.

    David Farr and those other CEOs just like him are the faces and names behind what has destroyed jobs in America.  Add in the Banksters behind our near complete economic collapse and you have nearly all of what stands in the way of a return to a stable, productive and powerful America.

    As we express our gratitude, we must never forget that the highest appreciation is not to utter words, but to live by them. John F. Kennedy

    by JaxDem on Sun Aug 24, 2014 at 04:19:18 AM PDT

  •  The gutting of our middle class.... (29+ / 0-)

    Written over and over and over.
    Those manufacturing jobs that created our "standard of living" and put money in tax coffers for services and upkeep sent overseas. With help from ol Uncle Sam.

    Not everyone is college oriented.  Some of us just want to provide for families with a decent wage.

    Whatever the Foxteapublicans say, the opposite is the truth.

    by Forward is D not R on Sun Aug 24, 2014 at 04:19:27 AM PDT

  •  Bingo !! On the Ferguson situation and Emerson. (10+ / 0-)

    As to ISIS or AQI or whatever, the media editors are on matching orders to sell us that the Iraqi Army is about to get up off its butt and retake Tikrit. Of course, as otherwise we utterly wated $2,000,000,000,000 and George Bush is maliciously stupid.

    Problem with that ???

    Tikrit was never lost in the first place. Only the far west side, about 40% by land area. And then middle of July a coalition of Iraqi Army, lots of AAH militia, Qods Force, and even some local Sunni tribesmen retook the city killing 300 ISIS raiders. Another 200 or so were trapped because the Iranian general in charge set up a perimeter defense, first thing out.

    "Axis of Evil" ??? About as sane as "Mission Accomplished." AOE came for Iran as they offered to send 20,000 troops to Afghanistan to help fight Taliban, who had murdered Iranians in northern Afghanistan. Now Iran is our ally with Arabic-speaking troops on the ground, spilling blood to defeat ISIS.

    But corporate MSM will go to their lying graves to defend Republican dogma -- including "Axis of Evil."

    "The illiteracy of our children are appalling." #43

    by waterstreet2008 on Sun Aug 24, 2014 at 04:20:02 AM PDT

  •  Ruth Marcus, honey -- just so you know (15+ / 0-)

    we will never get "W" far enough in the rearview mirror of history to look even remotely competent.

    As we express our gratitude, we must never forget that the highest appreciation is not to utter words, but to live by them. John F. Kennedy

    by JaxDem on Sun Aug 24, 2014 at 04:25:54 AM PDT

  •  Not true. (29+ / 0-)

    In reference to Rick Perry, Leonard Pitts says:

    His crime? He issued a veto.
    Rick Perry was indicted for threatening a duly elected official with taking away funds from her department, which is against the law.

    For years the right insisted that Bill Clinton was not charged with a sexual picadillo but lying in a deposition - perjury - which is against the law.  And he was impeached for it.

    Do pundits not understand the law, or do they just get caught up in the meme of the day?  Whichever, Pitts is emblematic of their just giving lip service to the subject without spending the time to understand the charges.

    "All that is necessary for evil to triumph is for good men to do nothing" - Edmund Burke

    by SueDe on Sun Aug 24, 2014 at 04:31:01 AM PDT

    •  Pundits are paid to obfuscate the law and reality. (5+ / 0-)
      •  Apparently. (6+ / 0-)

        Either that or they're also right-wing crazies, or they're lazy, or they're all stupid.  I just don't usually expect it from someone like Leonard Pitts.  I guess I should get used to it from anyone.

        "All that is necessary for evil to triumph is for good men to do nothing" - Edmund Burke

        by SueDe on Sun Aug 24, 2014 at 04:58:54 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •   It seeems to me that Leonard Pitts (8+ / 0-)

          is really missing the the back story in this case.  I'm disapointed in his critique.  While he says
          courts should not be used as weapons of political destruction, trying to win judicially what they could not win at the ballot box, he forgets that Rosemary Lehmberg is a duly elected official and ignores that her office was uncovering a hudge scandal of Perry and his cronies.  Her leaving would have closed the investigation that has resulted in the disclosure of his involvelvement in the multi million dollar scam.

          Be the change you want to see in the world. -Gandhi

          by DRo on Sun Aug 24, 2014 at 05:24:28 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Other than his being completely correct, what (0+ / 0-)

            makes you think he hasn't bothered to investigate the story before writing the piece?

            Are you saying Pitts is just a lightweight hack?  A Republican mouthpiece?

            LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

            by dinotrac on Sun Aug 24, 2014 at 06:05:27 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  No (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              skohayes, SueDe

              I have the highest regards for Leonart Pitts.  That does not mean I cannot disagree with him.  In this case I do.  That's why I said, "I'm disapointed in his critique".

              Be the change you want to see in the world. -Gandhi

              by DRo on Sun Aug 24, 2014 at 06:12:03 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  You said that Pitts "is really missing the (0+ / 0-)

                back story in this case."

                That would mean that he didn't do his due diligence, didn't research and didn't care.

                That would be the work of a lightweight hack.

                I don't think he is that kind of lightweight hack.  I believe that you disagree with him, but not because he doesn't understand what he's writing about.

                LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

                by dinotrac on Sun Aug 24, 2014 at 07:18:42 AM PDT

                [ Parent ]

    •  Not to mention (10+ / 0-)

      Not to mention that the case was brought forward to the grand jury by a Republican judge and prosecutor.

      "Son, if you really want something in this life, you have to work for it. Now quiet! They're about to announce the lottery numbers." Homer Simpson

      by SanAntonioKrusty on Sun Aug 24, 2014 at 05:12:52 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Ummm...prosecutor works for Lehmberg. (0+ / 0-)

        This is about revenge, pure and simple.

        Pure abuse of prosecutoriral power.

        LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

        by dinotrac on Sun Aug 24, 2014 at 06:07:32 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Wrong (14+ / 0-)
          The Public Integrity Unit is largely funded by the Texas Legislature. That money isn’t earmarked for Rosemary Lehmberg; it’s earmarked for the oversight function of the Travis County DA’s Public Integrity Unit. It is that money that Perry threatened to line-item veto if Lehmberg did not resign. When she did not, and Travis County opted not to remove her, Perry then yanked the funding. Afterwards, he continued to make offers to restore the funding in exchange for Lehmberg’s resignation, according to media reports. One account says he signaled that he would find Lehmberg another well-paying job within the DA’s office. Had she resigned, Perry would have appointed her successor.

          The criminal case against Perry centers on his “coercion” of a local elected official using threats and promises. It is not premised—as has been repeatedly misreported—on the veto itself. Craig McDonald, the head of Texans for Public Justice and the original complainant, has said as much. As McDonald told CNN:

          “The governor is doing a pretty good job to try to make this about [Lehmberg] and her DWI conviction. But this has never been about his veto of her budget and about her. This is about his abuse of power and his coercion trying to get another public citizen to give up their job.”

          http://www.texasobserver.org/...

          I should note that part of the evidence out there is that there are other prosecutors who have also received DUIs, and Perry never tried to get them to quit.

          Two other Texas DAs were arrested for DUI during Perry's tenure in office and he spoke not a discouraging word about their indiscretions. Kaufman County D.A. Rick Harrison drove the wrong way into traffic and was found guilty of drunk driving in 2009 and in 2003 Terry McEachern, DA of Swisher County, was convicted of a DUI. Perry said nothing. It's probably only coincidental that both of those individuals were Republicans and did not oversee an investigative unit responsible for keeping elected officials honest in the capitol.
          http://www.huffingtonpost.com/...

          If trees gave off WIFi signals, we would probably plant so many trees, we would save the planet. Too bad they only produce the oxygen we breathe.

          by skohayes on Sun Aug 24, 2014 at 06:20:19 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Sorry, but I'm right. If you'll try a little truth (0+ / 0-)

            telling instead of debunking, you'll discover that the unit reports to her.

            LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

            by dinotrac on Sun Aug 24, 2014 at 07:08:26 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  wow, convincing argument. lol (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              Josiah Bartlett
            •  Um, this has nothing to do with (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              Josiah Bartlett, salmo

              the Public Integrity Unit, it has to do with Perry using bribes and threats to try and force someone (a particular someone) from their job.
              A judge (not the PIU) decided that the charges deserved a special prosecutor. And the original complainant was "Texans for Public Justice" an NGO (and not the PIU).

              If trees gave off WIFi signals, we would probably plant so many trees, we would save the planet. Too bad they only produce the oxygen we breathe.

              by skohayes on Sun Aug 24, 2014 at 08:59:56 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  What bribes and threats? (0+ / 0-)

                Is there something that hasn't been reported?

                Or are you just making stuff up because you hate Perry and are sure that a really nasty person (Lehmberg) isn't just seeking revenge by any means necessary?

                LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

                by dinotrac on Sun Aug 24, 2014 at 09:53:16 AM PDT

                [ Parent ]

                •  She's "nasty" because she got a DUI? (2+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  Josiah Bartlett, salmo

                  Why would she seek revenge when she hasn't lost her job?

                  As for the threats and coercion, please see my comment above, where it's explained very clearly.

                  If trees gave off WIFi signals, we would probably plant so many trees, we would save the planet. Too bad they only produce the oxygen we breathe.

                  by skohayes on Sun Aug 24, 2014 at 02:58:15 PM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

                  •  Did you see the video? (0+ / 0-)

                    You wouldn't be asking about nasty.

                    You also wouldn't be asking about revenge.

                    LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

                    by dinotrac on Sun Aug 24, 2014 at 03:29:42 PM PDT

                    [ Parent ]

                    •  A lot of people arrested for DUIs are (0+ / 0-)

                      abusive and mean, it's the alcohol that does it.  
                      Doesn't make her any different from any other person arrested for DUI.

                      If trees gave off WIFi signals, we would probably plant so many trees, we would save the planet. Too bad they only produce the oxygen we breathe.

                      by skohayes on Mon Aug 25, 2014 at 03:39:05 AM PDT

                      [ Parent ]

                      •  Alcohol does not make you a different person, (0+ / 0-)

                        it just removes your inhibitions.  

                        That woman is one nasty sack of entitled shit.
                        And yes, of course she's taking revenge.

                        LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

                        by dinotrac on Mon Aug 25, 2014 at 04:23:01 AM PDT

                        [ Parent ]

                        •  What you seem to not realize (0+ / 0-)

                          is that she did not charge Perry with anything, her department did not file charges, and she has nothing to do with this, other than that she was targeted illegally by Perry to be removed.
                          An NGO filed a complaint with a judge, the judge assigned a special prosecutor, and the prosecutor presented the evidence to the grand jury, which indicted Perry. Felony charges, by the way.

                          If trees gave off WIFi signals, we would probably plant so many trees, we would save the planet. Too bad they only produce the oxygen we breathe.

                          by skohayes on Mon Aug 25, 2014 at 01:42:28 PM PDT

                          [ Parent ]

            •  Interesting (4+ / 0-)

              most people would consider debunking, truth telling. Especially when backed up by statements from people actually involved. You, see there you have it from the "horse's mouth" (McDonald, a Republican by the way) that the case is not about the veto itself, but about Perry's attempt to force a duly elected official to resign. The charges that the Republican prosecutor argued to the grand jury are: abuse of official capacity, a first-degree felony, and coercion of a public servant, a third-degree felony.
              No one has made the claim that the veto itself was illegal. But that he threatened funding of the part of the DA's office (Public Integrity) with the veto unless the DULY ELECTED head of that office resigned. This is the abuse of official capacity and the coercion of a public servant, which is apparently illegal in Texas. Who knew? I thought the foundation of Texas state government was abuse of power and coercion.
              By the way, the prosecutor that made the pitch to the grand jury was a special prosecutor, so no, he doesn't report to Lehmberg. He was appointed by a Republican judge at the request of the Public Integrity Unit, exactly to distance itself from the lame "politically motivated" charge.
              Dino, you'll need to do better than that if you continue to troll DKos. This is a site where actual facts and links to back those facts are valued. And don't fret it. There are enough ultra right wing judges in Texas to get this dismissed, which one of them will. Although I'll bet Perry wants to drag this out to squeeze every dime he can out of it. He's already got merchandise! Have a nice day, and bless your heart.

