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"No self-respecting woman should wish -- or work for -- the success of a Party that ignores her sex." ~ Susan B. Anthony, 1872.

Liberal Granny published an excellent diary on Saturday morning. She wrote of how touched she was when two little girls thanked her for fighting to give them equal rights.

Her words made me think of the many women, including the women in my own family, who had fought to give me the rights I enjoy today. Rights I - and other women - might easily lose if we are not willing to fight - and vote - in order to keep them.

The first person who came to mind was my great-great-grandmother, Shade. She is the subject of much family lore and legend, but the story I remember most clearly concerned the day that she, and several other women, chained themselves around a public fountain, protesting for the right to vote.


Shade and her daughters in 1903.

Shade was born in Sonoma County, California, in 1864. Her parents were pioneers who traveled West in covered wagons. Shade and her six siblings were raised on the Bishop family's sprawling ranch near Dry Creek.

I don't know if it was genetic or simply a product of their upbringing (no shrinking violet would survive long on a working ranch!), but all of the Bishop Sisters were intelligent and feisty - a real force to be reckoned with. They were ahead of their time. They knew their own worth, believed that they were equal to any man, and they were willing to fight to have that fact recognized.


Suffragettes in 1917

Shade moved to Portland, Oregon, in the 1880s. She was eventually joined there by her younger sisters. Aunt Ann was a school teacher. While Aunt Flo, the baby of the family, was the first member of the Bishop family to graduate from college. All three were active in the cause of Women's Suffrage.

One day, after many long meetings, marches, and protests of one sort or another, a group of Suffragists came up with a plan to garner local press attention. During the afternoon, when most men would be out of the office and having their lunch, the women would go to a public place, form a circle around a large fountain and chain themselves together, making it more difficult for police to separate them. They knew arrest was inevitable.

Grandma Shade and her daughters were determined to take part.

Shade's husband, Richard, was a respected newspaper reporter. He agreed with Shade's cause, but not her methods. And what was worse, his employer abhorred Suffragists, referring to them as "wretched and unnatural women". Now, Richard was willing to fight for a good cause. He had exposed more than one corrupt wheeler-dealer in his day. Still, he didn't think it was appropriate for his wife and daughters to "make public spectacles" of themselves. And risking arrest? Out of the question! No, he advised, it would be better, much more sensible, to just continue with the women's meetings and lobby quietly for suffrage.

Shade wouldn't be deterred. She fought on. She picketed, she chained herself to those women around that fountain, and she was arrested. She did whatever she could to help further the cause of Women's Suffrage. She fought with her sisters, and her daughters, right there beside her.


Shade's sisters: Aunt Flo (left) and Aunt Ann (right).

It was no small task. The risks were very real.

Women of my generation often forget how much was endured by our mothers, grandmothers, and great-grandmothers before us, in order to gain equality.

Throughout the winter of 1917, Alice Paul and her followers in the National Women's Party picketed the White House. They stood silently at the gates, holding signs that said "Mr. President, how long must women wait for liberty?"...At first, the suffragists were politely ignored. But on April 6, 1917, the United States entered World War I. The suffragists' signs became more pointed. They taunted Wilson, accusing him of being a hypocrite. How could he send American men to die in a war for democracy when he denied voting rights to women at home? The suffragists became an embarrassment to President Wilson. It was decided the picketing in front of the White House must stop.

Spectators assaulted the picketers, both verbally and physically. Police did nothing to protect the women. Soon, the police began arresting the suffragists on charges of obstructing traffic.


Police arresting British suffragette Emmeline Pankhurst in London
At first, the charges were dropped. Next, the women were sentenced to jail terms of just a few days. But the suffragists kept picketing, and their prison sentences grew. Finally, in an effort to break the spirit of the picketers, the police arrested Alice Paul. She was tried and sentenced to 7 months in prison.

Paul was placed in solitary confinement. For two weeks, she had nothing to eat except bread and water. Weak and unable to walk, she was taken to the prison hospital. There she began a hunger strike--one which others would join...In response to the hunger strike, prison doctors put Alice Paul in a psychiatric ward. They threatened to transfer her to an insane asylum. Still, she refused to eat. Afraid that she might die, doctors force fed her. Three times a day for three weeks, they forced a tube down her throat and poured liquids into her stomach. Despite the pain and illness the force feeding caused, Paul refused to end the hunger strike--or her fight for the vote...


A suffragette being force fed.
After 5 weeks in prison, Alice Paul was set free. The attempts to stop the picketers had backfired. Newspapers carried stories about the jail terms and forced feedings of the suffragists. The stories angered many Americans and created more support than ever for the suffrage amendment.

Grandma Shade, like so many women who fought for equality, was ridiculed, spat on, threatened with physical violence, called vile names, and finally, arrested. But it was worth it. On August 18, 1920, the 19th Amendment was ratified.

