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Leading Off:

OH Redistricting, WA Redistricting: New congressional maps were released in two states yesterday: Ohio (where the GOP unleashed a breathtaking gerrymander) and Washington (where each of the state's four independent redistricting commissioners put out their own separate proposals). In a bit of kismet, the fortunes of one man are tied to redistricting in both places: Ohio Rep. Dennis Kucinich, who has long been flirting with the impossibly weird idea of seeking re-election in Washington. With that in mind, David Jarman combined an analysis of both sets of plans into one mega-post. Click the link for the complete run-down, and also see our Ohio bullets below for more.

Senate:

AZ-Sen: Former US Surgeon General Richard Carmona, who last month said he was thinking about running for Senate as a Democrat, sounds like he's getting cold feet. From the horse's mouth: "Quite frankly, I'm just not sure it's the right opportunity yet." Meanwhile, the first linked article, without citing any sources, adds that former state Dem Party chair Don Bivens, who has also been looking at the race, "is expected to announce his decision in the next few weeks."

CA-Sen: Holy crap. Sen. Dianne Feinstein says her coffers may also have been "wiped out" by Kinde Durkee, the treasurer for a huge array of Democratic campaigns who was recently arrested on charges that she stole from her clients. Feinstein isn't sure of the extent of the damage just yet — she had over $5 million on hand — but she joins a growing list of officeholders who have been hit, including Reps. Loretta Sanchez and Susan Davis.

MA-Sen: According to a statement released yesterday, Elizabeth Warren will officially announce her campaign for the Democratic Senate nomination today.

MO-Sen: PPP is out with a new survey in Missouri, and they find Dem Sen. Claire McCaskill leading Todd Akin 45-43, Sarah Steelman 43-42, and John Brunner 46-37. These numbers, while far from great, are pretty much unchanged from May, which is actually a good sign for McCaskill given how crappy the summer has been for Democrats.

MO-Sen: Karl Rove's American Crossroads is spending $75K on ads trying to revive what already seems like an old issue: Sen. Claire McCaskill's proper reimbursements for official travel on a private plane (which she decided to return anyway), and her unpaid taxes on that same plane (which she paid off). Part of the reason these incidents didn't get as much play as they might have is because it turned out that Lt. Gov. Peter Kinder, the GOP's gubernatorial candidate in all but name, had engaged in genuinely abusive mis-spending of taxpayer dollars on personal travel of his own. You bring up one issue, you bring up the other. But with Kinder seemingly doomed, I guess Crossroads just doesn't care about tying this anvil around his neck, and they seem to think they can hurt McCaskill with it.

Gubernatorial:

WA-Gov: Republican AG Rob McKenna's fundraising has been neck-and-neck with Dem Rep. Jay Inslee's — he, too, took in around $500K in the month of August and has about $1.5 mil on hand. But McKenna's burn rate has been much higher: He's already spent $620K to just $294K for Inslee. Gotta wonder why he's running through cash like this fourteen months before election day and long before any ads go up on the air.

House:

AZ-08: Rep. Gabby Giffords will sit down for her first interview since being shot early this year with ABC's Diane Sawyer on Nov. 14. Apparently "it's still not decided whether she will sit for an interview in front of the camera."

CA-35: Rep. Joe Baca, who currently occupies the old 43rd CD, just announced that he'd seek re-election in the new Fontana-centric 35th. That sets him up on a collision course for the Democratic nomination with state Sen. Gloria Negrete McCleod, and also possibly with Assemblywoman Norma Torres, who formed an exploratory committee last month. The first linked article says that Baca had been considering a run in the new San Bernardino-based 31st, but most of Baca's current district is in the new 35th, which is also a much bluer seat.

OH-03: Aaron Blake reports that Dem ex-Rep. Mary Jo Kilroy, who represented the old 15th for a single term, is interested in making a comeback in the proposed new 3rd CD. This district, according to the new GOP map (see redistricting item below) is a Columbus-centric Democratic vote sink that would have no incumbent, so I suspect Kilroy would not be alone in seeking this seat.

