Skip to main content



Aztec Camera -- "Oblivious"
Discuss

Mystery Science Theater 3000-- "Noh Theater"
Daily Kos Elections is taking this Friday off, as well as this Monday in observance of Memorial Day. We'll be back Tuesday: In the meantime, have a good weekend!
Discuss
U.S. Senator Lisa Murkowski (R-AK) (L), with her husband Verne Martell (C), takes part in a ceremonial re-enactment of her swearing-in by Vice President Joe Biden (R) in the Old Senate Chamber at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, January 5, 2011. REUTERS/Jo
Alaska GOP Sen. Lisa Murkowski
Leading Off:

AK-Sen, AL: Last week, Roll Call reported that state Sen. Mike Dunleavy may be interested in challenging Sen. Lisa Murkowski or Rep. Don Young in the GOP primary. On Tuesday, Dunleavy spoke to the Alaska Dispatch News about his plans: He didn't mention Young at all, but acknowledged that he is looking at facing Murkowski.

Dunleavy conceded that Murkowski has "always treated me decently, and I think vice versa," but he criticized her record in the Senate on national security. Dunleavy also previewed a possible attack line when he accused the federal government of working to "basically strangle the development of the state of Alaska and make us a dependent."

Dunleavy said that he'd start thinking more seriously about a campaign when the legislative session ends, but that may take a little while: Gov. Bill Walker is likely to call another 30-day special session once the current one ends this week. If Dunleavy runs, he could definitely draw some blood from Murkowski. The incumbent has a reputation as a moderate Republican, and she actually lost her 2010 primary to little-known businessman Joe Miller in a complete shocker (Murkowski won the general election with a write-in campaign).

Murkowski is laying the groundwork early to prepare for another challenge, and her new position as chair of the Energy and Natural Resources Committee gives even skeptical Republicans a good reason to keep her in office. But if well-funded conservative groups decide to take aim at her, we could have a real race. Dunleavy also hails from the Mat-Su Valley, which is full of conservative primary voters. Dunleavy's chances will be a lot better if no other well-known Republicans get in, and he may be in luck. Roll Call previously reported that if Dunleavy opposes Murkowski, Miller is likely to take on Young.

Democrats know that they wouldn't have much of a shot at beating Murkowski but if it looks like she could lose her primary, it's possible that we'll see ex-Sen. Mark Begich try for a comeback. Even if Begich says no, Team Blue will probably try and recruit a respectable candidate if Murkowski looks like she's in trouble, though their bench is thin in the Last Frontier.

Continue Reading
Daily Kos Elections Live Digest banner
Want the scoop on hot races around the country? Get the digest emailed to you each weekday morning. Sign up here.

9:01 AM PT (Jeff Singer): LA-Gov: On behalf of the conservative website The Hayride, GOP pollster MarblePort Polling gives us a glance at the Oct. 24 jungle primary. Like pretty much everyone, they find Republican Sen. David Vitter and Democratic state Rep. John Bel Edwards looking good to secure the top-two spots and advance to the Nov. 21 general. They give Vitter and Edwards 38 and 27 percent respectively, with GOP Lt. Gov. Jay Dardenne pretty far back with 15, and Republican Public Service Commissioner Scott Angelle bringing up the rear with 6.

These results are very similar to a recent Southern Media and Opinion Research poll, which also showed Edwards easily beating Dardenne for the second place spot. Given how Republican Louisiana has become in the last few cycles, it's hard to see Vitter losing a runoff to Edwards, though a Republican versus Republican contest between Vitter and Dardenne (or less likely, Vitter and Angelle) could be very interesting.

The gubernatorial field looks pretty set, but there's still one potential wildcard out there. Retired Army Lt. Gen. Russel Honoré has been considering the race, and he tells LaPolitics that he's still thinking about it. Honoré rose to prominence during Hurricane Katrina when he led the relief effort to New Orleans, and he shouldn't struggle for name recognition. In recent years, Honoré has decried the oil industry and opposed fracking, but his environmental positions haven't turned him into a Democrat: Honoré says if he runs, he'll likely do it as an independent.

It's possible that if Honoré gets in, he'll take enough Democratic voters away from Edwards to allow Dardenne to advance to a runoff with Vitter. However, MarblePort took a look at a hypothetical five-way jungle primary and found the opposite outcome. Vitter is still clearly in front with 34, while Edwards leads Dardenne by a wider 26-13. Honoré starts off making very little impact, taking only 7 to Angelle's 6.

MarblePort argues that because Honoré does so well among independents, he takes swing voters away and keeps someone like Dardenne from expanding his support. This is just one early poll and things could change, especially if Dardenne or his allies run some ads reminding Democratic voters that they have a lot in common with Honoré. But right now, a Vitter-Edwards runoff continues to look like the most likely scenario.

9:26 AM PT (Jeff Singer): NV-Sen, 01: Well, maybe Democratic Sen. Dina Titus is serious about a Senate bid after all. Titus had previously expressed interest in running to succeed Harry Reid, but after Reid, the DSCC, and EMILY's List rallied behind ex-state Attorney General Catherine Cortez Masto, it looked unlikely she'd give up her safe House seat for a risky Senate bid. But Titus is once again saying that she's looking at the Senate race, and promises "a decision will be coming soon." Maybe Titus is just enjoying some extra time in the spotlight, but it does sound like she's really considering a "Damn the torpedoes, full speed ahead!" bid against the establishment-favored Masto.

If Titus goes ahead with it, it will open up her safely blue 1st District. There are no shortage of Democrats who could seek this Las Vegas seat, and a few of them may be already running for Congress. State Sen. Ruben Kihuen and ex-Assembywoman Lucy Flores are currently challenging GOP freshman Cresent Hardy in the 4th District, but they may be tempted to switch over to the 1st if Titus leaves (Kihuen ran for the 1st in 2012 but dropped out when he decided he couldn't beat Titus). Kihuen and Flores' legislative districts are mostly contained in the 1st, and if they won, they'd be insulated from even the worst GOP wave in this Obama 66-32 seat.

9:42 AM PT (David Jarman): Demographics: The Census Bureau has released its newest population estimates for the nation's major cities, many of which are still quickly growing. The biggest numeric gain was New York City, gaining 52,700 people between mid-2013 and mid-2014; San Jose, California, gets top billing in that it crossed the one million mark, bringing the total number of million-plus cities to 10. The biggest gainer, percentage-wise, though, was the fairly obscure San Marcos, Texas (up 7.9 percent over the year). Texas, in general, saw the biggest gains: 5 of the 10 largest population gains were in Texas (Houston, Austin, San Antonio, Dallas, and Fort Worth), and 6 of the 13 biggest percentage-wise gains were also in Texas (in suburban/exurban places).

