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Reposted from jwcrawley by Mokurai

Horrible Insurance Provider: www.CareSource.com

So, this is how Obamacare (Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act) will be demolished:

I have CareSource health/dental/vision silver plan. I need to go to said dentist because of bad tooth. I do what any techie would do, and go to their website and use "Find a Doctor" tool to find dentists. Simple.

I then call the first dentist on the list: jeffreytallendds.com/ ... They no longer take CareSource because CareSource hasn't paid their Effing bills since January 1! Well bugger.

The next 2 places I call explain they they simply don't take CareSource. They're both on the list, but nope, they're private pay. And one said 'We only take good insurance'. Well, fuck you too, Gentle Dentist at 1121 W 2nd St Bloomington, IN .

I call next dentist: http://www.bloomingtonfamilydental.com/ . They never heard of CareSource, yet they are on my list of approved providers. I set up appointment yesterday. Got call today, they are *NOT* part of CareSource.

On phone now with CareShit, telling that they need to find me a dentist, and their list of "approved providers" is nothing such! The 3 the lady at CareShit gave me ... surprise surprise... DON'T TAKE CARESOURCE.

So how many other "doctors" are on the list that aren't really plan providers? No bloody clue. My guess is some brainiac scraped the yellow pages and dumped all doctors in their "provider directory".

So.. back to Obamacare. Sure, PPACA can offer insurance. Good luck collecting on it and using it. And worse yet, the law requires health insurance. It put no onus on creating shell companies to "sell" health insurance that has no providers that will take it.

And Us individuals' answer is to sue said providers for not providing their contractual obligations... but we through the Marketplace are by definition are without employee insurance, and most likely poor. So, we are screwed as well by the lack of being made whole.

And that's how Obamacare can die.

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Reposted from Daily Kos Elections by Mokurai
Congressman Mike Ross (D-AL) (L) confers with Congressman Baron Hill (D-IN) during the House Energy and Commerce Committee meeting to markup H.R.3200, America's Affordable Health Choices Act of 2009, on Capitol Hill. in Washington July 30, 2009.  REUTERS/Molly Riley  (UNITED STATES POLITICS HEALTH) - RTR268QK
Former Democratic Rep. Baron Hill (right) gives his party a credible Senate candidate
On Friday, former Democratic Rep. Baron Hill announced that he will run for Indiana's open Senate seat. Hill, who was unseated in the 2010 GOP wave, originally looked likely to seek the governorship, but GOP Sen. Dan Coats' retirement changed his calculations. Hill has the Democratic primary to himself so far, but state Rep. Christina Hale has been talking about running as well. National Democrats would love for ex-Sen. Evan Bayh to jump in, but Bayh says it's unlikely.

Hill first ran for the Senate all the way back in 1990, losing to Coats 54-46. Hill made it to Congress eight years later, winning a conservative but ancestrally blue southern Indiana district. Hill narrowly lost his 2004 re-election campaign to Mike Sodrel but regained his seat in 2006 and easily held on in 2008. However, the 2010 GOP wave was too much, and Hill was unseated by Todd Young by a decisive 52-42 margin. Hill became a lobbyist afterward, something the GOP will no doubt remind voters if they face him next year.

Hill's entrance gives Democrats a credible candidate who can raise money and knows how to campaign. But Indiana is a conservative state, and Hill is going to need a lot to go right if he's going to win next year. Team Blue would love if tea partying Rep. Marlin Stutzman, who has a bad relationship with his party establishment, emerged as the GOP nominee, but it's no sure thing. Former Coats aide Eric Holcomb is in and several other candidates are considering, including Young. We'll be watching all the developments at Daily Kos Elections.

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Reposted from Daily Kos Elections by Mokurai
Indiana Democratic state Sen. Karen Tallian
Newly-minted Democratic gubernatorial candidate Karen Tallian
While John Gregg came unexpectedly close to beating Republican Gov. Mike Pence in 2012, plenty of Democrats were not excited when Gregg announced he would seek a rematch. Even though Gregg criticized the infamous Religious Freedom Restoration Act, which could have allowed businesses to refuse to serve gay people, he has a record of opposing same-sex marriage and taking some other conservative positions. State Sen. Karen Tallian is hoping to take advantage of Gregg's potential liabilities with the base, and she's just announced that she'll oppose him in the primary. Tallian isn't being subtle about her plan to run against Gregg from the left, calling herself "a clearer choice, and a more progressive choice."