OH-09 (?): And here's a statement from Dennis Kucinich himself, who is, amazingly enough, painting the new map as a bit of good fortune. However, he actually does not say he'll run in the new 9th CD (the most obvious choice), or in fact in Ohio at all:

"It is an amazing turn of events that the legislature decided not to dismantle the district I represent. I have been praying that I could continue to serve my Cleveland-area constituency and it looks like I have a chance. That is all I could have hoped for."

Other Races:

NJ-St. Sen.: Great news for Carl Lewis! The Third Circuit Court of Appeals just overturned the district court and found that the Democrat (and former Olympic champion) can indeed appear on the ballot this fall. Republicans are vowing to appeal, but their options are poor: They can either ask the entire Third Circuit to hear the case (known as en banc review), or they can go to the Supreme Court. However, neither court is obligated to hear the case, and both decline the vast majority of requests to do so.

Grab Bag:

Pennsylvania: Man, I do not like the sound of this. Republicans in Pennsylvania are trying to pass legislation that would change the state's winner-take-all system for electoral votes and divvy them up by congressional district, as Maine and Nebraska do. Obviously it would be a much bigger deal if PA does it, though. And this isn't some backbencher filing a random bill. It's being pushed by Senate Majority Leader Dominic Pileggi and has the support of Gov. Tom Corbett.

Redistricting Roundup:

ID Redistricting: How did they miss this one? Just days after the state Supreme Court refused to hear a case brought by a deadlocked redistricting commission, Secretary of State Ben Ysursa says that the entire commission needs to be reconstituted from scratch. Why? Because of a 2009 law which, somewhat insanely, prevents people from serving on a commission more than once. So now Ysursa is insisting that Democrats and Republicans provide him with new names by today… but then what? Do they start from scratch? Try to pick up where the previous commissioners left off? Sounds like a serious mess, and it seems like further delays are inevitable.

TX Redistricting: Michael Li reminds us that that other big Texas redistricting case is about to heat up. One case (currently at trial) is underway in San Antonio, but the parties will soon be filing important papers in the preclearance suit that the state of Texas brought in Washington, DC. While there are a lot of intervenors, the chief defendant is the Department of Justice (as per the Voting Rights Act), which promises a substantive (rather than pro forma) answer to Texas's complaint on Sept. 19.

Originally posted to Daily Kos Elections on Wed Sep 14, 2011 at 05:00 AM PDT.

Also republished by Daily Kos.

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Comment Preferences

  •  Elizabeth Warren's in! (8+ / 0-)

    19, Chairman DKE Gay Caucus, male, Dem, (College IN-09) (Raised IL-03, IL-09) Tammy Baldwin and Elizabeth Warren for Senate!

    by ndrwmls10 on Wed Sep 14, 2011 at 05:00:31 AM PDT

  •  Carl Lewis back on ballot in New Jersey (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    LordMike, dc1000

    any chance at all of winning here??

    http://www.nj.com/...

  •  Reposting this (0+ / 0-)

    CA-39: Los Angeles County DA/failed 2010 AG candidate Steve Cooley endorses Ed Royce over Gary Miller. http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/...

    21, male, RI-01 (voting) IL-01 (college), working in MA-08 for the summer, hopeless Swingnut

    by sapelcovits on Wed Sep 14, 2011 at 05:21:13 AM PDT

    •  good (0+ / 0-)

      in a safe R district with two conservatives, i'll take the clean one over the corrupt one any day

      18, D, new CA-18 (home) new CA-13 (college). Economic liberal, social libertarian, fiscal conservative. Put your age and CD here :) -.5.38, -3.23

      by jncca on Wed Sep 14, 2011 at 03:02:24 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Kucinich would probably get pasted... (5+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    fladem, bronte17, KingofSpades, Odysseus, jncca

    ...in a primary with Kaptur.  Even thought the most pro-Kucinich parts of his district were saved for him, Marcy gets to keep almost all of her old district.  If you had visited Toledo in 2010, you'd be amazed at the support she received over there even in a down year.  Kucinich has a strong base of support, too, but has mostly worn out his welcome over the last few years.  He sheds most of the western Cleveland suburbs that are really sick of him, which helps him, but I'm not sure how much population is left to be an effective counter to Kaptur's much larger base.

