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UPDATE 12:52 PM PT: Here are some other comments that people placed on the Facebook thread:

You think ACORN contributed to voter fraud and gave the White House to Obama.

You think electing Raul Labrador to congress will win your party the Hispanic vote.

In societal terms, I believe racism is institutionalized if special privileges are granted to particular groups based on their race or cultural identity.

You are oblivious to "white privilege".

You have to build your own compound in North Idaho because the rest of North Idaho is not "White" enough for you.

You still insist president Obama is from Kenya.

You still refer to Mexicans as beeners.

You think racism is a thing of the past OR that any brown person who objects to your lovely unkind generalization about brown people is themselves racist against white people -- because unfortunately you are not sure what racism is.

___

A friend of mine posted the phrase:

"You might be a racist if ...."
in her Facebook status.

She received several interesting responses.

Below are some of them:

1) You begin your sentence with "I'm not a racist, but..."

2) You indicate "some of my best friends are . . ."

3) If your DNA test results comeback showing you are 14% Sub-Saharan African...
WATCH: White Supremacist's DNA Results Reveal He Is 14 Percent Black

4) You own a confederate flag and try to explain "southern pride"?

5) You describe a person by their race. The "Mexican guy" I work with or the "black chick" down the hall. Drives me nuts.

6) ... that is so funny because I always say the person with the black curly hair over their and folks look at me crazy. If I said, "see that white chick over there" then they would look at me crazy too. Duh! Hooray for matching pet peeves.

7) Here is my personal fav, you say you aren't racist but if you see someone of color walking down the street you change your trajectory or lock your belongings up.

8) Think we were better off with George W Bush.

9) You say "I don't see race"

10) ...if...you're sure you're not!

11) Call a coworker "our cute little brown girl" in the office (which recently happened to me).

12) You continually say "I hate rap and hip hop. It's not music."      

13) I added: You become excessively combative and defensive at the mere mention of racism.

14) To which I received the response: Right. "I'm not a racist. THEY'RE the racists."

15) You see the world in terms of pigment, instead of culture. If you tip toe or are hypersensitive to the ethnic or cultural diversity.  

16) I find some cultures disgusting. Am I a racist?

Comments are coming in as I write this, so check back soon for updates.

UPDATE: 9:28 a.m. MST

17) I added: You have absolutely no problem with certain types of people living on "your block".

And please add your thoughts.

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Comment Preferences

  •  if you preface a comment by "THEY" (4+ / 0-)

    when complainig about some aspect of society.  I am not too sure about the hip-hop or rap music. I think that is more generational.

    •  i don't think so (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      dougymi
      I think that is more generational.
      Back in their generation, rock and roll was the devils music, yet all of them rock out, even the country folks.

      Lets be honest here. People who say rap music isn't music are most likely not music critics. They just don't like it for some reason, which in my opinion is bigotry, even if they don't externalize it.

      -You want to change the system, run for office.

      by Deep Texan on Thu Nov 14, 2013 at 08:06:54 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  I have problems with the idea that not liking (5+ / 0-)

      music means racism. Many of the same people who say they don't care for hip hop or rap will happily sing along with the Tempations, the Four Tops or the Supremes.  In the same vein, does that fact that one doesn't like all country music mean that one is anti-white people? Music is something you like or don't like based on how it sounds and how it appeals to you.  While I'm sure there are people out there who have racist attitudes toward music because of the ethnicity of the performer, because there always are those people, there just aren't many of them. Some of the most racist people I know still listene to music performed or written by African Americans because it was what they grew up with.

      btw, even though I'm old, I don't mind hip hop or rap at all. I have some in my mp3 collection. What I don't like is overdriven speakers, which is a problem with a lot of rock music too.

      A learning experience is one of those things that says, 'You know that thing you just did? Don't do that.' Douglas Adams

      by dougymi on Thu Nov 14, 2013 at 08:19:34 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  If one doesn't like country music (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        disinterested spectator, dougymi

        then personally I would up the odds of one harboring conscious or unconscious prejudices against rural Southerners.

        It isn't a one-to-one correlation, but a lot of our preferences in vocal music are connected to unconscious associations we make with the voice and accent of the singer.

        •  I find country music too depressing (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          dougymi, Batya the Toon

          Can't listen to most of it for that reason.

          But, there are some rock bands that are depressing too.

          Hip-hop and rap sound too repetitive to me, without enough melody for me, and I get tired having to listen to hear the words.

          Country music is like that too, the words are the important thing and I usually don't want to have to listen that hard.

