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President Barack Obama denounced the "alleged" comments by Donald Sterling, the owner of the Clippers basketball team, as being "incredibly offensive racist statements" and placed them in the context of "a continuing legacy of slavery and segregation that Americans must confront." reports Obama: Donald Sterling Comments 'Incredibly Offensive.'

"When ignorant folks want to advertise their ignorance, you don't really have to do anything, you just let them talk," Obama said when asked to respond to the reported comments from Los Angeles Clippers' owner Donald Sterling. ...

Obama cast the comments through a broader prism of racism in America, adding that "we constantly have to be on guard on racial attitudes that divide us rather than embracing our diversity as a strength."

"The United States continues to wrestle with the legacy of race and slavery and segregation, that's still there, the vestiges of discrimination, ....We've made enormous strides, but you're going to continue to see this percolate up every so often," he added. "And I think that we just have to be clear and steady in denouncing it, teaching our children differently, but also remaining hopeful that part of why statements like this stand out some much is because there has been this shift in how we view our ourselves."

We've had a surprisingly intense barrage of racial news in the last week. Cliven Bundy riveted our nation with his shocking and repugnant lectures on "the Negro." On Friday I reported Representative Paul Ryan has been called on the carpet by former chairmen of the Congressional Black Caucus Emanuel Cleaver who will host a consciousness and awareness raising session "in Paul Ryan's honor" in the House on Wednesday. Ryan offended many by quoting Charles Murray, who Cleaver says is well known for spouting "racist sewage" that Ryan has no excuse not to have known about given how many times he has done it.

I will post a link to this in an update and encourage all Democrats and progressive Americans to make ourselves aware of this upcoming event to help the Congressional Black Caucus make the most of this fortuitously timed event. Rep. Cleaver deserves high praise for the skill and courage with which he confronted Representative Paul Ryan's weasel-like exploitation of "dog-whistle" politics while acting innocent the whole time.

All of these developments build on Representative Nancy Pelosi's excellent press conference last week calling the Republicans to task for exploiting racist themes which received too little attention. I will also link the post I did on that last week in an update.

If any silver lining exists from these vile episodes perhaps America is finally ready to confront these ugly racist undertones we keep feeling and hearing churning just under the veneers of polite society. As human beings all of us seem all have some kinds of prejudices. Only by openly and honestly confronting them can we understand, and surmount their corrosive influence.

Despite so many angry, hurt, and shocked feelings assaulting so many this week, we may be in the process of making progress. What we are witnessing now is not an explosion of new racism, but a collective public exposure of it. Many people are shocked and stunned, but many (some - most?, please don't pin me down - I'm trying to make a gentle point here - others can speak for themselves)  people of color and other minorities of a wide variety, have heard, felt, experienced, and known about attitudes like this for most of their/our lives -- actually let's be real - everyone has.

What is different in this last week is that, perhaps for one of the first time I can remember, we are all experiencing these events together, via extensive media exposure where we stand in collective judgement that is near universal in our stark rejection of the racists and their vile ugliness!

Is this not fairly amazing?

When I thought about Paul Ryan bracing himself for his "consciousness raising" session on this next Wednesday with the Congressional Black Caucus (I hope I'm not confused about this) and imagining Paul Ryan hoping for the whole week that he could slip in and out of the Wednesday session with no one noticing, I gritted my teeth, pledging myself to call attention to this. Then, when the two posts I wrote last week calling attention to Representative Cleaver only receiving about a dozen recs, I became angry, thinking thatt slippery Ryan might away with it again.

Then as each day has passed and I imagined him shitting bricks shouting "oh, God! why are these Cliven Bundy and Donald Sterling scandals happening now?"  I'm starting to laugh more each day, with each and every outrageous infuriating offensive insult to our national psyche. Not because I do not wince with pain, or feel empathy for the hurt others feel, but rather because I've discovered another secret, and perhaps shameful place deep withing myself that anticipates Paul Ryan's Karmic Chickens coming home to roost. Each additional daily indignity now will add another lash to the balancing of the scales of justice of the bigots when their day comes.    

Wouldn't it be great if this hot shot organizer Representative Emanuel Cleaver could arrange for Cliven Bundy, and Donald Sterling to join Representative Paul Ryan on Wednesday for a special panel discussion on what if feels like to learn one has been spouting "racist sewage" "without realizing it?"