              "Liberty" is a living wage. "Freedom" is not worrying about your medical bills.

              by billybam on Sun Aug 24, 2014 at 10:38:54 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

      •  And that, regardless of the merits of the case (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Josiah Bartlett

        Completely destroys Pitts' attempt at "I don't want to do false equivalence, but this is at least a little equivalent because it's Democrats going after a Republican politician."

        No, when you have Republicans going after a Republican politician who's become too corrupt for them to ignore, that doesn't become a Democratic crime comparable to Republicans going after a Democratic politician because green cheese.

        The real USA Patriot Act was written in 1789. It's called the Bill of Rights.

        by nicteis on Sun Aug 24, 2014 at 08:08:46 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  He took action within his power as Governor (0+ / 0-)

      of the state of Texas.

      The lawsuit is ridiculous and patently political.
      It is the revenge of a drunken prosecutor.

      Texas law already provides the proper way to override a veto:
      a 2/3 vote in each house of the legislature.

      Pitts is completely correct in his assessment.
      If there were any justice, the prosecutors in this case would lose their law licenses.  In most jurisdictions, an attorney bringing a suit as ridiculous and trumped up as this one would be subject to sanctions.

      LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

      by dinotrac on Sun Aug 24, 2014 at 06:04:12 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  It is not a "lawsuit". It is a felony indictment, (11+ / 0-)

        And as SanAntonioKrust already said, it was

        "brought forward to the grand jury by a Republican judge and prosecutor."
        Not the revenge of a "drunken prosecutor"
        •  Yes. My bad. Doesn't change my comment at (0+ / 0-)

          at all.

          It's a malicious prosecution.

          LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

          by dinotrac on Sun Aug 24, 2014 at 07:20:11 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  How exactly don't the facts differ from your (0+ / 0-)

            comment "at all"?

            "It is the revenge of a drunken prosecutor"
            No, no it's not. The "drunk prosecutor" has nothing to do with this prosecution.

            The felony indictment against Perry is also not just about a veto. It is about using coercion and bribery to force a duly elected official out of office so he could thwart the will of the voters and appoint one of his cronies to the office.

            "Texas law already provides the proper way to override a veto:
            a 2/3 vote in each house of the legislature."
            Texas law also provides the proper way to remove an official from office if they are indeed no longer able  to lawfully carry out their duties. However, since Perry was on his own little political witch hunt/power trip, he chose to ignore that fact.
      •  What Perry did was attempt to extort (4+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Stude Dude, DRo, Josiah Bartlett, salmo

        a public official into resigning office. I'm no fan of the DA and certainly no fan of Perry. If he hadn't connected the veto to the demand that she resign there would be no indictment.

        "I agree with you, I want to do it, now make me do it!" ~ FDR

        by JC Dufresne on Sun Aug 24, 2014 at 07:15:59 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  H e did it by purely legal means. If the Texas (0+ / 0-)

          lege is offended, they have the power to overturn the veto.

          This is a malicious prosecution and proof positive that Lemberg should not continue in office.

          LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

          by dinotrac on Sun Aug 24, 2014 at 07:21:09 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Try reading this.... (3+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            skohayes, aimeehs, Josiah Bartlett

            The repubs have the lege locked up.  They only meet every 2nd year.  For at least 10 years, the Texas Republican Party has officially sought to strip Travis County of the public integrity unit, which prosecutes political corruption. In this bright red state, that office remains one of the few significant powers left in Democratic hands.

            Read more: http://www.politico.com/...

            Be the change you want to see in the world. -Gandhi

            by DRo on Sun Aug 24, 2014 at 07:45:14 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  So? (0+ / 0-)

              There is no need for you to like the law, just as there is no need for the law to be fair.

              This is the way Texas works and it's the way Texas has worked for many years.  

              Malicious prosecution is malicious prosecution.

              Want to grouse about Perry's veto?
              Grouse away.

              At least he hasn't had Lehmberg indicted on felony charges.
              So far as I can tell, her DWI was all her own doing, as was here absolutely reprehensible diva act while under arrest.

              LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

              by dinotrac on Sun Aug 24, 2014 at 09:51:49 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

      •  Democrats are not leading this investigation (6+ / 0-)

        nor is Lehmberg's office.
        The case was assigned by a REPUBLICAN judge to a special prosecutor:

        The criminal complaint against Perry was filed in June 2013 by the liberal Texans for Public Justice but it was assigned to a Republican judge in Bexar County who appointed Michael McCrum—a former police officer and prosecutor in the George H.W. Bush administration—as special prosecutor. McCrum was previously tapped by U.S. Sen. John Cornyn and former Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison (both conservative Republicans) to be the U.S. Attorney for the Western District of Texas. There is no evidence that McCrum has a partisan axe to grind—quite the contrary.

        The Travis County DA’s office, including Rosemary Lehmberg, had nothing to do with the indictment.

        http://www.texasobserver.org/...

        If trees gave off WIFi signals, we would probably plant so many trees, we would save the planet. Too bad they only produce the oxygen we breathe.

        by skohayes on Sun Aug 24, 2014 at 07:39:01 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Funny isn't it? (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          skohayes, Josiah Bartlett

          When the argument is made that the actual prosecutors bringing the case against Darren Wilson before the grand jury still work for and are answerable to McColloch, who has an appearance of conflict that would almost certainly keep him off a jury hearing such a case (his father, a policeman, was shot by a black person) we get the opposite argument. Oh no, they may work in McColloch's office, be answerable to him, have a future or not dependent upon him, but they are totally independent—no need for McColloch to recuse or a special prosecutor with zero ties to that office be appointed. An example can be seen here.