Jed Kolko, now writing for FiveThirty Eight, has a worthwhile critique of the whole enterprise, though; how populous a "city" is, has nothing to do with how "urban"-feeling it is, but rather is mostly about where the city limits arbitrarily got drawn. His maps of the Houston, New York City, and Los Angeles metropolitan areas, that show which portions are urban, suburban, or rural, illustrate this point.  The "urban" portions of New York spill over the city limits into surrounding municipalities, while in Houston the "urban" portion stops well short of the city limits, leaving the city itself only 63 percent urban.

He does so using a neat method; his starting point for the urban/suburban divide -- which the Census Bureau doesn't make, as they only differentiate between urban and rural -- was to survey individuals and ask whether they considered themselves as living in an urban or suburban setting. From there, he was able to merge their responses with density data from the Census, to assign each ZIP code as urban, suburban, or rural.

9:46 AM PT (Jeff Singer): CO-Sen: National Republicans have not been remotely subtle about their goal to recruit Rep. Mike Coffman to challenge Democratic Sen. Michael Bennet. Coffman has won twice in a suburban Denver swing seat, and he's proven to be a very impressive fundraiser, though he's occasionally had his glitches. Coffman knows that he's the NRSC's top choice in the Centennial State and tells Roll Call that he'll probably decide "within the next month." Coffman didn't give any real hint as to which direction he's leaning, saying that he's "[s]till thinking. Never say never. But I haven’t ruled it out."

If Coffman says no, the GOP has some other possible candidates, but none of them exactly set the world on fire. El Paso County Commissioner Darryl Glenn has been running for a while, but he's attracted little attention from anyone. State Sen. Ellen Roberts has expressed interest, though her eclectic mix of social views could be a liability in a GOP primary. Coffman's wife state Attorney General Cynthia Coffman could conceivably run if the congressman says no, but she hasn't shown much inclination to leave the job she was just elected to. Rep. Scott Tipton initially expressed interest, but he sounds unlikely to give up his seat now. There are some other names to watch, but there's no doubt the NRSC badly wants Coffman to be their standard bearer.

10:39 AM PT (Jeff Singer): AK-Sen, AL: Last week, Roll Call reported that state Sen. Mike Dunleavy may be interested in challenging Sen. Lisa Murkowski or Rep. Don Young in the GOP primary. On Tuesday, Dunleavy spoke to the Alaska Dispatch News about his plans: He didn't mention Young at all, but acknowledged that he is looking at facing Murkowski.

Dunleavy conceded that Murkowski has "always treated me decently, and I think vice versa," but he criticized her record in the Senate on national security. Dunleavy also previewed a possible attack line when he accused the federal government of working to “basically strangle the development of the state of Alaska and make us a dependent.”

Dunleavy said that he'd start considering more seriously when the legislative session ends, but that may take a little while: Gov. Bill Walker is likely to call another 30-day special session once the current one ends this week. If Dunleavy runs, he could definitely draw some blood from Murkowski. The incumbent has a reputation as a moderate Republican, and she actually lost her 2010 primary to little-known businessman Joe Miller in a complete shocker (Murkowski won the general election with a write-in campaign).

Murkowski is laying the groundwork early to prepare for another challenge, and her new position as chair of the Energy and Natural Resources Committee gives even skeptical Republicans a good reason to keep her in office. But if well-funded conservative groups decide to take aim at her, we could have a real race. Dunleavy also hails from the Mat-Su Valley, which is full of conservative primary voters. Dunleavy's chances will be a lot better if no other well-known Republicans get in, and he may be in luck. Roll Call previously reported that if Dunleavy opposes Murkowski, Miller is likely to take on Young.

Democrats know that they wouldn't have much of a shot at beating Murkowski but if it looks like she could lose her primary, it's possible that we'll see ex-Sen. Mark Begich try for a comeback. Even if Begich says no, Team Blue will probably try and recruit a respectable candidate if Murkowski looks like she's in trouble, though their bench is thin in the Last Frontier.

11:10 AM PT (Jeff Singer): KY-Gov: Tea partying businessman Matt Bevin emerged from Tuesday's GOP primary with only an 83-vote lead over state Agriculture Commissioner James Comer, and it's no surprise that Comer is requesting that the results be recanvassed. However, as Al Cross of the Institute for Rural Journalism and Community Issues reminds us, the recanvass is unlikely to change much even in a contest this tight. Most of the voting process is electronic, so there's less room for mistakes. We saw that in 2010 in the state's 6th District, where just one vote moved after the recanvass.

The recanvass is scheduled for the morning of May 28 and we'll see where things stand after that. However, while Comer has promised to get behind Bevin if things don't change, he hasn't ruled out seeking a recount if he gains votes next Thursday. A recount would take a lot longer to finish and Democratic nominee Jack Conway would love it if Comer dragged things out, but it doesn't sound like Comer's going to try unless he thinks he has a real path to victory after May 28.

11:28 AM PT (Jeff Singer): PA-Sen: The Democratic primary to face Republican Sen. Pat Toomey has been locked in stasis for a while. National Democrats are dreading the idea of having Joe Sestak serve as their nominee again, and his weak first quarter haul didn't assuage any of their fears. However, Allentown Mayor Ed Pawlowski, the only other notable candidate, didn't impress anyone with his 2014 gubernatorial bid.

The DSCC has been reaching out to Montgomery County Commissioner Josh Shapiro but he's been non-committal. Meanwhile, potential candidates state Sen. Vincent Hughes, Philadelphia District Attorney Seth Williams, and ex-Rep. Chris Carney haven't said anything about their plans in months. Maybe a Shapiro decision can break the logjam, but it's anyone's guess when he'll make his 2016 plans clear.

Politico tells us that Democrats are looking for other potential candidates, and one of them may be Katie McGinty. McGinty ran for governor in 2014 and took only 8 percent of the vote, but she impressed eventual winner Tom Wolf. McGinty serves as Wolf's chief of staff and if she ran for Senate, she could count on more institutional support then she enjoyed last year. Of course, that's a big if, and there's no word if McGinty is even interested.

11:40 AM PT (Jeff Singer): FL-18: Former Secret Service agent Dan Bongino came close to unseating Maryland Democrat John Delaney last year, but he decided to move to Florida rather than seek a rematch. But Bongino isn't putting his political ambitions on hold, telling Sunshine State News that he's considering running for this light red open seat. Bongino does have a good fundraising network, so he could stand out if he gets into what should be a crowded GOP primary. Of course, his opponents aren't going to hesitate to portray him as a carpetbagger. But even if the blows land, Bongino could still slip through if this contest is packed enough.

11:45 AM PT (Jeff Singer): MD-08: Hotel executive Kathleen Matthews has been talking about running for this safely blue open seat for a while, and it looks like she's all but in. Matthews just resigned from her post at Marriott, and it's very unlikely her decision isn't a prerequisite to a House bid. Four notable Democrats are already running for this suburban D.C. seat, and several more could join them before too long.