Because, for the first time I can ever think of, we know the bad guys are going to get their due - a public "whuuping." Seeing how we are mostly all liberals here, none of us are likely to be the kind of people that would take pleasure in the misfortunes of others. In this particular case, I'm fairly sure, God, or the scientific humanist metaphorical equivalent in our minds, will make an exception, on account of how destructive and insidious these extremist racist Republicans have been.

Yes, folks, this might actually be good news, that we just haven't realized yet. Is this possible? Maybe someone needs to talk me down, as Rachel Maddow likes to say. This may actually be one of the very few times every liberal can smile without guilt at the public flogging of a bad person. So if someone asks, "is it wrong that I am smiling," you can say,  "no, and go ahead and bring some popcorn too!" (Ask a Christie Watch fan.)

What's that odd expression that female comic delivers in a highly affected way during a disaster? "One day we are going to look back on this and just laugh!"

If this week represents our nation's turning point, where from this point forward, anyone, and everyone including these vile weasel-ass Republicans who use these thinly veiled dog-whistles like Paul Ryan did with his "inner city men" don't like to work because of their "culture of poverty" bullshit, are called on it, then yes, this will go down in history as a great week we may actually look back, be proud of, and laugh at.

In the future we may talk about this week as a "high water mark" in class rooms and churches to school children with a smile on Martin Luther King, Jr, Birthday, with a resolute smile of national accomplishment.

And, if I am correct in my understanding of that article about Representative Emanuel Cleaver's that Paul Ryan has agreed to attend the Congressional Black Caucus "awareness raising session" on Wednesday, and we can get CNN and the whole nation to link into it because of these Cliven Bundy, and Donald Sterling incidents. We may have to set up live blogging rounds to make the best of it.  

Could it also be possible that these kinds of events have been ongoing for nearly forever, but it has only been in the last few weeks that for some reason the media elites have decided to make an issue of them? Whatever he cause, let's strike while the iron is hot. America, and all of us, have an opportunity to take some giant steps forward towards improved racial relations for all of us.

One small step for Paul Ryan, one gain leap for mankind!    

Umm, I'm Noticing I wrote this on April 23 so does the reference to Wednesday mean three days from now or last week. I'm going to feel pretty stupid if I missed this after making such a big deal about it all week. Don't we have anyone here on the Congressional Black Caucus?

Former Con. Black Caucus Chair Cleaver blasts Paul Ryan for quoting Charles Murray's "racist sewage"

9:52 AM PT:  photo EmanualCleaverjpg_zps4d6780bd.jpg

Kudos to former Congressional Black Caucus Chairmen Representative Emanuel Cleaver for calling Representative Paul Ryan to accountability for his "insensitive" remarks about the "inner city culture." Jessica Chasmar - The Washington Times writes Paul Ryan to meet with black lawmakers after ‘inner cities’ flap, next week with the Congressional Black Caucus for consciousness raising.

“The problem though is that he was quoting Charles Murray, who has been pouring racist sewage into open ears for a couple generations now,” said Congressional Black Caucus Chair Rep. Emanuel Cleaver on MSNBC Wednesday. “He has been pushing his theories of the Bell Curve and white supremacy, and Ryan quoted him as one of the authorities.”

The Wisconsin Republican said during a March appearance on “Bill Bennett’s Morning in America” radio show that there is a “tailspin of culture, in our inner cities in particular, of men not working and just generations of men not even thinking about working or learning to value the culture of work,” NBC News reported.

Later, Paul Ryan said he had been "inariculate" and that he had meant nothing racial.

Cleaver observes:

“The problem though is that he was quoting Charles Murray, who has been pouring racist sewage into open ears for a couple generations now,” said Congressional Black Caucus Chair Rep. Emanuel Cleaver on MSNBC Wednesday. “He has been pushing his theories of the Bell Curve and white supremacy, and Ryan quoted him as one of the authorities.”

Fmr. Congressional Black Caucus Chairman Blasts Paul Ryan for Racial ‘Ignorance, by Noah Rothman reports that Paul Ryan(R-WI) has agreed to meet next week with with former Rep. Emanuel Cleaver (D-MO) with the Congressional Black Caucus when they will discuss poverty with Ryan in an attempt at racial consciousness raising.

.

Cleaver said that, while the meeting will be more “light than heat,” he said that Ryan’s comments on that program were even more problematic because he quoted economist and libertarian political scientist Charles Murray.