          That said, in a very rare agreement with our resident TP/GOP advocate there is one point of past agreement about the McColloch role. Yep avoid accusations of taint and even the appearance of conflict—a good reason to have a special prosecutor.

          The only foes that threaten America are the enemies at home, and those are ignorance, superstition, and incompetence. [Elbert Hubbard]

          by pelagicray on Sun Aug 24, 2014 at 08:04:59 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

    •  Also Perry's prosecution is totally in republican (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      aimeehs, Josiah Bartlett, salmo

      hands.  The Democratic prosecutor has reclused herself from
      the case.  
      Republicans are moving forward with it now.

      We are not powerless!! "Activism is the rent I pay for living on this planet."– Alice Walker

      by nocynicism on Sun Aug 24, 2014 at 08:25:24 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Emerson (5+ / 0-)

    I followed the link and was not surprised to see the same old right wing talking points in the comments section. I just don't have the energy to refute the old chestnut that "inner city" folks don't put a premium on education and simply want "big government" to take care of them. Haven't you heard? They're "entitled".

    And as the song and dance begins, the children play at home with needles, needles and pins.

    by The Lone Apple on Sun Aug 24, 2014 at 04:32:12 AM PDT

  •  Navel gazing over at Redstate.... (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    JaxDem, xxdr zombiexx, skohayes

    '....we should be open to discussion. We should listen respectfully, consider the concerns of the black community...'

    http://www.redstate.com/...

    •  Pod people don't have bellybuttons. Just saying... (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      skillet, kkkkate

      Pod people don't have bellybuttons. Just saying.

      Kidding aside, it is a good start I guess. I'll take anything that gets people to listen to each other. I'm old enough to remember pre-Rush when I could find common ground with even the most extreme people on either side of the spectrum. I would be happy to see those days again.

    •  If you skip the first comment there, (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      skillet

      the others are almost (almost) self-reflective.
      People are "SHOCKED, shocked, I tell you!" at the racism going on.
      The first comment is reflective of the stupid wing of the Republican party(complete with bad spelling and malapropisms):

      We have a problem ! 126 comments so far and a article with antidotes that are reflective, a problem, everyone wants more loving and giving, more free stuff ? How did we get here ? Being around for sometime now and some of my closest friends being of the opposite colors, and for years we agree on one thing, it has gotten worse. Not racist, but social favoritism, and because by political design the blacks get lumped in the largest pot they receive the greatest attention. But this will change, next it will be the Latin, we can already see it well on the way, the Mexican voting block and the ongoing fight to secure it. No we aren't raciest and yes we have a lot of people that just aren't interested in there government and why should they, we have made it necessary only when there party vote is needed to secure there lifestyle that is being provided for that vote. So the scholars and beaters will continue to fret over why one white policeman shot one black man and don't give a damn 34 black kids were shot by there brothers and sisters last night, but we have a problem !

      If trees gave off WIFi signals, we would probably plant so many trees, we would save the planet. Too bad they only produce the oxygen we breathe.

      by skohayes on Sun Aug 24, 2014 at 07:52:06 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  My running buddy (conservative) (10+ / 0-)

    was complaining that Obama was on camera making a hasty statement about ISIS recently then rushing off to play golf.

    He was outraged. It's cool the man gets  a vacation and he wants him to have it but he was just not pleased to see a rush to play golf after talking about terror.

    .

    .

    .

    .

    So I reminded him of this. :D

  •  Is Dowd trying to get Douthat to ask her out? (7+ / 0-)

    She is making me like Parker at the WS Urinal and I think it is time for her column to move over to Red Snake and be done with it.

  •  Thanks for the excellent roundup, Mark! (11+ / 0-)

    Ruth Marcus is an Obamascold. He could float down from heaven on a pink cloud, dispensing a million dollars each to everyone on earth and she'd still find something to bitch about. I stopped reading her long ago.

    These days I read only three op-edders on the WaPo: Eugene, E. J., and Harold. No point in reading any of the others.

    "Religion is what keeps the poor from murdering the rich."--Napoleon

    by Diana in NoVa on Sun Aug 24, 2014 at 04:44:26 AM PDT

  •  That 'wrong side of history' trope has gotten (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    dinotrac, a2nite, Mark Sumner

    lazy and boring. No doubt there were Romans who said "That Attila. He's so 3rd century!"
    There are always barbarians who want to burn the world down.

  •  BREAKING! (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    tobendaro, Mark Sumner, skohayes

    U.S. officials rule that monkey selfies cannot be copyrighted

    The ruling effectively closes the book on an intellectual property debate between David Slater, the UK photographer whose camera was recently used by a curious crested black macaque living in the Indonesian island of Sulawesi to snap a picture of herself, and Wikimedia Commons, which argued that the image should be considered public domain and not Slater’s property.

    “Slater insists he owns the rights to the image of a monkey staring curiously into the camera as he snapped a selfie, and the photographer claims he’s suffered considerable expense to secure the photos,” explained Abby Phillip of the Washington Post. “The fact that they have been, essentially, distributed for free on the Internet through the Wikimedia Commons Web site has cost him untold amounts of money.”

    I know this will allow a lot of people to get on with their lives....
  •  And in addition to this.... (0+ / 0-)

    "It was here, at the Little League World Series, that Mo’ne Davis captured the country’s hearts. A 13-year-old wunderkind from Philadelphia, she was believed to be the first black girl to play in the series. She was definitely the first girl ever to pitch a shutout. She landed on the cover of Sports Illustrated, exploded stereotypes about women and sports and did it with a poise and grace that most people twice or even four times her age struggle to muster."

    We have this...

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/...

    "These 'Yet To Be' United States" --James Baldwin-- -6.75, -5.78

    by kevinbr38 on Sun Aug 24, 2014 at 05:03:46 AM PDT

  •  Nothing on Ebola...... (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    DRo, tb mare

    The pundits might know that they are in over their heads.