There was little indication that Tallian was interested in running for governor before she said she was in, though Gregg himself said a few weeks ago that he thought she was considering. But Tallian says she's been talking to labor and women's groups in the last few months, though it's not clear how many of them are prepared to back her. State Superintendent of Public Instruction Glenda Ritz says she'll decide in the next month whether to run, and Gregg's Democratic skeptics may prefer to wait on her before backing Tallian. State House Minority Leader Scott Pelath also recently confirmed that he's eyeing this contest.

Back in 2012 Pence looked like the clear favorite to win, and no serious Democrats challenged Gregg in the primary. However, with the governor posting weak poll numbers on the aftermath of the RFRA firestorm, more Hoosier Democrats are smelling blood, though an expensive primary could hamper them in the general.

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Reposted from Daily Kos Elections by Mokurai
U.S. Representative Marlin Stutzman (R-IN) (R) walks with a member of his staff as he talks to a reporter outside the U.S. Capitol in Washington September 11, 2013. Indiana Republicans have been at the front of the pack as House conservatives demanded a tougher stance against Obamacare, persuading colleagues to back a stopgap government spending measure that directly withholds money from the healthcare reform law. Picture taken September 11, 2013.        To match USA-FISCAL/INDIANA        REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS HEALTH BUSINESS) - RTX13X1N
Republican Rep. Marlin Stutzman
Republican Rep. Marlin Stutzman has been flirting with a bid ever since Sen. Dan Coats announced his retirement in late March, and he kicked off his campaign on Saturday. Stutzman will face Coats' former chief of staff Eric Holcomb in the primary, and we could see some real fireworks.

While the establishment-flavored Holcomb is a former state party chair and an ally of Coats and former Gov. Mitch Daniels, Stutzman hails from the tea party wing of the party. Stutzman, at the time a little-known state senator, refused to drop out of the 2010 primary after national Republicans brought Coats out of retirement. Stutzman earned the backing of influential tea partier Jim DeMint, and he lost by a relatively narrow 39-29 margin. If ex-Rep. John Hostettler hadn't been competing for a similar pool of voters, it's a good bet that the underfunded Stutzman would have pulled off an upset.

Stutzman soon arrived in the House after his predecessor resigned due to a sex scandal, and he never stopped being trouble for his party's leaders. Stutzman unsuccessfully challenged two better-connected colleagues in last year's majority whip contest, and he voted against John Boehner in January's speakership election. While groups like the Club For Growth might like Stutzman's antics, the NRSC is not going to be enamored by the possibility of having him as their nominee.

But this primary may get bigger soon. Rep. Todd Young has also been considering the race, and he may be able to appeal to the very conservative voters Stutzman needs without alienating national Republicans. Fellow Rep. Todd Rokita has also expressed interest and while he hasn't sounded quite as eager as Young, he's promised a decision within the next few weeks. There are also a few other Republicans who could also go for it.

Democrats would love for Stutzman to emerge as the GOP nominee. Stutzman's bad relationship with national Republicans could hamper him in the general election, and the congressman hasn't always shown much discipline. During the 2013 government shutdown, Stutzman infamously declared that he and his fellow House Republicans were "not going to be disrespected. We have to get something out of this. And I don’t know what that even is." While it's too early to declare that Stutzman is the second coming of Richard Mourdock, the disastrous 2012 Senate nominee who lost to Democrat Joe Donnelly, he might give Team Blue more of an opening than Holcomb or Coats.

Still, Indiana is a conservative state. It's going to take some luck for Democrats to win here, and the party is still looking for a viable candidate. The DSCC is holding out hope that popular former Sen. Evan Bayh will come out of retirement, but Bayh sounds unlikely to go for it (though Bayh is an unpredictable guy, so you never know what he'll do). Former Rep. Baron Hill, state Rep. Christina Hale, or Hammond Mayor Thomas McDermott might run if Bayh doesn't. We'll be keeping a close eye on both sides' developing fields in what promises to be an exciting Senate race.