1:53 PM PT (Jeff Singer): Site News: The Daily Kos Elections Live Digest will be taking Friday and Monday off for the extended Memorial Day weekend. We'll be back here on Tuesday: In the meantime, have a great holiday!

Discuss
Republican Sen. Lisa Murkowski
Republican Sen. Lisa Murkowski lost her 2010 primary, and she may be a conservative target again
Last week, Roll Call reported that state Sen. Mike Dunleavy may be interested in challenging Sen. Lisa Murkowski or Rep. Don Young in the GOP primary. On Tuesday, Dunleavy spoke to the Alaska Dispatch News about his plans: He didn't mention Young at all, but acknowledged that he is looking at facing Murkowski.

Dunleavy conceded that Murkowski has "always treated me decently, and I think vice versa," but he criticized her record in the Senate on national security. Dunleavy also previewed a possible attack line when he accused the federal government of working to “basically strangle the development of the state of Alaska and make us a dependent.”

Dunleavy said that he'd start considering more seriously when the legislative session ends, but that may take a little while: Gov. Bill Walker is likely to call another 30-day special session once the current one ends this week. If Dunleavy runs, he could definitely draw some blood from Murkowski. The incumbent has a reputation as a moderate Republican, and she actually lost her 2010 primary to little-known businessman Joe Miller in a complete shocker (Murkowski won the general election with a write-in campaign).

Murkowski is laying the groundwork early to prepare for another challenge, and her new position as chair of the Energy and Natural Resources Committee gives even skeptical Republicans a good reason to keep her in office. But if well-funded conservative groups decide to take aim at her, we could have a real race. Dunleavy also hails from the Mat-Su Valley, which is full of conservative primary voters. Dunleavy's chances will be a lot better if no other well-known Republicans get in, and he may be in luck. Roll Call previously reported that if Dunleavy opposes Murkowski, Miller is likely to take on Young.

Democrats know that they wouldn't have much of a shot at beating Murkowski but if it looks like she could lose her primary, it's possible that we'll see ex-Sen. Mark Begich try for a comeback. Even if Begich says no, Team Blue will probably try and recruit a respectable candidate if Murkowski looks like she's in trouble, though their bench is thin in the Last Frontier.

Discuss
Senator David Vitter (R-LA) (L) and Representative Ron DeSantis (R-FL) hold a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington to
Republican Sen. David Vitter (left)
On behalf of the conservative website The Hayride, GOP pollster MarblePort Polling gives us a glance at the Oct. 24 jungle primary. Like pretty much everyone, they find Republican Sen. David Vitter and Democratic state Rep. John Bel Edwards looking good to secure the top-two spots and advance to the Nov. 21 general. They give Vitter and Edwards 38 and 27 percent respectively, with GOP Lt. Gov. Jay Dardenne pretty far back with 15, and Republican Public Service Commissioner Scott Angelle bringing up the rear with 6.

These results are very similar to a recent Southern Media and Opinion Research poll, which also showed Edwards easily beating Dardenne for the second place spot. Given how Republican Louisiana has become in the last few cycles, it's hard to see Vitter losing a runoff to Edwards, though a Republican versus Republican contest between Vitter and Dardenne (or less likely, Vitter and Angelle) could be very interesting.

The gubernatorial field looks pretty set, but there's still one potential wildcard out there. Retired Army Lt. Gen. Russel Honoré has been considering the race, and he tells LaPolitics that he's still thinking about it. Honoré rose to prominence during Hurricane Katrina when he led the relief effort to New Orleans, and he shouldn't struggle for name recognition. In recent years, Honoré has decried the oil industry and opposed fracking, but his environmental positions haven't turned him into a Democrat: Honoré says if he runs, he'll likely do it as an independent.

It's possible that if Honoré gets in, he'll take enough Democratic voters away from Edwards to allow Dardenne to advance to a runoff with Vitter. However, MarblePort took a look at a hypothetical five-way jungle primary and found the opposite outcome. Vitter is still clearly in front with 34, while Edwards leads Dardenne by a wider 26-13. Honoré starts off making very little impact, taking only 7 to Angelle's 6.

MarblePort argues that because Honoré does so well among independents, he takes swing voters away and keeps someone like Dardenne from expanding his support. This is just one early poll and things could change, especially if Dardenne or his allies run some ads reminding Democratic voters that they have a lot in common with Honoré. But right now, a Vitter-Edwards runoff continues to look like the most likely scenario.

Discuss
Washington Gov. Jay Inslee
Washington Democratic Gov. Jay Inslee
Leading Off:

WA-Gov, Sen: Washington's Democratic Gov. Jay Inslee only won a narrow victory when he was first elected in 2012. However, Public Policy Polling suggests he'll have an easier time when he runs for re-election, even if it's a rematch against ex-Attorney General Rob McKenna. Inslee sports a 41-42 job approval, consistent with an uneventful first few years and an improving economy; his strength in head-to-head matchups seems more about the fact that the Republicans don't have any top-tier options who seem interested in challenging him.

46-34 vs. Port of Seattle Commissioner Bill Bryant

45-31 vs. state Sen. Andy Hill

43-38 vs. ex-Attorney General/2012 opponent Rob McKenna

45-34 vs. Rep. Dave Reichert

The only potential opponent who comes within single digits is McKenna, who seemed like he was interested in a rematch right after the 2012 election but lately has seemed unenthusiastic in re-emerging from the private sector. The only candidate who has actually declared, Bryant, trails by 11, and that's not purely an artifact of Bryant being almost completely unknown. You can see that Inslee polls at 43 against McKenna but at 46 against Bryant, so McKenna's presence seems to change a few minds.

What's perhaps most surprising is that Dave Reichert, long considered the best option on the GOP's bench for a statewide run (an option he never exercises, preferring to keep his House seat, which got much safer after redistricting), performs closer in line with the nobodies than with McKenna. You can also see that in PPP's poll of Washington's 2016 Senate race, where he's also down by double digits against Patty Murray, who'll be seeking her fifth term. Perhaps some of the novelty of his "tough-guy-who's-also-moderate" shtick has worn off, as he's gotten more entrenched as a part of the national GOP's House.

47-37 vs. Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler

46-41 vs. McKenna

48-37 vs. Reichert

48-35 vs. Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers

While McKenna also comes within single-digits of Murray, Reichert performs about as well as Herrera Beutler. Bear in mind, though, that none of these named opponents have expressed any interest in running. McMorris Rodgers isn't going to give up her House GOP leadership slot for a suicide mission, and party elders would probably discourage Herrera Beutler from running anyway, since an open WA-03 would be at serious risk of flipping in a presidential year. Basically, any Republican with any juice would focus on the potentially-winnable gubernatorial race instead, meaning the person with the thankless task of opposing Murray will probably be either a random rich guy or a state legislator looking to build up some name rec.