In May, 1919, the necessary two-thirds vote in favor of the women suffrage amendment was finally mustered in Congress, and the proposed amendment was sent to the states for ratification.  By July 1920, with a number of primarily southern states adamantly opposed to the amendment, it all came down to Tennessee.  It appeared that the amendment might fail by one vote in the Tennessee house, but twenty-four-year-old Harry Burns surprised observers by casting the deciding vote for ratification. At the time of his vote, Burns had in his pocket a letter he had received from his mother urging him, "Don't forget to be a good boy" and "vote for suffrage." Women had finally won the vote.
At the age of fifty-six, Grandma Shade was finally granted the right to vote.

Because of Shade, and Aunt Ann, and Aunt Flo - and so many others - I have the right to vote. How could I dishonor their memory by failing to do so?

Katja Von Garner, in her film about Alice Paul, gave Suffragists the name Iron-Jawed Angels - women who were not only beautiful, but strong as iron.

So, thank you, my Iron-Jawed Angels. Thank you for picketing in the rain, and the snow, and the summer heat. Thank you for withstanding the vile curses, the threats of physical violence, the actual physical violence, and the force-feedings. Thank you for enduring the indignity of being spat upon by strangers. Thank you for being willing to go even to prison to ensure that you, your daughters - and I - would one day have the right to vote. The right to be heard and recognized as an equal. You will never know me, but my life is better because of what you did, what you sacrificed, and for that I am eternally grateful. THANK YOU.

On behalf of all the women out there who now have the right to vote, the right to family planning and birth control, the right to work outside the home if we choose to, and the right to earn equal pay for that work -- THANK YOU.

From the bottom of my heart -- THANK YOU.

A scene from Iron-Jawed Angels depicting the suffragettes being attacked by Marines (and others) before Alice Paul was arrested.

REGISTER TO VOTE

VOTER REGISTRATION DEADLINES BY STATE

Alabama - October 26, 2012
Alaska - October 6, 2012
Arizona    - October 9, 2012
Arkansas - October 6, 2012
California - October 22, 2012
Colorado - October 9, 2012
Connecticut - October 23, 2012 (mailed) -- October 30, 2012 (in person)
Delaware - October 13, 2012
District of Columbia - October 9, 2012 (by mail) - November 6, 2012 (in person)
Florida    - October 9, 2012
Georgia    - October 6, 2012
Hawaii - October 9, 2012
Idaho - October 12, 2012 (by mail) - November 6, 2012 (in person)
Illinois - October 9, 2012
Indiana    - October 9, 2012
Iowa - October 22, 2012 (by mail) - November 6, 2012 (in person)
Kansas - October 16, 2012
Kentucky - October 9, 2012
Louisiana - October 9, 2012
Maine - October 16, 2012 (by mail)- November 6, 2012 (in person)
Maryland - October 16, 2012
Massachusetts - October 17, 2012
Michigan - October 9, 2012
Minnesota - October 16, 2012 (by mail) - November 6, 2012 (in person)
Mississippi - October 6, 2012
Missouri - October 10, 2012
Montana    - October 9, 2012 (by mail) - November 6, 2012 (in person)
Nebraska - October 19, 2012 (by mail) - October 26, 2012 (in person)
Nevada - October 16, 2012
New Hampshire- October 27, 2012 (by mail) - November 6, 2012 (in person)
New Jersey    Received 21 days before the election    October 16, 2012
New Mexico    Postmarked 28 days before the election    October 9, 2012
New York - October 12, 2012
North Carolina - October 12, 2012. (by mail)  - November 3 (in person)
North Dakota - North Dakota is the only state that does not have voter registration. ( http://www.nd.gov/... )
Ohio - October 9, 2012
Oklahoma - October 12, 2012
Oregon - October 16, 2012
Pennsylvania - October 9, 2012
Rhode Island - October 6, 2012 (by mail) - November 6, 2012 (in person)
South Carolina - October 6, 2012
South Dakota - October 22, 2012
Tennessee - October 6, 2012
Texas - October 9, 2012
Utah - October 9, 2012 (by mail) - October 22 (in person or online)
Vermont    - October 31, 2012
Virginia - October 15, 2012
Washington - October 6, 2012 (by mail) - October 29, 2012 (in person)
West Virginia - October 16, 2012
Wisconsin - October 17, 2012 (by mail) - November 6, 2012 (in person)
Wyoming    - October 22, 2012 - November 6, 2012 (in person)

3:38 PM PT: Thank you so much to DKos Oregon, J Town and Community Spotlight for republishing my diary!


Originally posted to AuroraDawn on Sun Sep 16, 2012 at 01:53 PM PDT.

Also republished by Daily Kos Oregon, J Town, History for Kossacks, and Community Spotlight.

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Comment Preferences

  •  If you are not registered to vote... (46+ / 0-)

    please, register now. My state votes by mail, but if you are already registered to vote, and live in a state that doesn't vote by mail, please, if you can, offer to help get other people to the polls. GOTV!

