Skip to main content


Reposted from PWB Peeps by Ojibwa

Our beloved Swampyankee is $1500 behind on her bills for heat and electric and is almost out of food. She is in CT, just got home a little bit ago(about two weeks) from her third angioplasty, and needs the heat and electric. She has been putting this off because she is too proud to ask, but called me in tears earlier today. She has been putting a good face on it but the depression, along with her physical health are taking their toll. Any/all help is appreciated. Her paypal is jennifercirino@sbcglobal.net.

If you would rather mail it to her, it is
Jennifer Cirino
28 Taylor St
2nd Floor
Waterbury, CT 06702

Continue Reading

Wed Dec 31, 2014 at 11:09 PM PST

Help Keep Okiciyap Open

by OTICEDPenick

Reposted from Notes from the Isabel Okiciyap Director by Pam from Calif
We here at the Isabel Okiciyap in Isabel, SD have been trying hard to get more grants to keep us functioning. BUT until the next one comes in it would be great to get some help to keep us afloat in order to keep the pantry open and stocked with food and winter stuff, including funds to keep the people warm!

I am currently trying to get the website updated but i do not have access to it. The lady that does it for us has been apparently busy busy! So i will get that updated ASAP because we need to put our actual Board Members up on the site as well.

Hopefully we will have a grant soon and our employees can get back to work and keep the community warm and fed and keep the office running!

Thank You All
Emily Penick - (i was the program director until the grant ran out, now I'm back to volunteering, and i was the Chairwoman prior to being the director and prior to that i was the secretary since 2010 when Georgia Little Shield started this organization)

I guess i shouldn't have tried to do a diary without talking to betson08 first. She's been helping us with diaries and fundraising, but lately no one wants to. We've been having a hard time at the Okiciyap because of limitations on the grant we received and things haven't gone the way we were told it would.

I am removing the fundraising link because i feel that we have jumped the gun, again, the chairwoman and i were just trying to get us some funding to pay bills and buy food for the pantry. We've gone from serving 50 families to serving around 400 families (800 + individuals) on the Cheyenne River Reservation. We were doing heating assistance for our local natives living in Isabel and it helped a lot last year! But again, this year is harder and different because we do not have funding for that type of assistance.

In our community we have Tribal Members from both Cheyenne River and our neighboring tribe to the north, Standing Rock, who live and work here. The majority of the Standing Rock members live in the Cheyenne River Housing homes and have done so for MANY year. They are a large part of this community. But our grant would not allow us to assist these people because they were not Cheyenne River members. Standing Rock will not help them because they live on Cheyenne River. I think this is wrong. We are trying to help all our natives, not just a few. We also get a lot of non-native elderly that come to the pantry because they are on fixed incomes and we help them too because we know they need it. The grant we had wouldn't allow us to help them either with the grant funding. Regardless, we helped them anyway, mainly because we felt it was the right thing to do. You shouldn't have to say "no, you cant have any of this food or assistance because you're not from this tribe." It's not right.

I apologize for posting this before i spoke to the right people. Me and my Chairwoman were just trying to get some help. Thanks.

Emily Penick

Discuss

Hi everybody,

I want to extend a warm thank you to everyone who has sent school supplies to the Okiciyap food pantry so the children on the Cheyenne River Sioux Reservation can be properly equipped this fall.

There are still a few items on their wish list if new people reading this diary feel inspired to send some.

List and pics below the fold.....

Continue Reading

Mon Aug 25, 2014 at 05:00 PM PDT

School supply drive for Okiciyap!

by ZenTrainer

This is something we’ve done here for a few years at Daily Kos. Provide almost 200 kids with school supplies to start the year with. Why do we do this, you may ask? Well. Partly because we’re Democrats and that’s the kind of thing we do.

No, no, you say, why don’t we just send them money and let them buy their own supplies? That’s a good question and the answer consists of a lot of geography and math.

Continue Reading
Reposted from www.okiciyap.weebly.com by betson08
Isabel pow wow
In the midst of all the turmoil in the world right now, you may have forgotten that school is just around the corner. This is the third year that the Daily Kos community has been sending school supplies for kids served by the Okiciyap food pantry on the Cheyenne River Sioux Reservation.