          Maybe that's because I was raised with mostly instrumental music, so never got into words a lot. Music for me is more about melody, change of tempo, and complicated changes in the sounds.

          But, it's all still music, just different kinds of music.



          Women create the entire labor force.
          ---------------------------------------------
          Sympathy is the strongest instinct in human nature. - Charles Darwin

          by splashy on Thu Nov 14, 2013 at 09:27:25 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

        •  I wouldn't say that's true at least in my case. (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Catte Nappe, Leslie Salzillo

          Love Bluegrass, hate country. They aren't the same. Which is more representative of rural Southerners?  

          A learning experience is one of those things that says, 'You know that thing you just did? Don't do that.' Douglas Adams

          by dougymi on Thu Nov 14, 2013 at 09:53:32 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  Ooh, good question. (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            dougymi

            I'm in a similar spot, myself -- I love a lot of folk music, and the line between folk and country can get blurry on occasion, but they are distinct genres.  And I dislike a lot of country, and have had the darnedest time articulating what the difference is and what I like about the one and dislike about the other.

            (This is why I said "up the odds" rather than "probably means", as cultural prejudice is only one of many factors that affects why we like or dislike music.)

          •  I'm the same, and I'm a rural southerner. (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            dougymi

            Country is just whining to me. Blue Grass, Classical, Jazz, Soul, Gospel are great. I also don't like most of the contemporary young "white" music, even though my grandson and his group have a Best Seller album going right now. It's a white group.

            I don't think choice of music can be used to denote racism, unless someone declares that they don't like Black music.

            •  It's certainly possible, though (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              dougymi

              for one to "not like Black music" but not be willing to admit that to oneself or others.

              I'd say choice of music can be affected by racism, but since it can be affected by a lot of other things also, it's probably not a good idea to judge solely based on it.

      •  I think there's a difference. (5+ / 0-)
        I have problems with the idea that not liking music means racism.
        I think there's a difference between saying "I don't like rap music," versus the the Facebook post which says "Rap and hip hop aren't music."

        The former is a matter of personal taste. It's not one's cup of tea. That's well and good, and people who don't like rap are not necessarily any more racist than those who don't like reggaeton or K-Pop or Pat Boone. (Though I should caveat that I do think white folks who are committed to anti-racism should be interrogating the extent to which their "personal taste" carries racial or class baggage.)

        The latter, though, is a judgment about the musical quality of a given genre, going from "it's not my cup of tea" to "it's not really music at all." Putting aside for the moment the rather privileged assumption on the part of the speaker that he or she is qualified to determine what is and is not music, that statement denigrates the musicality and talent of the performers. When such a thing is said about genres like rap or hip-hop, in which the most recognized artists are African-American and which are encoded in our culture as African-American genres, I don't think it's a leap to say that it's an expression of racism.

        "When I give food to the poor, they call me a saint. When I ask why the poor have no food, they call me a communist." --Dom Helder Camara, archbishop of Recife

        by JamesGG on Thu Nov 14, 2013 at 09:14:28 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  good point. I hadn't considered that. (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          JamesGG

          A learning experience is one of those things that says, 'You know that thing you just did? Don't do that.' Douglas Adams

          by dougymi on Thu Nov 14, 2013 at 09:18:39 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

        •  There is a sad prevailing tendency (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          dougymi

          for people to say "That isn't art" of any art they dislike, "that isn't poetry" of poetry they dislike, "that isn't music" of music they dislike.  (Provided, of course, that they think of themselves as liking art/poetry/music in general.)  Not even that the thing isn't good art; that it isn't art at all.

          Racism and other forms of prejudice absolutely affect people's judgment, but I do think there are people who will say "That's not music" solely because it isn't music they like, rather than because they consider people of That Sort incapable of producing music.

          I wonder if there's more of a correlation there, though, in terms of exposure to / appreciation of more diverse forms of it.

          •  brings back memories (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Batya the Toon, Deep Texan

            of those discussions about what constitutes visual art.  People used to (perhaps still do) look at a piece of "modern" art and exclaim how they couldn't understand it or see anything in it so "it wasn't art".  Or they'd look at something like Warhol's famous Campbell's soup can and just shake their head saying the same thing.  Not sure what that means, but it certainly brings back memories.