    History, despite its wrenching pain, cannot be unlived, but if faced with courage, need not be lived again. ~ Maya Angelou

    You can tell Romney’s depressed. Last night he just sat on his couch and bought the Häagen-Dazs corporation ~ Jimmy Fallon

    by AuroraDawn on Sun Sep 16, 2012 at 01:53:37 PM PDT

  •  The Rapepublicans (16+ / 0-)

    want women to be:

    Silent
    Modest
    Barefoot and Pregnant (especially if the pregnancy is the result of rape or incest)
    At Home
    Dumb as a Brick
    Obedient
    Bigger breasted.

    If a woman doesn't vote, she's complicit in her own slavery.

    "Love One Another" ~ George Harrison

    by Damnit Janet on Sun Sep 16, 2012 at 02:07:48 PM PDT

    •  Absolutely. (9+ / 0-)
      If a woman doesn't vote, she's complicit in her own slavery.
      If you don't make your voice heard, if you don't use your right to vote, then you have no right to complain about the system.

      You can tell Romney’s depressed. Last night he just sat on his couch and bought the Häagen-Dazs corporation ~ Jimmy Fallon

      by AuroraDawn on Sun Sep 16, 2012 at 02:11:38 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  It's not just about the complaining (14+ / 0-)

        So many women think they "aren't political" which is total bs.

        Women are very political... if they are awake and aware.  Politics isn't just about whose ass in in the white house.  It's about what you yourself are doing with your own mind, body and soul.  Politics is about what we women put into our baby's body.  What we wear or don't wear on our own skin.  Where we shop.  How we play?

        Our politics is the daily choices we make.  We have so much POWER... yet we have been indoctrinated to believe that we are powerless.

        I'd be damned to let another person make the decision of what book I was to read at bedtime - let alone what POTUS thinks I should do with my body.

        :) Great diary.

        "Love One Another" ~ George Harrison

        by Damnit Janet on Sun Sep 16, 2012 at 02:26:56 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Very well said... (11+ / 0-)
          Women are very political... if they are awake and aware.  Politics isn't just about whose ass in in the white house.  It's about what you yourself are doing with your own mind, body and soul.  Politics is about what we women put into our baby's body.  What we wear or don't wear on our own skin.  Where we shop.  How we play?

          Our politics is the daily choices we make.  We have so much POWER... yet we have been indoctrinated to believe that we are powerless.

          I'd rec this a hundred times if I could. I can't tell you how many arguments I've had with my cousin, making the point you just did, though not as eloquently. She sat out the last election. I have finally persuaded her to vote this time around (with a little help from Mitt Romney and Todd Akin).

          I'm glad you enjoyed the diary.

          You can tell Romney’s depressed. Last night he just sat on his couch and bought the Häagen-Dazs corporation ~ Jimmy Fallon

          by AuroraDawn on Sun Sep 16, 2012 at 02:32:24 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

      •  Corollary -- if she votes Republican (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        AuroraDawn, KenBee

        is she actually helping enslave other women?

        LBJ, Lady Bird, Anne Richards, Barbara Jordan, Sully Sullenberger, Ike, Drew Brees, Molly Ivins --Texas is no Bush league! -7.50,-5.59

        by BlackSheep1 on Mon Sep 17, 2012 at 09:34:41 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Absolutely (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          BlackSheep1, AuroraDawn

          Some of the most hateful women I've seen are the ones who are screaming at young women as they enter Planned Parenthood.  

          Those women are vile creatures.  You want to see pure hate... go check out some of the "women" who are protesting PP every week.  

          "Love One Another" ~ George Harrison

          by Damnit Janet on Tue Sep 18, 2012 at 02:35:20 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  naw, I quit goin' to church over some of 'em (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Damnit Janet, AuroraDawn

            threatenin' to pray for me after they caught me pullin' the "target poster" of a PP provider here in town off light poles.

            Got no idee what Jesus would say to 'em, but I bet it ain't what they expect.

            LBJ, Lady Bird, Anne Richards, Barbara Jordan, Sully Sullenberger, Ike, Drew Brees, Molly Ivins --Texas is no Bush league! -7.50,-5.59

            by BlackSheep1 on Tue Sep 18, 2012 at 03:34:42 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

    •  Within the GOP, they've made great progress on (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Damnit Janet, BlackSheep1, AuroraDawn
      Dumb as a Brick
      It's so telling what sort of "tokens" the GOP puts forth. Their women are stupid, their African Americans are insane and their LGTB republicans are peeking out under toilet stalls. The common characteristic is that all are suicidally self-loathing. This is what the GOP teaches.

      Mark Twain said "to a man with a hammer, everything looks like a nail." So to a man with a gun, what did Trayvon Martin look like? -- Max Minton

      by teachme2night on Mon Sep 17, 2012 at 08:25:22 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Self-loathing. Yes they are! (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        AuroraDawn

        Malkin, Coulter, Palin, ...  all of them, any of them...

        Condi Rice.  She's not dumb.  But she's probably the closest thing outside of Rove that I'll ever come close to and call pure evil.  

        "Love One Another" ~ George Harrison

        by Damnit Janet on Tue Sep 18, 2012 at 02:36:51 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  I don't understand how... (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Damnit Janet

          a black woman raised in the Jim Crow South can take the positions she does. How does she live with it? Were ALL the members of the Bush Administration sociopaths? It seems like it.