They have really, really counted on our donations to prepare the kids for back-to-school.

Okiciyap means "we help" in Lakota. The whole name of the organization is Okiciyap the Isabel Community, or OTIC.
Continue Reading
Reposted from Native American Netroots by weck Editor's Note: Please help Greyhawk spread his message, and enjoy the two tales he has included in the diary; "Woo Tales"! -- weck

Note: This diary is in support of an ongoing crowdfunding effort by the North American Indian Center of Boston (NAICOB). The funding will play a crucial role in helping regenerate the building they've occupied for the last 40 years. Please help in any way you can - ideally, by Rec'ing and sharing as widely as you can, and if time and finances allow, with whatever you can provide to help with the fundraising effort. Times are tight for many of us - simply sharing news of this effort is more than appreciated. Please read on, and thank you.

Everything in life presents challenges: sometimes, those challenges are presented in a way to encourage us to test ourselves, to push our limits or to motivate us toward achieving something we might otherwise not have noticed. Sometimes these challenges present us with opportunities to help others, in such a way that we are paying forward any help or opportunities that we may have received. And sometimes, the challenge is simply reach out and help others, to make the world a better place - one person, one action, one challenge at a time.

Yes, there are other types of challenges in life - those which face us that we did not ask for, which hold us back unless or until we can overcome them, and that threaten the path we set for ourselves. Those are the types of challenges which, when faced with them, we could use the help of others - sometimes directly, but many times simply through the indirect acknowledgement and recognition of the issues facing us, and encouragement as we work through them.

Today, I'm going to challenge you to do something to help the North American Indian Center of Boston (NAICOB), and I'm going to meet that challenge myself, in a way that you too can benefit from.

First, a bit about NAICOB: a non-profit organization located in Jamaica Plain (essentially, Boston), the North American Indian Center has been located in the same building for over 40 years. They assist Native Americans throughout the greater Boston area, and have - like most of us, and many organizations - suffered during the economic downturn and slow recovery process. Their funding has dwindled; they've lost some of the programs they've traditionally offered, and need to "regenerate" their building before they can obtain additional funding.

Here's the video from their fundraising campaign page:

I've written two previous diaries about their ongoing fundraising effort:

  1. "We're still here" - for now: NAICOB Fundraiser and
  2. Foundations cast in stone and spirit: NAICOB

Many of you know me in one form or another - either as a writer of Woo Tales (stories about family, caregiving, etc. centered on dogs), or of causes; some of you have seen me participating in other fundraisers, like the Okiciyap school supplies drive or the Daily Kos Okiciyap Quilt Auction. And I sometimes write meta, in additional to political diaries. I'm the primary contact for BosKos, and sometimes write diaries that can be instructional/educational or just plain silly.

My "twofer" challenge to you all is this:

  1. Rec and share this diary, and
  2. Encourage two others to do the same.

That's it. You can - if, and only if, you can definitely afford it - kick in $2 to the NAICOB Regeneration Fund on IndieGoGo, but that's up to you and your financial situation. I'm primarily hoping that we can get the word out to as many people as possible, far and wide, about the fundraising effort - more eyeballs mean more chances for those who can comfortably donate to do so, and that increases the likelihood of NAICOB hitting their goal. They have 44 days left to do it - it's achievable.

And, for encouragement, I'm writing and posting two mini "Woo Tales" beyond the organic orange curlicue.

Continue Reading
Reposted from GreyHawk by weck Editor's Note: Today we can help GreyHawk spread the word about a big project he is working on in Boston. Thanks for your kind assistance. weck -- weck

Note: This diary is in support of an ongoing crowdfunding effort by the North American Indian Center of Boston (NAICOB). The funding will play a crucial role in helping regenerate the building they've occupied for the last 40 years. Please help in any way you can - ideally, by Rec'ing and sharing as widely as you can, and if time and finances allow, with whatever you can provide to help with the fundraising effort. Times are tight for many of us - simply sharing news of this effort is more than appreciated. Please read on, and thank you.

A foundation is the underlying, load-bearing part of a physical structure, or it can be the core principles upon which an institution or organization is built. It defines the primary base that all other elements attach to: it creates, sometimes in both the physical and social - even spiritual - sense, a touchpoint for grounding oneself and one's history.