Part of the unremarkable-ness of Inslee's tenure is that he and the legislature haven't really done much other than just keep the lights on (nothing big is going to happen as long as Republicans control the state Senate). Instead, the momentous changes have happened through the initiative process -- which is usually the case in the West Coast states anyway, even when one party holds the trifecta. PPP also polled the recently passed initiatives legalizing recreational marijuana, recognizing same-sex marriage, and expanding background checks on gun purchases.

They found, perhaps unsurprisingly, that voters now approve of those choices by wider margins now than the original vote. For instance, while same-sex marriage was approved by an 8-point margin, respondents now approve of it by a 56-36 margin, and 53 percent say it's had no impact on them at all. Interestingly, gun purchase background checks are even more popular than either same-sex marriage or marijuana. Respondents now approve of background checks by a 68-24 margin, and in a sample where 41 percent of respondents own guns, only 18 percent say the measure has had a negative impact on them.

Continue Reading
Washington Governor Jay Inslee talks to reporters about ongoing recovery operations for the Oso mudslide, at the Arlington Municipal Airport in Arlington, Washington April 3, 2014. The death toll in the Washington state mudslide that wiped out a rural com
Gov. Jay Inslee (D)
Washington's Democratic Governor Jay Inslee won only a narrow victory when first elected in 2012, but Public Policy Polling suggests he'll have an easier time of it when he runs for re-election, even if it's a rematch against ex-Attorney General Rob McKenna. Inslee sports a 41-42 job approval, consistent with an uneventful first few years and an improving economy; his strength in head-to-head matchups seems more about the fact that the Republicans don't have any top-tier options who seem interested in challenging him.
• 46-34 vs. Port of Seattle Commissioner Bill Bryant

• 45-31 vs. state Sen. Andy Hill

• 43-38 vs. ex-Attorney General/2012 opponent Rob McKenna

• 45-34 vs. Rep. Dave Reichert

The only potential opponent who comes within single digits is McKenna, who seemed like he was interested in a rematch right after the 2012 election but lately has seemed uninterested in re-emerging from the private sector. The only candidate who has actually declared, Bryant, trails by 11, and that's not purely an artifact of Bryant being largely unknown, despite his recent notoriety over his support for allowing Shell drilling equipment to be based in Seattle's port (with only 5-12 favorables): you can see that Inslee polls at 43 vs. McKenna, while at 46 vs. Bryant, so McKenna's presence seems to change a few minds.

What's perhaps most surprising is that Dave Reichert, long considered the best option on the GOP's bench for a statewide run (an option he never exercises, preferring to keep his House seat, which got much safer after redistricting), performs closer in line with the nobodies than with McKenna. You can also see that in PPP's poll of Washington's 2016 Senate race, where he's also down by double digits against Patty Murray, who'll be seeking her fifth term. Perhaps some of the novelty of his "tough-guy-who's-also-moderate" shtick has worn off, as he's gotten more entrenched as a part of the national GOP's House.

• 47-37 vs. Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler

• 46-41 vs. McKenna

• 48-37 vs. Reichert

• 48-35 vs. Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers

While McKenna also comes within single-digits of Murray, Reichert performs about as well as Herrera Beutler. Bear in mind, though, that none of these named opponents has expressed any interest in running; McMorris Rodgers isn't going to give up her House GOP leadership slot for a suicide mission, and party elders would probably discourage Herrera Beutler from running anyway, since an open WA-03 would be at serious risk of flipping in a presidential year. Basically, any Republican with any juice would focus on the potentially-winnable gubernatorial race instead, meaning the person with the thankless task of opposing Murray will probably be either a random rich guy or a state legislator looking to build up some name rec.

Part of the unremarkable-ness of Inslee's tenure is that he and the legislature haven't really done much other than just keep the lights on (nothing big is going to happen as long as Republicans control the state Senate). Instead, the momentous changes have happened through the initiative process -- which is usually the case in the west coast states anyway, even when one party holds the trifecta. PPP also polled the recently passed initiatives legalizing recreational marijuana and expanding background checks on gun purchases, and same-sex marriage, which was passed by the legislature and survived a 'people's veto' referendum.

They found, perhaps unsurprisingly, that voters now approve of those choices by wider margins now than the original vote. For instance, while same-sex marriage was approved by an 8-point margin, respondents now approve of it by a 56-36 margin, and 53 percent say it's had no impact on them at all. Interestingly, gun purchase background checks are even more popular than either same-sex marriage or marijuana: respondents now approve of background checks by a 68-24 margin, and in a sample where 41 percent of respondents own guns, only 18 percent say the measure has had a negative impact on them.

Discuss
Daily Kos Elections Live Digest banner
Want the scoop on hot races around the country? Get the digest emailed to you each weekday morning. Sign up here.
KY-Gov: We were expecting a tight GOP primary, but not this tight! With all precincts reporting, tea partying businessman Matt Bevin leads state Agriculture Commissioner James Comer by just 83 votes, a 0.04 percent margin. Former Louisville Councilor Hal Heiner took third with 27.1 percent of the vote, while former state Supreme Court Justice Will Scott brought up the rear with just 7.2 percent. Comer says he'll ask to have the results recanvassed, which won't take place until May 28. The Lexington Herald-Leader's Sam Youngman describes the process:
In a recanvass, printed vote totals are checked against figures sent to the state Board of Elections. No individual votes are actually recounted.
It's rare for election outcomes to change after the fact, but you never know what will happen in a race this close. However, Comer says that if he's still behind when all is said and done, he'll back Bevin.

Tuesday's vote brings an end to an incredibly nasty primary. A few weeks ago, Comer's college girlfriend came forward and accused him of abusing her two decades ago and taking her to get an abortion, and her former roommates confirmed parts of her story. Comer denied everything and in turn accused Heiner of paying her to lie. Comer also claimed that a blogger connected to Heiner threatened his running mate's children, a charge local prosecutors are investigating. Bevin managed to stay out of the slugfest, though Heiner ran a last-minute spot that sought to drag him into the muck with Comer.

Bevin's apparent victory comes just one year after his primary challenge against now-Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell went down in flames. When Bevin entered the gubernatorial race at the last minute, he appeared to have a better shot of winning than he did in his prior attempt, but he was still the underdog. However, Bevin had the personal resources to join Heiner and Comer on television, and while McConnell was able to portray Bevin as a big-spending hypocrite, Bevin benefited from having the spotlight trained on his two major rivals. Heiner's allies ran ads against Bevin that rehashed some of McConnell's old attacks, but they weren't quite enough this time. However, if he proceeds to the general election, he can expect Team Blue to zero in on his many flaws.