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Reposted from ManfromMiddletown by Mokurai

It's a measure of the failure of Mike Pence as Governor of Indiana that he is suddenly vulnerable to defeat in the 2016 elections.

People from outside the state have this idea of Indiana as an unrepentantly Republican.  Yet in the last 25 years, Democrats controlled the House for 17 years, and the Governor's office for 14 years. With the exception of the Senate, Indiana has been a competitive state for Democrats at the state and local level.  Which is why the "unexpected" vulnerability of Governor Mike Pence feels all but that to people who've followed Indiana politics for long enough.

Which is why news the former Indiana House Speaker John Gregg is running has been greeted with considerably more enthusiasm nationally than in the Hoosier state.  Mike Pence's relationship with the Koch Brothers political network is well know.  His willingness to front for awful ALEC model legislation has been making progressive Hoosier facepalm since long before this RFRA mess caught the rest of the country's attention.

The problem is that Pence's prospective opponent John Gregg has a Koch problem, or more to the point ALEC problem too.

If John Gregg wants to prove that he's not PWNED by the Koch Brothers/ALEC, he's got to own up to the fact that he has this ALEC connection.  He hasn't.  Forgive me if my enthusiasm for replacing Pence with another Koch pawn is lacking.

Poll

Should John Gregg issue a statement acknowledging his ties to ALEC?

89%17 votes
5%1 votes
5%1 votes

| 19 votes | Vote | Results

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Reposted from Daily Kos Elections by Mokurai
Democrat John Gregg
Democrat John Gregg, who lost to Mike Pence 50-47 in 2012, is back for a rematch
Leading Off:

IN-Gov: On Thursday, former state House Speaker and 2012 Democratic nominee John Gregg announced that he would seek a rematch with Republican Gov. Mike Pence. Pence prevailed by a surprisingly narrow 50-47 margin last time, and the governor's popularity at home took a major hit after he started a national firestorm when he signed the Religious Freedom Restoration Act, which could have allowed businesses to refuse to serve gay people.

A few months ago, Pence looked safe in conservative Indiana, but two recent polls show him struggling in head-to-head matchups with Gregg. And while voters' anger over Pence's handling of the RFRA may fade in the next year-and-a-half, business groups may be less forgiving. Gregg himself says that he was encouraged to run by business people who knew that the RFRA could harm Indiana longterm: If they come to his aid, Pence will be in real trouble next year.

Still, not all Democrats are sold on Gregg. While they acknowledge he is personally very appealing, they were disappointed with his weak fundraising last time. And while Gregg opposed the RFRA, he's still quite socially conservative. A few other Democrats have been mentioned as potential primary challengers, and one of them seems to be moving towards a gubernatorial bid. Despite earlier announcing that she would run for a second term next year, state Superintendent of Public Instruction Glenda Ritz now says that a gubernatorial campaign is "on the table," and that she'll decide by June.

A recent poll gave Pence only a 42-39 lead against Ritz, while Gregg trailed 43-37. Ritz has also won statewide once, unseating GOP incumbent Tony Bennett 53-47 in 2012. Pence and the Republican legislature have been working to strip Ritz of her duties in revenge for her opposition to their policies, claiming she badly handled a statewide test. But if Ritz runs, Team Red will definitely continue to portray her as incompetent.

It's not going to be easy to unseat even a wounded Pence in a state as red as Indiana. Still, Hoosiers have proven that they're willing to split their ballots, and if business groups take up arms against the governor, he'll be in real trouble. A few months ago this contest looked like a snoozer, but now it's become of one of 2016's must-watch races.

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Reposted from Daily Kos Elections by Mokurai
Gov. Mike Pence (R-IN)
Indiana Republican Gov. Mike Pence
On Thursday, former state House Speaker and 2012 Democratic nominee John Gregg announced that he would seek a rematch with Republican Gov. Mike Pence. Pence prevailed by a surprisingly narrow 50-47 margin last time, and the governor's popularity at home took a major hit after he started a national firestorm when he signed the Religious Freedom Restoration Act, which could have allowed businesses to refuse to serve gay people.

A few months ago, Pence looked safe in conservative Indiana, but two recent polls show him struggling in head-to-head matchups with Gregg. And while voters' anger over Pence's handling of the RFRA may fade in the next year-and-a-half, traditional Republican business groups may be less forgiving. Gregg himself says that he was encouraged to run by business people who knew that the RFRA could harm Indiana long-term: If they come to his aid, Pence will be in real trouble next year.