    Philippines prepares mandatory repatriation order

    Most Filipinos in the three main Ebola countries are there as nurses. It pays $1,500 a month which is first-rate money. But now the government is afraid of the staggering rate-of-expansion of this strain of the virus and wants to get its people out of there:

    The Department of Foreign Affairs (DFA) is poised to raise Alert Level 4 - imposing mandatory repatriation - for Filipinos in three West African countries hardest hit by the Ebola virus outbreak: Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia.

    This, even as it explained that the welfare of the Filipinos is driving its plan to pull out its sizeable contingents of peacekeepers from LIberia....

    "We are preparing for the implementation of mandatory repatriation of Filipinos" in the three Ebola-stricken countries, confirmed DFA spokesman Charles Jose in a text message.

    Alert level 2 (restriction phase) was raised earlier on these countries.

    Mr. Jose had said earlier that the Philippine government will shoulder the repatriation of the overseas Filipino workers wishing to exit Sierra Leone, Guinea and Liberia, where the Philippine government has a large peacekeeping contingent that it said would likely be pulled out this year.

    Government data show 880 Filipinos are in Guinea, 632 in Liberia (including the 148 UN peacekeepers) and 1,979 in Sierra Leone.

    I think they're missing Ivory Coast. That'll be easy to fix.

    Since a conjecture came out that human sweat is the most likely transfer vector for this strain of Ebola, it has been a nightmare for public health officials trying to plan a response to a local outbreak. Avoiding sweat in a city? How are people going to do that? For any city, but worst for the tropics.

    Betcha shaking hands disappears in a trice.

    "The illiteracy of our children are appalling." #43

    by waterstreet2008 on Sun Aug 24, 2014 at 05:03:53 AM PDT

    •  Also, WHO reports that new beds for (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      DRo, tb mare

      quarantine facilities are being flooded, at least in Liberia. That goes with unreported cases.

      There's still no official estimate for the transfer ratio, the R-zero for this strain in tropical urban environments. WHO did acknowledge that sweat tests positive -- not just blood and semen -- but did not follow up with an estimation for the R-zero.

      "The illiteracy of our children are appalling." #43

      by waterstreet2008 on Sun Aug 24, 2014 at 05:38:17 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Why do folks believe this? (6+ / 0-)

    One of the "pundits" above wrote:

    Increasingly, the only choices in any contentious political issue are 1) take whatever President Obama can generate through executive order, or 2) settle for nothing happening until at least 2016 with no guarantee that the right won't commit itself to hamstringing the next president just as it has the current president.
    I thought we had an election coming up this November, and I thought elections had consequences.

    And I believe we can take back the House and keep the Senate.

    And then we make some of the changes we've been waiting for since Obama got elected.

    •  You think we can take back the (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Msanger, tb mare

      House in 2014?

      •  I do. (4+ / 0-)

        I "think" that. What I know for sure is that if we think we can't, we wont (how do you spell that?)

        I think that a combination of women voting, and people realizing the republicans really don't want to do anything for the next two years -- will motive core dem voters.

        And when Democrats vote, we win.

        •  That POV discounts the realities of... (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          tb mare, skohayes

          ...House district maps and pools of voters.

          We can win a national election where we need only simple majorities to secure electoral votes.

          We can even win statewide races where the threshold is the same.

          House races are local. No matter how enthusiastic the party, if the lines are drawn a certain way, the odds can become insurmountable.

          I have never been fond of holding my nose and doing anything...even when someone farts in the elevator.

          by Love Me Slender on Sun Aug 24, 2014 at 06:12:16 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  Sounds to me that you (0+ / 0-)

          are intentionally just trying to use positive thinking to accomplish something. The math just doesn't work though - we're not going to win races in which the district is bright red and we don't even have a candidate on the ballot. Or maybe if we just think positively...

          •  If we don't compete, we don't win (0+ / 0-)

            and even if we have a candidate, if we know we are going to lose, then nobody puts in any effort.

            I was in Northern VA around the time of Dean running for the nomination, and it was not blue and not even purple at the time. The powers that be knew we couldn't win, so they didn't do much.  Somebody whose name I dont' remember but is now a state rep, got us organized, and we started working as if we could win.

            And now Northern Va is blue.  Of course demographics have a lot to do with it, but so does thinking we can win and then doing something to make the vision real.

      •  You should be able to, given how badly the GOP (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        hlsmlane, Stude Dude, New Rule

        has performed.

        Republican base is pretty small these days and there are many, many unaffiliated voters.

        The biggest problem I see is that Democrats aren't doing much to inspire confidence and that might make enough people vote for divided government -- ie, doing nothing is better than doing bad -- to keep the wins from coming.

        LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

        by dinotrac on Sun Aug 24, 2014 at 06:11:02 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  The Republican base was pretty small in 2010, too (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          dinotrac, Stude Dude, kay3295

          In fact, at that point, they were downright pitiful. They were a beaten party. Even Hannity proclaimed his status as "conservatism in exile".

          Now, they're fired up and have BIG money bankrolling their efforts. Our side? Not seeing the enthusiasm...and the polling numbers in senate races are bearing that enthusiasm gap.

          I have never been fond of holding my nose and doing anything...even when someone farts in the elevator.

          by Love Me Slender on Sun Aug 24, 2014 at 06:30:59 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  2010 should be a cautionary tale...but 2014 is (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Love Me Slender, Stude Dude

            very different.

            2010 came after the worst of the Great Recession/Depression hit ordinary Americans.  Through the magic of bad timing, the crash happened on Bush's watch, but the damage to the middle really hit in 2009.

            So -- Democrats were hurt by "being there".

            And, while ACA may be a selling point now, the year-long wrangle to get it passed took place while unemployment was skyrocketing.  A bit of a disconnect with the public.  For that matter, I recall Democratic priorities being everywhere except for the things that were hitting Americans hard.  Even the "stimulus" package was passed so early in the administration that much of the bad news happened as it was fading into the rear-view mirror.