The eventual Republican nominee will face Attorney General Jack Conway, who easily won the Democratic primary. While Kentucky is a conservative state, voters there have been much more willing to elect Democrats at the state level even as they've spurned them federally. A recent SurveyUSA poll gave Conway a hefty 48-37 lead against Bevin, though things may get closer once the wounds from this primary start to heal. At the very least, Conway won't mind if his would-be Republican foes spend a little extra time fighting with one another. (Jeff Singer)

Jacksonville Mayor: Voters went to the polls in the mayoral runoff in Florida's largest city, and Republican businessman Lenny Curry narrowly unseated Democratic incumbent Alvin Brown by a 51-49 margin. Brown was always in for a tough campaign in this conservative city, and the state GOP made winning city hall back a major priority. Brown did his best to appeal to crossover voters even though he was always at risk of jeopardizing his popularity with his party's base; in the end, he simply came up short. (Jeff Singer)

Philadelphia Mayor: Former City Councilor Jim Kenney won a decisive victory in Tuesday's Democratic primary, defeating state Sen. Anthony Hardy Williams 56-26. Williams' pro-charter school allies heavily outspent Kenney's labor backers, but Kenney was able to win over key endorsements from notable African-American politicians, even though Kenney is white and Williams is black.

Kenney also benefited from ex-District Attorney Lynne Abraham's steep drop in support. While Abraham started the contest with high name recognition, she didn't have much money or any high-spending super PACs on her side, and in the end, she only took 8 percent of the vote.

A late gaffe by Williams also appears to have contributed to his defeat. Williams called for the dismissal of Police Commissioner Charles Ramsey, arguing that he was the architect of Philadelphia's stop-and-frisk policies. However, Ramsey was incredibly popular across racial lines, and Williams had no time to recover from this misstep. Philadelphia hasn't elected a non-Democratic mayor since the 1940s, and Kenney will be the heavy favorite in November. (Jeff Singer)

8:08 AM PT (Jeff Singer): Special Elections: Via Johnny Longtorso:

New Hampshire House, Rockingam-32: This was a Republican hold; Yvonne Dean-Bailey defeated Democrat Maureen Mann by a 52-48 margin.

Pennsylvania SD-05: Democrats easily held this seat, no doubt due in part to the mayoral primary occurring at the same time. Democrat John Sabatina Jr. defeated Republican Tim Dailey by a 76-24 margin.

The New Hampshire contest would have attracted little attention if it was held in almost any other state, but GOP presidential candidates couldn't resist the chance to wave the red flag for party activists. Rick Perry and Carly Fiorina stumped for Dean-Bailey, a 19-year old attending college in Massachusetts. Americans for Prosperity also got involved in get-out-the-vote efforts. Romney won this seat 54-45 so Dean-Bailey's win wasn't a huge surprise in the end.

8:25 AM PT (Jeff Singer): CA State Senate: Orinda Mayor Steve Glazer pulled off a 55-45 win over Assemblywoman Susan Bonilla in the special election to succeed Rep. Mark DeSaulnier. While both candidates are Democrats, this contest attracted $7 million worth of spending. While Glazer has served a close advisor to Gov. Jerry Brown, he has a terrible relationship with labor groups.

One major issue in the contest was whether Bay Area Rapid Transportation (BART) union workers should be allowed to strike. Glazer came down strongly against it, and he struck a chord with voters in this East Bay seat. A recent SurveyUSA poll, which gave Glazer a 45-35 lead just days before the vote, found that respondents said that BART workers should not be allowed to strike by a 60-30 margin. Two 2013 BART walkouts caused problems for local commuters, and the issue helped Republican Catherine Baker win a local Obama 58-40 Assembly seat last year. Glazer's reputation as am moderate also helped him make inroads with the seat's Republican minority, which appears to have overwhelmingly backed him against Bonilla.

8:39 AM PT (Jeff Singer): Charlotte Mayor: Republican ex-Councilor Edwin Peacock lost the 2013 race to Democrat Patrick Cannon by a respectable 53-47 margin, and he announced on Tuesday that he's trying again. Peacock should be favored against 2011 nominee Scott Stone in the GOP primary, and he may have a good chance to prevail here in November. Charlotte is a Democratic-leaning city, but Peacock's last race proved that city hall isn't out of reach for Republicans.

Peacock may not learn the identity of his opponent for a while though. Interim Mayor Dan Clodfelter, who replaced Cannon after his arrest and resignation last year, will face Councilors Michael Barnes and David Howard and former Mecklenburg County Commissioner Jennifer Roberts in the Sept. 15 Democratic primary, and an Oct. 6 runoff will be held if no one takes more than 40 percent of the vote.

8:49 AM PT (Jeff Singer): Colorado Springs Mayor: Voters in Colorado's second-largest city went to the polls in Tuesday's runoff and to no one's surprise, former state Attorney General John Suthers defeated ex-Mayor Mary Lou Makepeace by a 68-32 margin. Suthers outpaced the moderate Makepeace by a 46-24 margin in the primary and with two conservative candidates taking most of the remaining vote, she didn't have much room to expand. Over the years, the GOP has attempted to convince Suthers to run for Senate or for governor but he's always declined, and it seems he's now found his dream job.

9:02 AM PT (Jeff Singer): Toledo Mayor: The special election to fill the final two years of the late Mayor Michael Collins' term is getting interesting. On Wednesday, his widow Sandy Drabik Collins announced that she would run as an independent, pledging to carry out his agenda.

Interim Democratic Mayor Paula Hicks-Hudson is already running and she appears to have consolidated her party's support, but she could face another well-known Democrat. Former Mayor Carty Finkbeiner said this week that he's seriously thinking about another campaign, and he'll make a decision by the late summer. Finkbeiner voluntarily left office in 2009 and love him or hate him, he's not a boring guy. There will be no primary for this special election, and all the candidates will run together on one non-partisan ballot in November: The filing deadline is Sept. 4.

9:09 AM PT (Jeff Singer): DE-Gov: Democrats had been wondering why former state Attorney General Beau Biden hasn't made his 2016 plans clear, and it looks like we may have to keep waiting. On Tuesday, his father Vice President Joe Biden announced that Beau is receiving treatment at Walter Reed for an undisclosed illness. The younger Biden suffered a stoke in 2010 and had a small lesion removed in 2013.

9:25 AM PT (David Jarman): WA-Gov, WA-Sen: Washington's Democratic Governor Jay Inslee won only a narrow victory when first elected in 2012, but Public Policy Polling suggests he'll have an easier time of it when he runs for re-election, even if it's a rematch against ex-Attorney General Rob McKenna. Inslee sports a 41-42 job approval, consistent with an uneventful first few years and an improving economy; his strength in head-to-head matchups seems more about the fact that the Republicans don't have any top-tier options who seem interested in challenging him.

• 46-34 vs. Port of Seattle Commissioner Bill Bryant

• 45-31 vs. state Sen. Andy Hill

• 43-38 vs. ex-Attorney General/2012 opponent Rob McKenna

• 45-34 vs. Rep. Dave Reichert

The only potential opponent who comes within single digits is McKenna, who seemed like he was interested in a rematch right after the 2012 election but lately has seemed uninterested in re-emerging from the private sector. The only candidate who has actually declared, Bryant, trails by 11, and that's not purely an artifact of Bryant being largely unknown (with 5-12 favorable): you can see that Inslee polls at 43 vs. McKenna, while at 46 vs. Bryant, so McKenna's presence seems to change a few minds.