Still, not all Democrats are sold on Gregg. While they acknowledge he is personally very appealing, they were disappointed with his weak fundraising last time. And while Gregg opposed the RFRA, he's still quite socially conservative. A few other Democrats have been mentioned as potential primary challengers, and one of them seems to be moving toward a gubernatorial bid. Despite earlier announcing that she would run for a second term next year, state Superintendent of Public Instruction Glenda Ritz now says that a gubernatorial campaign is "on the table," and she says she'll decide by June.

A recent poll gave Pence only a 42-39 lead against Ritz, while Gregg trailed 43-37. Ritz has also won statewide once, unseating GOP incumbent Tony Bennett 53-47 in 2012. Pence and the Republican legislature have been working to strip Ritz of her duties in revenge for her opposition to their policies, claiming she badly handled a statewide test. If Ritz runs, Team Red will definitely continue to portray her as incompetent though.

It's not going to be easy to unseat even a wounded Pence in a state as red as Indiana. Still, Hoosiers have proven that they're willing to split their ballots, and if business groups take up arms against the governor, he'll be in real trouble. A few months ago this contest looked like a snoozer, but now it's become of one of 2016's must-watch races.

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Reposted from Daily Kos Elections by Mokurai
U.S. Representative Mike Pence speaks during the National Rifle Association's 139th annual meeting in Charlotte, North Carolina May 14, 2010. REUTERS/Chris Keane (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS HEADSHOT) - RTR2DVYW
What once seemed like an easy win for Republican Gov. Mike Pence is looking a lot more unpredictable now
Potential candidates are constantly getting "mentioned" for higher office, but who's doing all that work? Why, the Great Mentioner, of course. In this new ongoing series, Daily Kos channels the Great Mentioner and catalogs all the notable candidates who might run in 2016's most important races.

Republican Gov. Mike Pence started the year with sky-high approval ratings and looked safe for re-election in conservative Indiana. But Pence set off a firestorm in late March when he signed a bill known as the Religious Freedom Restoration Act, which could have allowed businesses to refuse to serve gay people. After an extraordinary firestorm fanned by corporations who were furious at the damage RFRA had done to the state's reputation, Pence and legislative Republicans eventually tweaked the most objectionable parts of the law. But almost overnight, the debacle left the governor looking genuinely vulnerable.

A couple of polls have been released since the RFRA controversy, and they show Pence in trouble. Most notably, a recent survey from Republican pollster Bellwether Research, conducted for local tipsheet Howey Politics, found Pence in the low 40s against a trio of potential Democratic opponents—not a great place for an incumbent to be.

Democrats weren't particularly optimistic about taking this seat just a month ago, but now Team Blue is looking closely at putting the governor's mansion back in play. Former state House Speaker John Gregg was actually considering a bid even before RFRA was drafted, and he sounds especially intent on running now. Gregg and Pence fought it out in 2012, and Pence won by a surprisingly close 50-47 margin.

But not all Hoosier Democrats are inclined to give Gregg another shot. Head below the fold for more.

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Reposted from unapologeticliberal777 by Mokurai

Things are going from bad to worse in Scott County, Indiana as new HIV cases continue to soar amongst IV drug users in Scott County and Indiana Governor Mike Pence and the GOP controlled legislature bear the responsibility for all of this and need to get their heads out of the sand.

As many of you know, the legislature and governor in Indiana shut down the Scott County Planned Parenthood facility in 2013, and four others were shut down across the state as far back as 2011.  Each of the five clinics all provided HIV testing and information about HIV transmission, etc., but were closed in large part due to funding cuts to the state's public health infrastructure passed by the GOP controlled legislature and signed by Governor Mike Pence.  Those cuts came amid a national/local political campaign to demonize Planned Parenthood due to it providing contraception and abortion services at some of their clinics.  Sadly, the Scott County location did not provide abortion services but seems to have fallen victim to the war waged by irrational conservatives across the country and in Indiana.