            Finally, the failure to do anything about siginficant looming tax increases for much of the middle class was a needless blunder.

            None of that is the case for 2014, PLUS we've had four years of those 2010 Republicans, and they've done a lot of stupid stuff.  Eric Cantor, anybody?

            LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

            by dinotrac on Sun Aug 24, 2014 at 07:15:04 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  I get what you're saying... (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              Stude Dude, dinotrac

              But they still have the money and enthusiasm edge and the benefit of very winnable races in the senate.

              We can point and laugh all we want, but the GOP 100% gets how to get their people to the polls in midterm elections (2006 was an outlier...Katrina and Iraq created an environment where GOP success was an impossibility)...while our side is relying on getting young people and other necessary constituents to the polls in a year when our dynamic leader isn't on the ballot and is seemingly uninterested in helping anyone get elected/stay in office.

              I think we have a severely uphill battle to keep the senate. Sorry if that seems pessimistic, but it's the truth as I see things right now.

              I have never been fond of holding my nose and doing anything...even when someone farts in the elevator.

              by Love Me Slender on Sun Aug 24, 2014 at 07:26:39 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  They also have (3+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                wintergreen8694, dinotrac, aimeehs

                gerrymandering, which is why they'll keep the House this cycle.
                I don't think the Republicans can win a majority in the Senate, however.

                If trees gave off WIFi signals, we would probably plant so many trees, we would save the planet. Too bad they only produce the oxygen we breathe.

                by skohayes on Sun Aug 24, 2014 at 07:55:40 AM PDT

                [ Parent ]

                •  Everybody has gerrymandering. (1+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  skohayes

                  Republicans may have a bit more right now, but there aren't enough true Republican voters to make gerrymandering insurmountable.

                  Remember how it works:

                  Gerrymandering creates more winnable seats by making fewer safe seats. IE, better to win 3 seats by 5% than 1 seat by 50%.  A bad enough performance, and that gerrymandering can hurt as easily as it can help.

                  LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

                  by dinotrac on Sun Aug 24, 2014 at 09:44:29 AM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

                  •  Over a million more people (0+ / 0-)

                    voted for Democrats in the House than Republicans in 2012 and we gained a few seats.
                    It's going to take a few cycles to get the majority back.

                    If trees gave off WIFi signals, we would probably plant so many trees, we would save the planet. Too bad they only produce the oxygen we breathe.

                    by skohayes on Sun Aug 24, 2014 at 02:45:17 PM PDT

                    [ Parent ]

                    •  Meaningless. (0+ / 0-)

                      You know as well as I do that the only national elections we hold are for President and Vice President.

                      Democrats can get a million vote edge in New York City alone.  Winning big in New York, however, cannot help you in Iowa or South Dakota or Wyoming, etc.

                      LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

                      by dinotrac on Sun Aug 24, 2014 at 03:32:25 PM PDT

                      [ Parent ]

              •  Important question: Why do they have an (0+ / 0-)

                enthusiasm edge?

                I don't think you're wrong, but I think it goes to Democrats not getting anybody excited.

                It's easy to blame Congress, but it's also easy to forget FDR's first two years, when GOP Senators blocked him at every turn.

                But Democrats kept throwing stuff out there and selling it to the people, creating an awesome sales pitch for a filibuster proof Senate: We did everything we could to pass a,b,c,d,and e for you.  You saw that. You saw how hard we fought for you.  Get these Republicans out of our way, and we will turn those things into law.

                Nobody's entitled to votes.  They should be earned.  All the Koch money in the world can't beat a candidate who has connected with the voters and gotten them excited.

                LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

                by dinotrac on Sun Aug 24, 2014 at 09:41:47 AM PDT

                [ Parent ]

      •  Can at the least man the trenches to limit the (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        New Rule

        damage at the polls. Constant defeatist chatter tends to drive people to stay home, ignorant people to be sure, and let a truly hostile opposition run the game. Many of us may look at the citizens of Ferguson who turned out for Obama and then sat on their hands for the local elections as "ignorant" but they have plenty of company among the upscale, advanced degree holders in my county.

        If we had Obama election turnouts we still might not retake the House, but we'd probably consolidate control of the Senate to avoid untold idiocy and grief over the next two years.

        The only foes that threaten America are the enemies at home, and those are ignorance, superstition, and incompetence. [Elbert Hubbard]

        by pelagicray on Sun Aug 24, 2014 at 08:17:11 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  I don't think that rational (0+ / 0-)

          analysis and assessment of which CD's we can win in and which we cannot in a particular election qualifies as "defeatist chatter". Sometimes you just cannot win, given the composition of the electorate. There are CD's that went 80% for Romney, where almost every voter is a white evangelical, where there may not even be a Dem on the ballot. Declaring that we are going to lose those CDs is not defeatist, it's smart (as it helps us to focus our limited resources on those battles we can actually win).

    •  I doubt we can take back the House, (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      kay3295, skohayes, aimeehs

      but certainly hope we don't lose ground in either the House or Senate.

      •  Yep...best case scenario for us is... (4+ / 0-)

        ...keep the senate (narrowly), hold the numbers in the house.

        I think holding the senate would be a major victory, and would, at minimum, allow Obama's judicial appointments to proceed. But if the GOP holds both chambers after Nov, dark times are ahead.

        That's why the most money should be focused on keeping as many senate seats as possible.

        I have never been fond of holding my nose and doing anything...even when someone farts in the elevator.

        by Love Me Slender on Sun Aug 24, 2014 at 06:33:36 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  On keeping the senate... (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      New Rule

      At some point, you have to embrace the realities of the situation:

      Here are the states where we are currently fighting to keep seats 6 years after a wave election handed them to us (or made them easier to keep):

      Alaska
      Arkansas
      Louisiana
      South Dakota
      Montana
      West Virginia
      North Carolina
      Iowa

      Of those states, President Obama won a grand total of ONE of them...and some of them are pretty deeply red.