What's perhaps most surprising is that Dave Reichert, long considered the best option on the GOP's bench for a statewide run (an option he never exercises, preferring to keep his House seat, which got much safer after redistricting), performs closer in line with the nobodies than with McKenna. You can also see that in PPP's poll of Washington's 2016 Senate race, where he's also down by double digits against Patty Murray, who'll be seeking her fifth term. Perhaps some of the novelty of his "tough-guy-who's-also-moderate" shtick has worn off, as he's gotten more entrenched as a part of the national GOP's house.

• 47-37 vs. Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler

• 46-41 vs. McKenna

• 48-37 vs. Reichert

• 48-35 vs. Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers

While McKenna also comes within single-digits of Murray, Reichert performs about as well as Herrera Beutler. Bear in mind, though, that none of these named opponents has expressed any interest in running; McMorris Rodgers isn't going to give up her House GOP leadership slot for a suicide mission, and party elders would probably discourage Herrera Beutler from running anyway, since an open WA-03 would be at serious risk of flipping in a presidential year. Basically, any Republican with any juice would focus on the potentially-winnable gubernatorial race instead, meaning the person with the thankless task of opposing Murray will probably be either a random rich guy or a state legislator looking to build up some name rec.

Part of the unremarkable-ness of Inslee's tenure is that he and the legislature haven't really done much other than just keep the lights on (nothing big is going to happen as long as Republicans control the state Senate). Instead, the momentous changes have happened through the initiative process -- which is usually the case in the west coast states anyway, even when one party holds the trifecta. PPP also polled the recently passed initiatives legalizing recreational marijuana, recognizing same-sex marriage, and expanding background checks on gun purchases.

They found, perhaps unsurprisingly, that voters now approve of those choices by wider margins now than the original vote. For instance, while same-sex marriage was approved by an 8-point margin, respondents now approve of it by a 56-36 margin, and 53 percent say it's had no impact on them at all. Interestingly, gun purchase background checks are even more popular than either same-sex marriage or marijuana: respondents now approve of background checks by a 68-24 margin, and in a sample where 41 percent of respondents own guns, only 18 percent say the measure has had a negative impact on them.

9:32 AM PT (Jeff Singer): ME-02: Freshman Republican Bruce Poliquin will be a top Democratic target in his 53-44 Obama seat, but Team Blue knows it won't be easy to beat him. Maine's 2nd District hasn't ousted an incumbent member of Congress since 1916, and Poliquin has proven to be an incredibly good fundraiser. 2014 nominee Emily Cain, who lost to Poliquin by a 47-42 margin, is running again, but her $136,000 haul last quarter isn't scaring off one potential primary foe.

Bangor Councilor Joe Baldacci, the brother of former Gov. John Baldacci, has been mulling a campaign for a while. Last week, Baldacci released part of a mid-April PPP survey that he says shows him "in a statistical dead heat" with Poliquin. Baldacci hasn't committed to anything, but he's been meeting with local Democratic groups. But it appears we won't be seeing a rerun from former state Senate Majority Leader Troy Jackson. While he has yet to rule anything out, he tells Roll Call that he's less likely to run since Cain is getting national Democratic support already. Jackson badly lost last year's primary to Cain, so it's not too surprising he doesn't have much of an appetite for another go.

9:50 AM PT (Jeff Singer): NV-Sen, 03: After initially ruling out a Senate run, Republican Rep. Joe Heck is now reportedly leaning strongly toward a bid. However, Roll Call reports that Heck is likely to wait on finalizing his plans until Gov. Brian Sandoval has completely and utterly ruled out a campaign. Sandoval is likely to make his announcement after the legislative session ends in early June. There's little reason to expect that Sandoval will jump in, but he hasn't said no yet.

Speculation has begun to turn to who would run to succeed Heck in the swingy 3rd District. GOP state Senate Majority Leader Michael Roberson looks likely to go for it, and tea partying Las Vegas Councilor Bob Beers may drop down from the Senate race to this contest. Beers hasn't attracted much attention in his year-long Senate bid, but he could draw some blood from Roberson if he can turn the spotlight on his support for Sandoval's proposed tax increases. Democrats will want to contest this seat especially if Heck leaves, but their top recruit philanthropist Susie Lee just kicked off her campaign for the neighboring 4th District.

10:06 AM PT (Jeff Singer): FL-06: Duval County Sheriff John Rutherford is about to leave office, and he seems to have his next campaign in mind. Rutherford tells First Coast Connect that he's "eyeing" this safely red open seat, and is "looking at putting a team together as we speak."

None of Jacksonville's Duval County is in the 6th, and only about one-third of the district is located in the Jacksonville media market. However, if enough Orlando-area candidates run, Rutherford might have a good shot in the GOP primary. And sure enough, former New Smyrna Beach Mayor Adam Barringer is already in, and ex-Rep. Sandy Adams looks likely to take the plunge soon. However, state Sen. Travis Hutson's office has announced that he will not be joining them.

10:20 AM PT (Jeff Singer): FL-18: Palm Beach County Commissioners Priscilla Taylor and Melissa McKinlay are already facing off to succeed Senate candidate Patrick Murphy, and lawyer Jonathan Chane is reportedly considering joining them in the Democratic primary. It's often difficult to tell if these various attorneys are legit candidates or Some Dudes, but the fact that Palm Beach County State Attorney Dave Aronberg is the one relaying Chane's interest makes it sound like he has some connections.

Three Republicans are already running in this Romney 52-48 seat, and they may also be about to get come company. Stephen Leighton, who serves as the Community Operations & Emergency Management director at the Martin County sheriff's department, says he's interested. However, while his call for a "bipartisan, moderate representative" probably isn't going to gain much traction, he could hold back fellow Martin County moderate Rebecca Negron if he gets in.

K.C. Ingram Traylor, who has been active in opposing a proposed Miami-to-Orlando rail service, is also publicly considering, but she has her own apostasy. Traylor appeared in a spot for Murphy last year, arguing that the Democrat was "independent, like me." Something tells me that's not going to sit well with GOP primary voters.

10:43 AM PT (Jeff Singer): FL-Sen: GOP Lt. Gov. Carlos Lopez-Cantera recently said that he wouldn't make a final decision on whether or not to run until the late summer, but according to the National Journal, it's not indecision that's delaying him. Instead, Lopez-Cantera is using his time as a non-candidate to attract donors to his super PAC Reform Washington, which can raise unlimited amounts of money. Once Lopez-Cantera actually becomes a candidate he can't coordinate with the group, but right now there's nothing stopping him from working on building it up ahead of what will be an expensive race.