            A learning experience is one of those things that says, 'You know that thing you just did? Don't do that.' Douglas Adams

            by dougymi on Thu Nov 14, 2013 at 10:26:18 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

  •  You people. (6+ / 0-)

    To make others less happy is a crime. To make ourselves unhappy is where all crime starts. We must try to contribute joy to the world. That is true no matter what our problems, our health, our circumstances. We must try. Roger Ebert

    by lexalou on Thu Nov 14, 2013 at 07:59:23 AM PST

  •  "I'm not a racist, but THOSE people..." (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Eyesbright

    to complete 1).

    The modern conservative is engaged in one of man's oldest exercises in moral philosophy; that is, the search for a superior moral justification for selfishness. -- John Kenneth Galbraith

    by richardak on Thu Nov 14, 2013 at 08:06:26 AM PST

  •  anybody watch the daily show last night (9+ / 0-)

    Jon had a funny segment about racism. They had a panel of judges to judge statements/actions to weigh in if it was racist.

    Jon eventually got to Sarah Palin and they didn't let him finish his sentence. RACIST they said quickly. Then after he explained the comments, they changed their answers to STUPID.

    -You want to change the system, run for office.

    by Deep Texan on Thu Nov 14, 2013 at 08:08:45 AM PST

  •  if... (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Eyesbright, Deep Texan, CookyMonzta

    you have a job on FOX News.

    "These are established professionals that have a liberal bent, but ultimately most of them if pushed will choose professional preservation over cause, such is the mentality of most business professionals" -BoA/HBGary/CoC

    by LieparDestin on Thu Nov 14, 2013 at 08:10:40 AM PST

  •  so not a rap fan (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Penny GC, dougymi

    but not a country western fan either

    Not sure which I dislike more.  

    so racist or not?

    It is well that war is so terrible -- lest we should grow too fond of it. Robert E. Lee

    by ksuwildkat on Thu Nov 14, 2013 at 08:19:21 AM PST

  •  I hate all the music my current partner listens to (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    my2petpeeves, Penny GC, dougymi

    on SIRIUS all the freakin time. A lot. Does that make me a racist, or do I just hate my partner?

  •  This just in (0+ / 0-)
    UPDATE: 9:28 a.m. MST

    17) I added: You have absolutely no problem with certain types of people living on "your block".

    Join us at Young People's Pavilion for a journey through children's literature. And follow this discussion on Twitter

    by The Book Bear on Thu Nov 14, 2013 at 08:30:38 AM PST

  •  You might be a racist if... (4+ / 0-)

    You're a realtor and you say,

    "I need to tell you (warn you), that property is in a 'mixed' community."

    "In this world, hate has never yet dispelled hate. Only love can dispel hate." ~ Buddha

    by Leslie Salzillo on Thu Nov 14, 2013 at 08:42:08 AM PST

  •  You might be a racist if... (5+ / 0-)

    You're white and  assume black government workers will screw you over, to 'get back at whiteys.'

    "In this world, hate has never yet dispelled hate. Only love can dispel hate." ~ Buddha

    by Leslie Salzillo on Thu Nov 14, 2013 at 08:46:05 AM PST

  •  Physical features in general (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Catte Nappe

    #5 is covered by a broader principle than that of racism.  One should always avoid indicating someone by a physical feature, other than sex, regarding which people may be very sensitive.  Most of us would know better than to say, “the fat woman,” or “the bald man,” but even “the tall man” or “the blonde” should be avoided.  Better is to say, “the man in the red shirt,” or “the woman near the window.”

    Of course, even identifying someone as to sex can be dangerous, if that person is androgynous in appearance.  In that case, one can say, "the person near the window," etc.

    •  An amendment to my comment (0+ / 0-)

      I should have distinguished those cases in which the person so described can overhear the description from those where he or she cannot.  More latitude may be allowed in the latter case.  I would still avoid “fat” and “bald,” but “tall” and “blonde” would be acceptable.

  •  You might be a racist if you say, (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Penny GC, Eyesbright
    "Rush Limbaugh is an entertainer. He's harmless. If you don't like him, just don't listen."

    "In this world, hate has never yet dispelled hate. Only love can dispel hate." ~ Buddha

    by Leslie Salzillo on Thu Nov 14, 2013 at 08:51:41 AM PST

  •  "All Southerners hold the Confederate flag dear" (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Loge, Eyesbright

    That's one I actually heard the other day from a not-racist.  

    When truth is only a matter of opinion, advantage goes to the liars.

    by Sun dog on Thu Nov 14, 2013 at 08:51:58 AM PST

  •  Here's one: (3+ / 0-)

    You assume any fictional character in a book is white unless otherwise specified -- sometimes even when otherwise specified -- and get annoyed or angry if anyone suggests differently.