      What's more, unlike in 2010, the GOP has not blessed us with crazy nut-job tea party candidates. If you are honest with yourself, you will understand that replacing Christine O'Donnell, Richard Mourdock, Todd Akin and Sharron Angle with even run-of-the-mill establishment candidates would have made keeping the senate more difficult than it was (especially in DE, where Mike Castle would have run away with that seat had the GOP had an ounce of brain matter during the primary process). This time around, the GOP has quashed the crazy and gone a safer route...which makes our job that much more difficult.

      I'm not saying we CAN'T keep the senate, but I think you're looking at reality through some pretty rose-colored glasses here.

      I have never been fond of holding my nose and doing anything...even when someone farts in the elevator.

      by Love Me Slender on Sun Aug 24, 2014 at 06:24:49 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Doubthat, like Scalia, believes in the Devil. (3+ / 0-)

    So of course he believes that the amount of brutality and evil in the world will always remain a constant.

  •  They openly refuse to create jobs for the (8+ / 0-)

    communities in which they headquarter, or in which they serve.  And then have the unmitigated gall to call themselves "job creators."

    That's one more thing to add to my long list of small problems. --my son, age 10

    by concernedamerican on Sun Aug 24, 2014 at 05:36:31 AM PDT

  •  Good for environment = bad for jobs = false? (0+ / 0-)

    All depends on how you do it, and lots of people do it badly.

    Let's see...

    Nancy Pelosi will always be my favorite whipping boy for this one, with her "I'm a friend of the earth" and mocking "Drill! Drill! Drill!" mantra when gas prices first topped $4 a gallon back in 2008.

    If I were King of the World, I would make saying "I'm a friend of the earth" a capital offense. There's not anything really wrong with being a friend of the earth, though I'm pretty sure the planet doesn't much care, but it seems to come out mostly when the discussion turns to people (like coal miners, oil and gas workers, auto-workers) whose industries stand to be destroyed.

    "Oh well. That's too bad, but, if the plaent fries, we're all dead."

    Way to win over the opposition.  Facts are good -- and need to be spread and explained -- but minds won't be changed while people believe that the upcoming change will leave them and their children screwed.

    Green technology as a driver for jobs needs to be front and center -- and reach beyond caulking windows. The potential is far too great to relegate to "and..uh..oh yeah! There'll  be some jobs. I'm really pretty darned sure of that." It's not just about making a living. It's about clearing out roadblocks.

    LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

    by dinotrac on Sun Aug 24, 2014 at 05:50:33 AM PDT

    •  all I hear is "I don't like the present reality so (4+ / 0-)

      I want my politicians to blow smoke up my butt and tell me something different."  The idea that manufacturing jobs and mining jobs are going away b/c of environmental regulations or b/c Nancy Pelosi calls herself "a friend of the earth" is laughable.  Those jobs have been steadily leaving the US since the 70s b/c of favorable taxes and low wages in other countries.  

      If you think "drill, drill, drill"  (which lost the 2008 election) is a solution to either the labor problems in this country or the energy crisis this country faces, you're ... confused.

      Green technology is the answer.  Now, who is standing in the way of green technology? Oh, the people chanting "drill, drill, drill."  

      •  Then clean the beans out of your ears. (0+ / 0-)

        You sound like a member of the "Collateral damage, who cares? crowd," the hypocrites who will call people stupid for not wanting their lives ruined.

        LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

        by dinotrac on Sun Aug 24, 2014 at 09:55:31 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  Fastest growing industry in Kansas (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      dinotrac

      right now is wind energy.  Brownback has been defending the subsidies, because it's one of the few industries growing in this state.

      If trees gave off WIFi signals, we would probably plant so many trees, we would save the planet. Too bad they only produce the oxygen we breathe.

      by skohayes on Sun Aug 24, 2014 at 07:57:52 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Lots of wind in places like Iowa and Illinois, too (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        skohayes

        Right here in Texas, patron saint state of the oil and gas industry, wind is continuing to grow, with solar getting set to take off.

        The state (which has its own power grid, btw) has, in the last few years, upgraded its power transmission capabilities from West Texas to support both wind and solar.  Wind was the original driver, but it turns out that, in Texas,  peak wind and solar generation times are offset in a way that works out very nicely.

        And -- even more high 5s and fist bumps to Elon Musk:

        Not only is he starting work on a giant battery factory here in the US of A, but is also planning a large solar cell/panel (not sure which) factory for New York State.  And I guess we shouldn't mention that Teslas  and SpaceX rockets are built here.

        OK. SpaceX may not be green, but -- it's still way cool and it's still American jobs.

        LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

        by dinotrac on Sun Aug 24, 2014 at 10:00:42 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  I live about 45 minutes (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          dinotrac

          from the Texas panhandle, so I've seen the huge wind farms built there. Kansas and Oklahoma are way behind the curve on wind energy.
          Frankly, it's a shameful display of ignorance from Republicans, who are against green energy simply because Democrats support it.

          If trees gave off WIFi signals, we would probably plant so many trees, we would save the planet. Too bad they only produce the oxygen we breathe.

          by skohayes on Sun Aug 24, 2014 at 02:50:45 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  I don't think Texas Republicans are against (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            skohayes

            wind energy.  Oil industry types, sure. But lots of money invested here both in wind farms and transmission infrastructure to carry the juice.

            LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

            by dinotrac on Sun Aug 24, 2014 at 03:33:49 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

  •  Pitts: Amen, brother. (0+ / 0-)

    Don't often find myself 100% in agreement with Pitts, but this is one of those times.

    LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

    by dinotrac on Sun Aug 24, 2014 at 05:52:38 AM PDT

  •  I fear Douthat may not only be right, but (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    tb mare, New Rule

    may understate the problem relative to Obama's optimism regarding the arc of history. On my good days I side with Obama on who is 19th century and who isn't, but lately Putin and ISIS and Israel make me fear very deeply for the human future. All of this barbarism is in relatively good times, I think in my dark moments, wait until climate change really takes hold. We can still fix it and Obama may turn out to be right, but it sure doesn't look that way lately.