Jeb Bush is trying this approach in the presidential race, and a lot of politicians are going to be watching both men closely to see if it's worth trying something like this in future cycles. However, one downside is that would-be candidates can't hire campaign staff, so a long delay could cost them critical talent.

11:02 AM PT (Jeff Singer): KY-Gov: Matt Bevin's apparent 83-vote win in Tuesday's GOP primary wasn't just one of the tightest contests we've ever seen, it was the closest major party gubernatorial primary in Kentucky history. Smart Politics takes a look at both parties' history since the early 1900s and finds that before this, the closest Republican primary was in 1991, when Rep. Larry Hopkins beat lawyer Larry Forgy by a 50.6-49.4 margin. However, Hopkin's 1,945 vote win feels like a landslide compared to the cliffhanger we saw on Tuesday! Ultimately, Hopkins lost to Lt. Gov. Brereton Jones by a decisive 65-35 margin.

On the Democratic side, the closest gubernatorial primary was in 1983, when Lt. Gov. Martha Collins beat Louisville Mayor Harvey Sloane 34.0-33.3, or by 4,532 votes. The tight primary didn't keep Collins from defeating former Major league Baseball player and future Sen. Jim Bunning by a 55-44 margin though.

While Attorney General Jack Conway's primary was just an afterthought compared to the messy GOP race, he did make history on Tuesday. Smart Politics reports that Conway's 79-21 margin over perennial candidate Geoff Young was the most decisive showing in any contested Democratic gubernatorial primary. Because Democrats traditionally dominated the Blue Grass State, it makes sense that they'd have plenty of up-and-comers looking for promotions. But while Team Blue still holds the state House and most statewide offices, the party rallied behind Conway in preparation for what could be a tight race.

12:02 PM PT: NY-01: So it turns out that Long Island Democrats will have to fight it out for the right to take on freshman GOP Rep. Lee Zeldin, but the latest entrant isn't exactly a Democrat herself. Southampton Town Supervisor Anna Throne-Holst is a member of the Independence Party who has, in the past, received the backing of the Democratic Party under New York's fusion voting rules. However, she'll have to switch her registration to run in the Democratic primary, something she says she's doing.

Venture capitalist Dave Calone, who joined the race earlier this month, took a subtle dig at Throne-Holst after she announced her bid on Wednesday, calling himself a "lifelong Democrat." It's the kind of issue that could come up in a primary, but the DCCC isn't bothered by her party switch, though, as the committee has already met with her in D.C., as has EMILY's List. (The D-Trip has met with Calone, too.) Two other candidates are also considering the race, Suffolk County Legislator Kara Hahn and former Brookhaven Supervisor Mark Lesko.

12:08 PM PT (David Jarman): Philadelphia mayor: If you're wondering how Jim Kenney wound up winning the Democratic primary in the Philadelphia mayoral race with surprising ease, take a look at Philadelphia magazine's lengthy recap of the race, which touches on every nuance of this race. Kenney's feat initially seems surprising, since he was running against a well-known African-American state Senator in a city that's plurality-black, and he was splitting the blue-collar white vote with a former District Attorney with a law-and-order reputation.

Nevertheless,  here's their summary of how he won:

•Large numbers of black voters were unsatisfied with Williams, the only high-profile black candidate in the race. Many were looking for an alternative.

•Kenney locked up union support early — and not just the Electricians. He won the backing of the city employee unions, the teacher’s union, the hospital workers union, to name just a few. These are unions with large numbers of middle-class black voters, many of whom seem to have voted for Kenney.

•He secured what proved to be a critical early endorsement from a group of influential black political leaders in Northwest Philadelphia, headed by State Rep. Dwight Evans.
On top of that, Kenney managed to position himself well with middle- and upper-middle-class whites as the most progressive candidate on issues like LGBT rights and marijuana decriminalization. And Kenney was helped along by Williams' own problems, including ineffective ads from his pro-charter school backers (who never went negative against Kenney), and a late implosion when Williams went after the city's popular police chief.

1:29 PM PT: NY-02: Democrats would love to oust veteran GOP Rep. Peter King from his Long Island House seat, but he's held in with ox-like stubbornness for years even though his district gave 52 percent of its vote to Barack Obama. Will 2016 finally be the year that King is deposed? It would take a hell of a lot, but Suffolk County Legislator DuWayne Gregory, the chamber's presiding officer and an Army veteran, is going to give it a shot.

King has been in office since 1993 and has always won re-election handily. Even though he's quite conservative by his own admission, he's managed to carve out a reputation as a security-obsessed loudmouth who knows when to break with his party and support local interests. In other words, he knows how to appeal perfectly to worried New York suburbanites.

But lately, he's been making goofy noises about running for president—he even claims he's "50-50"!—and that's the kind of thing that never endears you to your constituents. It could also be a sign that King, who is 71, has finally gotten bored of the House. So whether he does or doesn't actually run (what a thing to type), Gregory will have the chance to make the case that the 2nd District deserves someone more engaged representing it. Add in a Hillary Clinton nomination at the top of the ticket and a surprise isn't impossible.

1:42 PM PT: MD-Sen: Here's an interesting bit of inside baseball that impinges on the Democratic primary for Senate in Maryland: According to a report in the New York Times, Rep. Donna Edwards joined a diverse group of fellow House members who tried to make the case to Nancy Pelosi earlier this year that Chris Van Hollen would have enough support from the caucus to succeed her as party leader, rather than Steny Hoyer, the current number two.

The lobbying effort failed, though. Pelosi reportedly refused to offer any assurances that she'd offer her own backing to Van Hollen, who then decided to run for Barbara Mikulski's open Senate seat instead. All this is trivia for junkies, of course, but as one nameless Van Hollen backer suggests to the Baltimore Sun, Edwards' criticism of Van Hollen's progressive credentials is "undermine[d]" by her support for his leadership bid. However, is this the kind of thing Van Hollen's camp will really push, though, and would voters even care? Probably not. Still, it's a rare look inside back rooms branching off the halls of power, and it shows that appearances can be very deceiving when it comes to political relationships.

Discuss
U.S. Senate candidate Matt Bevin (R-KY) speaks to a gathering at FreePAC Kentucky in Louisville, Kentucky, April 5, 2014.  Picture taken April 5, 2014. The conservative Tea Party movement is supporting Bevin, but they face a tough campaigner in Republican
Matt Bevin holds an 83-vote lead with all precincts reporting
Leading Off:

KY-Gov: We were expecting a tight GOP primary, but not this tight! With all precincts reporting, tea partying businessman Matt Bevin leads state Agriculture Commissioner James Comer by just 83 votes, a 0.04 percent margin. Former Louisville Councilor Hal Heiner was about 6 points behind with 27.1 percent of the vote, while former state Supreme Court Justice Will Scott brought up the rear with just 7.2 percent. Comer says he'll ask to have the results recanvassed, which won't take place until May 28. The Lexington Herald-Leader's Sam Youngman describes the process:

In a recanvass, printed vote totals are checked against figures sent to the state Board of Elections. No individual votes are actually recounted.
It's rare for election outcomes to change after the fact, but you never know what will happen in a race this close. However, Comer says that if he's still behind when all is said and done, he'll back Bevin.