          You can tell Romney’s depressed. Last night he just sat on his couch and bought the Häagen-Dazs corporation ~ Jimmy Fallon

          by AuroraDawn on Wed Sep 19, 2012 at 12:15:32 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  I've seen her confronted (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            AuroraDawn

            by people who have lost their children in these illegal occupations.

            She's cold hearted.  

            Black or white or striped and polka-dotted.  How can any HUMAN be that cold?

            "Love One Another" ~ George Harrison

            by Damnit Janet on Wed Sep 19, 2012 at 07:52:11 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  I honestly don't know... (0+ / 0-)
              Black or white or striped and polka-dotted.  How can any HUMAN be that cold?
              I've never understood how ANYONE in that Administration could sleep at night.

              You can tell Romney’s depressed. Last night he just sat on his couch and bought the Häagen-Dazs corporation ~ Jimmy Fallon

              by AuroraDawn on Wed Sep 19, 2012 at 01:26:34 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

    •  Damnit Janet--You never fail to amaze me. (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      AuroraDawn
      •  In a good way I hope :) (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        AuroraDawn

        I amaze myself with how fast I can eat a pint of Purely Decadent So Delicious "ice cream" it's vegan LOL

        I'm like, "holy shit, I'm amazed I hate the entire fucking pint!?!"

        Actually, I'm amazed they don't make those damn things bigger. :)

        "Love One Another" ~ George Harrison

        by Damnit Janet on Tue Sep 18, 2012 at 02:32:30 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  Thanks for reminding us that equal rights are not (11+ / 0-)

    granted by those in power, they are won by hard work, suffering, persistence, sacrifice, bravery, and determination.  Expanding rights is not something that happens in one election cycle or one term, it is a decades long effort against those who have wealth and power and who absolutely do not want to share.

    “when Democrats don’t vote, Democrats don’t win.” Alan Grayson

    by ahumbleopinion on Sun Sep 16, 2012 at 02:17:59 PM PDT

    •  Yes, women fought for over a century... (13+ / 0-)

      to gain the right to vote in this country. Black women had to struggle even longer. It didn't happen overnight, and the right wasn't handed to them, they had to fight for it.

      Women actually had the right to vote in a few states at the end of the 18th Century, but that right was taken away.

      Timeline of Women's Suffrage in the United States

      1776    Abigail Adams writes to her husband, John Adams, asking him to "remember the ladies" in the new code of laws. Adams replies the men will fight the "despotism of the petticoat."

      1777    Women lose the right to vote in New York.

      1780    Women lose the right to vote in Massachusetts.

      1784    Women lose the right to vote in New Hampshire.

      1787    US Constitutional Convention places voting qualifications in the hands of the states. Women in all states except New Jersey lose the right to vote.

      1792    Mary Wollstonecraft publishes Vindication of the Rights of Women in England.

      1807    Women lose the right to vote in New Jersey, the last state to revoke the right.

      1840    World Anti-Slavery Convention in London. Lucretia Mott, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and other women barred from participating on account of their sex. Women Begin to Organize For Their Own Rights

      1848    First Women's Rights convention in Seneca Fall, New York. Equal suffrage proposed by Elizabeth Cady Stanton After debate of so radical a notion, it is adopted.

      1850    Women's rights convention held in April in Salem, Ohio. First national women's rights convention held in October in Worcester, Massachusetts.

      1850-1861    Annual Women's Rights conventions held. The last, in 1861, in Albany, New York lobbies for a liberalized divorce bill. Horace Greely opposes the bill, which loses.

      1861-1865    Civil War. Over the objections of Susan B. Anthony, women put aside suffrage activities to help the war effort.

      1867    Fourteenth amendment passes Congress, defining citizens as "male;" this is the first use of the word male in the Constitution. Kansas campaign for black and woman suffrage: both lose. Susan B. Anthony forms Equal Rights Association, working for universal suffrage. Suffrage Movement Divides Over Black vs. Woman Suffrage

      1868    Fourteenth amendment ratified. Fifteenth amendment passes Congress, giving the vote to black men. Women petition to be included but are turned down. Formation of New England Woman Suffrage Association. In New Jersey, 172 women attempt to vote; their ballots are ignored.
      1869    Frederick Douglass and others back down from woman suffrage to concentrate on fight for black male suffrage. National Woman Suffrage Association formed in May with Elizabeth Cady Stanton as president. American Woman Suffrage Association formed in November with Henry Ward Beecher as president. In England, John Stuart Mill, economist and husband of suffragist Harriet Taylor, publishes On the Subjugation of Women. Wyoming territory grants first woman suffrage since 1807.
      Civil Disobedience Is Tried

      1870    Fifteenth Amendment ratified. The Grimke sisters, now quite aged, and 42 other women attempt to vote in Massachusetts, their ballots are cast but ignored. Utah territory grants woman suffrage.

      1872    Susan B. Anthony and supporters arrested for voting. Anthony's sisters and 11 other women held for $500 bail. Anthony herself is held for $1000 bail.