    We have only just begun and none too soon.

    by global citizen on Sun Aug 24, 2014 at 05:53:23 AM PDT

  •  Love that dkos bogos trollers. This site is one... (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    tb mare, New Rule

    Love that dkos bogos trollers. This site is one of two I visit where I can read the comments section. It only takes one troll to ruin my buzz when reading the comments. I wish other sites were more agressive at banning users who hurl invectives.

    Happy Sunday folks! Enjoy the last few weeks of summer.

  •  Mary Ann was hot. (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    tb mare, Stude Dude

    Once in a while you get shown the light, in the strangest of places if you look at it right.

    by darthstar on Sun Aug 24, 2014 at 06:35:49 AM PDT

  •  Jobs lift people out of poverty everywhere (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Stude Dude

    not just in the US.

    Labor is international.

    I bothers me to imagine some kind of authority sweeping in to force American corporations to close their foreign manufacturing operations. People who are currently working there, beginning to form a regional middle class, would be cast aside like garbage, but because it would be done in the name of more American jobs, few if any Americans would have any moral qualms about it.

    Seriously, folks, labor really is international. A worker in Mexico or China or India is the American worker's brother or sister.

    And from a political perspective, if labor could become organized internationally, can you imagine the impact that would have on economic inequity around the world?

  •  I spent 5 years closing Emerson facilities..... (5+ / 0-)

    all over the US.  They were typically located in small towns and consequently the largest and best employer.  When Emerson moved from these areas people were devastated; what were they going to do?  retrain for a career at age 60?  Get a job at another company?  Emerson was the only company aside from the occasional prison facility in most all of these towns.

    I cleaned up the contamination left at the Emerson sites after years, think 40s and 50s, of operation.  They were operating before there were environmental regulations, and kept us geologist employed.  The company picked up and went to Mexico, then to China, because "China was cheaper".  A lot of these Emerson employees had to train the Mexicans or Chinese that were taking their jobs.

    To this day, I am haunted by these souls and towns that were left without so much as an anchor.

    "A weed is a plant whose virtues have not yet been discovered." Ralph Waldo Emerson

    by Yo Bubba on Sun Aug 24, 2014 at 07:23:30 AM PDT

  •  Great Article By Horrigan (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    New Rule

    A great article that clearly demonstrates how globalization has ruptured the middle class. Make no mistake, globalization is nothing but capital’s war on labor and the abdication of good corporate citizenship by capital. It’s a bad situation now as this article illustrates, but it’s only going to get worse because Capital’s search for easy profit at the expense of the great majority of Americans is endless. It has destroyed basic manufacturing, it has made income inequality in the US one of the highest in the world, and it is now using all sorts of tax loopholes like stockpiling money in offshore accounts or off shoring corporate headquarters as ways to avoid paying a fair share of taxes. The corporate bottom line has to grow somehow in order to fatten executive compensation and Wall Street dividends. After this bit of financial ledgermain where capital goes from here is anybody’s guess, though I do hear some calling for the end to child labor laws and the elimination of the minimum wage. So whenever Republicans and rich people and their spokesmen accuse individuals of engaging in class warfare by suggesting higher taxes, the truth is they actually have been fighting and winning that war since Reagan. And until labor is able to fight back in this war, the economy will continue to suck for most Americans. And Ferguson may only be a precursor to future turmoil because it not only is a racial tinderbox, and white rage at immigrants and blacks not only manifestations of racism, they are also symptoms of economic deprivation, the clash of the have-nots as the pie shrinks. Poverty brings the worst out in people.

  •  Thanks for this diary, Denise! (0+ / 0-)

    And thanks for providing the link to,the Memorial Fund. Just donated.

    "Religion is what keeps the poor from murdering the rich."--Napoleon

    by Diana in NoVa on Sun Aug 24, 2014 at 07:42:58 AM PDT

  •  Oops, wrong diary--sorry! (0+ / 0-)

    "Religion is what keeps the poor from murdering the rich."--Napoleon

    by Diana in NoVa on Sun Aug 24, 2014 at 07:46:38 AM PDT

  •  I feel like the manufacturers (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    New Rule

    who are going to move overseas have already moved. They use the threat of moving like NFL owners use the threat of moving a team to Los Angeles: to extort money and concessions from cash strapped municipalities.

    I'm living in America, and in America you're on your own. America's not a country. It's just a business.

    by CFAmick on Sun Aug 24, 2014 at 08:51:02 AM PDT

  •  Ooops, THAT'S WRONG: (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    New Rule, gardnerhill
    "It costs too much money to do basic manufacturing in the United States."
    NO IT DOES NOT!

    The corrected statement would read:

    "Manufacturing companies can make a profit manufacturing in the USA, but many of them can make MORE profit manufacturing elsewhere, so they do."
    There, fixed it.

    Change the charter of corporations to serve the public interest BEFORE fiduciary concerns. 100% of Republicans and HALF the Dems are AGAINST We The People. We need TRUE Progressives, NOT Republican-Lite Dems - like Hillary, Pelosi, Feinstein...

    by RTIII on Sun Aug 24, 2014 at 09:57:07 AM PDT

  •  3D printer every household, problem solved. (0+ / 0-)

    Motley says that is the way to bring mfg. back. We make what we use. They make what they use. Same cost, different location.

    But.. will it make a good cup of coffee?

    Will Tea Potty mouths use Koch money to insure only the 1% can buy them, rent them, lease them.

    Our money system is not what we have been led to believe. The creation of money has been "privatized," or taken over by private money lenders. Thomas Jefferson called them “bold and bankrupt adventurers just pretending to have money.” webofdebt

    by arealniceguy on Sun Aug 24, 2014 at 02:08:22 PM PDT

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