Tuesday's vote brings an end to an incredibly nasty primary. A few weeks ago, Comer's college girlfriend came forward and accused him of abusing her two decades ago and taking her to get an abortion, and her former roommates confirmed parts of her story. Comer denied everything and in turn accused Heiner of paying her to lie. Comer also claimed that a blogger connected to Heiner threatened his running mate's children, a charge local prosecutors are investigating. Bevin managed to stay out of the slugfest, though Heiner ran a last-minute spot that sought to drag him into the muck with Comer.

Bevin's apparent victory comes just one year after his primary challenge against now-Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell went down in flames. When Bevin entered the gubernatorial race at the last minute, he appeared to have a better shot of winning than he did in his prior attempt, but he was still the underdog. However, Bevin had the personal resources to join Heiner and Comer on television, and while McConnell was able to portray Bevin as a big-spending hypocrite, Bevin benefited from having the spotlight trained on his two major rivals. Heiner's allies ran ads against Bevin that rehashed some of McConnell's old attacks, but they weren't quite enough this time. However, if he proceeds to the general election, he can expect Team Blue to zero in on his many flaws.

The eventual Republican nominee will face Attorney General Jack Conway, who easily won the Democratic primary. While Kentucky is a conservative state, voters there have been much more willing to elect Democrats at the state level even as they've spurned them federally. A recent SurveyUSA poll gave Conway a hefty 48-37 lead against Bevin, though things may get closer once the wounds from this primary start to heal. At the very least, Conway won't mind if his would-be Republican foes spend a little extra time fighting with one another.

Continue Reading
Daily Kos Elections Liveblog Banner
Tonight, voters go to to the polls in party primaries Kentucky and Philadelphia, and for a mayoral runoff in Jacksonville, Florida. Our guide to the key races can be found here. Polls start to close in the Eastern time zone portion of Kentucky at 6 PM ET, and we'll be bringing you tonight's results as they come in.

Results & Poll Closing Times (all times Eastern):

Kentucky (6 PM & 7 PM) | Jacksonville (7 PM) | Philadelphia (8 PM)

Tue May 19, 2015 at 6:36 PM PT: KY-Gov: With 99.7 percent reporting, Bevin leads Comer by 83 votes. We're looking at what's left now.

Tue May 19, 2015 at 6:38 PM PT: KY-Gov: According to the AP, the final 12 precincts come from Jefferson County. Heiner dominated there but Bevin beat Comer 31-13 for second. If Bevin has a narrow edge, those 12 precincts should seal it.

Tue May 19, 2015 at 6:47 PM PT: KY-Gov: We've verified the AP's totals with the SoS site. Aside from the SoS not including Ballard County, the totals match up. Those 12 Jefferson precincts should decide who ends the night with a lead, but there's no way this doesn't go to a recount. Under state law, any candidate can ask for one if he pays, and you can bet either Comer or Bevin will pay.

Tue May 19, 2015 at 6:52 PM PT: KY-Gov:

No automatic recanvass trigger in Kentucky. Candidate can make a written request to SOS's office. Recanvass would be 9 am 5/28
@samyoungman

Tue May 19, 2015 at 6:55 PM PT: KY-Gov: The AP says all precincts are in, and Bevin ends the night with a 83-vote lead over Comer. Hello recount!

Tue May 19, 2015 at 7:02 PM PT: It's clear we're not going to know the winner tonight. We're all-but-certain to see a recount in the upcoming weeks, and Democratic nominee Jack Conway won't be complaining if this drags out. Check back to Daily Kos Elections as this unfolds. Have a good night and thanks for reading!

Tue May 19, 2015 at 7:04 PM PT: And sure enough, Comer asking for a recanvass.

Discuss
Daily Kos Elections Liveblog Banner
Tonight, voters go to to the polls in party primaries Kentucky and Philadelphia, and for a mayoral runoff in Jacksonville, Florida. Our guide to the key races can be found here. Polls start to close in the Eastern time zone portion of Kentucky at 6 PM ET, and we'll be bringing you tonight's results as they come in.

Results & Poll Closing Times (all times Eastern):

Kentucky (6 PM & 7 PM) | Jacksonville (7 PM) | Philadelphia (8 PM)

Tue May 19, 2015 at 5:57 PM PT: KY-Gov: It looks like we're in for a barnburner. With 96 percent in, Bevin leads Comer just 33-32.1, which translates to a 1,861 vote edge.

Tue May 19, 2015 at 5:59 PM PT: Philadelphia Mayor: With 20 percent in, Kenney is still taking 63 percent of the vote. A few weeks ago this looked too close to call, but Kenney surged at exactly the right time.

Tue May 19, 2015 at 6:05 PM PT: KY-Gov: Wow: With 97 percent in, Bevin leads Comer by 921 votes, or 0.50.

Tue May 19, 2015 at 6:08 PM PT: Philadelphia Mayor: This one wasn't so close though. The AP has called the Democratic primary for Kenney, who currently leads Williams 60-21 with 32 percent in. Former DA Lynn Abraham started out the primary as a co-frontrunner but she's only taking 9 percent.

Tue May 19, 2015 at 6:10 PM PT: KY-Gov: With 98.4 percent in, Bevin leads Comer by 748 votes, or 0.3 percent.

Tue May 19, 2015 at 6:13 PM PT: KY-Gov: Comer has taken a 30 vote lead with 99 percent of precincts in... wow.

Tue May 19, 2015 at 6:19 PM PT: KY-Gov: We're waiting on two western Kentucky counties, Ohio and Ballard. Surrounding counties have backed both Comer and Bevin.

Tue May 19, 2015 at 6:22 PM PT: KY-Gov: Again: Wow.

Ballard County is in.
 Comer 107
 Bevin 68

Comer lead goes up to 69.
#kygov
(cc: @ScottJenningsKY)
@MattMackowiak

Tue May 19, 2015 at 6:26 PM PT: KY-Gov: From our reading of Kentucky recount law, anyone can request a recount if they pay for it. You can bet someone will pay for it.

Tue May 19, 2015 at 6:33 PM PT:
BEVIN BACK IN FRONT: Leads Comer by 83 votes. 12 precincts left. #KYGOV
@POLITICO_Steve

Tue May 19, 2015 at 6:35 PM PT: The liveblog continues here.

Discuss
You can add a private note to this diary when hotlisting it:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary from your hotlist?
Are you sure you want to remove your recommendation? You can only recommend a diary once, so you will not be able to re-recommend it afterwards.

RSS

Subscribe or Donate to support Daily Kos.

Click here for the mobile view of the site