    I'd say that the district is drawn 60/40 in Kaptur's favor for a primary, but she's not a lock.  A strong campaign by Kucinich could win the thing.  People forget that he has a LOT of union support and this is a tailor-made union district.  A few pictures of Dennis standing in picket lines with strikers (something he does often) would go a very long way all along that lakeshore strip.

    Still, I'd give Kaptur the edge here.  She's no slouch herself and is beloved for her excellent constituent service, even by many conservatives.

    GODSPEED TO THE WISCONSIN FOURTEEN!

    by LordMike on Wed Sep 14, 2011 at 05:25:37 AM PDT

  •  This is just a hunch (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    KingofSpades, Odysseus

    But I have a feeling that Marcy Kaptur is going to run in the 5th CD against Latta, instead of the 9th CD against Kucinich.  There's probably just as much of Toledo if not more in the 5th than the 9th, and its not like the 5th is THAT republican anymore at only 2% McCain win.  Latta's pretty much a weakling, Kaptur would have a really good shot at beating him.  

    •  How is her appeal in that area? (0+ / 0-)

      How The Doctor does redistricting: 'I'm going to need a SWAT team ready to mobilize, street-level maps covering all of Florida, a pot of coffee, twelve jammie dodgers and a fez.'

      by KingofSpades on Wed Sep 14, 2011 at 08:03:42 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  risky (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      James Allen, jncca

      I would guess that Kaptur would have a better chance than any other Dem to beat Latta. The best scenario for Dems would be if she could win that one and another Toledo Dem could win her old district, but I don't know that it's the best scenario for Kaptur. She'd probably be about 50-50 against Latta but a strong favorite to beat Kucinich.  

      SSP poster. 42, CA-5, -0.25/-3.90

      by sacman701 on Wed Sep 14, 2011 at 09:25:42 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  The PA Electoral College thing is scary (9+ / 0-)

    We must stop this.

    Sen. Daylin Leach (D., Montgomery) noted that Pileggi was pushing this legislation even as congressional districts were being redrawn as part of the once-a-decade remapping process based on federal census figures.

    Because congressional districts are reconfigured through legislation, the party that controls the legislature and the governor's office also controls the process, which good-government advocates say is rife with gerrymandering. Right now, both legislative chambers and the governor's office are controlled by the GOP.

    "I think this an obscene desecration of our history and our heritage," said Leach. "We have fought on individual issues over the years, but both parties have respected the fundamental rules of our democracy and not used our power to change the rules to undermine or fix future elections.

    •  I Live in PA. (0+ / 0-)

      I actually think its a good Idea.

      That would make for some interesting Elections. No longer writing off 99% of the state, and only caring about Philli and Pittsburg.

      I wouldn't mind a little representation for the first time ever.

      I have never seen a candidate for any office ever. And I never will with a winner take all here.

      •  It is only a good idea (8+ / 0-)

        If (a) the electoral vote is divided proportionally rather than by gerrymandered districts, and (b) all other states follow the same system.

        •  In which case (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          itskevin

          You may as well just go by the national popular vote.