Cleaver said that Murray has been “pouring racist sewage into open ears for a couple generations now” and he has been “pushing his theories of the bell curve and white supremacy.”

 photo Emanualcleaver_zpsc8a99719.jpg

Cleaver added that Ryan’s admission that he was unaware of the objections to Murray’s theories suggests “ignorance” on Ryan’s part. “If you know the least, you shouldn’t speak the loudest,” the Missouri representative added.

Cleaver went on to say that the term “inner city” is suggestive of race. “Chairman Ryan, I think, knows that,” he added. “If not, I think we’re going to have to create an atmosphere where he can learn things.”

Representative Emanual Cleaver deserves much credit for showing us how to confront Republican bullshit head one and call them to account. The G.O.P. should be taught to expect the be held to higher standards of accountability that we in the Democratic Party have been willing to demand. Emanuel Cleaver's inspiring example provides an excellent example for us all to emulate.  

10:40 AM PT: Thanks to Doctor Who for the link to this new tape: Exclusive Extended Donald Sterling Tape.

11:05 AM PT: I analyze the reaction to he Donald Sterling incident in my previous post

Donald Sterling apologizes for "alleged" racist comments, NBA investigates, furor (harsh language)

11:10 AM PT: Don Sterling Won't Get An NAACP Award After All

WASHINGTON -- The NAACP's Los Angeles chapter has apparently reconsidered plans to give Don Sterling an award in the wake of the Clippers owner's racist rant.

"He is not receiving a lifetime achievement award from the NAACP," Lorraine Miller, NAACP interim vice president, said Sunday on NBC's "Meet the Press."

Miller's comment came after host David Gregory had pressed Miller on the award. She first condemned Sterling's remarks, saying, "If you're silent about this, then you're accepting this, and people have got to say that this is not good and do something about it."

1:10 PM PT: http://www.dailykos.com/...

Nancy Pelosi calls out Republicans on race as a factor in delay on immigration reform

 photo NancyPelsosi_zpsab69f4c1.jpg

Nancy Pelosi once again breaks through the BS  and gets to the core of the issue. Pelosi suggests Republicans not acting on immigration because of race

"I think race has something to do with the fact that they're not bringing up an immigration bill," Pelosi told reporters at her weekly press conference Thursday.

Referring to GOP members, Pelosi added, "I've heard them say to the Irish, 'If it was just you, this would be easy.'"

Pelosi was responding to a question about Attorney General Eric Holder's remarks at a civil rights event suggesting congressional Republicans treated him and President Obama differently than others who have held their positions. The Democratic Leader sidestepped whether she believed race was a factor in the GOP's posture, but said of congressional Republicans, "generally speaking they are disrespectful to the representatives of the President's administration, very disrespectful."

Perhaps, if we take the GOP on directly in their stalling we can fire up our base for he 2014 elections and give them a run for their money. The strategy of playing nice provide too much cover for them.




Update: Wesley Lowery has an even better article in the Washington Post Blog Pelosi: House GOP holding up immigration bill because of race

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Cali) told reporters:

"I think race has something to do with the fact that (the GOP House leadership) are not bringing up an immigration bill," Pelosi said Thursday morning, later adding: "I've heard them say to the Irish, 'if it were just you this would be easy.'"

Pelosi's comments came after she was asked by reporters at her weekly media briefing whether or not tense exchanges between President Obama, some of his top officials and Cabinet members, and House Republicans -- most recently between Attorney General Eric Holder and Rep. Louie Gohmert (R-Tex.) -- are in-part motivated by race.

​"I think, generally speaking, they are disrespectful of members of the president's administration," she said. "I think their disdain for anyone who disagrees with them is across the board. I don't want to go to the race piece, but I think it certainly applies to women. It's so self-evident that it applies to women."

Later asked the same question John Boehner got angry:

"There is no issue of race here," Boehner said, as his demeanor grew visibly bothered, and his tone turned angry.

"The frustration is that the American people have not been told the truth about what happened at the IRS, the American people have not been told the truth about what happened at Fast and Furious, the administration has not told the American people the truth about what happened at Benghazi." Bohner said.

"The administration refuses to tell us the truth!" an angry Boehner said before walking briskly off the podium.

Originally posted to HoundDog on Sun Apr 27, 2014 at 09:43 AM PDT.

Also republished by Black Kos community, Barriers and Bridges, and White Privilege Working Group.