      1873    Denied a trial by jury, Anthony loses her case in June and is fined $100 plus costs. Suffrage demonstration at the Centennial of the Boston Tea Party.

      1874    Protest at a commemoration of the Battle of Lexington. In Myner v. Happerstett the US Supreme Court decides that being a citizen does not guarantee suffrage.

      1876    On July 4, in Philadelphia, Susan B. Anthony reads The Declaration for the Rights of Women from a podium in front of the Liberty Bell. The crowd cheers. Later, the suffragists meet in the historic First Unitarian Church.

      1878    Woman suffrage amendment first introduced in US Congress.

      1882    The House and Senate appoint committees on woman suffrage, both report favorably.

      1884    Belva Lockwood runs for president. The US House of Representatives debates woman suffrage.

      1886    Suffrage amendment reaches the US Senate floor, it is defeated two to one.

      1887    Utah women lose right to vote.

      1890    The NWSA and the AWSA merge to form NAWSA. The focus turns to working at the state level. Campaign loses in South Dakota.

      1893    Matilda Joslyn Gage publishes Woman, Church and State. After a vigorous campaign led by Carrie Chapman Catt, Colorado men vote for woman suffrage.

      1894    Despite 600,000 signatures, a petition for woman suffrage is ignored in New York. Lucy Stone, born in 1818, dies.

      1895    Utah women regain suffrage.

      1896    Idaho grants woman suffrage.

      1907    Harriet Stanton Blatch, Elizabeth's daughter, forms the Equality League of Self Supporting Women which becomes the Women's Political Union in 1910. She introduces the English suffragists' tactics of parades, street speakers, and pickets.

      1910    Washington (state) grants woman suffrage.

      1911    California grants woman suffrage. In New York City, 3,000 march for suffrage.

      1912    Teddy Roosevelt's Progressive Party includes woman suffrage in their platform. Oregon, Arizona, and Kansas grant woman suffrage.

      1913    Women's Suffrage parade on the eve of Wilson's inauguration is attacked by a mob. Hundreds of women are injured, no arrests are made. Alaskan Territory grants suffrage. Illinois grants municipal and presidential but not state suffrage to women.

      1916    Alice Paul and others break away from the NASWA and form the National Women's Party.

      1917    Beginning in January, NWP posts silent "Sentinels of Liberty" at the White House. In June, the arrests begin. Nearly 500 women are arrested, 168 women serve jail time, some are brutalized by their jailers. North Dakota, Indiana, Nebraska, and Michigan grant presidential suffrage; Arkansas grants primary suffrage. New York, South Dakota, and Oklahoma state constitutions grant suffrage.
      1918    The jailed suffragists released from prison. Appellate court rules all the arrests were illegal. President Wilson declares support for suffrage. Suffrage Amendment passes US House with exactly a two-thirds vote but loses by two votes in the Senate.

      1919    In January, the NWP lights and guards a "Watchfire for Freedom." It is maintained until the Suffrage Amendment passes US Senate on June 4. The battle for ratification by at least 36 states begins.

      1920    The Nineteenth Amendment, called the Susan B. Anthony Amendment, is ratified by Tennessee on August 18. It becomes law on August 26.

      You can tell Romney’s depressed. Last night he just sat on his couch and bought the Häagen-Dazs corporation ~ Jimmy Fallon

      by AuroraDawn on Sun Sep 16, 2012 at 02:27:42 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Superb diary (9+ / 0-)

    "Injustice wears ever the same harsh face wherever it shows itself." - Ralph Ellison

    by KateCrashes on Sun Sep 16, 2012 at 03:27:14 PM PDT

  •  thank you for this excellent diary! n/t (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    AuroraDawn, bewareofme, teachme2night

    "It's about what they've done, and when what they say is some distance from what they've done, that distance is the story. This is what the press is for. " Rachel Maddow

    by politik on Sun Sep 16, 2012 at 04:38:25 PM PDT

  •  Thanks (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    AuroraDawn, bewareofme, BlackSheep1

    The radical Republican party is the party of oppression, fear, loathing and above all more money and power for the people who robbed us.

    by a2nite on Sun Sep 16, 2012 at 04:48:15 PM PDT

  •  'Cause we were sufferin' until sufferage, oh! (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    AuroraDawn, bewareofme

    I blog about my daughter with autism at her website

    by coquiero on Sun Sep 16, 2012 at 05:09:44 PM PDT

    •  I never posted a video before, I'm glad I finally (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      AuroraDawn, bewareofme

      figured it out!

      I love this little Schoolhouse Rock video, and so do my kids.  

      The young ones really have no idea that women used to have virtually no rights at all.

      The song is catchy, too!

      By the way, your gg-grandmother was lovely.  I love her name, too.  

      Great diary.

      I blog about my daughter with autism at her website

      by coquiero on Sun Sep 16, 2012 at 06:08:46 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Thank you... (6+ / 0-)

        I've always loved her name as well. Shade was a actually a nickname given to her as a child. No one ever bothered to use her real name, though. Many of her friends were actually surprised to discover at her memorial service that her given name was Mary Margaret! They never knew.