          26, Dem, Dude seeing a dude, CT-04(originally), PA-02/NY-12(now)

          by Xenocrypt on Wed Sep 14, 2011 at 08:42:06 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Exactly (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            itskevin

            n/t

          •  not really (0+ / 0-)

            doing it proportionally avoids the possibility of a nation-wide recount lasting for months

            18, D, new CA-18 (home) new CA-13 (college). Economic liberal, social libertarian, fiscal conservative. Put your age and CD here :) -.5.38, -3.23

            by jncca on Wed Sep 14, 2011 at 03:04:15 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  I'm not sure how (0+ / 0-)

              assuming that the actual counting would still be done county-by-county.

              26, Dem, Dude seeing a dude, CT-04(originally), PA-02/NY-12(now)

              by Xenocrypt on Wed Sep 14, 2011 at 03:45:42 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  Yeah (0+ / 0-)

                and you could just have candidates pay for recounts out of their own accounts--expensive yes, but not much in the context of the big money that goes into presidential races.

                21, male, RI-01 (voting) IL-01 (college), working in MA-08 for the summer, hopeless Swingnut

                by sapelcovits on Wed Sep 14, 2011 at 04:06:18 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

                •  i meant more in that (0+ / 0-)

                  if the national popular vote were 500 vote difference for example, every county nationwide would have to recount.

                  if it were proportionally by state, some would be out of each for the extra electoral vote

                  18, D, new CA-18 (home) new CA-13 (college). Economic liberal, social libertarian, fiscal conservative. Put your age and CD here :) -.5.38, -3.23

                  by jncca on Wed Sep 14, 2011 at 04:42:04 PM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

            •  Proportional - Congress Could be Left to Decide (0+ / 0-)

              If the whole-number proportional approach had been in use throughout the country in the nation’s closest recent presidential election (2000), it would not have awarded the most electoral votes to the candidate receiving the most popular votes nationwide.  Instead, the result would have been a tie of 269–269 in the electoral vote, even though Al Gore led by 537,179 popular votes across the nation.  The presidential election would have been thrown into Congress to decide and resulted in the election of the second-place candidate in terms of the national popular vote.  

            •  Recounts less likely with National Popular Vote (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              sapelcovits

              Recounts are far more likely in the current system of state-by-state winner-take-all methods.

              The possibility of recounts should not even be a consideration in debating the merits of a national popular vote. No one has ever suggested that the possibility of a recount constitutes a valid reason why state governors or U.S. Senators, for example, should not be elected by a popular vote.

              The question of recounts comes to mind in connection with presidential elections only because the current system so frequently creates artificial crises and unnecessary disputes.

              A nationwide recount would not happen. We do and would vote state by state. Each state manages its own election and recount. The state-by-state winner-take-all system is not a firewall, but instead causes unnecessary fires.

              Given that there is a recount only once in about 160 statewide elections, and given there is a presidential election once every four years, one would expect a recount about once in 640 years under the National Popular Vote approach. The actual probability of a close national election would be even less than that because recounts are less likely with larger pools of votes.

              The average change in the margin of victory as a result of a statewide recount was a mere 296 votes in a 10-year study of 2,884 elections.

              No recount would have been warranted in any of the nation’s 56 previous presidential elections if the outcome had been based on the nationwide count.

              The 2000 presidential election was an artificial crisis created because of Bush's lead of 537 popular votes in Florida. Gore's nationwide lead was 537,179 popular votes (1,000 times larger). Given the miniscule number of votes that are changed by a typical statewide recount (averaging only 274 votes), no one would have requested a recount or disputed the results in 2000 if the national popular vote had controlled the outcome. Indeed, no one (except perhaps almanac writers and trivia buffs) would have cared that one of the candidates happened to have a 537-vote margin in Florida.

              The common nationwide date for meeting of the Electoral College has been set by federal law as the first Monday after the second Wednesday in December.  Under both the current system and the National Popular Vote approach, all counting, recounting, and judicial proceedings must be conducted so as to reach a "final determination" prior to the meeting of the Electoral College.  In particular, the U.S. Supreme Court has made it clear that the states are expected to make their "final determination" six days before the Electoral College meets.