  •  You might be a racist if you move your hand (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Penny GC, Catte Nappe

    as inconspicuously as possible to hit the 'lock doors' button when driving through, or waiting for a long traffic light, in a predominantly black neighborhood.

    Many of these racial fears are perpetuated by movies that portray black neighborhoods as being drug-infested, pimping war zones, just as they used to portray indians as being savage beasts. It may be changing, but these movies are still circulating and sending  out damaging messages.

    "In this world, hate has never yet dispelled hate. Only love can dispel hate." ~ Buddha

    by Leslie Salzillo on Thu Nov 14, 2013 at 09:06:43 AM PST

  •  You might be racist if you support/tolerate racism (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Penny GC, dougymi

    And racism is more than just thinking badly of other races; it's the existence of systematic oppression or inequality among racially-ascribed groups in society.

    As rightly satisfying as it is to call out Richard Cohen for what may or may not be his personally-held racist beliefs, it doesn't really address the real problems of racism in America. For example, interracial marriage - I'm not so quick to give praise to Americans as a whole for 'approving' of interracial marriages. Geez, 50 years since Loving and now almost 90% of Americans approve of something that's none of their business to express a favorable or unfavorable opinion on in the first place. Congratulations, Americans overwhelmingly approve of interracial marriage. Let's pat each other on the back and give ourselves a cookie for not being racist! :|

    This isn't a critique of the diarist; rather, against all those Republicans/conservatives/libertarians/moderates who like to glom onto MLK, and say 'I'm not a racist because xyz', yet are all too happy to support/tolerate policies like voter suppression, stop-and-frisk, racial profiling, and all the other political and economic inequalities with a racial component in America today.

  •  Last one - You might be a racist if - you think by (4+ / 0-)

    voting in a black president twice, we have proven we are not a racist country - and that we've paid our racist dues.

    I saw a bumper sticker two years ago in Texas (of all places), that said:

    'Our president is black - what's your excuse now?'
    To some that was hilarious. They might be... no, they are racists. It's so blatant in some areas of the country. During college in the 80's, I worked part-time as a cocktail waitress in a swank Dallas night club. I saw the bouncer actually ID Card a black couple who looked to be in their 40's or 50's. The bouncer turned them away, saying the man's ID was fake. Breathe in, breath out...

    "In this world, hate has never yet dispelled hate. Only love can dispel hate." ~ Buddha

    by Leslie Salzillo on Thu Nov 14, 2013 at 09:23:10 AM PST

  •  i saw some responses (0+ / 0-)

    to the O-care enrollment numbers preemptively rebutting non-existent objections that the numbers were low because people were too racist to sign up.  I didn't get it either, but now I'm starting to wonder.

    I'd say you might be a racist if you think all objections to right wing ideology are based on anti-racism and not just the racist ones.

    Difficult, difficult, lemon difficult.

    by Loge on Thu Nov 14, 2013 at 09:27:31 AM PST

  •  If you say (4+ / 0-)

    that there is no more racism in America.

    You can wake someone who is sleeping, but you cannot wake someone who is pretending to sleep.

    by gnothis on Thu Nov 14, 2013 at 09:30:19 AM PST

  •  A responder in a Facebook group wrote: (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    73rd virgin, Matt Z
    Honestly I was not impressed with the list, I think we ought to hire Jeff Foxworthy to write the next one. IMO most of the items were identifying how a paranoid person looks for racist people.
    What are your thoughts on this?

    Join us at Young People's Pavilion for a journey through children's literature. And follow this discussion on Twitter

    by The Book Bear on Thu Nov 14, 2013 at 09:34:43 AM PST

  •  Without criticizing hip-hop and rap... (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Eyesbright

    ...I see no musicality in most of the works I've heard; would categorize them as performance art.  But it's a tough call - some of it can be called both.

    A racist idea?  Three words: Ha. Ha. Ha.

    Warren/3-D Print of Warren in 2016!

    by dov12348 on Thu Nov 14, 2013 at 09:38:21 AM PST

  •  Avenue Q (0+ / 0-)

    Well, as a song from Avenue Q points out, "Everyone's a Little Bit Racist."  I think that they are trying to point out that even people who are not hateful racists may sometimes generalize.  This generalization is not always based on race. Sometimes it's about age or region of the country a person is from, or just looks.  Do you ever generalize in your mind about skinny or fat people or people who dress differently from you?