It's what you build upon, and shore up - as needed - as you grow, or as your organization or institution grows.  

When that foundation weakens, it can undermine the whole structure - physical, social and spiritual. If issues arise that go unaddressed, the foundation can weaken, crumble and collapse.  Even before such issues get to any extreme, any signs of weakness can impact the ability to address and resolve issues.  If, for example, funds that might normally cover repairs to a building are withheld because the building needs repair, that can be a cruel Catch-22 - how can a building be repaired, its infrastructure and foundation strengthened, if the funds to do that are withheld because small issues have appeared?

In a building like the current home of NAICOB (North American Indian Center of Boston), a situation somewhat similar to that has arisen. The folks at NAICOB have organized an Indiegogo campaign to address it - they want to raise funds to fully assess and repair the building they call "home," which in turn will enable them to qualify once more for some of the funding they've lost that helped them provide programs - and infrastructure - in support of the Greater Boston area Native American population.

The seasons of the year, in Mi'kmaq, as painted on the wall in one of the large gathering rooms
at the NAICOB building in Jamaica Plain, MA.
Join me below the fold for a brief tour of NAICOB, some further explanation and information about how you can help - either directly or simply by helping to spread the word about the fundraiser and its goal.
Continue Reading

Cindy Taylor reported on February 3rd that the price of one gallon of propane heating fuel was up to $5.00 on the reservation.  Please be assured that even a donation of just $5.00 will help.  Please accept a heartfelt thank you for your help, and whether you give a rec or a dollar, every little bit will help today.   {{{ ♥ }}}

 photo OkiciyapQuiltBannerTEXT_zps1b7b08ce.jpg

Propane Heat

 photo 9294425_zps970e56da.png
DONATE
by credit card
or PayPal
Okiciyap is a 501(c)(3)
non-profit organization

Donate by Check:
Okiciyap
PO Box 172
Isabel, SD 57633

  Here is the place to spend a moment thinking of a Valentine you may never meet.  The Okiciyap Food Pantry depleted their funds in January to prevent elders in their community from losing electricity and running out of propane.

Propane shortages are real, even when you can get a delivery, it is rarely a full tank and the price is much higher than expected.  

Winter is real this year, too.  A cold and early start, with no end for many weeks; we are all feeling the misery of a winter we didn't expect to be so harsh.

The Okiciyap Pantry has approximately thirty elders in the community who continue to need help to heat their homes this winter.  

A little bit of help from you will go a long way in South Dakota, and be a true blessing for those on small fixed incomes, who must rely on propane or electricity for their heat.

Please, won't you send a Valentine's day gift to someone you haven't met?
Snowheart
Continue Reading
 photo OkiciyapQuiltBannerTEXT_zps1b7b08ce.jpg

 photo 9294425_zps970e56da.png
DONATE
by credit card
or PayPal
Okiciyap is a 501(c)(3)
non-profit organization

Donate by Check:
Okiciyap
PO Box 172
Isabel, SD 57633

Almost exactly four years ago, I read a newspaper article entitled "Chilled by Choice." It told of several different people who, for a variety of reasons, chose to go without heat. One was an engineer/landscape designer living in a stone house 7000 feet up in the Colorado mountains. She kept the pipes from freezing by letting the faucets drip,"15 to 30 drips a minute; any more than that causes an ice buildup and the dishes freeze in the sink.” Another was a Manhattan woman whose upstate NY getaway, an old one-room schoolhouse, didn’t have heat (although it had a wood-burning stove). She made regular winter trips there, and said that surviving the cold focused and clarified her mind.

I was in my home office at the time I read this. The room is heated, but it gets pretty chilly on cold days. I don’t find cold rooms clarifying. I don’t think well when I’m cold, and that puts me in a bad mood. So I shot off a letter to the writer, denouncing it all as “cold chic," although I admit that I wasn’t being entirely fair. But I still hold to one of the things I said: I hoped the people in the article used some of what they saved on heating bills to contribute to others – the ill, elderly, families with babies - who can’t afford to heat their homes properly - or at all.

I would have included Okiciyap, but I wasn't aware of it then. I'm aware of it now.