        •  Proportional System Would Have Tied in 2000 (0+ / 0-)

          Any state that enacts the proportional approach on its own would reduce its own influence. This was the most telling argument that caused Colorado voters to agree with Republican Governor Owens and to reject this proposal in November 2004 by a two-to-one margin.  

          If the proportional approach were implemented by a state, on its own,, it would have to allocate its electoral votes in whole numbers.  If a current battleground state were to change its winner-take-all statute to a proportional method for awarding electoral votes, presidential candidates would pay less attention to that state because only one electoral vote would probably be at stake in the state.

          If the whole-number proportional approach had been in use throughout the country in the nation’s closest recent presidential election (2000), it would not have awarded the most electoral votes to the candidate receiving the most popular votes nationwide.  Instead, the result would have been a tie of 269–269 in the electoral vote, even though Al Gore led by 537,179 popular votes across the nation.  The presidential election would have been thrown into Congress to decide and resulted in the election of the second-place candidate in terms of the national popular vote.  

          A system in which electoral votes are divided proportionally by state would not accurately reflect the nationwide popular vote and would not make every vote equal.  

           It would penalize states, such as Montana, that have only one U.S. Representative even though it has almost three times more population than other small states with one congressman.  It would penalize fast-growing states that do not receive any increase in their number of electoral votes until after the next federal census.  It would penalize states with high voter turnout (e.g., Utah, Oregon).  

          Moreover, the fractional proportional allocation approach does not assure election of the winner of the nationwide popular vote.  In 2000, for example, it would have resulted in the election of the second-place candidate.  

          A national popular vote is the way to make every person's vote equal and guarantee that the candidate who gets the most votes in all 50 states becomes President.

      •  Huh? (8+ / 0-)

        Republicans will only focus on the swing districts, as they do already.  If you live in a rural area where the Dems can't win, they'll still ignore you.

        Unilaterally going proportional kills PA's electoral clout.  No one will come.

      •  Are you serious? (7+ / 0-)

        So you think a system where Obama would have actually gotten fewer electoral votes than Kerry despite winning by a much greater margin is fair?

        There is basically no logical argument that I can see to be made for this specific type of system. Especially not in a state as gerrymandered as Pennsylvania.

        21, male, RI-01 (voting) IL-01 (college), working in MA-08 for the summer, hopeless Swingnut

        by sapelcovits on Wed Sep 14, 2011 at 07:10:20 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  not to be too picky but Pittsburgh has an H (3+ / 0-)

        in its name.

      •  You Really Feel Ignored in a battleground state? (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        sapelcovits

        Candidates overwhelmingly poll, visit, advertise, organize, campaign, and care about the voter concerns in battleground states, while literally ignoring 2/3rds of the states and voters in "flyover" states - that's over 85 million voters.

        In the 2008 campaign, candidates concentrated over 2/3rds of their campaign events and ad money in just 6 states, and 98% in just 15 states (CO, FL, IN, IA, MI, MN, MO, NV, NH, NM, NC, OH, PA, VA, and WI).  Over half (57%) of the events were in just 4 states (OH, FL, Pennsylvania, and VA).

        You'd have NO hope of getting attention under the proposed district plan, unless you happen to be in one of the only 4 competitive districts in PA.

        Dividing Pennsylvania’s electoral votes by congressional district would magnify the worst features of the Electoral College system and not reflect the diversity of Pennsylvania.

        The district approach would provide less incentive for presidential candidates to campaign in all Pennsylvania districts and would not focus the candidates’ attention to issues of concern to the state as a whole. Candidates would have no reason to campaign in districts where they are comfortably ahead or hopelessly behind.

        Due to gerrymandering, in 2008, only 4 Pennsylvania congressional districts were competitive.

        In Maine, where they award electoral votes by congressional district, the closely divided 2nd congressional district received campaign events in 2008 (whereas Maine’s 1st reliably Democratic district was ignored).