        I'm glad you enjoyed the diary, and I love the link to School House Rock. They used to play reruns of School House Rock on weekends when I was little. I wish they would produce a similar series to help educate children today.

        The young ones really have no idea that women used to have virtually no rights at all.
        I was speaking to a woman my age (late 20s) last week and was astounded that she didn't know anything about the history of women's suffrage or the fight for family planning and birth control. The woman in question is actually quite intelligent, but apparently, she barely learned anything at school about the subject. I was fortunate to have a mother and grandmother who helped to enlighten me.

        We take so much for granted.

        My mother can remember in the early 70s being told by a physician that he wouldn't agree to give her birth control pills unless her husband came in and gave his consent! That was only 40 years ago, not that long at all. And now we have imbeciles, once again, trying to take away our rights. We can't be complacent.

        You can tell Romney’s depressed. Last night he just sat on his couch and bought the Häagen-Dazs corporation ~ Jimmy Fallon

        by AuroraDawn on Sun Sep 16, 2012 at 06:18:59 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  The vote was not granted... (7+ / 0-)

    ...it was fought for and won.

    It was also happening all over the world.

    Still long ways to go sisters.

    Daily Kos an oasis of truth. Truth that leads to action.

    by Shockwave on Sun Sep 16, 2012 at 05:30:22 PM PDT

    •  I posit that the Prohibition Amendment set back (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      AuroraDawn, KenBee, Shockwave

      the cause considerably.

      I was taught in high school that women's suffrage predated Prohibition, and that the ban-alcohol "temprance women" couldn't've passed that amendment without WW1 drawing away male voters.

      Prohibition, inarguably, damaged our nation.

      In the South, it was seen as another interference by a government "too big for its britches" -- the very same government that had imposed Reconstruction.

      LBJ, Lady Bird, Anne Richards, Barbara Jordan, Sully Sullenberger, Ike, Drew Brees, Molly Ivins --Texas is no Bush league! -7.50,-5.59

      by BlackSheep1 on Mon Sep 17, 2012 at 09:42:49 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  That's not entirely true... (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        BlackSheep1, KenBee, Shockwave
        I was taught in high school that women's suffrage predated Prohibition, and that the ban-alcohol "temprance women" couldn't've passed that amendment without WW1 drawing away male voters.
        There were numerous men in government - and outside it - who supported Prohibition. It wasn't just women. Women didn't have the power necessary at that time - war or no war - to pass anything without men supporting the legislation. I think the fact that they had to wait for the vote until 1920 - and it all hinged on the vote of some 24 year old man from TN - is proof of that.

        Women played their part, to be sure, but they weren't alone.

        I look at most of the ordinary women involved in Prohibition (with some notable exceptions) as well-meaning, but horribly misguided. They not only wanted to control "vice", many of them hoped Prohibition would eliminate things like domestic violence. Of course, it didn't, but hindsight is 20/20. They had no real way of knowing, as we do today, that Prohibition can't stop or prevent addiction and vice. It just doesn't work. In fact, it made matters worse.

        You can tell Romney’s depressed. Last night he just sat on his couch and bought the Häagen-Dazs corporation ~ Jimmy Fallon

        by AuroraDawn on Mon Sep 17, 2012 at 09:58:49 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  This is an excellent diary! Thank you! (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    AuroraDawn, coquiero

    We can't let them down. Suffrage says it all. I'm so grateful for those ladies and all those that have maintained the fight since.

    The Republicans are coming at us again. We must fight back.

  •  Turning Point Suffragist Memorial (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    AuroraDawn, coquiero, KenBee

    Many women picketed the White House during 1917 for the right to vote.  They picketed until they were arrested.  Upon arrest, they were jailed at the DC Jail or at the Occoquan Workhouse because they refused to pay their fines.  They considered themselves political prisoners. Over time the sentences grew longer and longer.  The women were an embarrassment to the Wilson administration and were considered traitors by many because America was entering World War I.

    On the night of November 14-15, 1917, 33 women were taken to the Occoquan Workhouse.  The warden told the guards to teach the women a lesson so they would not want to return.  The women were savagely beaten.  One woman was thrown against a wall and knocked unconscious.  Another saw this happen and had a heart attack because she thought the first woman was dead.  Lucy Burns was hung from a hook with her hands over her head and was almost asphyxiated. This Night of Terror was the epitome of many actions collectively known as the "turning point" in the women's suffragist movement in this country.

    There is a national memorial being built to these women who made great sacrifices for OUR rights to vote. It will be located close to the site of the original Occoquan Workhouse.

    http://www.suffragistmemorial.org/

  •  After my high school American History students (5+ / 0-)

    study the Suffrage Mvt. as part of our Reform Unit, we watch the last 45 minutes of Iron-Jawed Angels.  As they watch the film, I watch their faces.  I am never disappointed; the young men as well as young women are astounded and disgusted by what they see.  Their Reaction Essays are one of my favorite assignments to read..."They get it!"