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Comment Preferences

  •  Thanks, HoundDog. Missed this in the news. (14+ / 0-)

    I agree that blatant racism is being called out more vociferously... but the more subtle attacks on race still go unnoticed and/or unmentioned.  We need to start making a racket about those, too.

    Where enough money calls the tune, the general public will not be heard. Inso­far as corruption cuts the link between political thought and political action, a free marketplace of political ideas loses its point. -- Justice Stephen Breyer

    by Yasuragi on Sun Apr 27, 2014 at 10:00:41 AM PDT

  •  Gets worse. There is now an extended version (18+ / 0-)

    of the recording at Deadpsin where Sterling nails his own coffin including talking about how he is not racist cause he gives his black playes houses, money, and food. And then goes on about 'black' (Ethiopian I assume) Jews.

    Dude is toast.

    If I knew it was going to be that kind of party, I'd have stuck my ---- in the mashed potatoes! - Paul's Boutique

    by DoctorWho on Sun Apr 27, 2014 at 10:05:58 AM PDT

  •  Link (11+ / 0-)

    If I knew it was going to be that kind of party, I'd have stuck my ---- in the mashed potatoes! - Paul's Boutique

    by DoctorWho on Sun Apr 27, 2014 at 10:07:18 AM PDT

  •  They played the recording on ESPN, dreadful nt (10+ / 0-)

    nosotros no somos estúpidos

    by a2nite on Sun Apr 27, 2014 at 10:30:44 AM PDT

  •  He's the owner (11+ / 0-)

    It kind of fits into the racist thing that he owns those blacks athletes. That is probably the only kind of relationship he wants with people he can fantasize are slaves and be proud that he gets to own them. And they are really strong and hard working.What a sickening thought if that is what is in his head.

    He has a history of discrimination in renting his real estate I understand...

    I am glad this came out.

  •  See, I have a very different view of these things. (8+ / 0-)

    I actually dont really care that he doesnt want to hang out or be seen with black people. That's his choice, no big deal. Why would I want to hang out woth a person who doesnt like black folks? Id prefer he be more upfront about it, but its his choice. That is prejudice, not racism.

    But he obviously has no problem hiring black folks and paying them fairly. On the team, in the front office, even among the cheerleaders. Thats more important in my book...how he applies his power, not his personal feelings. Ive had white people bluntly tell me they dont mind doing business, but dont expect a home invitation. Fair enough.

    Thats where Americans, liberal and conservative, keep screwing up. We get hung up on manners, preferences, ugly words, offenensive language. But the real problem with racism is not ugly words, but ugly deeds. Ugly laws, not ugly sentiments.

    Not that prejudice isn't bad. But for black folks, at least, it is an acceptable circumstance of life. But racism...where power and money come into play, well thats the real problem. And thats the problem that is much harder to tackle.

    •  I see what you're saying, however ... (8+ / 0-)
      But he obviously has no problem hiring black folks and paying them fairly. On the team, in the front office, even among the cheerleaders. Thats more important in my book...how he applies his power, not his personal feelings. Ive had white people bluntly tell me they dont mind doing business, but dont expect a home invitation. Fair enough.
      Honestly, I don't see how you can ignore the implications of his racism in his hiring practices. There are players that used to play for him who alleged that he brought women into the locker room after the games and encouraged them to look at his players' "beautiful black bodies." That's disgusting, and it can't be overlooked just because these guys get paid a lot of money.

      I understand and largely agree with what you're saying when you talk about race relations outside the context of employment; but you can't have people with views like this in a position to hire and evaluate the performance of their employees. I think that's what's relevant here. Not simply the fact that he doesn't like black people, and black men in particular because they make him feel insecure in his manhood.

      •  Well said. But what to do? (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        fou

        How does one properly evaluate this:

        but you can't have people with views like this in a position to hire and evaluate the performance of their employees.
        Hard to make a law or policy on this without becoming opinion police.

        We can evaluate hiring practices, pay equity, etc. We can look at hard data points. In the Marines, I worked quite successfully with superiors who made no secret of their not politcally correct personal views. But promote and reward he did, because military rules on such things are quite clear. Like or dont like, it isnt difficult to treat people fairly even if you dont like them, provided the rules are clear to all and actively enforced.

        In the private sector, however, much tougher go of it. Because you can get plenty of smiles, yet no promotion. If hired at all. And that includes some of the most diveristy loving businesses. Or when it comes to apartment rentals. Or startup loans.