        In Nebraska, which also uses the district method, the 2008 presidential campaigns did not pay the slightest attention to the people of Nebraska’s reliably Republican 1st and 3rd congressional districts because it was a foregone conclusion that McCain would win the most popular votes in both of those districts. The issues relevant to voters of the 2nd district (the Omaha area) mattered, while the (very different) issues relevant to the remaining (mostly rural) two-thirds of the state were irrelevant.

        When votes matter, presidential candidates vigorously solicit those voters. When votes don’t matter, they ignore those areas.

        Nationwide, there are only 55 “battleground” districts that are competitive in presidential elections. Seven-eighths of the nation’s congressional districts would be ignored if a district-level winner-take-all system were used nationally.

        If the district approach were used nationally, it would be less fair and less accurately reflect the will of the people than the current system. In 2004, Bush won 50.7% of the popular vote, but 59% of the districts. Although Bush lost the national popular vote in 2000, he won 55% of the country’s congressional districts.

        Because there are generally more close votes on district levels than states as whole, district elections increase the opportunity for error. The larger the voting base, the less opportunity there is for an especially close vote.

        Also, a second-place candidate could still win the White House without winning the national popular vote.

        A national popular vote is the way to make every person’s vote equal and guarantee that the candidate who gets the most votes in all 50 states becomes President.

    •  Eh (5+ / 0-)

      It would simply neuter Pennsylvania as a battleground state by vastly reducing the number of electoral votes in play there. If the winner nets only 6-8 votes either way, it is not as important.

    •  Corbett is a nightmare, last week, we had (3+ / 0-)

      major floods when the Susquehanna crested over flood stage plus creeks were over their banks, streets and towns were flooded and people were evacuated. I was lucky to just have had 2 feet of the creek in my garage.

      Corbett got on TV and he was like a deer in the headlights. We could not make sense of anything he was saying and he stumbled and stammered and could not form one coherent sentence. He is just plain awful.

    •  This is why I'm big on government reform (5+ / 0-)

      The electoral college being abolished and boundary commissions for drawing districts are two things that really need to happen. There are some serious power grabs occurring and reform needs to happen in the future.

      25, Male, CA-24, DK Elections Black Caucus Chair.

      by DrPhillips on Wed Sep 14, 2011 at 07:27:22 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  It's messing with our democracy (8+ / 0-)

      People belong in our voting booths, not political calculation.

      PA 2010 Senate Candidate, Congressman, Admiral, Director for Defense Policy, Director of Navy Counter-Terrorism, but most importantly, Dad. Follow me at http://twitter.com/JoeSestak and http://facebook.com/JoeSestak

      by Joe Sestak on Wed Sep 14, 2011 at 10:41:38 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Ohio redistricting is a big loss for progressives (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    mchestnutjr

    Instead of leaving a good Dem district in NE Ohio, they've now shifted a "Dem" leaning district from greater Cleveland/Akron area to Columbus.

    Instead of keeping the seat in NE Ohio, where it can be protected for Dems, its going south to Blue Dog/DLC country.  Columbus area Dems will run a GOP-lite candidate who will promptly lose the seat.

    In sum, Dems are losing 3 seats instead of 2.  

    If anyone wonders why Dems can't keep OH in the blue column, they need look no further than the DLC Dem leadership in central and southern Ohio.

    "My father always told me that all businessmen were sons of bitches, but I never believed it until now." - JFK during the 1962 Steel Crisis

    by Betty Pinson on Wed Sep 14, 2011 at 07:09:13 AM PDT

    •  StephenCLE said that he has a HUNCH (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Betty Pinson

      that Kaptur will run against Latta instead.

      How The Doctor does redistricting: 'I'm going to need a SWAT team ready to mobilize, street-level maps covering all of Florida, a pot of coffee, twelve jammie dodgers and a fez.'

      by KingofSpades on Wed Sep 14, 2011 at 08:09:00 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Seriously? The Columbus seat is almost 68% Obama (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      James Allen, LordMike, jncca

      No way in hell does (A) a DLCish candidate win the primary, or (B) a Democrat lose the general election.