    Generalization is an aspect of human intelligence and logic. If we couldn't generalize every decision would have to be carefully thought out and we would be unable to act quickly.  We wouldn't know when to get out of the way or when a dog may be dangerous or how to determine what to eat.  

    So, based on our upbringing and experiences we generalize about people too. BUT we don't have carry these generalizations that we inherited throughout our lives. If we want to get rid of them, however, we have to make an effort.  

    If you have unfounded fears about people of another race or age or from another part of the country you need to meet people from these groups and get to know them.  Once you interact with and get to know people from these previously feared or misunderstood groups you stop seeing that group as "other" because now you know Sean, or Mary or Somsak.

    Think about how easily some people disliked and feared members of the LGBT community until they realize that they are their family members, coworkers and neighbors.  (OK, I know some still do, but look at how the tide is turning and how people who thought that same sex marriage was unreasonable just a few years ago are now voting to change laws.)

    Don't you generalize about somebody? Maybe you just have expectations of how an older or younger person will act, or what someone from the East Coast or the South may think.

    If we decide to be accepting of differences and not treat people hatefully regardless of age, gender, race, sexual identity or a hundred other factors then we are on the right track.  We will always see age, gender, race, religious symbols like crosses and stars of David etc. We will always hear accents.  The point is not to stop recognizing differences, but not to fear and hate them.

    (http://www.youtube.com/...)

    "The Trouble with the rat race is that even if you win, you're still a rat." attributed to Lily Tomlin

    by uniqity on Thu Nov 14, 2013 at 10:28:11 AM PST

  •  Gotta disagree ...I hate rap, opera and metal (0+ / 0-)

    equally.  It is a generation thing and just because I hate opera does not make me a non cultural person.   Just because I hate metal does not make me uncool....My son is a double bass drummer ..It just makes me deaf.   Rap?
    I don't like to strain to hear talking to music..no matter how fast and rhyming it is.

    We the People have to make a difference and the Change.....Just do it ! Be part of helping us build a veteran community online. United Veterans of America

    by Vetwife on Thu Nov 14, 2013 at 10:37:51 AM PST

  •  I will always remember (0+ / 0-)

    the day my then  nine-year-old daughter went to a birthday party where she was the only white child. The black mothers there did not call her "that white child" when they greeted me. They said, "Oh, you must be the mother of the kid in the hat." My daughter loved hats and it warmed my heart that day.

    "Duty is where you find it." me Curmudgeon Blog

    by janraefrank on Thu Nov 14, 2013 at 12:30:40 PM PST

  •  I disagree somewhat w/ 15 (0+ / 0-)

    Racism, to me, is the belief that one's ethnicity/skin color indicates one's superiority over people of other ethnicities/skin colors, and grants one a complex web of unearned powers in comparison to one's inferiors (even if their inferiority is entirely not their fault, an accident of nature, and one wishes them no ill because of it).

    Trying to tread softly, tip top, etc., to me is an indication that one (whether in the up group or the down[s]) is aware that racism exists, but may not feel familiar enough with people of other ethnicities/skin colors to be more forward. To me this is a sign of a potentially constructive mindset.

    For instance -- and transiting a bit from racism to sexism -- I far prefer men who tread lightly around issues of male privilege than men who are just sure they know "how women think" on the subject.

    If, however, time and familiarity do not bridge the comfort and knowledge gaps between the tip-toer and tip-toees, I take that to indicate a prejudice that stubbornly resists unlearning.

    Fight them to the end, until the children of the poor eat better than the dogs of the rich.

    by raincrow on Thu Nov 14, 2013 at 12:54:02 PM PST

    •  And I can't tolerate 95% of the hip-hop lyrics (0+ / 0-)

      I've heard. The music is a total jam, incredibly creative and definitely puts a spring in my heel, but even after weeding out the overtly sexist crap, which makes me wild with rage, there's only so far 4-bar rhyming couplets can go. If that makes me a racist rather than someone who worships at the feet of poets the likes of Leonard Cohen, then by God I'm one of the worst.

      Fight them to the end, until the children of the poor eat better than the dogs of the rich.

      by raincrow on Thu Nov 14, 2013 at 01:03:55 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  racism in this sense (0+ / 0-)

      is prejudiced based on the color of their skin. racial discrimination.

      which in this case is saying things like rap music isn't music, when it certainly is. you don't have to like it.

      -You want to change the system, run for office.

      by Deep Texan on Thu Nov 14, 2013 at 01:21:40 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

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