        •  Well, okay. (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          cotterperson, clubbing guy
          Hard to make a law or policy on this without becoming opinion police.
          But then why make laws at all then? If someone like Donald Sterling can just claim he's not racist and being persecuted by opinion police, then anti-discrimination laws are meaningless.

          I don't think that Sterling's case has any ambiguity at all. He's a racist who's been sued for discrimination in the past.

          He shouldn't be an NBA franchise owner.

          •  Well, we make laws with the goal of being fair. (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            fou, a2nite

            Howd you like to be fired from your job for expressing your political views in private? Or because you lost a civil suit in the past? A suit that was settled?

            Obviously, he should not be an owner, but mainly because hes a loser owner. I dont think his views are that much different from most team owners or most CEOs for that matter. Or small business owners for that matter. After all, this is America. (Here in Bed-Stuy, we have a lot of new ultra super liberal environmentally awsome new shops...not a black face ever to be found behind the counter despite the high unempolyment around here. But Im pretty confident the owners have approved liberal views on race, for sure.)

            I think anti-discrimination laws are harder to enforce when we get to down to evaluation of peoples opinions. And making sure people have the right opinions. But hard data items, well those are something you can measure. And enforce.

            Such methods are the #1 reason people of color can get so far in the military but have a tough go of it in the private sector.

            •  Right, but I'm not just talking about his (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              clubbing guy, cotterperson

              opinions.

              I specifically said that he's been sued in the past, which means there's evidence that he doesn't just have the "wrong" opinions, but that he also acts on them. Someone with a history of actual discrimination against people for their race shouldn't be in a position to hire and fire people.

              I really don't see why that's controversial.

              •  Agreed. It's a no brainer n/t (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                cotterperson
              •  shit, ive been sued in the past. lol (0+ / 0-)

                Not for discrimination obviously but still. Nobody should be fired because they got sued. Especially when the claimants settle.

                •  I have no idea what the circumstances (1+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  cotterperson

                  of your lawsuit are or were. So I don't have any idea how that's relevant to this discussion ...

                  I don't understand how the fact that you got sued has any bearing on Donald Sterling's racism and history of discrimination.

                  He's not getting "fired" because he got sued. He's not getting fired at all. He owns the fucking team. He got caught saying some really racist shit, so now he's going to have to sell his team because no one will want to work for him. The free market speaketh.

                  •  You brought it up. (0+ / 0-)

                    My point is 'he got caught saying racist shit' is the problem. Because folks make racism only a target if 'racist shit' is said. My contention is that racism is present, in most places, no matter if racist shit is said or not. Racism is a systemic problem, not a personal matter of bad etiquette. You'd never know a thing had this guy kept his mouth shut. As 99% of them will. As long as racism is a problem that is dependent on saying shit, the ability to do anything about it is well...kinda like this. Get rid of this one guy, wait for the next guy to say something mean. Thats why I dont get excited when everyone else heads for the fainting couch. I assume prejudice by default until proven otherwise. This is America, lets face it.

                    The basic logic behind Affirmative Action is that no matter how nice people are, racism will persist without direct action, even on those who never use epithets and have black friends. Now that its personal issue, we can watch news show after news show find their token guy to express outrage, and then next week the all white cast, crew, and production staff carries on. After all they were all appalled im sure.

                    Sort of the 'ive never called my slaves niggers! I treat them with respect!' defense. Im sure there were kind, friendly, gentle slaveowners. Bad manners isnt the problem. The system is.

                    So, get rid of this one guy, sure. But what to do about the 1 black team owner in the NBA statistic? Wait for the next outburst?

                    •  Please. I've never said that only "problem" is (0+ / 0-)

                      that people say racist things. People make that the problem because they don't want to deal with their complicity in covert racism.

                      Covert racism is a much more pernicious problem.

                      Duh.

                      •  I never said you said that. (0+ / 0-)

                        Im just pointing out how we as a society have jumped all over this guy because he said some shit, meanwhile the fact that the NBA has 1 black team owner is...well...I think im the first person to bring it up arent I? So we keep missing the real racism problem. Duh.

                        •  If one good thing comes out of all this (0+ / 0-)

                          it would be more black entrepreneurs/rich guys stepping up to buy teams.  They are fewer black millionaires than white ones ,for sure, but more with each passing decade.  There was a time when there were no black coaches, and that time has passed.  Now it's time to end the all-white ownership league.