      There isn't a single electoral district in the country where Republicans have a federal office holder where the Obama % is that high.

  •  WI2 - Another Dem to announce (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    dc1000, KingofSpades, Nickers

    The one I did not see coming, and I can;'t see him winning a Democratic primary, but Dane County Treasurer Dave Worzola appears set to announce for the open House seat based on this Wisconsin State Journal article.

    Link: http://host.madison.com/...

    "My name's Dr. Multimillionaire and I kicked your ass." --Rep. Steve Kagen D-WI to Karl Rove

    by walja on Wed Sep 14, 2011 at 07:24:35 AM PDT

  •  WI Senate - Thompson moving toward run (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    dc1000, supercereal, Odysseus

    Tommy Thompson, for once, appears serious about running for Herb Kohl's Senate seat.  I suspect the Club of Growth attacks have re-ignited the fire in his belly and he will pull the trigger and run for office for the first time since concluding his run as Governor.

    Link: http://host.madison.com/...

    "My name's Dr. Multimillionaire and I kicked your ass." --Rep. Steve Kagen D-WI to Karl Rove

    by walja on Wed Sep 14, 2011 at 07:28:34 AM PDT

  •  CT-Sen: McMahon Body Slams Shays (5+ / 0-)

    Linda McMahon has an internal poll showing her beating Shays by 19 points (no specific numbers) and with 68-24 favorables among Republicans vs. 46-27 for Shays.

    21, male, RI-01 (voting) IL-01 (college), working in MA-08 for the summer, hopeless Swingnut

    by sapelcovits on Wed Sep 14, 2011 at 07:34:09 AM PDT

  •  WA Gov. McKenna is burning through funds (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    KingofSpades, itskevin

    because he's fiscally conservative.

    No. That doesn't even make sense.

    Because he's fiscally erratic? But he's a conservative! Ah yes, socially conservative!  

    Oh dear gawd! Don't tell the voters. He borrowed that nice sheep's costume from Rossi. It couldn't cover up the fact that Dino is a wolf. But Rob really does come across as a nice, thoughtfull intelligent guy (well, he IS intelligent. I'll give him that).

    Keep burning cash Rob. It's good for our economy.

    © grover


    "Overflow zone. So much thinking going on." -- Meteor Blades, August 2, 2004.

    by grover on Wed Sep 14, 2011 at 08:07:00 AM PDT

  •  Notice on the linked map Ohio district 06 (2+ / 0-)

    It includes almost all of the eastern edge of Ohio and follows the Marcellus Shale map.  Our new congressman is on the energy committee and a very anti-EPA dude.

    Newbie elected in 2010 and a special protege of Mr. Boehner.  These guys know what they're doing.  

    The advertising about how safe hydraulic fracturing is has become a constant on TV, radio, and, today, a full page ad in the local paper.  They know they have a problem.

  •  You asked where McKenna's money (0+ / 0-)

    is going.  I've been inundated today with "ad words" ads all over the tubes for Rob.  Here on Dkos and a couple of completely non political sites.  Here's hoping I can spend his money for him.

  •  Boccieri (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    LordMike

    Looks like former 16th District Congressman John Boccieri is now in Tim Ryan's district.  

    http://www.vindy.com/...

     

  •  CA-31&35 Joe Baca seems a bit greedy , (0+ / 0-)

    switching from CA31 (CA31, where he actually lives), to 35.

    CA31 is strong-lean Democratic, whereas CA35 is a safe Democratic CD. (based on the 2010 election results)

    And CA35 is 52% CVAP Hispanic, which one of the up and coming Hispanic state legislators could've moved up into.

    So in CA31 Jerry Lewis won't be facing against a fellow incumbent (tho we do have a candidate there, we could use a stronger one).
    Oh well.

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