    I cannot praise the film enough as a means to "bring home" the message concerning what past women had to fight and what they fought for.  My nieces are each getting a copy for Christmas this year accompanied by a note form "Auntie"...$5.35 per niece--well spent!

    Robber Baron "ReTHUGisms": John D. Rockefeller -"The way to make money is to buy when blood is running in the streets"; Jay Gould -"I can hire one half of the working class to kill the other half."

    by ranton on Sun Sep 16, 2012 at 07:23:26 PM PDT

    •  You're one of ... (4+ / 0-)

      my heroes.

      Not only are you a teacher, you're a history teacher. Americans desperately needs to gain a better awareness of our nation's history. Maybe then we could stop repeating the same mistakes generation after generation.

      "Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it" ~ George Santayana
      Thank you for all of the work you do. Teachers aren't thanked often enough, these days.

      You can tell Romney’s depressed. Last night he just sat on his couch and bought the Häagen-Dazs corporation ~ Jimmy Fallon

      by AuroraDawn on Sun Sep 16, 2012 at 07:47:56 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Thank you... I sometimes worry (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        AuroraDawn, GreenMother

        about the "unsaid" message my students might get during our Reform Unit because it seems that we study so much of what was "unjust" in America.  I try to take time to talk about the fact that true history does not just show the "good" and the "bad"...it strives for truth.  

        To me, America's greatness lies in the fact that "Reform" is and was possible...not easy but possible!  

        Robber Baron "ReTHUGisms": John D. Rockefeller -"The way to make money is to buy when blood is running in the streets"; Jay Gould -"I can hire one half of the working class to kill the other half."

        by ranton on Sun Sep 16, 2012 at 09:48:59 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Very well said. (0+ / 0-)
          To me, America's greatness lies in the fact that "Reform" is and was possible...not easy but possible!  

          You can tell Romney’s depressed. Last night he just sat on his couch and bought the Häagen-Dazs corporation ~ Jimmy Fallon

          by AuroraDawn on Sun Sep 16, 2012 at 09:58:58 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

  •  In 1898 (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    AuroraDawn, coquiero, GreenMother, KenBee

    My great grandmother Mina had twins. Mina's husband was lace importer in NYC and they lived a fashionable life on the Upper West Side. The twins grew up into the flapper era, but along the way, Mina and her twins, dressed in almost Art Nouveau gowns, marched in NYC for Suffrage.  The little girls wore paper sashes. My Cousin still has my Grandmother's sash, it is, of course, a family treasure.
    By the time I met my grandmother, she was deeply involved in the Civil Rights movement and took me along whenever it could be arranged. When VietNam came and then the anti Nuke campaign, she backed my activism and always was a source of excellent political insight. I don't know if it's genetic or environmental but the activist streak has followed through our family for generations and the next generation is taking on Legalization.

    •  Your grandmother sounds very much like my... (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      coquiero, GreenMother, KenBee

      own grandmother (Shade's grandchild). I'm beginning to think there might indeed be an activist gene. ;-)

      Or I may just have Shade's Canadian step-mother to thank for my family's liberal bent. I have a definite feeling the second Mrs. Bishop was the original liberalizing influence in our family. So, thank you Canada!

      You can tell Romney’s depressed. Last night he just sat on his couch and bought the Häagen-Dazs corporation ~ Jimmy Fallon

      by AuroraDawn on Sun Sep 16, 2012 at 08:11:17 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  one tiny correction (4+ / 0-)

    What a lovely piece, but I have a correction.  American suffragists rejected the term suffragette because of the violence of the English movement.  Alice Paul, although a veteran of the English movement, was also a Quaker.  She and all of her colleagues called themselves suffragists.  At the risk of giving away my identity, let me say that I wrote my undergraduate honors thesis on the Congressional Union/National Woman's Party and my Ph.D. dissertation on the final drive for woman suffrage in general. I know of what I speak.

    http://ozarkhomesteader.wordpress.com/

    by Ozark Homesteader on Sun Sep 16, 2012 at 08:26:12 PM PDT

    •  I'll correct the term in the article, but... (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      coquiero, GreenMother, KenBee

      not the title. My ancestor referred to herself in multiple letters as a Suffragette. Perhaps Shade preferred the methods of the British movement? I'll never know. Thank you for the correction.

      You can tell Romney’s depressed. Last night he just sat on his couch and bought the Häagen-Dazs corporation ~ Jimmy Fallon

      by AuroraDawn on Sun Sep 16, 2012 at 08:35:35 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Inspiring and moving (5+ / 0-)

    This was a beautiful diary,  Thank you. I especially was struck by the photographs, Your great great grandmother, and her daughters were a truly beautiful family. Her strength and self respect fairly beams out at us through the ages, and almost makes me wish that I could have known her.

    But the diary also touched me on a personal level.  My great Aunt Rose, my grandmother's eldest sister, was born in Romania and came to this country as a young girl in the 1880's.  She was fortunate to come from a family that prized education, even for women, and was encouraged to go to college, rare for a woman before the turn of the century.  She completed college and then went on to law school, which was even more unheard of at that time. One of her idols was Kate Stoneman, the first woman admitted to the bar in New York.