Continue Reading
Reposted from www.okiciyap.weebly.com by betson08
 photo OkiciyapQuiltBannerTEXT_zps1b7b08ce.jpg

Standing Rock Reservation, January 2009
If you've been shivering through this winter and crumbling under the weight of mounting heating bills, particularly propane, imagine how bad it is for the elders on the Indian reservations in the Dakotas, like Cheyenne River, Standing Rock or Pine Ridge, where the usually brutal winter has been even colder this year.

Imagine drafty, substandard housing in combination with these two things.....this means no heat for many people.

This winter has only just begun, and already there have been two major blizzards, the latest of which was only this past Sunday. So here we go again

Residents of North Dakota and South Dakota dealt with dangerous cold, high winds and blowing snow on Sunday that caused whiteout conditions and treacherous travel throughout much of the two states.

The storm, the most recent in a wave of heavy storms to hammer the Dakotas, packed powerful wind gusts that reached up to 60 mph over much of North Dakota and the northern portion of South Dakota on Sunday...snip...the wind chill was expected to plunge as low as 60 degrees below zero Sunday night over parts of the Dakotas, creating life-threatening conditions.

A series of Alberta clippers have swept down from Canada into the Northern Plains in the past couple of weeks, bringing light snow, strong winds and cold temperatures.

"This is definitely the most widespread event we've had this year," Jones said.

Yes, it's only January. And now to add injury to insult, the propane shortage has doubled prices in the Dakotas and elsewhere.

For the elders on the reservations, this winter has been dangerously cold, as some have run out of both propane and money.  With cuts in LIHEAP the tribes themselves have had trouble assisting them.  This is where Okiciyap (we help) comes in....

FYI - our new donations site is called YouCaring. You can go directly to that site here.

Continue Reading
 photo OkiciyapQuiltBannerTEXT_zps1b7b08ce.jpg

As you probably know if you clicked on this diary, the Daily Kos community supports a food pantry on the Cheyenne River Reservation in South Dakota called Okiciyap ("we help" in Lakota) the Isabel Community.

With this community's help, Okiciyap had what the director, Emily Penick, told me was the best Christmas party yet! I wanted to share some photos of that party with you, and remind you that you still have a few hours to get a tax deduction for your donation this year.

More below the fold...............

 photo 9294425_zps970e56da.png
DONATE
by credit card or PayPal
Continue Reading
 photo OkiciyapQuiltBannerTEXT_zps1b7b08ce.jpg

 photo 9294425_zps970e56da.png
DONATE
by credit card
Okiciyap is a 501(c)(3)
non-profit organization

Donate by Check:
Okiciyap
PO Box 172
Isabel, SD 57633

I mentioned last night that I'd received several gifts over the course of the day — not the kind you open, but the kind that are much deeper and more lasting than any thing. There have been several additional gifts over the course of yesterday evening and today, too (including one I even got to open!):

Carrying on a conversation with Gaagaagishiinh, Raven, yesterday afternoon.

Seeing Waabooz, Rabbit, stop to let me speak to him last night. Then watching Griffin follow him to the hay barn, lift his paw, and point, which he hasn't done in years.

Waking up this morning to see Ice waiting patiently to be fed. Finding out today that Ice is not a she, but a he, and that he has already decided that that is his name, whether in English or in Ojibwemowin (Mikwamii).

Knowing that he and our five other horses and four chickens are all safe and healthy and well-fed.

Seeing all five dogs lying in here at my feet, also safe and well-fed.

Knowing that Wings is happy and healthy, resting after a day in the studio and the stables, and that soon we'll eat a simple but wonderful dinner.

We're blessed.

Too many are not.

At this moment, on the Cheyenne River Reservation in Isabel, South Dakota, the temperature isn't bad: 25 degrees — with a wind chill of 15. A couple mornings ago, it was 16 below. Actual temperature. It's supposed to get down to 5 below on Saturday night.

And there are folks there who need our help.

Continue Reading
You can add a private note to this diary when hotlisting it:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary from your hotlist?
Are you sure you want to remove your recommendation? You can only recommend a diary once, so you will not be able to re-recommend it afterwards.

RSS

Subscribe or Donate to support Daily Kos.

Click here for the mobile view of the site