As a result of these misguided steps taken by the legislature and governor, HIV rates have soared from the usual 5 cases per year to over a 120 this year and climbing:

There are now 120 confirmed H.I.V. cases and 10 preliminary positive cases tied to Scott County, the Indiana State Department of Health said on Friday. That is up from 106 the previous week.

Health officials who declared an epidemic last month have said that they expect the number of cases to rise as more people are tested. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention sent staff members to Indiana last month to help with testing, the Health Department said in a news release. The growing number of cases could put pressure on Gov. Mike Pence to extend the 30-day needle exchange program that he approved on

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Reposted from Frederick Clarkson by Mokurai

I think there are two underreported features of the fallout from Indiana that we should make sure do not get lost in the hoo ha.  

One is that people are getting it that religious freedom does not and must not equal the right to discriminate. The other is that people are also broadening and deepening their understanding of what they basically already know:  the Christian Right’s view on these things is not shared by all of Christianity.

The Indiana RFRA, as originally written, allowed people to invoke their religious beliefs to deny commercial services to LGBTQ people – but Republican political leaders did not want to admit it. History may recognize Governor Pence’s disastrous interview with George Stephanopoulos on ABC’s This Week as a turning point, not only in the battle over the state’s RFRA, but in the struggle over the definition of religious freedom in our time.

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Reposted from Kerry Eleveld by Mokurai
Gov. Mike Pence (R-IN)
Here's something Indiana lawmakers probably didn't account for in their annual budget—spending $2 million on a global public relations firm to stanch the bleeding from the "right to discriminate" bill they enacted. And that doesn't even include the money they'll sink into ad buys. Tom LoBianco and Tony Cook have the details:
Indiana's economic development and tourism agencies announced Monday they have hired global PR firm Porter Novelli to help rebuild the state's image in the wake of the Religious Freedom Restoration Act debacle...

"The recent controversy has advanced the thinking of just a lot of people, that you can't take for granted that people know what Indiana is," said Chris Cotterill, general counsel for the Indiana Economic Development Corp.

The news surfaced after a poll commissioned by the Human Rights Campaign found that 75 percent of Indiana voters believe the state's reputation has been badly damaged.

Indiana Gov. Mike Pence's favorability rating among voters has also taken a dive. Before the fiasco, Pence was riding high with approval ratings of 66 percent in January and 62 percent in February. That support has dropped of by more than 20 points.

HRC’s April poll finds Pence’s personal approval rating essentially tied at 39 percent favorable to 38 percent unfavorable. Separately, 53 percent of voters said the RFRA fight gave them a less favorable impression of Pence.
Surprisingly, Indiana's story isn't enough of a cautionary tale for Republican lawmakers in Maine who are making their own attempt at killing the state's tourism industry.

Republican Gov. Bobby Jindal is also throwing caution to the wind, cuz tourism isn't essential to Louisiana's economy either.

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Reposted from Leo W Gerard by Mokurai
 Indiana Gov. Mike Pence by DonkeyHotey on Flickr

After Indiana Republicans passed a license to discriminate law, a restaurant called Memories Pizza in the Hoosier town of Walkerton stepped up last week to make sure potential customers knew its religious rules: “No Shirt, No Shoes, No Certification of Heterosexuality, No Service.”

Indiana GOP Gov. Mike Pence provided official sanction for such acts of oppression when he signed a gay-bashing version of the Religious Freedom Restoration Act. It enabled individuals and businesses to legally claim their faith required hateful acts of intolerance. Pence got all huffy when human rights groups accused him of seeking to change the state’s slogan from Hoosier Hospitality to Hoosier Hostility.

Marriage-equality-hating Indiana Republicans were joined by counterparts in Arkansas, North Carolina and Georgia in advancing government-sanctioned discrimination. This is not the way Americans treat each other. Well, not in 2015 anyway. America traveled down the path of intolerance for too many centuries. Now, Americans look back at all-white lunch counters with shame. Despite anxiety about ISIS, they disapprove of blaming terrorism on all Muslims. Americans aren’t perfect inclusive egalitarians. But they’re trying. On a deeply spiritual level, they hate institutionalization of minority hate. 

Poll

I should be able to discriminate against gay people if I believe my God says I should. And black people too. And people who aren't Christians. And people with green eyes, cause, you know, that's weird.

20%1 votes
80%4 votes

| 5 votes | Vote | Results

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