                          The civil rights, gay rights and women's movements, designed to allow others to reach for power previously grasped only by white men, have made a real difference, and the outlines of 21st century America have emerged. -- Paul West of LA Times

                          by LiberalLady on Sun Apr 27, 2014 at 10:00:10 PM PDT

                          [ Parent ]

            •  He was sued by the Feds (0+ / 0-)

              over housing discrimination. His opinions led to actions that violated fair housing laws.  He did not admit wrongdoing -- but he had to settle.  

              That said, the suits have clearly not enlightened him any!

              The civil rights, gay rights and women's movements, designed to allow others to reach for power previously grasped only by white men, have made a real difference, and the outlines of 21st century America have emerged. -- Paul West of LA Times

              by LiberalLady on Sun Apr 27, 2014 at 09:56:24 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

    •  This is interesting. (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      fou, cotterperson, HCKAD

      I guess for me the context of this remark is key. One context could be him asking his girlfriend not to bring her [black] boyfriends to the games and rubbing her younger lovers in his face. He is an old man. He must know he's her sugar daddy. Why else would a beautiful young woman be with him? Seriously.

      But there is also the context that he has a history of racism beyond what he says about his girlfriend's boyfriends. He has some choice things to say about Latinos, African Americans, Koreans as tenants in his extensive rental property ownings (the subject of several lawsuits).

      So yeah, I totally agree that people say that kind of racist crap and at least you know where they stand. It's reprehensible, but out in the open. On the other hand... such horrible opinions.

    •  Who says he hires and pays fairly? (3+ / 0-)
      While Sterling has cobbled together a terrible franchise, he is seen as a visionary at the art of turning his team into a cash cow, dumping contracts, pocketing television revenue and collecting his share of the NBA’s luxury tax. The cheapness of Sterling is the stuff of myth, if not legend. During his first season as owner, he asked coach Silas if he could double as the team trainer and take up the duties of taping players before games. During the 1998–99 NBA owners lockout, when almost half the season was cancelled, Sterling chose simply to not hire a coach for six months. [The Clippers finished the lockout season with a sterling 9-41 mark]. Not one of Sterling’s nine lottery picks before 1998 re-signed with the team.
      A Clippers draft pick who could actually play was Kansas star Danny Manning. Manning didn’t last in LA. This might be because Sterling, according to Baylor, would grumble that he didn’t like being in a position where “I’m offering a lot of money for a poor black kid.” Baylor’s lawsuit claims the team has “egregious salary disparities” based on race. Baylor claims he was told to “induce African-American players to join the Clippers, despite the Clippers’ reputation of being unwilling to fairly treat and compensate African-American players.”
      http://www.thenation.com/...
      We could go ahead and run down a list of players who got up and left Los Angeles throughout the '80s and '90s because of the team not wanting to give them a fair salary, but I think Ron Harper is the perfect example.

      In 1993, the Clippers made the playoffs after a solid .500 season. During the offseason, Larry Brown and a handful of the starting lineup left the franchise, while Harper grabbed a one-year deal with the team for $4 million.

      The next offseason, Los Angeles offered him a five-year, $16 million deal, while the Chicago Bulls offered him a $20 million deal for the same length.

      http://bleacherreport.com/...

      “Texas is a so-called red state, but you’ve got 10 million Democrats here in Texas. And …, there are a whole lot of people here in Texas who need us, and who need us to fight for them.” President Obama

      by Catte Nappe on Sun Apr 27, 2014 at 12:08:11 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Ron Harper sure made the right move (4+ / 0-)

        He not only got more money with the Bulls, but ended up being a key part of their second three-peat. We were glad to have him, especially on defense.

        Sterling's cheapness has been well-known. The early 90s were perhaps the worst example of it, since the Clippers actually had a decent team then until he chased everyone who could play out.

    •  He doesn't do biz without letting his racism (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Catte Nappe, cotterperson, HCKAD, HoundDog

      interfere.

      He's been subject to multiple lawsuits because of his actions & until recently didn't pay his players well.

      Now as to his feeling, whatever.

      nosotros no somos estúpidos

      by a2nite on Sun Apr 27, 2014 at 12:25:44 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Sorry, bbb, must strongly disagee with this: (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      a2nite, HCKAD
      for black folks, at least, it is an acceptable circumstance of life. But racism...where power and money come into play, well thats the real problem. And thats the problem that is much harder to tackle.
      Prejudice is not "an acceptable circumstance of life." If  you meant "accepted" as it is the current reality, I would certainly agree. But considering all the lives lost in the last century's civil rights movement and all the lives to come,  the cost of giving it up as "acceptable" is just too great.