    Aunt Rose worked ceaselessly for woman's  suffrage, and in 1919 became the first women Assistant District Attorney in New York and later, in the 1950's the first woman to run for Judge in NYC - as a Democrat, of course.  As a child I remember her telling stories about the days of the suffragettes and how proud she was to have been a part of that movement.  Your grandma Shade reminds me of her.

    So, your story really touched a note with me.   Thanks again.  Oh, and all of you out there, especially the women, get out and vote!  My grandmother, my great aunts, my aunts and my mother and my wife would not forgive you if you didn't.

    If Tyranny and Oppression come to this land, it will be in the guise of fighting a foreign enemy. ~James Madison

    by mjshep on Sun Sep 16, 2012 at 09:23:12 PM PDT

    •  What an incredible woman! (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      mjshep, coquiero, KenBee

      Thank you for sharing the story of your Aunt Rose. I'm sure Shade would have been honored by the comparison.

      I feel very fortunate to have a mother who has shared so many stories with me about my relatives, especially the Bishop Sisters.

      I'm so glad you enjoyed the diary.

      You can tell Romney’s depressed. Last night he just sat on his couch and bought the Häagen-Dazs corporation ~ Jimmy Fallon

      by AuroraDawn on Sun Sep 16, 2012 at 09:30:40 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  It was my pleasure (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        AuroraDawn, KenBee

        Thanks for bringing these memories to the surface.  My mother was born ten years before the nineteenth amendment was ratified.  I remember these people well. It is good that those younger, as I assume you are, do not forget.

        If Tyranny and Oppression come to this land, it will be in the guise of fighting a foreign enemy. ~James Madison

        by mjshep on Sun Sep 16, 2012 at 09:49:38 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  I'm in my late 20s. I have no desire to forget... (4+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          teachme2night, GreenMother, mjshep, KenBee

          I'm proud of Shade and her sisters, and grateful to them, too.

          My mother made a point of keeping our family history alive, through stories, photographs, and other mementos. I'm fortunate to come from a long line of storytellers.

          Shade raised her granddaughter, my grandmother, and passed all of the family history down to her. My grandmother, in turn, passed down the stories to her daughters. My mother has passed them down to me. I suppose one day, I'll be the torchbearer, keeping that flame alive.

          You can tell Romney’s depressed. Last night he just sat on his couch and bought the Häagen-Dazs corporation ~ Jimmy Fallon

          by AuroraDawn on Sun Sep 16, 2012 at 09:57:37 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

  •  wonderful diary (3+ / 0-)

    Thank you for remembering and for reminding all of us!

    "The fools are as plentiful as ever." Albert Parsons, Haymarket martyr

    by kainah on Sun Sep 16, 2012 at 10:59:37 PM PDT

  •  We must not let our daughters forget (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    GreenMother, AuroraDawn, KenBee, Yamara

    My grandmother cooked for her co-workers at the "battle of the overpass" to protect their right to unionize. My mother never missed a vote in her life, often making sure she countered my father's right-wing tendencies. I know so many other women who stood strong.

    The most insidious phrase I hear today--and I hear it again and again--is "they wouldn't do that" whether the suggestion is prohibiting birth control or ending medicare.

    It is the absolute duty of every mature progressive woman to make sure that every young woman she knows is registered and then make sure they vote.

  •  So many forget the hardships endured by (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    GreenMother, coquiero, AuroraDawn, KenBee

    women and minorities and gays to get the simple rights white men were accustomed to. We fought long. We fought hard. And we won.
    But there are those who would still like to deny us our rights.
    This election, even if you are on the fence about Obama, is crucial. We must ensure a Democratic majority to prevent rights for all from being taken away and to prevent the likes of Romney from having the chance to stack the Supreme Court with more right wingers.
    Women are the majority. When we vote, we can move mountains.
    Register if you're not already...and VOTE!

    Isn’t it ironic to think that man might determine his own future by something so seemingly trivial as the choice of an insect spray. ~ Rachel Carson, Silent Spring ~

    by MA Liberal on Mon Sep 17, 2012 at 08:25:32 AM PDT

    •  Like the sign says... (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      KenBee

      When Women Vote, Democrats Win. That's why the Republicans are so desperately hoping that women and minorities stay home.

      You can tell Romney’s depressed. Last night he just sat on his couch and bought the Häagen-Dazs corporation ~ Jimmy Fallon

      by AuroraDawn on Mon Sep 17, 2012 at 10:02:13 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  really good Aurora (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    AuroraDawn, Damnit Janet

    and a fine tribute to the personal historical heritage you are part of.
     Keep it up!

    This machine kills Fascists.

    by KenBee on Mon Sep 17, 2012 at 02:04:05 PM PDT

    •  I'm glad you enjoyed the diary, KenBee. (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      KenBee

      Thank you for taking the time to read it.

      You can tell Romney’s depressed. Last night he just sat on his couch and bought the Häagen-Dazs corporation ~ Jimmy Fallon

      by AuroraDawn on Mon Sep 17, 2012 at 02:10:39 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

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