      However you draw the line between prejudice, a more general term, and racism, a more specific term, the fact is that the wealthy are trying to stir up hatred and violence. It is in their best interests to do divide us with hate. The white supremacist movements (Bundy) are violent, absolutely unacceptable in any terms. This racist talk feeds them.

      Furthermore, racial hatred has been carefully bred most recently since wealthy whites began using hatred in their Southern Strategy in response to the Civil Rights Act. A few years later the hateful "religious right" was deliberately formed by a group of Republicans to up the ante. Stirring up hate is the only way they can keep power over the rest of us and retain their absurd wealth. You see where that has brought us.

      As a former small-time civil rights activist back in the late '60s, no one I worked with then -- black or white -- would consider this acceptable in any way. The struggle must continue in whatever is now the most effective way. I don't have the answer, but we must never give up.

      /strongly felt opinion

      "Let each unique song be sung and the spell of differentiation be broken" - Winter Rabbit

      by cotterperson on Sun Apr 27, 2014 at 01:55:21 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Wasn't he sued by his black former coach? (0+ / 0-)

      for discrimination, no less?  The coach was reportedly paid a lot less than other (white) coaches.  The man is not only an ass, but a racist one.  

      The civil rights, gay rights and women's movements, designed to allow others to reach for power previously grasped only by white men, have made a real difference, and the outlines of 21st century America have emerged. -- Paul West of LA Times

      by LiberalLady on Sun Apr 27, 2014 at 09:51:55 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Denouncing racism? From MALAYSIA? (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    River Rover

    Man, Obama is just trolling now.

    Did he have his arm around Bill Ayers when he did this?

    Lol.

    Art is the handmaid of human good.

    by joe from Lowell on Sun Apr 27, 2014 at 12:44:58 PM PDT

  •  A bit OT. It's kind of a shame (0+ / 0-)

    That this is the big story out of Malaysia, while the TPP ( which is why he's there)  is what SHOULD be the talk of the day.

    At the same time, I'm very glad the Prez said this is such clear language about Sterling. Good for him.

    This quote about the TPP kind of sticks out:

    Speaking at a joint press conference with Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Abdul Razak after holding bilateral talks, Obama said he also faces protests from his own Democratic Party over the issue.

    "Keep in mind that I got protests back home from my own party about TPP. There's never been a trade deal in which somebody is not going to object because they are fearful of the future or they are invested in the status quo," he said.

    "I think it's very important for everybody to wait and see what exactly is the agreement that has been negotiated before folks jump to conclusions," he added.

    Obama referring to the TPP simply as a "trade act" that the Adults In The Room should really approve.

    And I guess we have no choice but to wait, as most of the text of this "trade act" remain secret.

    It's WAY more than a "trade act", and he KNOWS it:

    A 95-page draft of a TPP chapter released by WikiLeaks on Wednesday details agreements relating to patents, copyright, trademarks and industrial design — showing their wide-reaching implications for Internet services, civil liberties, publishing rights and medicine accessibility. Critics say the deal could rewrite U.S. laws on intellectual property rights, product safety and environmental regulations, while backers say it will help create jobs and boost the economy.
  •  Teaching moment (0+ / 0-)

    I took the opportunity to tell my 10 year old son about Don Sterling's comments.  He was shocked and had some choice words for Sterling right away.  Beyond the need to punish Sterling himself in some way, I think this is also a wake up call for the players and the League.  They cannot continue to employ mostly black players and also elevate bigots to the ranks of owner.  Finally, there is recognition that a majority-black league matters, that their opinion matters, their culture, and frankly, their feelings.  They are hurt by this.  On a very basic human level, they're hurt.  And they must be wondering why the hell they're playing basketball at all to just be insulted like that.  

    I hope more prospective owners of color step up to buy teams, and that the players union gains more power through this so they have say in who becomes an owner, and who stays an owner.  Maybe the owner's contracts should state that if they violate the values of the league -- including diversity and respect for all -- the contract is terminated.

    The civil rights, gay rights and women's movements, designed to allow others to reach for power previously grasped only by white men, have made a real difference, and the outlines of 21st century America have emerged. -- Paul West of LA Times

    by LiberalLady on Sun Apr 27, 2014 at 09:43:46 PM PDT

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